1809 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for January 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 January, 1809

I pray this coming year may be happier and more prosperous to us all than the last.  It snowd fast in the morning, but it soon turnd to rain and did not cease the whole day.  We read prayers directly after breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not sit down.  I wrote part of a long letter to dear William in the morning.  In the evening my Aunt Powell read  in the bible aloud.  What a different New Year’s Day to those past, when I was a child, when all was mirth and delight.

Monday, 2 January, 1809

It did not rain, but was very foggy.  Mrs Jones, Eliza and Betsey calld and took us to Bath.  We calld on Lady Colnbrook to tell her of Bailbrook for Mrs Coddington, also at the Bastard’s and Workman’s.  We passd a very pleasant half hour at Lady C’s.  Rebecca Workman was not at home.  We saw Mrs Henderson there and Mrs Williams and James came in while we were there.  Mr Bastard frankd some letters for us and from there we went to Lucas’s.  My Aunt bought some towells for Cooper.  When she had done there, we ran down to my mother’s, who was not at home.  Met Mr James and Mr Henderson in the street, but could hardly stop to speak to the latter, because Mrs Jones was waiting in the Carriage at Mr Bastard’s door to take us up.  She brought us back a little after three.  I workd hard all the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper.  Mrs Boundris? sent to beg a bunch of berried holly, which my Aunt sent her and some geraniums and myrtles for the Ball tonight.

Tuesday, 3 January, 1809

Quite a white world this morning and it continues snowing.  Mr Wiltshire calld at the gate, but did not get off his horse.  I workd hard all day.  My Aunts playd cards after dinner.  I workd hard all the evening.

Wednesday, 4 January, 1809

Very cold with hard frost. Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall and Betsey calld.  Mrs Jones and Betsey took my Aunt Powell and me to Mrs Chalies’ and Mrs Wiltshire’s. Mrs Vassall staid with my Aunt Neate.  At Mrs Chalies we saw a Miss Arnold, a Miss Hibbert and a Miss Laurence, all stupid enough, as indeed was the whole visit.  Mrs C is always very awkward. At the Wiltshire’s, we saw Miss W, Miss Maria, Miss Helen and Charlotte.  They were all very pleasant and friendly, particularly Miss Helen.  Dear Charlotte lookd beautiful and was in very good spirits.  Miss W was just come home from visiting Mrs Bower, where she saw her son and his wife.  I was quite surprised to hear he was married.

They gave us some excellent ham for luncheon, but I was obliged to leave mine, for it began to snow so very fast.  Mrs Jones did not like to keep the horses out.  She put us down at home and took Mrs Vassall back with her.  My Aunt Powell and I playd Spillikins all the evening.  Mr Wiltshire call’d before we went out.

napoleonic-prisoner-of-war-work-finely-fretcut-bone-set-of-spellicans-or-jack-straws
Spillikins http://www.onlinegalleries.com/art-and-antiques/detail/napoleonic-prisoner-of-war-work-finely-fretcut-bone-set-of-spellicans-or-jack-straws/63911

Thursday, 5 January, 1809

A rapid thaw and very cold and uncomfortable.  It raind about the middle of the day and continued till night and we did  not see a creature out of our own family all day.  I began to make my purple gown and workd hard all the day and evening.

Friday, 6 January, 1809

A rainy, uncomfortable day. We did not see a creature the whole day.  My Aunt P sent a piece of brawn to Mrs Jones.  My Aunts playd cards after tea.  I workd at my gown.  A very uncomfortable evening.

Saturday, 7 January, 1809

A very rainy morning, but it ceased about two o’clock.  Edmund Bastard rode up and sat an hour with us.  I never saw him in such good spirits or looking better.  He read a letter to us he had had from Mrs Macmurdo.  It was full of compliments to Cooper.  My Aunts playd cards in the evening.  I workd at my gown, which I very nearly finished.  Mrs Chalie sent us all an invitation for the 25th, Mr Skrine’s Birth day.

Sunday, 8 January, 1809

An excessive hard rain till twelve o’clock.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast.  I walkd in the garden near an hour.  It was very wet under foot, but not as cold as I expected.  A Mr White (a stranger to us) calld on Cooper, but did not come in.  We did not see a creature out of the family all day.  I think Mr Wiltshire must either be unwell or gone somewhere, for we have not seen him since Wednesday, which is very unusual for him, for he very seldom misses calling every day, whether Cooper is at home or not.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 9 January, 1809

A very wet morning and continued so the whole day, notwithstanding which Mrs Cox came to pay us a visit.  She has been a fortnight in Bath, but we had no business to know that till she sent or came.  She looks very well.  John Wiltshire calld while we were at luncheon.  He eat some with us and told us his father had met with a bad accident.  His horse had fallen with him and bruised his leg so much that he was confined to the sopha, which accounts for his not having calld.  I finishd my gown.  My Aunts playd cards after tea.

Tuesday. 10 January, 1809 

A wet morning, but it cleard up at twelve o’clock.  Mrs Vassall, Mr and Mrs Jones came and staid all the morning.  Mrs Jones took my Aunt Powell with her and Betsey to call on Mrs Noyes and Mrs Walters.  Mrs N and Mr J staid with my Aunt N and me.  Sir John and Lady Durbin and Mr Andrews calld, the latter did not come in.  The Jones’s and Durbins eat luncheon with us.  My Aunt N and I playd Spillikins from tea till near supper.

Wednesday, 11 January, 1809 

A beautiful day, quite Spring.  Mrs Bastard, Mrs Henderson and John came and sat two hours in their way to Shockerwick and eat luncheon with us.  Mrs H as vulgar and disagreeable as usual.  Miss Wiltshire calld on horseback and staid some time with my Aunts, but I did not see her.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Bourdais, saw her and Miss Burney.  I think them more second rate every time I see them.  Mrs Vassall dined with us and staid till after ten o’clock.  Betsey had been to a childrens’ party at Mrs Noyes’s and calld in the Carriage in her way home for Mrs V.  I workd all the evening till after supper, when my Aunt Neate and I playd Gosch.  I walkd in the garden directly after breakfast and again, when we returnd from Mrs Bourdais.

Thursday, 12 January, 1809

A very foggy morning, so thick we could not see the opposite side of the river.  Eliza Hendy came in Mr Jones’s Carriage to take my Aunt P and me to Bath, to see if she could find Mr Adams, to speak to him about Mr Vassall.  We calld at Mrs Bourdais and took up Mrs Jones, who was paying a visit there.  We went to the Pump Room, where we saw Mrs and Miss Bower and Grange and his bride.  She is a pretty little woman.  They are to call here Tuesday in their way home.  We calld on Mrs Bastard and went with her to the South Parade, where we met Mr B and walkd home with them.  Met Major Coffin in our way home, who  walkd with us.  We sat half an hour with my mother, found Mrs Jones and Eliza there.  Emma was going to the Play with Mrs Gibson  and Edmund, who is just come back from Clifton looking remarkably well.  Mrs Jones took us up at Mr Bastard’s, where we left Mr and Mrs Templer.  We calld in our way home on Lady Durbin, who was not at home, saw the Miss Workmans and Mrs Henderson in the street, but had hardly time to speak to them.  Before we went to Bath, Mrs Noyes calld and brought her two boys, Henry, Walter and two boys of the name of Wharton with her.  She was as good humourd and pleasant as usual.  I workd all the evening.

THE PUMP ROOM, BATH by John Claude Nattes (British Library)
The Pump Room, Bath by John Claude Nattes (British Library)

Friday, 13 January, 1809

A very wet morning.  I workd hard all day new bodying my brown gown, which I have trimd with some silver ribbon which my Aunt has given me for that purpose.  My Aunt Powell and I playd a game at Spillikins at tea time.  I workd the rest of the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper, two letters written different days, but both frankd the same day.

Saturday, 14 January, 1809

A frosty morning and very cold.  Mrs Vassall walkd from Bailbrook and staid all the morning.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and John calld in their way to Shockerwick.  Edmund Bastard also rode up.  He was going to Mr Wiltshire’s.  It began to snow while they were here and continued slightly the rest of the day.  Mrs V tried on my new purple gown, which fitted her so well I cut the pattern for her to make a stuff one by.  My Aunts playd Gosch after supper.  I made some lip salve from Mrs Vassall’s receipt.

Sunday, 15 January, 1809

Quite a white world and extremely cold.  We read Prayers soon after breakfast.  We did not see a creature out of our own family the whole day. Indeed, the weather was so cold, and it lookd so much as if it would snow again the whole day, that peaple must have been very much tired of their own house to go out of them.  We all read the the whole evening.  My Aunt P had a note from Cooper.

Monday, 16 January, 1809

A fine day, but a very hard frost and extremely cold.  Molly Giles came up to see us and my Aunt desired she would stay and sleep here.  We all three went to Bath and spent the day.  Met Mrs Williams, James, Miss Figgins and a young lady with her, in the road coming to see us.  We paid a great many visits, calld on Mrs Keen, where we saw my mother and Emma.  They came away with us.  We then calld on Mrs Flinn, Mrs Cox, Mrs Gibson, Mrs Henderson, Miss Figgins and Mrs Phillip.  Mrs Cox, Gibson and Henderson were out.  We went to Lady C Harris for the Character of a servant, which was a very good one.  We sat half an hour with my mother (with whom my Aunt Neate dined) and then went to dinner at Mr Bastard’s, only ourselves and Pownel and young Pellen, who came to Bath last night.  They had all sorts of disasters in the Mail.  They were overturnd once and broken down afterwards.  It had not hurt either of them, for I never saw Pownel look better.  He is grown quite handsome. Pillon is a very pleasant boy.  The Hendersons came to tea.  My Aunt Neate calld for us a little after tea.  My Aunt Powell took a cake of sweet meat to my mother.

Tuesday, 17 January, 1809

A beautiful day. Paunal and Pillon were to have breakfasted with us, but did not come.  Mrs Vassall spent the morning here.  Miss E Wiltshire, Mr Pick, his little boy, Mrs Tudor, Mr and Mrs Walters and Sophy calld.  Mrs Tudor staid two hours and had some luncheon.  We expected the Bowens and Hendersons, but they did not come.  My Aunt Powell and I playd spillikins in the evening and I afterwards workd.  Cooper sent an hare and couple of woodcocks.

Wednesday, 18 January, 1809

A fine day, but intensely cold.  We had visitors the whole morning.  Mr Bowen, Mrs Williams, and Ann, Miss Figgins and Miss Pitches, Mr and Mrs Greenly, Mr and Mrs and  John Henderson and Dr Davis.  The Hendersons and Williams’s eat luncheon with us.  Captain Chivers also calld.  He arrived at Bath yesterday.  Mrs Vassall came and dined with us. The carriage fetchd her at ten o’clock.  I did nothing in the evening but clean and put to rights the tea and sugar drawer.

Thursday, 19 January, 1809

A very bad day.  It rained extremely fast and froze as it fell, so that the ground was a sheet of ice and intensely cold.  I bathed my feet and broke sugar in the morning.  Cooper returned from Devonshire about nine o’clock, that is, he came home at that time.  He arrived with Mr Bastard at Bath at two and stayd to dine at Mr E B’s and came home in the evening.  He was not in good spirits and evidently uncomfortable at leaving all the magnificence and grandeur of Kitley to come to a hum drum family circle.  He talkd of nothing the whole evening but of the “princely stile” in which Mr Bastard lived, not even inferior to the Prince of Wales. We did not go to bed till after twelve.

Kitley House, Yealampton, Devon, home of Edmund Pollexfen Bastard. Ackermann's Repository, February 1828
Kitley House, Yealampton, Devon, seat of Edmund Pollexfen Bastard.
Ackermann’s Repository, February 1828

Friday, 20 January, 1809

Rain and frost as yesterday.  Cooper very much out of spirits.  He and my Aunt Powell went to Shockerwick.  I would not go, it was so cold.  While they were there Mr Henderson walkd up to see Cooper.  He stayd about an hour, but would not be prevailed upon to wait till they returnd, which they did before three o’clock.  Cooper has determind (at the instigation and repeated solicitation of the elder Mr Bastard) to sell the villa.  I think he will be sorry before he has parted with it a twelve month, but that remains to be proved.  Certainly Mr Bastard is doing everything in his power to estrange him from us and will very shortly succeed, there is no doubt.

Cooper dined at lady Louisa Lenox’s, to meet the Bastards, the elder of whom goes to town tomorrow, thank goodness.  C came home a little after ten o’clock, but not in better spirits.  We did not go to bed very early.

Saturday, 21 January, 1809

A snowy morning, but it ceased soon after breakfast.  Cooper was in better spirits today.  Mr Williams calld.  I suppose Mrs Williams made him come, as nobody who had a will of their own would have come out  such a day.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt N playd Chess in the evening.  My Aunt P and I at spillkins.  Cooper very chearful and good humoured.  He sent to enquire after Mr Jones, who has got the gout.

1809
Click to enlarge

Sunday, 22 January, 1809

A deep snow, which is likely to last, as it continues snowing very fast.  Cooper in very good humour, speaking before breakfast of letting this house.  He said if he could get 450 pounds a year for it, he should have 1,500 a year clear to spend, “but I can’t afford to marry on that Fan can I?”  “Marry”  I replied “You don’t want to marry” “Yes, I do”.  “You would not marry except the Lady had a large fortune”  “No, I could not afford to do so without, but if I had ten thousand an year, I would ask you to marry me”.   O said I (laughing), that’s very pretty talking, but I don’t believe a word of it.  “I would upon my honor as a man”  he replied in the most solemn manner.

Captain Cooper
John Hutton Cooper

He read prayers to us soon after breakfast and had intended going to Bath, but the weather was so bad we persuaded him not.  We dined alone. Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess in the evening. He was in very good spirits and pleasant and chearful as he used to be.  He wrote a poetic note to John Bastard, who answerd in the same stile.  I read and lookd at the chess players.

Monday, 23 January, 1809

A fine frosty day, but a deep snow on the ground.  Cooper in delightful good humour.  Miss E Wiltshire, Miss L Savage, Mr James and Mr Henderson calld.  The latter came on purpose to say he would go to Weymouth for the month Cooper is to be there, if he thought it would be of service to John.  Mrs H, who can’t bear the the idea of parting with C has, I suppose, worried him into going there.  I wonder he has not sense enough to see her folly, but I imagine he does not  care about it and probably would not be sorry to get rid of her entirely.

Mr and Miss Greenley, Count Kielmensegge, Mrs Bastard and John dined here, the latter looking remarkably well and just as good humourd as when he left England.  He told us a good deal about our poor William, tho he had not been fortunately enough to see him in India.  It was but a stupid sort  of a day. We playd Cards in the evening.  Miss Greenley, Cooper, Mrs Bastard and I playd Cassino, Mr Greenley, my two Aunts and John Bastard playd Whist.  The Count lookd on and I won three shillings.  The party went away before supper.  It snowed the whole evening, very fast.  I wrote a note to my mother and sent the patterns she lent me.

Tuesday, 24 January, 1809

A very bad day.  It raind and thawed extremely fast, notwithstanding which Mr James and John Wiltshire calld and Morgan Geatman came from Dorchester.  He was wet to the skin when he came in.  He is looking better than I ever saw him.  No one dined with us but him.  They playd Whist in the evening.  While they were at Cards, I went to let Geta out of doors when, to my astonishment, I found the hall under water.  It was rushing in at the street door in such quantities that if I had not fortunately gone out, as I did, all the lower part of the house would have been some part under water and all the carpets spoilt.  The violence with which it came down the Lane, filled up the proper channel with mud and sand and it forced its way and it found its way under the gates and into the house.  It was with some difficulty they could prevent its running into the drawing room, but at last succeeded into returning it into its proper channel.

Wednesday, 25 January, 1809

A showery day and the highest flood that ever was known at Bath Easton.  The bridge and road of each of it was so overflowd that carriages could not pass.  Two horses in one of the Stages were drownd at Bath Easton and it was with most difficulty they could get the passengers out.  All the coaches were stoppd and neither of the Mails arrived.  The road was impassable at Lambridge and the only communication between this and Bath was up the Land at the back of the house and across above Dead Mill.  There were three houses washed away in Bedford Street and seven poor people perished.  All the cattle and hay between Bath and Bristol swept away and immense damage done everywhere.  Mr Walters and one of his boys calld.  He told us the water was six feet higher than it was ever remembered to be by the oldest person in the Parish.  Mrs Chalie sent a note to put off her Dance till tomorrow, as the water prevented any one passing.  Only Morgan Geatman dined with us.  They playd Whist in the evening.  Cooper was in very good spirits.

Thursday, 26 January, 1809

A violent storm of wind and rain before breakfast, but it cleard up afterward, tho the wind continued very high. The flood did not abate much in the night, but began to decrease rapidly about twelve o’clock.  It was showery the whole day.  Cooper, Morgan Geatman, my Aunt and I went to Bath.  We calld on the Bastards and Mrs Flinn.  Did not see Mr or Mrs Williams.  My Aunt and I sat half an hour with my mother and Emma, both of whom were pretty well.  This is the first day the road has been passable into Bath and the accounts of the devestation, the flood has made are lamentable.  When we came home we found Captain Graves here.  Mr and Mrs Williams, Mr and Mrs Henderson dined and supp’d here.  Captain Graves Morgan and my two Aunts playd Whist.  Cooper, Mrs Henderson, Mrs Williams and myself Casino.  I won three shillings.  As disagreeable a day as could be.  Indeed, it always is to me where Mrs Henderson and Mrs Williams are.  They did not go away till past twelve.  We had another excuse today from Mrs Chalie.  The Dance is to be tomorrow.

Friday, 27 January, 1809

A showery day.  Edmund Bastard, John, the two Workmans and Captain Chivers calld. Poor Eliza Hendry came in the carriage with the W’s, but was too unwell to get out.  The Bastards brought a couple of woodcocks.  Morgan Geatman  went to Bath with Captain Chivers and his horse went down for him to ride back.  Captain Graves and my Aunt Neate playd Backgamon almost all the morning.  Edmund and Captain Bastard dined and suppd with us.  Captain Graves, John Bastard, Morgan Geatman and my Aunt P playd Whist, as did Cooper and I against my Aunt Neate against Edmund.  They did not go away till twelve o’clock.  Cooper went to bed soon after they left us.  Captain Graves and my Aunt P playd four games of Piquet.  We did not go to bed till after one o’clock.

Saturday, 28 January, 1809

A beautiful day, quite warm.  Cooper came down stairs in a contradictory, uncomfortable humour.  Captain Graves, my Aunt P, Cooper and I went to Shockerwick in the coach.  Morgan Geatman rode on horseback.  We met Miss Wiltshire and Miss L Savage in their Lane and took them back with us.  Poor Mr Wiltshire very indifferent.  Dear Charlotte looking beautiful and in very good spirits.  Miss Maria I thought appeard better and Miss Helen very well.  They were very friendly and kind.  We stayd there near two hours and then went to Bath, but it was so late when we got there we could do nothing but get some fish for dinner and call at the Bastards, where we saw the whole family, all pretty well.  We did not get home till six o’clock.  Only Captain Graves and Morgan dined with us. They playd Whist in the evening.  We heard a great deal about Mrs Chalie’s Ball from the Wiltshires.  A great number of the guests sent excuses and they had only nine gentlemen to fifty ladies.  The supper was very elegant and the Miss Gladstones presided as poor Mrs Chalie was too unwell to appear.  Mr Andrews calld while we were out.

Sunday, 29 January, 1809

A showery day with such a tremendous wind that we thought the house would have been blown down.  The coach came at twelve o’clock to take Cooper to Bath, but the tempest raged so violently he did not think it safe to go out.  We did not read prayers, for Cooper and my Aunt were settling accounts the whole morning.  Mr and Mrs Chapman and the Andrews calld, the latter staid two hours.  He came to tell Cooper he had sent in his resignation to Lord Hinton in consequence of his Lordships having given the vacant company in the regiment to Mr Graman?.  Only Mr Geatman and Captain Graves dined with us.  They amused themselves in the evening with reading and guessing Cooper’s Charades.

Monday, 30 January, 1809

A terrible wet day with tremendous wind.  When I came down stairs in the morning I found Captain Graves and Morgan playing Backgammon.  When Cooper came down he never took the least notice of me, any more than if I had not been home, except to desire I would give him the ink stand and to be angry that there was not more ink in it.  I went into the cellar with Morgan Geatman to mix the Isinglass with the Malmsey Madeira to fine it.  He had great difficulty to get the bung out of the cask and we were an hour before it was finishd.  Captain Graves, Morgan Geatman, Cooper, my Aunt Powell and I went to Bath in the coach.  In our way we calld at the Jones’s where we saw Mr and Mrs J, Mrs Vassall, Eliza and little Betsey.  It was with the greatest difficulty we could get into the coach again, it blew such a hurricane.  We took up Captain Graves and Morgan whom we had left at the Lodge.  We set Cooper down at Mr Watts and we went on to Mr Bastard’s, where we waited till Cooper came to us.  We then took leave of the Bastards (who go tomorrow) and went with Cooper to Mr Clarke’s, where I left them and went to my mother’s.  Cooper shook hands with me when he got out of the coach, but did not offer to kiss me.  I do not know any thing I have done to offend him and I am sure I do not care.  My Aunt went everywhere with him till he left Bath, which he did with Mr and Mrs Henderson at half past three o’clock.  I staid with my mother till my aunt fetchd me.  It did not cease raining the whole time we were in Bath.  We returnd to dinner about five o’clock.  In the evening I wrote a long letter to my brother Henry, as Mr Bastard had given me a frank.

Tuesday, 31 January, 1809

A beautiful day, quite Spring.  I walkd in the garden a little while before breakfast.  Miss Wiltshire calld, but could not sit down as Miss L Savage was waiting for her at the door.  Mrs Noyes and her two little boys sat a long time with us.  She brought a Mrs Still with her.  A genteel woman.  Miss Silverthorn came up to tell my Aunt that the young woman she had hired in Ambrey’s place was unexpectedly married and therefore she could not come to dine with my aunt. Miss Silverthorn had a glass of wine and some ginger biscuits.  I walkd in the garden near an hour before dinner and broke sugar in the evening.  My Aunts playd at Gosch.  It blew a whole gale in the night.

Fashion plate for February 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for February 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, 1 February, 1809

A fine morning but it turnd to rain in the middle of the day.  Mrs Vassall came down and staid till the first shower was over.  She could not spend the day with us as Maria Jones arrived unexpectedly from Ireland yesterday and she thought it would appear unkind to leave her the first day.  My Aunt Neate was very unwell the whole day.  My Aunts playd Gosch in the evening.  I was very heavy and uncomfortable and fell asleep till tea time.  The wind high all day.

Thursday, 2 February, 1809

Not a very fine day.  My Aunt P and I went up to Bailbrook to see Maria Jones, who is looking very well, I think.  I taught Eliza Hendy to make flat bobbin.  Mrs Jones, Maria, Eliza, Betsey and a young lady, who came with Miss Jones from Ireland, went to Bath while we were there.

We staid a short time afterwards with Mrs V and Mr J.  It raind a little when we came home and was very wet all the evening.  My Aunt Neate has got the gout in her foot and is hardly able to put it to the ground.  I workd all the evening, so did my aunts.

Friday, 3 February, 1809

A showery and sunshine day.  The man brought home my Aunts new head dress, which fits her very nicely. I workd hard all day new bodissing one of my morning gowns.  Put away three dozen pounds of candles that came from Bath.  My aunts playd cards in the evening and I workd.

Saturday, 4 February, 1809

A very beautiful morning but it raind about one o’clock and there were frequent hard showers in the afternoon. I walkd in the garden directly after breakfast for an hour.  Mrs Vassall came and spent the morning with us.  Miss Jones, Maria and Eliza Hendy sat some time with us and then took my aunt Powell with them to call on Mrs Mann.  Mrs V staid with my Aunt N and me till they returnd.  She then got into the carriage with them to go home.  I workd hard all the evening.

Sunday, 5 February, 1809

Sunshine and showers all day. We read prayers directly after breakfast, soon after which John Wiltshire calld.  He brought a very indifferent account of his father.  I sent Charlotte five Charades by him.  Major Durbin calld and sat some time.  He is looking remarkably well.  My Aunt P sent my mother some Green Gage and Plumb sweetbread.  I wrote a note to go with it.  We all read in the evening.

Monday, 6 February, 1809

It raind extremely hard all day with rain and then sunshine.  John Wiltshire calld, but did not sit down. He brought rather a better account of his father.  I workd hard all day and in the evening too.  My Aunts playd cards and Spillikins.

Tuesday, 7 February, 1809

A dry day but dull looking and cold.  Mrs Williams calld.  Somebody brought her up in their carriage and calld for her again in about half an hour.  Soon after she was gone Mrs Savage, Miss Maria and Miss Elizabeth Wiltshire came.  They staid a long time and were all very pleasant.  While they were here Mrs Vassall, Miss Wolfenden and Betsey Jones came and sat some time.  They eat some luncheon, so did Miss M Wiltshire.  We all playd cards between dinner and tea and afterwards I workd.  It was a dreadful windy night.

Wednesday, 8 February, 1809

A tremendous windy day.  It blew down a very large branch of the Cedar tree next to the library.  Fortunately it is from a part of the tree where it is not much missed.  This being the day being appointed a general Fast, we read prayers, just as we were going to begin a carriage drive to the gate, as all the servants were gone to church, except Kitty.  My Aunt desired her to say “not at home” notwithstanding which a person calling himself Sir Hugh Bateman would persist in coming in to see the house, tho Kitty told him he could not be admitted but on a Thursday.  He replied he could not come any day but this and it was very hard he could not see the house when it was to be let.  Kitty said it was impossible, for independent of its being the wrong day, the ladies were at home and engaged at prayers.  Ah, he said, she could shew him the house without interrupting the ladies and he forced his way into the drawing room.  When Kitty came to my aunt to say she could not prevent his coming in and he insisted on seeing the house at last, my aunt was obliged to go into the hall to speak to him.  She asked him if he had a ticket.  He said No, he did not know if it was necessary.  She told him no one could be admitted but on Thursdays and then not without a ticket from Mr Clarke.  She was , it was not in her power to ask Lady Bateman in (there were ladies sitting in the carriage), but if she deviated from the rule laid down she should have constant interruptions, which would be very unpleasant.  She was so determined, he could no longer persist, so wishd her good morning and went away.  It began to snow about one o’clock and continued to snow almost all the rest of the day.  I eat nothing but dry bread for breakfast and luncheon and salt fish at dinner and did not drink any wine till supper.  I workd hard all day.

Thursday, 9 February, 1809

A very wet day.  It day not cease raining half an hour at a time.  We had hardly done breakfast when Sir Hugh Bateman, his Lady and two daughters came up again to see the house.  The day was so cold we thought there was no chance of anyone coming so early and the rooms were not ready.  They were shewn into the library  and sat with us until the beds were put to rights.  They were very polite, but appeard to me all very weak.  Just as they went away, Mrs Jones, Maria and Mrs Vassall calld and took my aunt P and me to Bath.  They set us down at my mother’s.  We found her and Emma pretty well.  We went to the Post Office and Mr Clarke’s (who was not at home) and then returnd to my mother’s, where Mrs Jones and Maria calld and paid their visit and then took us with them to Fountain Buildings in search of Miss Fitch, whom we could not find.  Left Mrs J and Maria at a friend’s there and we got into the carriage and went out again to my mother’s, where we waited till we thought we could see Mr Clarke.  We went there and after staying more than half an hour, he came in.  When my aunt had told him what she had to say, we went back to my mother’s, where Mrs Jones calld for us and brought us home.  We stopped in our way at Mrs Marnes? and Grange took two guineas to her for Mrs Aldney’s flowers.  When we came home we found that Mrs Dacres and her two daughters had also been to see the house.  A man stood in the Pilloury in the Market Place today, but I do not know what for.  The crowd was so great that Mrs Jones said they had difficulty in getting through.  I workd in the evening.

Friday, 10 February, 1809

Sunshine and showery, but more rain than sun.  Mrs Noyes and Mr Littlehales, with little Ben, walkd here and were detained near two hours, but they were so pleasant, that the time did not appear long.  They eat some ginger biscuits and praised them very much.  They went from here to the Jones’s, up the garden.  John Wiltshire calld to say his father and Charlotte were a little better.  I workd hard all day and in the evening also.  My Aunt Neate playd Patience.

Saturday, 11 February, 1809

A miserable wet day with now and then a gleam of sun.  Mr Williams walkd up from Bath.  He is obliged to do as his wife chuses he should, poor man.  Major Durbin calld.  They both eat luncheon with us.  It raind  hard when they went away.  John Wiltshire brought my Aunt a letter from the Post but he was so wet he could not come in.  I made me a new cap, the pattern of Mrs Cooper’s Mob.  I playd a few games of Patience, as did my Aunt, after supper.

Sunday,12 February, 1809

A fine morning.  We read prayers directly after breakfast, after which I walkd once around the garden and gatherd a good many spring flowers.  Mrs Vassall came to stay a day or two with us.  She walkd down just before dinner and it began to rain soon after she came and continued almost all the evening.  Stocker came up to see Kitty.  She is looking remarkably well.  My Aunt sent Grange down to the Turnpike with her.  We chatted and read in the evening.  I wrote a note to my mother and my Aunt sent her a little leg of pork.

Monday, 13 February,1809

A very wet day, disagreeable day and the wind blowing tremendously. In the night it blew harder than I ever remember to have heard it in my life.  I really thought part of the house would have been blown down.  Mrs Vassall was downstairs long before me.  I was employd all day cutting out and helping make a gown for her and workd hard at it in the evening.  Mrs Vassall and my Aunt Neate playd a few games of Chess after tea and then workd all the rest of the evening.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Shrove Tuesday, 14 February, 1809

A very wet day again with now and then sunshine.  I was downstairs before Mrs Vassall and the first man I saw out of our own family was one of the Stagecoach men.  Consequently he was my Valentine.  Workd all day at Mrs Vassall’s gown.  Mr Jones came down and spent the whole morning here.  He was very chatty and pleasant.  Miss Jones sent down in the evening a little box containing eighteen small men, like Backgammon men, to play at a new game calld ‘The Mill’ and to beg Mrs Vassall and my Aunt Neate (both being very clever) would puzzle out the game that Mrs V, when she returnd, might be able to teach Eliza.  They soon found it out and playd at it a good deal in the evening.  I and my Aunt P workd.  We did not go to bed till very late.

Ash Wednesday, 15 February, 1809

A dismal day.  It raind torrents and did not cease a moment, till after dark.  I finishd Mrs Vassall’s gown and it sets very nicely.  Began to alter one of my own.  We did not see a creature out of the family the whole day.  I began taking the Infusion of Roses again.  Mrs Vassall and my Aunt Neate playd at “the Mill” in the evening.  My Aunt P and I workd till after supper when Mrs V and my Aunt P playd Spillikins, my Aunt N and I at “the Mill”.

Thursday, 16 February, 1809

A lovely morning.  I was down and went out on the gravel walk long before Mrs Vassall came down.  I walkd in the garden after breakfast.  Mrs V and my Aunt joind me and took two or three turns before the former went back to Bailbrook.  Tho it was so beautiful a day, not a creature came to see the house.

I sent my mother’s gown back to her and with it the pattern she wishd to have and a note.  It continued fine till nearly four o’clock and it then began to rain and. I believe, continued all night.  I mended a pair of stockings after tea.  My Aunts both playd Patience after supper.

Friday, 17 February, 1809

A fine morning, but there was a very had shower soon after breakfast.  However, it was fine the rest of the day.  Captain Chivers brought the Workmans up to see us.  He has been in London, which is the reason we have not heard anything of him for so long.  Mary Workman I thought  did not look well, but Rebecca, gracious, handsomer and younger every day.  Miss Wiltshire calld and sat half an hour.  I workd all the evening till after supper, when I playd Patience, as did my Aunt Neate.  I went as far as the Hot House between breakfast and dinner.

Saturday, 18 February, 1809

A wet, uncomfortable morning with a tremendous wind, but it cleard up soon after breakfast and was fine the rest of the day.  I felt very idle and did very little work, except mending some stockings in the evening.  It was a most beautiful night;  clear sky with bright moon and stars.

Sunday, 19 February, 1809

A beautiful day.  We read prayers directly after breakfast and my Aunt P and I walkd in the garden afterwards.  She staid out much longer than I did.  Mr and Mrs Jones, Maria and Miss Wolfenden calld and staid some time.  Molly Giles came up to dine with the servants.  She told us a man in Bath, of the name of Campbell, has undertaken to cure her of her deafness.  I fear it is not possible, but she is very sanguine, poor thing.  She is to give him three guineas at the beginning and three more when he has perfected the cure.  We read all the evening.  Gardener got a second pint of Infusion of Roses for me.

Monday, 20 February, 1809

A fine morning, but it raind soon after breakfast and continued the rest of the day with a very high wind.  I workd hard all the morning.  Mrs Cowdry came to speak to my aunt about the bank and wall that has given way in the Lane.  She did not pretend to say Cooper was obliged to do it, but “that they must make it easy to each other”.  The weather was so dismal I did not go out at all and mended stockings in the evening.

Tuesday, 21 February, 1809

A very fine morning.  Two men came up from Bath to measure and take a plan of the ground.  I went to walk in the garden, but was driven in again by a violent shower of hail.  Mrs Vassall came and sat two hours with us.  When she went away I went up the garden with her and it was so fine I finishd my walk before dinner.  The two men who came about the ground had some luncheon.  Grange asked leave to go to Bath after dinner.  My Aunt sent to enquire after Lady Durbin by him.  He brought back word she had not been out of the house this fortnight and was still very unwell.  I workd all the evening.  It was extremely cold and a very severe frost.  I lent Mrs Vassall my Spillikins to take to Bailbrook.

Wednesday, 22 February, 1809

A beautiful morning.  While we were at breakfast Mrs Spires walkd up from Bath, where they had been a fortnight.  She is looking very well and is to come and spend a day here before she returns into Devonshire.  My Aunt P and I set out to walk to Bath.  We called in on the Jones’s in our way.  Saw only Mr J, Mrs Vassall and little Betsey.  The rest of the family were gone to Bath.  We sat there about half an hour.  When we got thro the Lodge, the road was so very muddy we were fearful we should not be able to get along.  While we were hesitating, Captain Chivers (who had been up to the Villa to fetch my Aunt Neate) very luckily came by and very kindly took us up and carried us to the Turnpike where we got out and walkd into Bath.  We did a great many things;  every one that was set down. Saw Maria Baker in the street.  Saw Sir John and Major Durbin, Captain and Mrs Rowe and Miss Coffin at the Pump Room door and my Lady in the carriage.  They all made such a fuss about my Aunt going to see Catalani tomorrow night, that it was impossible to get off.  The Major would go to the Play House to take the places with us.  We got two, in the Stage Box, next to Sir John’s and he is to send the carriage to fetch us and bring us back.   We calld on the Workmans, who gave us a biscuit and a glass of wine.  We sat half an hour with them and then went to my mother’s, where we found my Aunt Neate.  We stayd with them till Captain Chivers sent his carriage to bring us home, which he did at five o’clock.  I workd in the evening.  There was a bad fire in Bath last night, which burnt the inside of two or three houses in the Grove.  George got the third bottle of Infusion of Roses for me.

Thursday, 23 February, 1809

A lovely morning.  John Wiltshire calld while we were at breakfast and sat half an hour and Miss Wiltshire, Miss Elizabeth and Sarah Chapman walkd here and staid a long time.  They were all very pleasant and chatty.  I wrote a note to Emma and enclosed four shillings to beg she would persuade my mother to go to the Opera, which I hope she did.  Lady Durbin sent the carriage up for us at six o’clock.  My Aunt Powell and I went to their house, where we got out, but did not sit down, tho my Lady was very anxious we should have some tea.

The Major got into the carriage with us and we drove to the Play House where our seats proved to be remarkably good and we were both enchanted with Madame Catalani’s expression and grace.  I do not know I was ever more delighted and amused at a public exhibition in my life.  The Major took a great deal of care of us and introduced us to a very pleasant old lady, a Mrs Edgell, aunt to the Captain Edgell, who was in the Second Somerset.

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette 23 February 1809
Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette 23 February 1809

We got out extremely well, without any bustle, put the Major down at his own door and they had the kindness to send us home.  We found my Aunt Neate up and had some supper and then went to bed.

Not any person came to see the house, tho the day was so fine.

Friday, 24 February, 1809

A dry day, but dismal and very cold.  Both my Aunt and I had a little headache.  I bathd my feet.  Mr Jones calld and sat a long time.  I was very lazy and uncomfortable all day.  Broke sugar in the evening.

Saturday, 25 February, 1809

A damp morning.  Maria Jones, Eliza Hendy and little Betsey calld and took my Aunt and I up to Bath.  They set us down in Milsom Street.  It began to rain when we got out of the carriage and hardly ceased the whole time we were in Bath, notwithstanding which, we did almost everything we had to do.  We sat a short time with my mother, who was not very well, but in very good humour.  Maria took us up again in Milsom Street and took us to the Workmans, where we found Mrs Jones who was suffering very much from the Rheumatism in her hand.   We left Betsey there, who was going to play with the Workmans and Mrs J., and Maria brought us home before three o’clock.  It cleard up soon after we returned and was a very fine afternoon fortunately, as my Aunt treated Grange, Aubrey, Ann, Ellen and the latter’s two brothers who have been staying here since Thursday, to the Play, with which they were highly delighted.

We saw Mr Sutherland in Barnett’s shop.  He was very sociable and pleasant.  I made a cap for my Aunt P from Rebecca Workman’s pattern in the evening.  We did not go to bed till late, as the servants did not come home till twelve o’clock.

Sunday, 26 February, 1809

So thick a fog we could hardly see the road, but it cleard off about one o’clock and was fine.  We read prayers directly after breakfast and then my Aunt P and I went and walkd in the garden, where Mrs Vassall joind us from Bailbrook.  Maria Jones, Mrs Beckford, Miss Hay and little Betsey also came down and staid some time.  Ellen’s brothers went home.  Her sister came up to see them before they went.  She is going to leave the place she is in and my Aunt spoke to her, but without saying it was for herself.  Stocker brought Lady Dunally’s beautiful Italian Grey Hound up for me to see.  It is very handsome, but Stocker dos not like it half so well as she does Gheta.  We read all the evening.

Monday 27, February, 1809

A beautiful day.  My Aunt Neate was down in the cellar all the morning bottling the Malmsey. They drew off thirty six dozen pints and then put the other Madeira into what remained.  Mrs Vassall and Mrs Horne calld.  Poor Mrs H was very much tired.  She had some bread and butter and a glass of Malmsey, which refreshed her very much.  My Aunt and I walkd up the garden with them and continued out some time.  I workd all the evening.

Tuesday, 28 February, 1809

A beautiful day.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bath.  We sat half an hour at Bailbrook in our way.  Saw Mrs Vassall, Maria and Mrs Horne.  Sat a little time at Lady Durbin’s.  The Major was not at home.  Went over the house at the Turnpike that Sewell lived in last year.  Calld on Miss Coffin, who we found at home and were introduced to her mother.   We then went to speak to Ellen’s sister, who is partly engaged to Miss Greenly, but is to let my Aunt know tomorrow.  Calld on Mrs Allen, who we found at home.  Did all the commissions we had to do and then went to my mother’s, where we staid near an hour, to rest ourselves.  I dressd Emma’s hair, as they were going out in the evening.  We walkd home, met Grange at the Turnpike with our pattens, for the road was too muddy in one place for us to walk without them.  We got home at half past five to dinner, but were both so completely tired we could hard move the rest of the evening.  I did nothing but sit by the fire.  On our return home we found Dryall arrived from Weymouth to fetch the grey mare.

Fashion plate for March 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for March 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, 1 March, 1809

A foggy morning and in the course of the morning there was a very hard shower of rain which lasted a long time.  John Wiltshire calld, but did not stay long.  My Aunt P and I did not recover our fatigue of yesterday the whole day.  I workd all the evening.

Thursday, 2 March, 1809

A dry day, but cold and uncomfortable.  My poor Aunt P was very much shockd at an account in the News Paper of a duel between Mr Powell and Lord Falkland, in which the latter was mortally wounded.  He was the aggressor and it was impossible for Mr P to put up with the insult.  Mrs Vassall calld and sat some time.  Captain Chivers calld, but we were denied to him,as we are, generally,to everyone of a Thursday, tho no one came to see the house today.  Mr Burnell, the master Taylor of the Regiment and Sergeant Brown came to ask if my Aunt had any thing to send to Cooper.  She wrote a letter by them and sent Mrs Henderson’s cards.  They had some luncheon and wine.  I was employd all the evening pasting Cooper’s arms into his books, all of which are to be done (fifteen hundred) before we leave the house.  We did not go to bed till late.  Dryall brought the fourth bottle of Infusion of Roses for me.

Friday, 3 March, 1809

A very fine day.  I went on with the books after breakfast, as far as I had the plates.  Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall and Eliza calld at the green gate and took me to Bath.  I paid a bill at Euenis’s and calld at Barnetts and then went to my mother’s.  They were not at home, but came in in a few minutes.  I sat with them till Mrs Jones fetchd me, which she did, at three o’clock.  I heard in Bath of the death of Lord Falkland.  He died Wednesday morning.  He acquitted Mr Powell of the blame and told Mr Heavyside he was the aggressor.  Poor creature, he suffered great agony while he lived and there was no hope from the beginning.  Major Durbin and Miss Mann calld while I was in Bath and John Wiltshire after I returned.  I workd in the evening.

Saturday, 4 March, 1809

A foggy, uncomfortable morning, but it turnd out fine afterwards. Mrs Vassall came down and sat a short time. I workd all the morning.  Mr Wiltshire sent my Aunt word that Mr Chapman of Bathford (who has been ill some time) was considered in imminent danger and he was going there to see him.  Grange went up there after dinner to make enquiries and brought word back he was very bad.  I was employd all the evening cutting the plates of Cooper’s arms and getting them ready to put into the books on Monday.

Sunday, 5 March, 1809

A fine morning, but it turnd to rain at three o’clock.  We read prayers after breakfast.  My Aunt Powell was far from well and was very much shockd at seeing the Coroner’s inquest on Lord Falkland in the Paper.  They gave their verdict “Willful murder against person or persons unknown.”  Mrs Vassall sat an hour with us.  John Wiltshire calld.  I did not see him.  He brought word Mr Chapman was a little better, but not out of danger.  My Aunt Powell has determind on writing to Mr Powell.  Kitty went to Bath to church, the first time since she has been ill.  We read all the evening.

Monday, 6 March, 1809

A dry day, but very cold.  My Aunt P breakfasted in bed.  Mrs Spines came while we were at breakfast, but did not stay long.  I was employd the whole day and evening pasting Cooper’s Arms into the books.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mr Powell and enclosed her letter in one to Mr Deane, begging him to convey it to Mr P.  I sent down Emma’s gown and wrote a note to my mother.  Dryall went to Weymouth with the gray mare.  John Wiltshire calld.

Tuesday, 7 March, 1809

A foggy morning, but a fine day.  I was engaged again the whole day about the books.  Mrs Vassall came and sat some time with us.  My Aunt prevailed on her to dine here.  She was obliged to go to Bailbrook, but returnd to dinner and slept here.  I was too much tired to go on with the books in the evening, so I cut and got the plates ready to go on with.  We heard today that Captain Hodge was well enough to go to Norfolk and that his wife had got a little girl.

Wednesday, 8 March, 1809

A very thick fog, with icicles hanging from all the trees in the morning, but it turned out a very fine day.  Mrs Vassall went home directly after breakfast.  I walkd up the garden with her.  Captain Chivers calld and sat half an hour with us.  He goes to the Regiment on Saturday.  I was busy about the books again all day and in the evening.  Also, I had a very long and affectionate letter from Harry, in which he tells me of the death of Mrs Withers and that he thinks she has left us all something.  He does not yet know exactly what, but believes between one and two hundred pounds apiece.  I had a note also from my mother.

Thursday, 9 March, 1809

A very thick fog, but a fine day after ten o’clock.  I went up to Bailbrook directly  after breakfast and walkd to Bath with Mrs Vassall.  At Bailbrook I saw Mrs Jones, Miss J, Eliza, Betsey, a Mrs Robinson and a Miss Grant. I did not sit down there.  Mrs V and I crossed the ferry and calld on Mrs Horne, who we found very unwell, but very glad to see us.  I left Mrs V there and went on to my mother’s to spend the day.  Found her and Emma tolerable.  I cut out part of a gown for Emma and am to finish it the next time I go down. I staid with them till five o’clock, when Emma had the kindness to walk as far as Mr Clarke’s with me.  I bought some ribbon and biscuits in my way and Emma stopd at Mr Lye’s at ask if Miss L was inclined to walk, but she was in the middle of dinner.  I met Grange just by the Turnpike and got home in very good time and not much tired. The Jones’s and the Robinson’s calld while I was at Bath.  I netted a little in the evening.

Friday, 10 March, 1809

A very fine day.  Rebecca Workman came down from Bailbrook (where they are staying) and sat all the morning with us.  Poor thing, she was very much affected when she came in at the idea of our leaving the house, but soon recovered herself.  Mr and Mrs Williams calld and tho we had said “not at home” to any body, with her usual vulgarity she persisted in coming in, to our great annoyance.  I am sure she had no reason to be pleased with her visit, for my Aunt received her very coolly and I very coldly, added to which she was evidently vexd at finding Rebecca here, where we were denied to her.  She staid two hours I believe.  I thought she never intended to go and she was sometimes grumpy and silent and then again very much inclind to be consequential and impertinent, if she had dared.  I short, she was very disagreeable and I wishd her any where else a thousand times.  I workd hard at the book all day and in the evening too.  I wrote a note to my mother to let her know of Mrs Wither’s [a bit torn off here] and Ellen took it to Bath and brought [another bit torn off] Mother’s knotting to be bleached.

Saturday, 11 March, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt Neate walkd down to spend the day with my mother.  My Aunt P and I went as far as Lambridge with her, by way of a walk.  We calld at Bailbrook in our way back and staid there more than an hour.  Saw Mr and Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall, both the Miss Workmans, Eliza Hendy and a Miss Frant.  While we were there Mr Todd Jones and a Mr Thomas came in.  We walkd round their new gravel works with Mr J, Mrs V and Rebecca.  The latter came home with us, but did not stay.  Major Durbin calld while we were out to say he was going to the Regiment on Monday.  I workd hard at the books after we came home and all the evening.  My Aunt Neate did not come home till seven o’clock.  We began to be quite uneasy.

Bailbrook House (via www.bath-business.net)
Bailbrook House (via http://www.bath-business.net)

Sunday, 12 March, 1809

A fine day, but a very cold wind.  We read prayers directly after breakfast.  I walkd in the garden some time.  When I came in I found Mrs Vassall in the library.  She did not stay long.  My Aunt P and I went up the garden with her and continued out some time after she went.  I wrote before dinner and read all the evening.  Grange went to Bath after dinner.

Monday, 13 March, 1809

A very fine day, but the wind extremely cold.  Mrs Jones calld and took my Aunt P and me to Bath.  We went to the top of Park Street to Mrs Anstey’s for the Character of the new servant, who is coming to live with my Aunt in Ambrey’s place.  She is sister to Ellen.  Mrs Anstey gave her an excellent character.  From there Mrs Jones took us down to the Pump Room, where I left my Aunt to go with Mrs J to call on Mrs Randolph, and I went to the post office and from there to my mother’s, who unluckily was not at home and did not come in till just before my Aunt calld for me to go with her to do what she wanted, so that I saw very little of them.  We walkd home to dinner and were not so much tired as I expected.  I finishd a good many books in the evening.  I bought half a quire of paper to make the journal book and gave sixpence for it.  Jones began painting and repairing the garden.

Tuesday, 14 March, 1809

A gloomy looking morning and very cold.  Rebecca Workman came to wish us good bye, as they are going home today.  Mrs Vassall and Eliza Hendy calld and took my Aunt P and me to Bath.  We went to my mother’s, but did not stay there many minutes.  We then did what we had to do.  Met Mrs Vassall and went with her to see the children dance of Miss Randall’s.  There were some of them very elegant and danced delightfully, but none so well as a little girl who had been a scholar of Miss Le Merciers.  From there we went to Mr Clarke’s, where we staid a long time and then to my mother’s, where we found Mrs Jones and Mrs Vassall waiting for us and while we were there Miss Lye came, so that I had no opportunity of doing any thing to Emma’s gown.  Mrs Jones brought us home and I think I felt more tired than yesterday.  I had a very kind letter from my Uncle James to say we should have an hundred pounds a piece from Mrs Withers, if not more.  I was very lazy all evening.  Mrs Stevens and the Miss Eltons calld while we were at Bath.  Grange got a fifth bottle of Infusion of Roses for me.  Mrs Noyes calld.

Wednesday, 15 March, 1809

A fine day, but I did not go out as I could not spare the time from the books, which I am very anxious to get done.  I workd hard at them all day and in the evening cut more the plates for them.

Thursday, 16 March, 1809

A very fine day.  We expected a gentleman to come and see the house, but he did not, or did any body else.  Miss Wiltshire calld and sat here till Miss Maria and Miss E Savage came and took her to Bath.  They did not get out of the carriage.  Mr Walters also calld, but was not admitted.  I cut out three caps from some muslin.  My Aunt Neate gave me one apiece for my mother, Emma and myself.  I made Emma’s and began my mother’s.  I went in the garden for a short time and in the evening I workd hard again at the books, which will never be done I believe.

Friday, 17 March, 1809

A very pleasant day, but dull looking. Mrs Vassall came from Bailbrook but did not stay above half an hour.  My Aunt and I walkd up the garden with her.  Mr and Mrs Jones took my Aunt P to call on the Noyes, Walters’s and Wiltshire’s.  The two former were not at home.  Kitty went to Bath, as did  Grange, to fetch the letters.  One of the cows calved last night.  It is a very nice stout calf.  I wrote a  note to my mother which Grange took down, but she was gone to Chippenham.  I workd hard the whole day at the books and finished those in the library, (tho not till after supper), so there are only those in the breakfast room to do and I shall rejoice most heartily when they are all done, for I never new so fagging and tedious a job in my life and I think I would not undertake it again.  Grange got me the sixth bottle of Infusion of Roses.  Sir George and Lady Colebrook calld, but were not let in.

Saturday, 18 March, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd up the garden after breakfast, but I would not allow myself many minutes, as I wishd to begin the books upstairs, at which I fagged the whole day and evening and got more than half of them done.  Mr Noyes calld.  Only my Aunt Powell saw him.  She says he is looking remarkably well and in very good spirits.  I was in the breakfast room till near supper time pressing and putting away the books I had done and did not do any thing after.

Sunday, 19 March, 1809

A dry day, but cold and dull looking.  My Aunt Powell and I went to church at two o’clock.  In our way home we met Mr and Mrs Walters, little Sophia, Mrs Boudair and Miss Burney.  They walkd to the gate with us, but would not come in.  When we came in we did not sit down but went immediately to Mr Jones’s, where we only saw Mrs Vassall and Eliza Hendy, the rest of the family were gone to dine at Mrs Beckford’s.  Mrs Vassall returnd and dined with us and when the Jones’s returnd from Mrs B they calld and took her home, but not get out of the carriage.  We met Mr Tudor in the road in the morning.  He told us he thought Mr Chapman out of danger.  I wrote part of a letter to my Uncle James.  I had a note from Emma.

Monday, 20 March, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bath.  We calld at Bailbrook in our way.  Saw Mrs Jones, Maria, Eliza, Betsey and Mrs Vassall.  Mrs Jones told us a long story of a woman who is confined in Bristol jail who has prophesied that Durdham Down at Bristol, Beacon Hill and Beachen Cliffe at Bath are to sink into the earth on Good Friday and take the City of Bath down with them and that the City of Bristol is to float away.  She says there are peaple in Bath who are seriously alarmed about it.  We calld on Mrs Blaunt (who was gone from Bath), Mrs Tudor, who was looking very well and handsome and was as friendly as she knows how to be, Mr Stevens and the Miss Eltons, who were extremely glad to see us and very friendly and on Mrs Gibson who was dressing for dinner, so we did not see her.  We found my mother unwell and in bed.  She has got a cold and is fatigued with her trip to Chippenham.  I saw Miss L Guy there and Mrs Hupsman calld, but I did not see her.  We sat some time with my mother and then did what we had to do and I walkd home to dinner.  Met Mr Jones on horseback in Union St. and had a little chat with him and just by the turnpike we met Mr Tudor, who stopd and spoke to us.  In going down, Mr James overtook us on horseback and got off and walkd by our side into Bath.  I finishd my letter to my Uncle James and put it in the Post.  I was too tired and too lazy all the evening to do any thing.  My Aunts playd Patience.

View of the Avon from Durdham Down by James Baker Pyne, 1829 (c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
View of the Avon from Durdham Down by James Baker Pyne, 1829
(c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 21 March, 1809

A beautiful day.  I made a cap for my mother, the same pattern as Miss R Workman’s.  Mrs Walters and little Sophia calld and staid near an hour.  Mr Jones also calld to take leave of us, as they go tomorrow morning.  My Aunt Powell and I went up to Bailbrook to wish them good bye.  They were all very much affected, but particularly Mrs Jones.  Mrs Vassall does not go till tomorrow and little Betsey goes to Oldbury with her.  I workd in the evening.

Wednesday, 22 March, 1809

A dull looking day with a little rain in the morning, but not enough to lay the dust.  The Jones’s went about eleven o’clock and waved their handkerchiefs to my Aunt P, who was the only one of us down stairs when they went past.  I finishd the books up stairs.  We all three went up to Bailbrook at two o’clock to see dear Mrs Vassall before she went away.  We found her in the midst of confusion.  I packd a basket for her and little Betsey’s curiosity trunk.  We staid with her till she got into the Chaise and drove off.  Her spirits were better than I expected to find them.  In the evening I pasted prints of Cooper’s into a book that was made on purpose for them.  My Aunt sold the calf to farmer Pritchard for 10/6.

Thursday, 23 March, 1809

A most beautiful day.  I walkd to Bath directly after breakfast to spend the day with my mother and Emma.  The sun had such power I found it almost too hot.  My mother has not lost the spitting of blood, but is otherwise pretty well.  I workd hard all day at Emma’s gown and did not leave them till six o’clock.  They both walkd with me as far as the Turnpike, where George and little Gheta were waiting for me.  I walkd extremely fast home, as it got dark and gloomy as if it was going to rain.  I was not so much tired as I expected, but too lazy to do any thing in the evening.  Two families came to see the house today, a Mr Whitehead and his daughters and a Mrs Bowles and some ladies with her.

Friday, 24 March, 1809

A showery morning and a very wet afternoon.  We heard of the death of poor Mr Chapman of Bathford and my Aunt sent to enquire after the family.  I had so bad an inflammation in my eye I could not do any thing that required much looking at, so I collected the loose prints and put them to rights and pasted a good many in a book.  I took some salts when I went to bed at night.  We had a pig killd.

Saturday, 25 March, 1809

A very fine day.  I was busy all day about the prints and only went as far as the Green house and in the evening I pasted some of them in the book.  I wrote a note to my mother and stupid Gardener contrived to lose the answer in his way home.  I sent the writing case that dear William gave me to Comer to mend and put to rights.

Sunday, 26 March, 1809

Very hard rain in the morning, which prevented our going to church, but it was fine in the middle of the day.  We read prayers, after which my Aunt Powell and I walkd in the garden for some time.  John Wiltshire calld and sat some time.  He gave but an indifferent account of his father and sisters.  I and my Aunt Neate read all the evening, my Aunt Powell wrote.

Monday, 27 March, 1809

A fine morning.  I was engaged about the prints all the day and evening.  Mr James calld but was not admitted.  Ambrey went away after dinner and Hunter came in her place.  George got me the seventh bottle of Infusion of Roses.  I scalded the back of my hand at tea pouring some water from the tea urn on a print.  It was very painful all the evening.

Tuesday, 28 March, 1809

A fine morning.  We all intended going to Bath to spend the day with my mother, but just as we were going to set out, the Miss Workmans walkd up and my Aunt insisted on their spending the day here and we would walk down with them tomorrow, which they consented to do, and we sent for their night things and an excuse to my mother.  As it turnd out, it was very fortunate, for about one o’clock there was a most violent storm of thunder, tho at a great distance, and rain and it did not cease pouring the rest of the day.  I workd in the evening and my Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille.  We did not go to bed till past one o’clock.  I wrote a note to my mother, sent her a nice nosegay and her knotting and my Aunt Powell had the kindness to send her a nice little leg of pork.

Wednesday, 29 March, 1809

A very dismal looking day and cold, tho dry.  My Aunt P and the Workmans were down long before me and had began breakfast when I made my appearance. It looked so like rain my Aunt persuaded the Workmans to stay till tomorrow.  Miss E Wilshire calld and sat some time.  She was more pleasant than usual.  I dried a good many  of my Aunt’s books in the breakfast room, that they may be packed properly to leave.  I workd in the evening and my Aunts and the Workmans played Quadrille.  I had a note from my mother.

Thursday, 30 March, 1809

A very dull looking day and very cold.  The Workmans were going home after breakfast, but my Aunt persuaded them to stay till Saturday, so Rebecca walkd to Bath and returnd to dinner.  Not one person came to see the house.  John Wiltshire calld.  He was just come from poor Mr Chapman’s funeral.  I workd hard at making tops of shifts all day.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening.

Good Friday, 31 March, 1809

I dry day, but extremely cold.  My Aunt P, Rebecca and I, went to church, after which we calld and sat a little while at Mrs Noyes’s.  Mr N is looking surprisingly well.  We walkd around their garden, for Rebecca to see it.  Mrs N lent us four numbers of the Papillon, which comes out weekly at Bath.  It is, I think, very vulgar and ill written.  Stocker came to see Kitty.  She told us it was astonishing how many peaple had been frightened out of Bath by the reported prophesy.  Upward of 200 families left Bath and there was not a pair of post horses to be had yesterday.  She herself was very much alarmed.  I workd and my Aunt P read a little to us in the evening.

Fashion plate for April 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for April 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Saturday, 1 April, 1809

A dull looking day and as cold as yesterday.  The Workmans left us soon after breakfast.  Miss Wiltshire calld.  She walked home, had some luncheon and staid a long time.  Soon after she was gone, we were agreeably surprised at seeing Mr Wiltshire, after a confinement of three months.  He is looking tolerably well, but still complains of the pain in his leg.  I workd all the day and evening.  I had a note from my mother and the Bath paper, in which paper I saw the marriage of Mrs Fenwick to Mr Hodgson.

Easter Sunday, 2 April, 1809

A fine day, but intensely cold.  We all three went to church and received the Sacrament.  Saw Mr and Mrs Walters, Mrs Noyes, Mrs Boudois and Miss Burney.  The two latter accompanied us as far as the bottom of the Lane.  Mr Wiltshire overtook us on horseback on his way to Bath and calld in his way back.  He told us he understood Mr Hodgson was to take the name of Fenwick, which is the best thing he could do, I think, as he will not be much noticed under his own name, I suppose.  Mr W had this intelligence from Mrs Porcher.  While we were at dinner, it began to snow and it continued for an hour or more, but not enough fell to make it set and it was fine afterwards.  I read all the evening.

St John's Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
St John’s Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Monday, 3 April, 1809

A very fine day, but almost as cold as yesterday.  Miss Wiltshire calld and very kindly took my Aunt P and me to Bath.  We sat half an hour with my mother, who was so hoarse we could hardly hear her speak.  Met Mrs Stevens and the Miss Eltons in the street.  We went to Miss Wiltshire at half past three and she brought us back, as far as the turnpike, where we got out and walked to the gravel pit Lank Hall? to look at the gravel, but it was so bad, so my Aunt would not bespeak any from them.  We walkd across the fields and up the Lane home.  I was not at all tired.  Mr Clark calld while we were out and two parties came to see the house but, of course, were not admitted.

Tuesday, 4 April, 1809

A fine day and as cold as yesterday.  I was employd all the day unpacking and drying my Aunts books in the breakfast room.  Mr Wiltshire calld but I did not see him.  He has at last heard from Cooper!! I put a leech on my left temple for an inflammation in my eye.  It suckd very well and fixd a second time just under the first.  My temple swelld and was very painful.  In the evening I playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate.

Wednesday, 5 April, 1809

A beautiful day, but very cold.  Mrs Stevens and the Miss Eltons calld, but were not admitted.  I packd a box of my Aunt’s books and dried a great many more.  I did not do any thing in the evening. I felt very unwell and my temple was much sweld.  My Aunts playd Gosch after supper.

Thursday, 6 April, 1809

An exceeding wet day.  It did not cease raining till the evening.  My Aunt Neate had intended going to Bath, but was prevented by the rain.  The side of my face, and particularly under my eye was so much swelld, I could neither work or read.  I pasted a few prints into the book. No one came to see the house today.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards in the evening and I took some Calomel when I went to bed.

Friday, 7 April, 1809

A cold, dull looking day, but dry.  I lookd over a great many old things and sorted them and in the evening cut up some old shifts for rags to keep.

Saturday, 8 April, 1809

A fine day with showers occasionally and very cold.  Gardner cut and tyed up the Clematis, which he has done very nicely.  I did the part that grows over the veranda.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was going to fetch Dr Gibbs to see Maria, who is very bad.  Mr W is out of spirits and is much worried by Mr Chapman’s affairs, which are in a very bad way from his having lost immense sums at the detestable York House Club, so much so, that if he had lived, he must have gone back to India this summer.  Mrs Bourdois and Miss Burney and Miss Baker with (as Kitty said) a parcel of young ladies from Bailbrook with her, calld but were not admitted.  I was busy all the morning emptying drawers and sorting old things of my own, some of which have never been undone since we came from Lambridge and in the evening I unraveld and wound some tufted fringe that has been laying by many years.  I attempted after breakfast to put the leech on my right temple, but it was not recoverd enough to suck, so must put it off till next week.  Molly Giles came and spent the day and sleept here, as it raind in the evening.

Sunday, 9 April, 1809

A wet day.  We read prayers directly after breakfast.  My Aunt Powell had a long letter from dear Mrs Porcher, frankd by the elder Mr Bastard who, with Powell, are at Cheltenham.  She very kindly sent me a pattern for work but begd I would copy it and return it immediately, as it was Mrs Richardson’s.  My Aunt wrote to her and sent it back by the same post she received it, directed to Mr Bastard.  We read all the evening.

Monday, 10 April, 1809

A fine morning.  We all three set out to walk to Bath.  Just as we got to the gate in the field, Miss Wiltshire was passing in the carriage and tho Miss Savage and Sarah Chapman were with her, she very kindly would persist in taking my Aunt Neate to save her the walk.  My Aunt P and I went to Hyetts in our way to see if we could get some gravel there, but he told us he had had orders not to dig any more, but if my Aunt could get leave from Mr Clarke’s agents, he should be very glad to supply her. We calld at Mr Hartley’s, who was not very well and could not see us.  From there we went to Admiral Phillip’s, where we staid a long time, as Mrs P was not at home.  When we first went, the Admiral said he had been very ill since we saw him last, and was evidently put out at our not having calld before.  I never saw Mrs P looking so well or in better spirits.  When we left there it began to rain, and by the time we got to Gay Street it rained extremely hard.  We took shelter in Dunn’s, where we eat some cakes, but there being no appearance of its holding up, we went to the Miss Workmans’, where we dried ourselves and had a glass of wine.  They were very kind and friendly.  From there, my Aunt went to call on Mrs Williams, and I went to my mother’s, where my Aunt Neate was.  My mother has got a bad cold and was very much out of spirits.  We staid with them till near five o’clock, when the rain ceasing, we walkd home.  It was dreadfully muddy, both in Bath and on the road.

View of Bath by Edmund Garvey (1740-1813) (c) Number 1 Royal Crescent; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
View of Bath by Edmund Garvey (1740-1813)
(c) Number 1 Royal Crescent; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Mr Wiltshire calld while we were out.  George met us near the Turnpike, with the pattens, which assisted us very much.  Mr and Mrs Williams and their maid go to London tomorrow morning in the two day Coach!!!  The poor man is to have the operation performed on his eyes immediately.  I hope, most sincerely, it will restore his sight.  It was late when we got home.  We had our dinner directly and went to bed soon after tea, before nine o’clock, as we were a good deal tired.

Tuesday, 11 April, 1809

A sunshine and cloudy morning.  I wrote a note to my mother and sent her a nosegay.  Gardener took them.  Soon after he went it began to rain and continued very hard  for a long time, but was tolerably fine in the afternoon. My Aunts were busy packing all the morning.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Luckily we were at luncheon and (he) eat some with us.  I workd all the evening.

Wednesday, 12 April, 1809

Quite an April day, sunshine and rain.  My Aunt P and I walkd in the garden a short time after breakfast.  Just as we were sitting down to luncheon, we were disagreeably interrupted by Mrs Pigott and a Mr and Miss Bold, friends of hers, who brought her here in their carriage.  She appears to me as mad as any poor creature ever was and I never saw such hottentots as her two friends.  They staid and had some luncheon and then took their leave for fear their horses should catch cold standing any longer.  Where the old man could possibly come from I can’t imagine, for he was scarcely human.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He complaind much of the pain in his leg and undid it here and wetted it with brandy.  We sat all the evening in the dining room, as Kitty and Hunter were fitting the green cloth to the floor in the library.  I workd all day and in the evening too.

Thursday, 13 April, 1809

A showery day with a tremendous wind and violent storms of hail.  No one came to see the house.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  My Aunt sent home Mrs Noyes’s Papillons with thanks.  I workd hard all day and read in the evening.  My Aunts playd cards.

Friday, 14 April, 1809

Alternate sunshine and showers.  I workd all day.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was very much out of spirits.  Maria was so bad, he said, he was apprehensive she would lose her senses.  I sorted a good many things before dinner and in the evening we all assisted in pulling to pieces old bodys of gowns.  I wrote a note to my mother and had two from her.

Saturday, 15 April, 1809

A very fine morning but showery in the afternoon.  My Aunt P and I were in the garden till luncheon time, directing George to cut dead boughs off some of the Laurels and old plum trees.  Mrs Noyes and her two little boys calld.  She lookd remarkably well and was very pleasant.  I sorted a great many things from a large drawer and dipd a piece of Persian in pink dye, which appears as if it would answer very well.  I bathed my feet after dinner and put a piece of corn plaster on my corn, which my Aunt thinks will take it away.  I read all the evening and my Aunt P and I did not go to bed till one o’clock.

Sunday, 16 April, 1809

A showery day but. particularly in the afternoon, it poured a torrent.  We read prayers at home.  I went into the garden for a short time, but the rain drove me in.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Maria was a little better.  I read all day and in the evening.  I had two notes from my mother.  I wrote her one and sent her some moss, which she wishd to have.

Monday, 17 April, 1809

Incessant rain the whole day.  We did not see a creature out of the family.  I workd hard all the morning and my Aunts were busy packing.  My Aunt P was up stairs most part of the evening.  I workd and my Aunt N playd Patience.

Tuesday, 18 April, 1809

When I got up in the morning it was snowing very fast and the tops of the hills were quite white and, tho it did not last long, it occurd two or three times in the course of the day, with bright sunshine between.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not stay long.  My Aunt was out in one of the storms directing Daniel to plant Laurels by the roadside in the shrubbery.  Mrs Stevens sent a card to take leave.  We sat all day and evening in the dining room as they were taking up the carpets and cleaning the library.  I workd in the evening and my Aunts playd Gosch.

Wednesday, 19 April, 1809

An extreme cold day, with frequent storms of snow and hail.  We breakfasted and sat the whole day in the dining room.  The servants finishd the library and put down the green cloth, which looks very neat.  I workd all day.  My Aunts packd.  I wrote a note to my mother.  George took it to Bath and brought me a bottle of Infusion of Roses, the 8th.  My Aunts playd at Gosch after supper.  A bat was flying about before the windows for a considerable time in bright sunshine.  About two o’clock I went out to see if would be alarmd by my going near it, but on the contrary, it hoverd so near me I could have knockd it down with my handkerchief.  It came twice and staid some minutes each time.  It certainly is a very extraordinary circumstance.

Thursday, 20 April, 1809

Incessant rain. I do not think it ceasd a moment the whole day or evening, notwithstanding which a man came from Bath to see the house for a gentleman who is at present at Tunbridge and thinks it will suit him exactly.  Mrs Hyde Clarke calld.  She came to bring two accounts she had paid for rates at Lambridge, which my Aunt Powell has certainly nothing to do with.  Nobody but such a mad woman as she is, would have come out such a day.  I workd all day and in the evening I wrote a very long letter to dear William.

Friday, 21 April, 1809

When we got up this morning we were astonished at seeing a very deep snow and it continued falling very fast all day.  It is heavier than any we have had this winter.  The Mail did not come in till after twelve o’clock.  I never saw such devastation as it has made here, there is hardly a tree about the premises that is not injured more or less.  Large branches torn off many of the evergreens and immense ones from the large Elms in the field, the Laurels and Lilacs about the house were borne down and the ends of their branches buried in the snow, many of them so broken, it is almost impossible for them ever to recover.  It began to thaw about one o’clock (tho it continued snowing) and George and Gardener threw the snow from the top of the house, notwithstanding which it came in a little in the breakfast room and in torrents on the landing place by the garret doors.  George went to Bath to take the letters to the post.  When he came back he told us he never had such difficulty to walk so short a distance in his life, for the snow water was nearly up to the top of this boots and the road was almost impassible.  One of the coaches attempted to go out, but was obliged to return and we saw the Mail go bye with six horses.  George also told us none of the coaches came in today.  One of them got as far as the top of Boxhill, but could not get any further and George saw four additional horses going out to bring them into Bath.  He also said the people were very apprehensive of a flood as dreadful as the last. I packed the remainder of my Aunt Powell’s books and sorted the contents of a drawer of my own.  When George returnd from Bath he beat and shook the snow off the evergreens round the house and my Aunt Powell and I watchd him from the library windows and the front door (for it raind too hard for us to go out) till it was nearly dark.  The snow that fell in the course of last night and today was upwards of two feet deep.  I wrote this in the evening and read.

Bath Mail Coach (Old Coaching Lines) by John Charles Maggs (c) The British Postal Museum & Archive; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Bath Mail Coach (Old Coaching Lines) by John Charles Maggs
(c) The British Postal Museum & Archive; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 22 April, 1809

A very rapid thaw and quite warm, with bright sunshine.  Such torrents of water came down the Lane that the drains would not take it off without taking up the gratings.  Luckily for us Jones came up with a little bill and assisted us very much by making dams in the Lane to prevent the water coming into the yard.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr James calld.  They did not get off their horses, as they found my Aunt P and me out of the gate in our pattens, watching the water.  Mr W said he was much worse off than us, for his house was compleatly inundated, owing to their having neglected throwing the snow off, and his orchard nearly destroyed by the weight of the snow on the trees.  I went into the stable to see Juno’s puppys.  They are the prettiest little fat things I ever saw.  Just as we were going to dinner,  George discoverd the water coming into the Hall and there was a general scramble to prevent its going into the Drawing Room, and as soon as they had succeeded in turning it off and had got rid of it in the Hall, my Aunt determind on having the carpet taken up in the Drawing Room, for fear of its coming in again in the night.  We all assisted in taking the furniture up into the breakfast room and Kitty very soon took up the carpet.  My Aunt P went out in the Lane after dinner and directed Jones to mortar the bottom of the gates and the door of the house, so that if the water had forced its way into the yard in the night, it could not have got into the house.  I was out a long time in the morning, releasing the small shrubs from the snow, with which they were weighd down and in attending to the binding up and propping a Lilac, (that was broke down and which I hope we shall save).  My Aunt P staid out till near nine o’clock.  The flood ran to a great height, but not any thing like what it was before.  I was very lazy in the evening.  Part of the wall that was new built up in the Lane and the bank above it fell down with a great crash and also some of Cooper’s, lower down in the Lane.

Sunday, 23 April, 1809

A very cold day, tho sunshine in the morning.  We read Prayers, soon after which Mr Wiltshire and Mr James calld.  They found my Aunt and me at the gate again.  Mr Wiltshire laughed and askd if we had been there all night.  They did not get off their horses.  It raind so hard in the afternoon that Gardener did not go to Bath a second time.  We all read in the evening.

Monday, 24 April, 1809

A fine day.  I was out the whole morning till dinner time with Jones and Gardener assisting and directing the propping and tyeing up the broken shrubs and Laurel trees about the house, which they have done very nicely.  I wrote a note to my mother, which George took when he went to the Post with the letters.  He got me a shilling’s worth of Essence of Lavender and Bergamot to make some Lavender water.  I saw the little foal in the field.  It appears a very pretty creature, the same color as the mare.  I was too much tired to do any thing in the evening.

Tuesday, 25 April, 1809

A beautiful day.  Just as we were going to breakfast the Workmans came in, intending to stay an hour or two, but my Aunt persuaded them to stay and sleep here and walk home tomorrow.  We all went down to the Plantation in the field to see Gardener and Jones put in some of the trees that were on the bank that has given way in the Lane.  Mr Littlehales calld just as we had done our luncheon and spent more than an hour here, very pleasantly.  He eat some ginger biscuits.  Mr Wiltshire came in for a few minutes, but did not sit down.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening and I coverd a box for my Aunt P.  Gardener brought me the 9th bottle of Infusion of Roses.

Wednesday, 26 April. 1809

It did not cease raining the whole day for a minute, so that the Workmans could not go home.  We were all very busy the whole morning.  Rebecca and Mary were so kind to make me a very pretty cap of the pink satin my Aunt P gave me the other day and I alterd my Aunt P’s green pelisse and made it fit her very nicely.  Kitty put down the carpet in the drawing room.  The weather was so bad no one calld.  The Workmans and my Aunts playd Quadrille in the evening and I lookd on.

Thursday, 27 April, 1809

A dry day, but not very fine.  The Workmans went home directly after breakfast, for fear it should rain.  My Aunt tried to persuade them to stay till tomorrow, but they were afraid of it being wet and preventing their going.  Then I gatherd a nice nosegay for them before they went.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not stay long.  My Aunt P and I walkd to the village after dinner to see a poor man of the name of Cattle, a soldier in the guards, who was in Spain and returnd very ill.  We went to see him in consequence of a note I had from my mother saying she understood his furlough would be out on Sunday and that he was very anxious to have it renewd by a Justice of the Peace and that she was sure Mr W would sign it, if my Aunt would ask him.  They are to bring the Furlough tomorrow.  No body came to see the house today.  I wrote a note to my mother, which George took, with some patterns for work for her.  My Aunt gave Cattle five shillings.

Friday, 28 April, 1809

A very wet morning, but fine in the afternoon.  I pasted some cloth on the back of a print for my Aunt Powell and after that gathered a beautiful nosegay to send to my mother and then finishd a morning cap I was at work on yesterday.  In the evening I read and burnt a great many old letters that I have had many years.  My Aunt P read and my Aunt N playd Patience. I wrote a note to my mother.

Saturday, 29 April, 1809

Very cold but dry.  I made a little green bonnet for my Aunt P to match her pelisse.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was so kind to sign Cattle,s Furlough.  My Aunt had two of Juno’s puppies drownd.  It raind a little after dinner, but as soon as the shower was over my Aunt P and I went to Cattle’s with his Furlough.  His mother and sister were very much delightd, but he did not appear to care much about the matter.  My Aunt gave the old woman two shillings.  On our return we stopd at a poor woman’s of the name of Adams, who’s husband died last year and left her with a family of eight children.  My Aunt gave her two shillings.  Miss E Savage calld at the door to bring me a note from my mother, but did not get off her horse.  I wrote a note to my mother to tell her Mrs Porcher had heard from Tom, who said my brother had been some time at Madras.  I hope we shall hear from himself.

Sunday, 30 April, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I went to church at two o’clock.  Met Mr Noyes just as he was coming out of his own house and walked to the church door with him.  I never saw him look better in my life.  We found it very cold returning.  I gatherd a nice little nosegay.  We all read in the evening.

Fashion plate for May 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for May 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Monday, May 1, 1809

There was a good day of rain before we got up in the morning, but it was fine afterwards.  I had intended going to spend the day with my mother, but was deterd by the appearance of rain and there was one hard shower about four o’clock.  I workd hard all the morning to new make my black and brown spotted muslin gown.  George heard of a boy in the village who has got a ferret and he came here after dinner to kill the rats.  He killd three small ones and is to come again tomorrow.  Poor Hunter and Ellen are in great distress and agitation from hearing their eldest brother had left home and enlisted in the 10th Light Dragoons at Bath.  Their second brother came to tell them and see if he could prevail on the eldest to give up the idea of being a soldier and return home, but when he found him in Bath John told him he was sworn in and if he was not, he would not home returnd as he was tired of living at home and had determind long ago to enlist as soon as he had an opportunity.  Hunter went down with Robert to see him, but could not prevail on him to come up here.  I workd all the evening.

Tuesday, 2 May. 1809

A showery day.  My Aunt Powell was out most part of the morning with Daniel and Gardener in the field where they cut down fifteen trees (that were dead from the cows having barkd them) in the Clump by Mr Jones’s.  Poor Hunter went to Bath again to enquire what could be done about getting her brother off and in the afternoon George went down to try to persuade him to come up here, which he succeeded in doing.  Hunter and Ellen also went down, but did not let him know it, when they found he was inclind to come up, for fear of preventing him.  His friend, who came and enlisted with him and who, by the bye, is an apprentice and of course has not the power of doing so, came up with him and they slept here.  They both heartily repent their folly I believe and John is now anxious to get off if possible.  The other they cannot detain, if his Master chuses to claim him. Robert went home before his brother came up here.  Mr Wiltshire calld and my Aunt spoke to him about it.  He said he would call again in his way back, but did not.  I workd hard on my gown all day and in the evening too.

Wednesday, May 3, 1809

A fine day, but cold.  Hunter’s eldest sister walkd from Melkson to see what could be done about her unfortunate brother.  The poor old father is almost distracted and the rest of the family in the greatest distress.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bath.  We went to Mr Wiltshire’s lodgings, as he had not calld here, in hopes of finding him and also to Mr Delamare’s, where the servant told us they did not expect him in Bath today.  We calld at the Workmans where my Aunt had appointed John and Ann to meet her.  She told them they might as well return to Bath Easton, as Mr W was not to be in Bath.  Ann returnd directly, but John staid with his friend till the evening and then came up to sleep at Bath Easton.  The Workmans were very kind and insisted on our going to them the last thing before we left Bath to have something to eat.  From there we went to my mother’s, who we found pretty well, but poor, dear Emma was laying on the sopha with the tooth ache and a bad swelld face and in very low spirits.  We sat with them some time and then went again in search of Mr Wiltshire, who we could not find and then to the Workmans again, where we had some cold beef and a glass of wine, given with a hearty welcome.  In our way home my Aunt stopd at Jones’s the fishmonger and sent my  mother a nice lobster.  We calld on Mrs Flinn in our way home and sat some time with her.  Saw Miss Haines and the two children, who are very much grown since I saw them last.  Mrs F is looking quite well and in remarkably good spirits.  She told us Mr Williams bore the operation with great fortitude and there is every prospect of his regaining his sight.  Mrs W talks of being in Bath the middle or latter end of this month, but if Cooper goes to town I am sure she will stay as long as she can, to be near to him.  As we came home we overtook a returnd Chaise standing at the Porter Butt.  My Aunt told the man she would give him a shilling to take us to the bottom of the house, which he agreed to do very unwillingly.  We got in and came home as snug as could be without the least inconvenience.  I workd in the evening.  John Hunter came and slept here.  Dear Emma had got another pair of silk stockings done for me, for which I gave a shilling.  Mr Wiltshire calld here while we were at Bath.

Thursday, May 4, 1809

A wet day.  Mr Wiltshire had the kindness to call about John Hunter and appointed him and his sisters to meet him at the Town Hall.  They went there and saw Mr W and the Sergeant, who would  not agree to let John off, but still Mr Wiltshire does not give it up, for he says he will write to Captain Goddard and try what that will do.  I wish for the sake of his poor sisters, who are wretched about him, that Mr Wiltshire may succeed, but as far as the young man, I think he deserves punishment and I believe it will be a severe one to him, to remain as a soldier.  No person came to see the house.  I workd all morning and was very lazy in the evening.  My Aunt had one of the little pigs killd.

A view of the Town Hall, Market Place and Abbey Church, Bath, 1804 (Victoria Art Gallery).
A view of the Town Hall, Market Place and Abbey Church, Bath, 1804 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Friday, May 5, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt Neate walkd to Bath to spend the day with my mother.  While we were at luncheon the Workmans came up (by invitation) to dine and sleep.  I workd all the morning.  My Aunt Neate came home about seven o’clock and in the evening the Workmans and my Aunts playd Quadrille.  I workd.

Saturday, May 6, 1809

A fine day.  I walkd to Bath.  Found dear Emma a little better, my mother pretty well.  I got a new ribbon for my bonnet and a glass for my watch, also a pound of tea and enquired at two places about my Aunt’s P’s ticket, which is a blank.  I walkd home at seven o’clock.  George met me just by the Lodge.  I saw Mr Turner at my mother’s.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd cards in the evening, I read.  Mr Wiltshire calld.

Sunday, May 7, 1809

A beautiful day, quite Summer.  My Aunt P, Rebecca and I walkd to church.  Met Mrs Noyes by her own door with Mr and Mrs Walters. the three Miss Dacres (to whom we were introduced) and a young lady with them.  Mr Littlehales preachd one of the best sermons I ever heard and so delightfully deliverd that it inspired one with devotion and religious sentiments.  After church we called on Mrs Mann, saw her, Miss Mann, a Mrs Smith, a ? with her and Mrs M’s little grandson, a sweet child.  My Aunt askd Miss M to bring him to breakfast with us Tuesday to see Rover fetch the newspaper.  From them we went to Mrs Noyes’s, where we found Mr and Mrs Walters, Sophia and Miss Nott all at luncheon.  Miss Nott went out of the room as soon as we came in.  Mr N was obliged to go to Catherine to serve his church and the W’s took their leave.  We spent half an hour very pleasantly.  My Aunt complimented Mrs N and Mr Littlehales on his sermon.  Just before we came away Mrs Bourdois and Miss Burney came in and we met Mrs Walters again, who walked a little way with us.

While we were at luncheon Mr Wiltshire came in and eat some with us.  He calld again while we were at dinner.  I gatherd two beautiful nosegays, one to sent to dear Emma and one for ourselves.  My Aunt had the kindness to send my mother a joint of the little pig.  We walkd about the garden all the morning and after dinner we went to the top of the field by Mr Jones’s and pickd up a great many cones and sticks in our way back.  We did nothing but chat in the evening.

Monday, May 8, 1809

A beautiful day.  My Aunt Powell, Miss Workman and I went to Bailbrook to call on Mrs Dacres.  For the first time we were obliged to go the road way, as they have a cow that will not always allow women to go thro the field.  It was intensely hot going up their hill.  We saw the Admiral, Mrs and three Miss Dacres, none of which I like at all.  The Mistress of the family is extremely consequential and grand, without knowing how to set about it.  While we were there Mr Littlehales and little Ben Noyes came in and we left the former there. In our way back we stopd at ? to tell him to pay his rent to Mr Clarke.  He gave us a large bunch of jonquilles.  Hunter’s father came over and had a long conversation about his son with my Aunt Powell.  After dinner the Workmans and I walkd in the garden.  We had a very nice syllabub after dinner, the first I ever mixd.

My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening and I finishd my gown.  We did not go to bed till past one o’clock.

Tuesday, 9 May , 1809

A beautiful day, but intensely hot.  Miss Mann, her cousin Miss Jepson and little Edward came and breakfasted with us.  The dear little boy was delighted with every thing he saw and was as happy as possible.  Miss M taught me a new method of plaiting the chip for bonnets.  They went away early and as soon as we had had our luncheon, my Aunt P and I walkd to Bath with the Workmans, who went home. We calld at Admiral Phillip’s and sat some time with him.  He looks very ill, she very well and was as friendly as possible.  After that we calld on Mrs Gibson, met the Dr just going out.  Mrs G looks very well, but says her leg is not yet well.  She was very glad to see us.  From her we went to my mother’s.  We found poor Emma looking very ill indeed and my mother extremely low.  We staid some time with them and then walkd home to dinner a little after six.  Mr Wiltshire calld before we went to Bath and we saw Miss E Savage in Milsom Street, who was as sociable as she used to be!!!  While we were out Mrs Dacres and her daughter returnd our visit of yesterday.  Hunter went to Shockerwick in the evening with a note from my Aunt to Mr W about her brother.

I was very tired and uncomfortable with my walk and went to bed before supper.  I lent Mother Hubbard’s Dog to little Edward Davis, who was delighted with it.

Milsom Street Bath c1806, courtesy of the British Library. Charles Jagger (1770-1827) was resident there around 1811 and Fanny was living at the time of her death in 1871
Milsom Street Bath c.1806, courtesy of the British Library.

Wednesday, May 10, 1809

A beautiful day.  Hunter walkd to Melksome early and returnd by the Mail.  Her father and brother came also to try what they could do for John, who is obliged to join the Regiment today.  Just as they were setting off for Bath, Mr Wiltshire came in. He had brought an extract of the Act relative to their enlisting, by which we find it is impossible for John to get off without a substitute and probably two.  He went from here by the Coach, Mr Wiltshire promising to do every thing in his power for him and my Aunt determining to ask Cooper to try, if Mr Wiltshire fails.

I was out in the garden almost all the morning, bringing in plants to put in the stand, which looks beautiful.  We dined early and my Aunt and I walkd to Farmer Hooper’s at Swainswick after dinner, but did not find him at home.  I read in the evening.  My Aunt sent my mother a bottle of vinegar and I wrote a note with it.

Thursday, May 11, 1809

An intense hot day.  I went as far as the Green House after breakfast, but it was too hot to stay out.  Mr Wiltshire calld and sat a quarter of an hour.  He told us he had sold Mr Chapman’s house to a Mrs Holder of Bath, who has given him five thousand pounds for it, without the furniture.  It has three acres of land, including the garden.  A lady and gentleman calld to see the house, but as they had not a ticket, they were not admitted.  We dined early and walkd (all of us) to Bath to drink tea with my mother, to meet Mrs Blackburne, who sleeps at Bath tonight in her way home.  She and Mrs Harvey did not come till past eight o’clock, so that we did not see much of them.  Susan looks remarkably well and staid at my mother’s till nine o’clock, too late a great deal, for it was so dark as we came home we could not distinguish objects.  Fortunately we met only one of the Coaches and that very near our own gate.  It was ten o’clock before we got home.  Lady Delawar calld after we went out, a curious time for a morning visit but she is always very late.  George has caught eight rats.

Friday, May 12, 1809

A very fine day, but not so hot as yesterday.  I was busy in the morning sorting different things to pack and was out in the garden part of the morning.  Mr Wiltshire calld and read us part of a letter he had receivd from Mr Porcher in which he says tho Mr Chamier has not been successful this time, he means to stand the next vacancy again.  I walkd in the garden in the evening and gatherd a nice nosegay.  I read after supper.  We left of fires.

Saturday, May 13, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I walkd as far as Dead Mill after breakfast to enquire about some  taxes.  We found it intensely hot coming back.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at dinner.  He was in very good spirits, having settled every thing as he wishd about Mr Chapman’s house and furniture.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay for my mother and sent dear Emma some arrow root.  I wrote a note with it and also sent some news papers.  I read in the evening.  This is our dear William’s birth day.

Sunday, May 14, 1809

An excessive hot day.  We read prayers after breakfast and my Aunt P and I went to church at two o’clock.  As we came back Mr Littlehales was standing at Mr Noyes’s door and came across the road to speak to us.  We wanted us to go in and have some refreshments, but it was so near dinner time my Aunt declind it.  I think I never felt hotter than it was as we walkd home.  We had a very unexpectd storm of thunder after dinner, attended with a heavy shower of rain and the lightening in the evening was very vivid.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at church and had some luncheon.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd in the garden after dinner, till the storm drove us in and we all three read in the evening.

Monday, May 15, 1809

A very hot day.  I got up at seven o’clock, had a cup of milk and a roll and then walkd to Bath to spend the day with my mother, got there (to their great surprise) before they had done breakfast. Found dear Emma better.  She has had her tooth out and I hope will now soon be well.  Mr Turner calld to see her and sat half an hour.  He gave Emma leave to go out and we walkd to see a lodging in Trinn Street, which my mother has agreed to take, as it is half a guinea cheaper than the one she is in  at present.  I workd hard all day on the gown I began so long ago for Emma and cut out another for her.  George came down to fetch me at seven o’clock and my mother and Emma walkd as far as Edward Street with me, where I left them and crossed the ferry.  I got home without any inconvenience before my Aunts had had their tea.  I did not do any thing but chat in the evening.

Tuesday, May 16, 1809

A beautiful day, but very hot and, I fancy, there was a thunder storm at a distance, as we had a hard shower, but it did not last many minutes.  As soon as breakfast was over, I went into the Hot House, where I cut all the plants and new potted thirty two seedling Geraniums and five other plants.  I did not sit down except at luncheon) for a moment till dinner time and when I had dined I went out again and waterd some of the flowers in the garden.  I was a good deal tired, but not so much as I expectd.  I wrote in the evening.  Gardener new potted the plants in the Green House.  Cooper wrote my Aunt word of poor Tom Chiver’s death, by which the old Captain comes into 80 thousand pounds.

Wednesday, May 17, 1809

A very fine day and as hot as yesterday.  I went out directly after breakfast to the Hot House, where I continued till dinner time, except coming in to eat my luncheon.  I washd and new potted the Orange tree, which took me nearly the whole morning.  Mr and Mrs Walters and Sophia calld.  They came into the garden to me, but I went on with what I was about.  Mr Wiltshire calld and eat some luncheon with us.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay which my Aunt sent to the Workmans.  My Aunt P and I strolld in the garden in the evening and I wrote a note to my mother to tell her some of the India fleet are arrived.  God grant we may have letters from our dearest William.  Gardener new potted the plants in the Hot House.

Thursday, May 18, 1809

A fine day.  I was in the garden some time in the morning and afterwards cut out and partly made a pink satin tippet that my Aunt P gave me.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not get off his horse.  No one came to see the house.  We all three went into the garden after dinner and staid out till the backchafers began to be very troublesome.  I gatherd a nice nosegay for ourselves and workd at my tippet in the evening.  We weighd and got the rags ready to send to my mother tomorrow morning.

Friday, May 19, 1809

Fine, but it threatend for rain all day.  There was a violent storm of thunder and rain at daylight this morning, which appeard to be very near, but all appearance of it was gone bye when we got up.  Kitty sent the trunk down to my mother this morning before eight o’clock.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay and sent her, with a note and the key, by George.  I was out in the garden some time after breakfast till it became too hot.  I then workd the rest of the morning.  Mr Wiltshire calld and staid some time.  I was out in the garden most part of the afternoon but it was cold.  I workd in the evening.  My Aunt P had the kindness to send my mother some Asparagus.

Saturday, May 20, 1809

A showery uncomfortable morning, which prevented our going to Bath.  I finishd my tippet in the morning and my Aunt P and I walkd about the garden and field from after dinner till it was quite dark.  Jones took up the drain from the water fall, part of which had fallen and stopd the water from running off.  I pleated some lace for my Aunt P’s bonnet in the evening.  It was extremely cold and damp.

Sunday, May 21, 1809

Violent storms of rain before we were up in the morning and in the course of the day.  My Aunt P and I walkd to church.  She staid to the Sacrament.  I was fortunate enough both to go and come without wet.  Mr Littlehales walkd home with my Aunt and we let him out at the top of the garden, as he was going to Admiral Dacres’s.  It raind a torrent while we were at dinner, but was fine in the evening.  All the servants went to Bath except Hunter.  I read in the evening.

Monday, 22 May, 1809

A very fine day, it being Whit Monday.  The Bath Easton Club came and walked round the house and receivd their Guinea.  Mr Davis calld and sat more than an hour, the first time we have seen him since Cooper went away.  My Aunt P and I went in the evening to Mrs Walters’s, where we met a very large party, the Noyes, Mr Littlehales, all the Dacres’s, Miss Moenn and her cousin Mrs Eckersall, Miss Neave, Miss E Savage, Miss Hughes and a great number of people we never saw before.  They danced, as usual, on the Green and made a very gay appearance.  We came away a little before nine.  My Aunt sent Mrs Walters a jug of very fine cream.

Tuesday, 23 May, 1809

A beautiful day.  We all three went to Bath immediately after breakfast in a boat.  My Aunt P and I went first to the Workman’s, where George brought my Aunt her letter.  There was a most distressing one from Maria Jones, written in great agony of mind, saying she heard Mr Henderson was named on of the Jury on Mr J’s trial, which comes on next Friday and to entreat my Aunt would write to him to beg he would not decline it, as they were very anxious he should be one, as being an unprejudiced person.  After my Aunt had  (written) to Maria and Mr H, which took her some time, we calld on Lady Delawar, but only gave our Cards, went to a good many places and then to my mother’s, who moved today into her new lodgings in Trim Street.  We found my Aunt Neate with her.  My mother gave us the money she received for the rag she sold for us, which amounted to 37 shillings, which was equally divided between my Aunt P, Emma and me.  We staid with my mother till four o’clock, when we went to the Workman’s, where we were engaged to dine. Nothing could be more friendly and kind than they were.  We did not leave their house till half past eight.  They walkd as far as Kensington Place with us and we came the Lane way home to avoid the holyday people in the road.  It was a beautiful moonlight evening and we had a very pleasant walk home.  We calld on Mrs Flinn, who has been very unwell.  The Williams’s return this evening and the old lady has fixd next Monday for going to Herrington, which Mrs W does not object to, as Cooper is at Weymouth instead of Bath Easton.  Had he been here, she would not have left Bath so soon, I will answer for it.

I was measured for a pair of boots.  We saw Ann Keen in Union Street.  She was looking remarkably well.  My Aunt P gave my mother half a crown for a poor woman who is in great distress and we are to look for some clothes for her.

Union Street, Bath c.1794 (Victoria Art Gallery).
Union Street, Bath c.1794 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Wednesday, May 24, 1809

A very fine day.  I went into the garden after breakfast and gatherd a beautiful nosegay for ourselves.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Mr Mayes’s to call on Lady C Littlehales, Mrs N’s eldest brother’s wife who came to her last night.  She appears to be a very agreeable, unaffected woman, extremely plain, but anxious to make herself pleasant.  In our way there we met Mr Wiltshire, who only returnd from Tetbury last night.  He gave a melancholy account both of Charlotte and Maria, the latter of whom, he said, was quite deranged.  After we left Mrs Noyes’s we calld on Mrs Mann, Mrs Walters and Mrs Croak, all of whom we found at home.  All three visits were very pleasant and at the first we saw Mrs and Miss Mann, Mrs Smith and Miss Jepson.  At the next, Mr and Mrs Walters and Mrs Melmoth and at the latter Mrs Croak only till we were coming away, when we met Mr C and his daughter and a young lady with them coming up the hill.  Mr Crook has improved his house very much by turning the staircase and enlarging his dining room.  As we came home we met Mr Littlehales on horseback, who stopd and had a little chat with us.  I was in the garden for some time after dinner, but it was too cold to stay out late.  I workd in the evening. My aunt P heard from Mrs Henderson and had a very impertinent letter from Mr Kempson of Totnes.

Thursday, May 25, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Bath.  We calld on Mrs Beckford in our way and sat more than an hour with her.  Met Miss Workman there.  The whole conversation was about poor Mr Jones and the family.  I think Mrs Beckford and Miss Hay imagine the result of the trial will be unfavourable.  They shewd us part of their house, which is a delightful one and let us out at the bottom of their garden, which saved us part of the hill.  Miss W walkd into Bath with us, as least as far as the Ferry, where we crossd and went to Henrietta Street to ask Sally Phelphs if she knew where Henry Jollif lived.  She was so kind to go up to Rivers Street to enquire for us, but the family did not know where his Master is at present.  My Aunt wishd to ask him a question about a house of Cooper’s which Kempsom of Totnes charges Cooper for the keep of.  After we all left Devonshire from Henrietta Street we went to the Post Office and then to my mother’s.  We found her in bed, but not ill and Emma tolerable.  We sat some time there and then went to Mr Clarke’s, who was not at home, but we luckily met him on the street and went back with him.  When my Aunt had askd him the questions she wanted to know, we returnd to my mother’s where she wrote a letter to Cooper and I took it to the Post.  We dined at my mother’s on a meat pye my Aunt bought at Bedford’s and drank tea with them also.  George came down to walk home with us.  He brought a beautiful nosegay I had gatherd in the morning and some clothes for the poor woman, that my Aunt Neate had sent her.  We left my mother about eight o’clock and had a very pleasant walk home.  Found my Aunt Neate at tea.  I was a good deal tired and did not do anything in the evening.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were out and we saw Mr Noyes in Bath, but no one came to see the house.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Vassall and wrote to Cooper, under cover to Mr Bastard.

Friday, May 26, 1809

A very rainy morning and so cold my Aunt had the fire lit after breakfast.  She was much alarmed by the soots catching fire on the top of the grate where it had collected, but it soon went out. The old man came with Lillys of the Valley.  He had only two pots, both which my Aunt took at a shilling each.  Lady E Littlehales, Mrs Noyes and little Ben calld but did not stay long.  They had some ginger biscuits and took some home with them.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but I did not see him.  I was in the garden a short time after breakfast and gatherd some Orange blossoms.  My Aunt P sent my mother some asparagus.  I workd all day and in the evening.  Also my Aunt wrote to Cooper.  Hunter had a blister put on.  My Aunt P read two sermons to us.

Saturday, May 27, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt P sent little Edward Davis a present of a rake, fork and spade and a note written to him with them.  At the same time she sent Mrs Noyes some melon seeds.  George stopd in his way back to fumigate Mrs Crook’s roses with his fumigating bellows and brought them home with him.  I workd all day.  While we were sitting after dinner Mr Williams walkd up.  He thinks he should benefit very much by the coaching?, as he can now distinguish objects, tho his eye is not yet strong enough to be uncovered.  They go to Herrington on Monday, and take Mrs Flinn with them.  I walkd in the garden a short time after dinner, but it was a very cold evening.   I dressd Hunter’s blister before tea.  It had risen remarkably well and discharged  the largest quantity of serum I ever saw from one before.  I workd in the evening.

bellows
Garden Fumigating Bellows

Sunday, May 28, 1809

A wet, cold, uncomfortable day.  We read prayers at home.  It was so cold my Aunt had the fire lit.  As soon as we had done breakfast Mr Wiltshire calld and brought my Aunt letters.  We see by the Paper today poor Mr Jones (whose trial came on Friday) has been found guilty.  Judgment is not yet passd.  I pity them all from the bottom of my heart.  It was too wet for us to go to church.  My Aunt P read some sermons and some chapters in the Bible in the evening.  I was very much out of spirits and depressd all day, and particularly so at night.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Porcher and Mrs Henderson.  She wrote to Cooper.

Monday, May 29, 1809

A very showery day.  My Aunt P had a note from Mrs Beckford enclosing a letter from Mrs Jones to Mrs Vassall, which she wishd her to have as soon as possible and my Aunt determind to take it over to Mrs V herself.  She sent George to Bath for a Chaise and we had an early dinner and all three went to Oldbury.  We had an excellent pair of horses and a very good driver and arrived there very safe, notwithstanding some of the hills are tremendous.  We found Mrs V tolerable, little Betsey but indifferent, complaining sometimes of pain in her head, which I believe she makes a great deal more of than is necessary.  Dearest Mrs V bears this affliction on the Jones’s, like herself, with the greatest resignation and fortitude.  She persuaded my Aunt to stay all night and return tomorrow.  We did not go to bed till late.  I slept with Mrs V.

My Aunt heard from Cooper, enclosing Mr Kempson’s letter.  She wrote to Mrs Porcher and a note to Mrs Beckford.  I wrote a note to my mother.  My Aunt bought a pot of Lillys of the Valley.  Mr Wiltshire calld after we left home.

Tuesday, May 30, 1809

A very fine morning.  We all three walkd with Mrs V thro the woods of Oldbury, which as well as the house are very much altered and improved since we saw them last.  We were out two hours.  Dr and Mrs Lovell came to see Betsy soon after we came in.  I did not see the Dr, but Mrs L came up to ask my Aunt N how she did.  I made a pair of shoes for Betsey’s doll.  We dined at three o’clock, as my Aunt had orderd the Chaise at five for us to come home, but just as it drove to the door a storm of thunder, lightening and as violent rain as I ever saw came on, which detaind us till half past six.  We had but one shower after we left Oldbury and arrived at home a quarter past nine, without any accident.  We had some tea immediately and our supper soon after.  My Aunt heard from Mr Handly, Mrs Blackburn and Tom Blenman (about the Jones’s).  She had a note also from Mrs Walters to ask us to be there this evening.  I had a note from my mother.  Mr Wiltshire and Mrs Croak calld.  I took some salts.

Wednesday, May 31, 1809

A very cold showery day.  We had a fire.  I went into the garden after breakfast, but did not stay, the wind was so high and cold.  The little black and white puppy was lost yesterday, but Admiral Dacre’s Coachman told George he saw it in the village and very civilly went to shew him where, and George brought it back with him.  The boy who had it came also, to hope my Aunt would give him something for having taken care of it. He said he knew the boy who had stole and left it in the village and that he had taken it to keep till anyone owned it, not knowing where to bring it.  My Aunt desird he would bring the boy here who had stolen it and she would give him something.  It raind all the afternoon without ceasing.  I workd at my gown all day.  Mr Aunt wrote to poor Maria Jones and Mr Handley.  George took the letters to the Post.

Fashion plate for June 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for June 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Thursday, June 1, 1809

A fine day, but an excessive high wind.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Bath, calld on Mrs Beckford in our way.  Saw her only and had a great deal of conversation about the poor Jones’s.  From her we went to the Workmans, who are looking wretchedly.  I never saw Rebecca look so ill in my life and poor Mary was quite in an agony of distress.  We had a glass of wine and a biscuit there and then went to my mother’s, who we found in bed, more from caprice, I believe, than illness.  I never saw Emma better.  She really looked quite pretty.  I went to the Post Office while my Aunt sat there.  From my mother’s we went to Gibbons, to Arnolds to have my boots alterd and to Benwell’s where my Aunt bought a cheap gown. She gave seven shillings for it.  I to ? notes to Mr Webb’s and Whitchurch’s for Mrs Beckford.  My Aunt bought a pretty little white veil, which she gave me.  We came down Pulteney Street home, that we might call on Mrs Horne, who appeard very glad to see us, but was much affected when talking of the Joneses.  We met Mrs Keen in Pulteney Street, who was more friendly and obliging than I ever saw her before.  George overtook us by the Turnpike with the Plaids and umbrellas, and we walkd the Lane way home and got some excellent cheese at a little shop by Lark Hall.  We did not get home till eight o’clock, found my Aunt N just going to tea, so we had some toast instead of dinner.  My Aunt Powell had a note from Rebecca Workman and I one from my mother.

Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at Bath.  My Aunt Powell gave me three pair of very nice cotton stockings, new.

Pulteney Street, Bath, early nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Pulteney Street, Bath, early nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Friday, 2 June, 1809

A very wet day, with the most tremendous wind I almost ever heard.  We thought the trees would all have been torn up by the roots. The whole garden was strewd with leaves and small boughs and a great number of large branches were torn from the Elms in the field.  It was really frightful.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He said it had blown two trees down in his Lane and in the night it was a perfect hurricane.  The wind abated after dinner and it was a fine evening, but so cold we were glad to replenish the fire, which we had lit directly after breakfast.  My Aunt P and I went into the garden and collected some dry wood that had been blown down and made a very chearful fire.  Just as we had finishd and the tea was brought in, Mr Handly and his two daughters arrived, Fanny not at all altered and just as good humourd and pleasant as she used to be, her sister Elizabeth a very fine girl and very pleasant.  Mr Handley friendly as usual.  We spent a sociable evening and went to bed about twelve.

Saturday, 3 June, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Handley walkd to Bath directly after breakfast and sent the Coach up (at my Aunt’s request) to take us to Bath.  My Aunt P and the girls walkd about the garden till it came, and then we all went down in it.  My Aunt Neate went directly to my mother’s, to whom my Aunt P had sent a message by Mr Handley (who very kindly said he intended to call on her), to beg she and Emma would meet us at the Museum, but before we went there my Aunt P and I walkd over every part of Bath that was worth the girls seeing. Went to the Pump Room, the private Baths and the upper rooms,  and then joind my mother, Emma and my Aunt Neate at the museum, which is extremely well worth seeing, but we had not time to examine every thing.  We saw Mr Handly in Bath, who was going over to Clifton to see Lord Manson, but returns in the evening.  We also saw Miss Workman for a minute, who had heard from Mr Broughton about the Jones’s and went home to fetch the letter for my Aunt to see.  We went to Barratts for Fanny Handly to write to her brother and she and I ran to the Post Office with the letter, which was in good time.  We did not get home to dinner till six o’clock, a good deal tired, but our dinner rested and refreshd us and as soon as it was over we took a walk across the fields by Farmer Sandals, thro the village as far as Farmer Pritchard’s and returnd home by the road, about four miles.  The girls were delighted with the views.  We met the Miss Dacres returning from their walk as we went out.  It struck nine just as we came home to tea, after which the girls amused themselves looking at the shells and marbles.  We waited supper till eleven o’clock for Mr H, who arrived in the middle of it just as we began to give him up.  We went to bed at twelve, a little tired.  I brought my boots home from Bath.  My Aunt heard from dear Mrs Vassall.

Sunday, 4 June, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Handly expected a letter from London today and as soon as breakfast was over walkd towards Bath to meet his servant, who he had sent to the Post Office.  As soon as he was gone we read prayers.  Mr H soon returnd with the disagreeable intelligence that they must leave us today.  He had ordered his horses at one o’clock, which was a great mortification to the two girls, who were in hopes he would have been able to go to the Gala tomorrow night.  My Aunt had an early dinner for them and they left us with apparent regret at half past two, intending to go as far as Speen Hill if they could.  Mr Wiltshire calld and staid half an hour with us.  My Aunt Powell and I took a walk at six o’clock. We calld at Mrs Noyes to fix a day with them to dine here, but they were at dinner, so we could not see them.  We went on nearly as far as Catherine Church, by way of seeing the beautiful Vale of Catherine, which is quite equal to all that is said of it, for it is indeed picturesque and beautiful to the greatest degree.  On our return we met Mr Littlehales and Miss Dununic, a very pretty girl, to whom Mr L introduced my Aunt and soon afterwards Mr Walters, Sophia and three of the Miss Dacres, then Mrs Walters and Miss Dacres and near Farmer Pritchard’s Lady E Littlehales, Mrs Noyes and little Ben.  They could not fix any day for coming here as Lady Elizabeth expects her brothers, the Duke of Leinster and Lord W Fitzgerald at Bath to stay a week at the York House and she goes there to meet them.  We came home to tea, very much tired, having walkd nearly six miles I think.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper and Maria Jones.  The former says Mrs Porcher and the children are to be at Weymouth next Friday to stay a month and the Hendersons return there tomorrow with their family to stay as long as the Colonel does I presume.

York House, early nineteenth-century. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
York House, early nineteenth-century. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Monday, 5 June, 1809

A most tempestuous day with violent  showers.  I gatherd a nice nosegay for my mother and my Aunt sent her some asparagus with it.  My Aunt sent to ask the Workmans to come for a day or two, but the afternoon was so wet, they sent word they would come up tomorrow.  I workd all day and in the evening.  My Aunt wrote to the Workmans and Cooper and I a note to my mother.

Tuesday, 6 June, 1809

A cold day with high wind and showers and very wet in the evening.  The Workmans walkd up soon after breakfast.  I workd hard all day cutting out and fitting a muslin pelisse for my Aunt P.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He brought me a note from my mother.  My Aunt P had a parcel from Maria Jones containing a letter for herself, one for the Workmans, one for Mrs Horne and a justification of Mr Jones’s conduct, written by himself, which Maria desired might not be seen by any one but Mrs Beckford and ourselves.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening.  I workd.  My Aunt P wrote to Mrs Vassall and Minah Warren.

Wednesday, 7 June, 1809

A finer day than yesterday but cold and some hard showers.  I workd all day, partly for myself and partly for my Aunt P.  I finishd my gown.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at dinner and sat half an hour.  He sufferd a great deal of pain in his back.  My Aunt P wrote a note to Mrs Horne and enclosed Maria Jones’s letter to her.  My Aunts and the Workmans sat down to Quadrille before tea and playd all the evening.  I workd and wrote and read the Bath paper, which George brought from Bath.

Thursday, 8 June, 1809

A very wet morning, but it cleard about one o’clock and was fine the rest of the day.  Poor Mary Workman was very unwell and did not get up till the evening.  She fancied she was going to have the Scarlet Fever and begd Mr Croak would call, which he did before he went to Bath and laughd at the idea of her having a fever.  He said it was only a cold, which would soon be better.  My Aunt P and I walkd as far as Mrs Beckford after dinner, but the road was so muddy we were obliged to cross the fields.  We met Mrs Horne at Mrs Beckford’s, who lookd very ill.  We came home to tea.  Just as we reachd our own gate we met Mr Walters and had a little chat with him.  We found my Aunt Neate and the Workmans at tea.  Mary was not well enough to play at cards.  I workd and we went to bed early.  Mr Croak calld again to see Mary Workman.  My Aunt P wrote to Mrs Bastard and enclosed a note to Cooper from Elmsly.  She heard from Fanny Handly.

Friday, 9 June, 1809

A very wet day.  Mary Workman a little better.  Mr Wiltshire calld and sat half an hour.  Mr Croak came to see Mary W before dinner and found her much better.  I workd all the morning altering a gown.  My Aunts and the W’s playd Quadrille in the evening and I workd.  I was not very well and took some magnesia in the morning and drank brandy and water at dinner and supper.  My Aunt P wrote to Maria Jones.  She had a note from Mrs Beckford and one from Cooper.

Saturday, 10 June, 1809

Most violent showers with sunshine occasionally.  Mary W a good deal better.  I finishd my gown.  I went into the garden to search for a white rose, it being the tenth of June, but could not find one.  Mr Croak calld to see Mary Workman.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening.  I trimd my cap.  We had some strawberries after dinner for the first time this year.

Sunday, 11 June, 1809

A showery day, so much so we could not go to church.  Mr Wiltshire and Sir George Colebrook calld.  My Aunt P, Rebecca and I walkd in the garden before dinner.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay and sent it to my mother.  We went into the garden again after dinner.  Mr Croak calld before tea and staid an hour.  I wishd it had been two or three, he was so very pleasant and amusing.  In the evening my Aunt P read Mr Hendy’s sermons and essay to us, which are delightful.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Vassall.  I wrote a note to my mother.

Monday, 12 June, 1809

A fine morning but showery afterwards.  Rebecca and I walkd to Bath.  We parted at Guinea Lane.  I went directly to my mother’s, found her and dear Emma pretty well.  I assisted Emma in making a gown.  Dined and staid with them till seven o’clock.  Emma went with me to the Post Office, where we met George, who had been to my mother’s and followd us there.  I parted with Emma at the top of Broad Street and fortunately got home without rain in very good time.  The Road was very slippery coming back.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening.  I playd for my Aunt P a short time.  Mr Croake calld to see Mary Workman and also saw and prescribed for Hunter, who is very ill.

Broad Street from Lansdowne Road, Bath, mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery)
Broad Street from Lansdowne Road, Bath, mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery)

Tuesday, 13 June, 1809

A very fine day.  Rebecca W walkd to call on Mrs Croak and when she came back my, Aunt P, she and I calld on Lady Colebrooke.  We saw her Ladyship, Sir George, Mrs Trail and Mrs Walters.  As we were returning we met Mr Wiltshire who had just left the villa.  He was in very good spirits and had a long chat with us.  I workd all the evening.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille.  My Aunt P heard from Mr Bussell.  She wrote to Cooper with a statement of his debts here.

Wednesday, 14 June, 1809

A fine morning, but it began to rain about three o’clock and pourd for two hours and continued raining almost all the evening.  Miss Wiltshire calld and sat two hours.  My Aunt went with her to Bailbrook. They only saw the Admiral.  The ladies were all gone to the music in Bath.  Miss W returnd with my Aunt and had some luncheon and then walkd to Shockerwick, but I fear did not get home before the rain began.  Poor Mary Workman was very unwell again in the afternoon.  She has caught a fresh cold and complains very much, but was well enough to play Quadrille in the evening with my Aunts.  I wrote a note to my mother, my Aunt one to Mr Allen and George took them to Bath.  He brought back some knotting of my mother’s to whiten.  Lady Durbin calld and sat some time.

Thursday, 15 June, 1809

A fine day.  Miss Workman very indifferent.  They were to have left us today, but my Aunt persuaded them to stay till Saturday.  My Aunt P, Rebecca and I walkd to Bath.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Beckford in our way down.  Saw only her.  Met Mrs Eyre in the street and had a long chat with her.  Saw Mr Wiltshire.  I also saw Colonel Andrews and Lady Catherine West, but did not speak to either of them.  We did a great deal of business and then went to my mother’s where we had some excellent bread and cheese and my Aunt wrote a letter, which Emma and I took to the Post office.  From there we went to Miss Workman’s lodgings, where Rebecca was waiting for us and then walkd home.  My mother and Emma came as far as Walcot Parade with us.  We were all very much tired when we got home, but particularly my Aunt P and me, for we had not sat down more than half an hour since we left home in the morning and did not return till six o’clock.  We calld on Mrs Davis, saw her and the Dr, the latter my Aunt asked to dine here tomorrow.  I got some white ribbon to trim my cap and began it in the evening, while my Aunts and the Workmans were at cards.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper.  She heard from him and Maria Jones.  When we came home from Bath we found Mr Croake here and we met Miss Bower in the road looking remarkably well.

Friday, 16 June, 1809

A beautiful day.  I gatherd an immense quantity of flowers to put in the drawing room and library and then finishd trimming my cap.  My Aunt P and I went up into Alford’s garden to get some peas, but they had not any.  Mr and Mrs Noyes, Sir Edward and Lady Elizabeth Littlehales, Sir George Colebrook and Dr Davis dined here.  Little Ben came while we were eating our desert.  We expected the Walters’s and Mrs Melmoth in the evening, but they sent an excuse.  My Aunt had Gurney from the rooms to assist George, who waited extremely well and the dinner went off very well, without any confusion.  Sir Edward’s servant also waited.  Dr Davis went away directly after tea, the rest of the party not till near eleven o’clock.  They did not play cards, but amused themselves with looking over the prints, the missell and painted cards.  Upon the whole it was a stupid sort of a day and I was very glad when it was over.  We had our supper as soon as they went away.  My Aunt wrote to Maria Jones.

Saturday, 17 June, 1809

A fine morning with a very high wind, but it became very gloomy about three o’clock and continued so the rest of the day.  I gatherd a nice nosegay for the Workmans, who left us soon after breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Walters calld to make apologies for not coming yesterday evening and while we were at luncheon Mrs Adams (of Totnes) and Miss Matilda Dacres calld and staid a long time.  They were both very pleasant.  They walkd about the garden and Mrs Adams begd a few roses.  I gatherd her a great number and also a quantity of honeysuckles.  Miss Adams is with her at Bailbrook, but did not come here.  They stay there till Tuesday.  I wrote a good deal in the morning and workd in the evening.  The Miss Workmans sent us word Mr  and Mrs Broughton arrived about an hour after they got home, staid two hours with them and then went on to Bristol.

Bailbrook House c.1870 via Bath in Time.
Bailbrook House c.1870 via Bath in Time.

Sunday, 18 June, 1809

A beautiful day.  The first summer weather we have had.  My Aunt P and I went to church.  Sir Edward Littlehale’s carriage was at Mr Noyes door to take them away. It would have been decent, I think, if they had staid till tomorrow, particularly as they were going for amusement, not from necessity.  We saw Lady Colebrook, Miss Sutherland and Mrs Melmoth as we were coming out of the church.  Mr Wiltshire calld and sat half an hour.  As soon as he was gone my Aunt P and I walkd to Bailbrook to call on Mrs Adams.  We took George with us to protect us from their cow, but she was so violent we were afraid to venture and went all round by the Gloucester Road and found it intensely hot.  Saw Mrs and Miss Adams, the Admiral and Mrs Dacres, Miss D, Miss Eleanor and Miss Matilda and a Mr Wise.  Mrs D was in my opinion extremely rude but I believe it is natural to her and she does not know how to be otherwise.  Miss Eleanor very kindly said she would walk across the field where the cow was with us, as she was not afraid of her.  Mrs Adams, the Admiral, Misses Eleanor and Matilda were very pleasant.  The rest of the party not at all so.  The eldest, Miss Eleanor and one of their servants walkd to the gate with us which saved our going all round by the road.  I walkd in the garden after dinner and gatherd an immense bunch of roses, which my Aunt sent up to Bailbrook, as they complaind they had not any and were particularly fond of them.  My Aunt P and I took two turns in the garden after tea, but it was too cold and damp to stay out and I read and wrote in the evening.  My Aunt had two letters from Cooper and one from Mrs Porcher.  My Aunt sent my mother some veal olives.

Monday, 19 June, 1809

A very fine day but intensely hot.  We all three walkd to Bath at twelve o’clock and went thro Lambridge fields to avoid the dust.  My Aunt P and I went to Mr Clarke’s on business for Cooper.  sat half an hour with my mother and then went to the Workmans, who were very desirous we should stay and dine with them.  My Aunt was half inclined to do so, but at last determined to return home to dinner, which I was very glad of, as we have so much to do and so short a time before we leave the villa, most probably for ever.  We returnd the same way, across the fields and had great difficulty in getting over one of the stiles and were very much indebted to three young ladies who were sitting on the grass by it, who came in the most obliging manner possible and assisted us.  We did not get home till past six and were so much tired we went to bed before eleven.  I fancy it must have been the heat that fatigued us so much, for we had not so much walking as usual.  We met John Wiltshire in the road who stopd and spoke to us and Major Coffin in Bath, who was extremely friendly and had a very long chat.  My Aunt P wrote to Cooper.

Tuesday, 20 June, 1809

A beautiful day.  I had not time to be out much, which probably was fortunate as the sun had intense power.  John Wiltshire calld but did not stay long.   He was so kind to say he would bring our letters.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay and sent to my mother by George and two nice seedling geraniums to dear Emma.  We were engaged all day collecting things and packing them.  A party of four ladies and a gentleman came after dinner to see the house, which my Aunt would not consent to, but allowd them to walk in the garden and they said they should apply to Mr Clarke for a ticket.  I trimd a cap for my Aunt P in the evening.  We had an invitation from Mrs Walters to go there Friday, but my Aunt sent word she was engaged.  She wrote to Cooper and heard from Minah Warren and poor Maria Jones, poor dear.  Mr Jones’s fate was decided yesterday.  He is  sentenced to be imprisond in Newgate for three years. Whether he is to refund what he got or be fined we have not yet heard. I would not give back a penny if I was him, except I was obliged to do so, which I sincerely hope he is not [Valentine Jones Trial].  I wrote a note to my mother.

Wednesday, 21 June, 1809

A beautiful day.  We were all engaged the whole of it packing.  I gatherd a nosegay before breakfast, but did not go out afterwards. We were very much tired in the evening and went to bed early.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Vassall and notes to Mrs Beckford and the Workmans.  I had a note from my mother.

Thursday, 22 June, 1809

A very fine day.  We were faggd to death packing.  Samuel brought his cart and took a good many of the things that were done to his house, where my Aunt has hired a room at three shillings a week to put them in till she gets a house.  We were so tired my Aunt Neate went to bed before supper, and my Aunt P and I very early.  She heard from Cooper and a note from Mrs Beckford, which she answerd. The peaple who came the other evening to see the house, came again today, with a ticket from Mr Clarke but, as Cooper said in his last letter, he would not let it, but sell it in September by Auction.  My Aunt did not admit them, at which they were rather angry.

Friday, 23 June, 1809

A beautiful day, but intensely  hot.  Samuel took a great many more of the things down in the course of the day and I don’t think there is above one load more to go.  We were all dreadfully tired, notwithstanding which I gatherd a nice basket of strawberrys to take to my mother tomorrow.  Two of Mr Walters’s sons calld, but were not admitted.  We received an invitation to dine at Admiral Dacre’s next Tuesday, but my Aunt sent an excuse, and at the same time, a very large bunch of roses to the young ladies, which I gatherd.  We all went to bed without supper.  My Aunt P sent my mother a loin of pork and I wrote a note with it.

Stipple engraving of Vice-Admiral James Richard Dacres RN (1749-1810)
Stipple engraving of Vice-Admiral James Richard Dacres RN (1749-1810)

Saturday, 24 June, 1809

A very fine day.  We all three went to Bath in the Coach directly after breakfast, calld in our way at Strong’s, where my Aunt P got out to see how things were placd and at the same time sent a message over to Molly.  She orderd some flowers at a woman’s at the top of Walcot hill.  From there we went to the Workman’s, where my Aunts got out and I went on to my mother’s, to whom I took a beautiful nosegay, some strawberrys, some chocolate, a few pieces for her patchwork and a bottle of Lavender water, and to Emma a workd Tucker and a bottle of Lavender water.  After going to the Post Office and getting some stamps for my Aunt, I went to the Workman’s, who were very low, on Mr Jones’s account.  From there we went to my mother’s, where we left my Aunt Neate and we went to do a great deal of business.  Calld on Mr Clarke and while we were waiting to see him, Mrs Hyde Clarke came in and was shown into the room where we were.  She was very polite and chatty.  We went to Miss Edgells, where my Aunt took her lilac and a white Parse net gown to be made.  We did not get back to my mother’s to dinner till half past four and dined on very nice pickled salmon that my Aunt bought at Andrews’s.  As soon as dinner was over, we went out again and Emma with us.  I got three pair of stockings at sixpence a pair and my Aunt bought some gloves, ribbons and four loaves of very nice sugar and some for preserving.  We went into almost every shop in Bath to try to get a blue muslin for a gown for my Aunt, but could not get one she liked.  We went back to tea at my mother’s and the coach came for us at nine o’clock.  We calld at the Workmans and brought them home with us to spend tomorrow.  I was a good deal tired but not half so much as with the packing.  We did to go to bed till after twelve o’clock.

Sunday, 25 June, 1809

A very hot day.  We had some excellent coffee at breakfast that my Aunt bought yesterday.  The Workmans and my Aunt walkd in the garden after breakfast.  Mr Croake came to see Hunter and thought her a little better.  Mr Wiltshire calld and had some bread and cheese.  We had an invitation from Lady Colebrook to drink tea there tomorrow to meet the Dacres, but my Aunt declined it.  I gatherd an immense nosegay for the Workmans to take home with them.  They left us a little after eight.  Soon after they were gone, Mr Lewis of the village and a Mr Phipps came to enquire if my Aunt could tell the latter where to find Sir John Miller, which she could not do.  My Aunt P had a very distressing letter from dear Mrs Vassall with a melancholy account of Betsey Blenman’s illness, but it also told us that William is promoted and appointed to the 6th of Foot, which is a great happiness to our beloved Mrs V.  My Aunt wrote to her.

We have all been so much taken up packing and sending my Aunt’s furniture away that I have not had a moment to write for this whole week, in the course of which we have had invitations from the Dacres’s and Colebrooks to dine and from the Walters to tea.

There appear to be no entries from 26 June to 2 July 1809

Fashion plate for July 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for July 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Monday, 3 July, 1809

A showery day.  We got up early to be off time enough to reach Weymouth this evening.  I gatherd a nice nosegay to take with us.  We left Bath Easton about half past eight and should have compleated our journey in the day, had we not been detaind at Ainsford Inn three hours for want of horses.  We did not reach Dorchester, in consequence of this delay, till half past ten.  We drove to the Inn where we had some very good tea and went to bed.

Tuesday, July 4, 1809

A very wet day.  We breakfasted at Dr Cooper’s, where we saw him, his wife, mother and Grace, who is just as good humourd as she used to be.  Miss Geatman came in to see us before we left Dorchester.  Morgan was not at home.  It fortunately did not rain at all the whole way to Weymouth, so that we were able to walk down Ridgeway Hill.  Mr Bussell received us in the kindest and most friendly manner,as he always does.  Not so the Colonel.  He was very distant and, in my idea, not at all glad to see us.  Mr Porcher, Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mrs Henderson and Mr Atkins came in to see us.  Major Durbin, a Mr Grimes (a pleasant young man who is in the 16th Dragoons), Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson dined here and Captain Gyllett came to tea.  My two Aunts, Mr Grimes and Cooper playd Whist, I wrote to my mother and the rest of the party amused themselves as they liked.  Miss Lintern came in after dinner, but did not stay more than half an hour.

Wednesday, 5 July, 1809

A very showery day, but fine between.  Cooper went out before breakfast and did not return till just time enough to dress for dinner.  He dined at Mr William Williams’s.  Captain and Mrs Nash, the Simmons, Davis’s, Bastards, Captain Chivers, Mr and Mrs Barnard, Mrs Cornwall,  Miss White and Mr Atkins calld.  As for Mrs Henderson, she runs in and out of the house like a puppy.  Mrs Porcher also came and I was really happy to see her looking so much better than she did when we saw her last.  Mr and Mrs Williams of Herringston did us the honor of calling, but I did not see her till afterwards at Mrs Henderson’s, where my Aunt P and I went to see John, who is confined to the house from having dislocated his elbow.  She was formal, as was I.  My Aunt P and I walkd up to Mr Porcher’s, where we saw all the family except Mr P and all looking remarkably well.  Mr Bussell dined with us. He, my Aunt P and I drank tea at Mr W Williams’s, where we met the Herringston family, Mr Geatman and Mrs Porcher, Mrs Henderson and Cooper, whose conduct with Mrs Williams was very extraordinary!! not to say indecent.  Mrs W invited us to dine at Herringston next Thursday, which my Aunt agreed to very coldly, and which she complaind to Cooper and pretended  to be very much affected.  We came home to supper and Cooper went to bed immediately.

Thursday, 6 July, 1809

A showery morning, but fine afterwards.  Captain Simmons calld, as did Mr Terry and Mr Roots.  My Aunt and I calld on Miss White, who was not at home and Mrs Cornwall, who was.  The Porchers, Mrs Henderson, Mr Phillips, Mr Bussell, Captain and Mrs Scot, Mr Scot and Morgan Geatman dined here.  The Simmons’s, Mrs Bastard, Mr Hickman and Miss Lintern came to tea, as did Dr Cooper accidentally.  We had Whist, Cassino, a round game and Chess.  I lost four or five shillings at Speculation.  The Porchers and the Scots went home before supper.  The rest of the party staid, but not late.

Friday, 7 July, 1809

A terrible wet day.  I found Mrs Henderson here writing with Cooper when I came down.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  The Bastards, Porchers and Captain and Mrs Scot calld.  The two latter staid all the morning playing Chess.  Cooper dined at Broad Main about six miles off.  He was to have taken Mrs Simmons and Mrs Henderson with him, but when they calld for him he had not finishd his game, nor was he dressd, so he desird Mr Bussell to go with them and he would come after them with Mr W Williams, to the great disappointment and annoyance of Mrs H, who was quite in a pet.  However, he came back with her and that made it up.  We dined alone.  Captain Chivers came in while we were at tea and sat half an hour with us.  Cooper did not come home till near twelve and then not in a very good humour. I workd at my pelisse in the evening.  My Aunt P and I walkd a short time after dinner up and down the pavement before the house.

Saturday, 8 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell rode out early, so did not breakfast with us.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Nash, Mrs Davis, Mrs Sanders, Mrs Gylett and Mrs Scot.  Found only the two latter at home.  The Bastards, Mrs Henderson and the Porchers calld here.  Mrs P wanted me to go with her to Upway, but I was obliged to go to return these nasty visits. When we came home we found Captain Scot and Cooper playing Chess.  The latter dined at Mr Scot’s.  We dined at home alone and drank tea at Captain Simmons, where we had an elegant supper.  Met Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mrs Cornwall, Mrs Bastard, Mrs Henderson and Captain Waller.  There was only one Whist table and it was a stupid sort of an evening.  Mrs Porcher had the kindness to send the carriage to take us and bring us home at night.  Cooper did not return till after us.  He was in rather better humour, but not like what he used to be.  I wrote to my mother.

Sunday, 9 July, 1809

A fine day, but a very high wind.  Mr Bussell and Mr Roots breakfasted here.  Mr and Mrs Porcher calld and took my Aunt P and me to Wyke church.  On our return we sat some time with Mrs Henderson, who is confined to the house with a pain in her side and my Aunt Neate with a complaint in her bowels.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mr Atkins and his little girl calld.  Mr Grimes and Mr Bussell dined with us and Mrs Porcher came to tea and Mr P afterwards.  They did not any of them stay to supper.  Cooper shewd us a letter he received some time ago from Lady Burnaby.  Such a composition I never saw before, except in a novel.  He was in a tolerable humour.  Just before we went to bed my Aunt heard from Minah Warren and George Shirley.  Mrs Pritchard, Rebecca and Madelina came in the morning to see us.  Cooper rode to Dorchester but returnd to dinner.  Lady A Ward and  Mrs Kean Osborn calld.

Monday, 10 July, 1809

A showery day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, the Porchers and a Major Archer of the 16th calld.  My Aunt P and I sat some time with Mrs Henderson, a short time with Mrs W Williams and calld on Mrs Simmons, who was at dinner, so we did not go in.  We all (except my Aunt N who was not well enough to go out) dined and suppd at Mr Bastard’s.  Met Captain Nash at dinner and Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mrs Cornwall and Miss White in the evening.  Mr P, Mr B, Captain N and my Aunt P playd Whist, the rest of the party chatted and such conversation I never heard before, or could have supposed modest women would have listend to, but they were all delightd with it and not only listend, but joind in and enjoyd it.  I was delighted when we came home, for I never passd a more uncomfortable afternoon. Dr Cooper came over, but only staid a few minutes.

Tuesday, 11 July, 1809

A beautiful day, but extremely hot.  Mr Bussell and a Mr Urquart breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in as usual.  My Aunt P went into Mrs Henderson’s for a short time, as Mrs Porcher calld and took her to Herringston.  Miss Greenley, Major Archer, the Bastards, Captain Eckersall and Mr Jacobs calld.  I only saw the two latter.  I bathed in the warm bath for the first tine and sat half an hour with Mrs Henderson afterwards in my way home.  She was better.  My Aunt P, Cooper, Mr Bussell and I dined at Captain Scot’s.  Met Captain Waller, Mr Scot and Miss Cousins at dinner and Mrs Cornwall in the evening.  Cooper went away early to see Colonel Bastard, who arrived with his bride, her two sisters and Edmund today, to dinner.  He is extremely ill and came for Cooper’s advice.

My Aunt P, Mr Scot, Captain Waller and Mr Bussell playd Whist.  It was a stupid day, but not near  so disagreeable as yesterday.  In our way home we calld in at Mrs Henderson’s, where we found Cooper, who took great pain, as well as Mrs H to tell us he had not been there long.  Mr B wishd us good night at the door.  My Aunt N was gone to bed.  We had some supper after we came home.  My Aunt and Cooper returnd Lady A Ward’s visit.

Wednesday, 12 July, 1809

An intense hot day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us and Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  Major Durbin, Captain Staples, Mr Morant, Lord Cavan and Mr Arnold of the Isle of Wight calld.  They were just come on shore from their excursion to Plymouth Land.  C and Mr A saild again with the tide.  Mrs Bastard calld, but did not stay many minutes.  Cooper dined at Mr Bastard’s.  Mr Bussell dined with us and Captain Simmons came in in the evening and playd a Rubber of Whist with my Aunts and Mr Bussell.  Cooper came home before supper.  The band has not playd once since we came, owing to Mrs Wardle’s illness.  This place is not at all like what it was last year.  I have not known a happy moment since we came, and shall most heartily rejoice when we leave it.  Would to heaven we had never come to it.

Weymouth from the Lookout, Dorset, May 1812 by R. K. Robens (c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Weymouth from the Lookout, Dorset, May 1812 by R. K. Robens
(c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday, 13 July, 1809

A very hot day.  Mr Bussell and Major Archer breakfasted here, the latter a very gentlemanly, pleasant man.  I went to the Bath and afterwards, sat a little time with Mrs Henderson, who is better.  My Aunt and Cooper calld on Sir John and the Miss Smiths, who dined at the Hotel.  The Misses calld on us afterwards.  I never saw the elder daughter.  She is a very pleasant woman.  Only Mr Bussell and Cooper dined with us.  While we were at dinner, a Mr Trawbridge came in and sat half an hour.  He went home with the Smiths, the elder of which came in after dinner for five minutes.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  Mr Warne came in after tea to say Mrs Wardle was better, but did not sit down.  I read all the evening.  I bathed.

Friday, 14 July, 1809

A beautiful day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast, soon after which Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund calld.  When they were gone, my Aunt and I calld on Mrs Henderson and Mrs Simmons. The latter was not at home.  We then went up to Lady Hawkin’s where we sat some time.  Cooper joind us there.  In our way back we met Mr Grimes who stopd and had a little chat.  Mrs Jacob, Miss White, Mrs Porcher, Mrs Buxton, Mrs Charles Buxton, Miss Wheatley and Captain and Mrs Simmons calld.  The two latter had some luncheon with us.  My Aunt and I walkd to the end of the Pier.  She was tired and came in.  I should have liked to have walked an hour longer.  Cooper and Mr Bussell dined at the Mess, we three alone.  Mrs Porcher came and asked my Aunt to walk, which she did.  I hate walking in an evening, so did not go.  Cooper came home just as we were going to tea, Mr B some time afterwards.  My Aunt Neate playd Chess with Cooper till Mrs Henderson sent for him.  Rather an extraordinary manouvre I think for a woman alone to do.  He staid about half an hour with her.  Mr B went home before he returnd.  I wrote a long letter to Emma and sent my mother four mackerel and four lobsters.

Saturday, 15 July, 1809

A very hot day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  We calld on Mrs Henderson, met Mr Porcher there and Mrs Nash came in as we were coming away.  I bathd and we afterwards calld on Mrs Jacob, who was not at home.  When we returnd we found Major and Mrs Archer, Miss Sweatenham and Captain Scot here and Mr Porcher came in soon afterwards.  As soon as they went away my Aunt and I went into every Milliners shop in the town to try to match my pelisse for something to trim it, but without success.  Mr Bussell went with us.  Major and Mrs Archer, Miss Sweatenham, Mr Grimes, Mr and Mrs Bastard, Edmund and Mr Bussell dined here.  Captain and Mrs Simmons and Miss Lintern joind the party at tea and all staid to supper.  It was the pleasantest day I have spent since we came, but not equal to any of last year.  Edmund and Miss S playd Backgammon.  There was a Whist and round table.  I lost two shillings.  The party went away about twelve.  Mr Grimes very kindly offerd me his beautiful little pony to ride, assuring me it was perfectly safe and gentle.

Sunday, 16 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr and Mrs Porcher very kindly took my Aunt P and me to Wyke Church again, where we were introduced to Mrs Chamberlain.  On our return we calld on Mrs Henderson, where we saw Captain and Mrs Scot who, with Miss Eupans? had just been to see us.  After we had had our luncheon Cooper, for the first time since we have been here askd us to walk.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Major Durbin were here at the time and we all crossd the water and walked on the ? for more than two hours. Mr B and the Major left us some time before we came over again.  I was compleatly tired. Cooper dined at Mr W Williams’s and Mr Bussell at the Mess, so that we were quite alone till tea time when Mrs Henderson came and drank tea, but went away very soon afterwards to receive Cooper, who sat some time with her before he came home.  Mr Bussell also drank tea with us.  The Band playd at Mrs Porcher’s.  It is the first time we have heard it since we came and we could hardly make out the tunes, the distance was so great.  The Esplanade was crowded.  Cooper came home while we were at supper and was in as good humour as he has been since we have been here, but his best humour is as bad as his worst was last year.  He did not sit up long.

Monday, 17 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  The Porchers, Bastards, Mrs Cornwall, Miss White and Captain Simmons went to Portland.  Mrs Bastard very obligingly asked me to be of the party, but I do not like water parties.  My Aunt, Cooper and I walkd to the Horse Barracks to call on Mrs Archer.  We only saw Miss Sweatenham.  The Major and Mrs P were out on horseback and we met the latter on our return.  Dr Cooper and Mr Bastard dined with us, but they both went away before tea and my Aunt askd little James Wilk and John Henderson to drink tea with us.  My Aunt and I playd at Casino with them till nine o’clock, when they went home.  I went into the warm Bath in the morning.  My Aunt Neate and Cooper playd Chess.

Tuesday, 18 July, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt P and I went to Market before breakfast and bought some flowers.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us, after which my Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Porcher and sat some time with her.  Mrs Archer and Miss Sweatenham calld to ask us to go to Lulworth with them tomorrow, but we were obligd to decline it, as we are engaged to dine at Mr Porcher’s. We had a large party with us today.  Sir John and Lady Hawkins, the two Miss Smiths, Major Durbin, Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson dined here and Mr and Mrs Porcher, Rebecca and Charlotte, Mr and Mrs Jacobs and Miss Whyte in the evening.  A tolerable pleasant day.  Lady Hawkins lookd lovely.  Mr Bussell made fierce and open love to Miss Smith and Mrs Jacobs was very pleasant. All the party, except Mrs Henderson, went away before supper.  She would have staid all night with all her heart after supper.  My Aunt Neate and Cooper playd five games at Chess, which lasted till one o’clock.  Mrs H was very loathe to leave while they were playing.  Mr Williams of Herringston calld in the morning.  I had a long letter from Emma.   I compleated my thirty   year today, but not near so happy a birth day as last year.  We had the Band play for the first time.

Wednesday, 19 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, soon after which my Aunt P and I calld on Miss Cussons, who very kindly shewd us all her apparatus for making shoes and says she will teach us how to make them. We then calld for a few minutes on Mr Porcher, where we met Mrs Henderson, who walkd to the warm Bath with us.  I Bathd as soon as we had our luncheon.  Mrs Porcher sent the carriage to take my Aunt P and me with Miss Whyte to return Mrs Barton’s and Mrs Chamberlain’s visits.  They were neither of them at home, luckily.  We met Mr Porcher and Cooper riding.  Mrs Henderson spelt very hard to be one of the party, but my Aunt would not ask her.  We all dined at Mr Porcher’s, where we met Mrs Henderson (indeed she went there with us) and Captain Chivers at dinner and Mr and Mrs Jacobs, Miss Whyte, Mrs Cornwall, Captain and Mrs Simmons and Miss Lintern.  They all staid to supper except Mr and Mrs Jacobs and Captain Chivers.  Mrs Henderson and the Simmons’s walkd home with us.  The Band playd at Mr Porcher’s.  I began a letter to William.  My Aunt P heard from Maria Jones.

Thursday, 20 July, 1809

A very fine day.  I got up early and finishd my letter to William and sent it up to Mr Porcher who is kind enough to say he will sent it for me.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain and Mr Scot came and playd Chess with Cooper.  Mr Porcher, Henry and Mr Du Pre calld.  My Aunt calld on Mrs Henderson and Mrs Jacob.  I did not go with her.  Major Archer, Mr and Mrs and Miss England and Morgan Geatmen calld, the three latter eat luncheon here.  I playd a game of Chess with Morgan and beat him.  Cooper and Mr Bussell dined at Mr Herbert Brown’s.  We had the Band in the evening and Charles and Madilina Porcher came in to hear it.  Mrs Henderson drank tea here, but as Cooper was not at home she went away directly afterwards.  John and little Jane came in with her.  Cooper did not come home till eleven o’clock and was not at all inclined to go to bed. He sat till near one o’clock. I had the most comfortable nights rest I have had since I came here.

Friday, 21 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Captain and Mrs Scot came to play Chess.  Captain and Mrs Nash and Miss Lintern calld.  My Aunt and I bathd.  We then came and had some luncheon and afterwards walkd on the Esplanade.  Mr Bussell and Mr Atkins joind us and the Colonel condescended to take one turn, while he was waiting for his horse.  We all dined at Mr Greenley’s.  Mr Bussell went on the box with us, Cooper and Mr Atkins in the other carriage.  Last year it would have been different.  At dinner we met Sir Mathew and Mrs Blackeston and Mr Ball.  Spent a pleasant day.  We returnd as we came between nine and ten.  Dr Cooper came over but did not stay long.  He was very friendly.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess after we came home.  I went to bed when Mr Bussell went away and left them playing.  I do not know what we should do but for the Chess boards, for Cooper is so uncomfortable and out of humour when he has nothing to do or when he is with us alone, that I am always glad to see him engaged at it.

Saturday, 22 July, 1809

An uncomfortable dismal looking day with now and then rain.  Mr Bussell and Henry Porcher breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons, Mr Vickers, Mrs Henderson and many other peaple calld.  We all dined at Herringston where we met Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mrs Henderson, Mr and Mrs Clavell, Miss Geatman and Morgan.  We sat down fifteen to dinner at a table not large enough for twelve and I really had not room to move and was obliged to cut my meat and then sit side ways to put it in my mouth.  I never was more uncomfortable.  We saw all the children, who are very much improved.  Mrs Flinn is looking so much better that I think she is likely to live much longer than Mrs Williams wishes.  We all came away at half past nine.  Cooper, Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson returnd with Mr and Mrs Porcher, Cooper would last year have returnd with us, but things are alterd since then.  We had a very pleasant ride.  It was a beautiful moonlight night.  Mrs H got out of the carriage at Mrs P’s and walkd home with Cooper, but did not come in here.

Sunday, 23 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  We did not go to church, as my Aunt P was not very well.  Captain Nash, Captain Sherston, Miss Lintern, all the Simmons’s, Mrs Sanders and Mr and Mrs Greenley calld. Allen very stupidly said “not at home” to the two latter, tho they saw us standing at the window.  My Aunt and Cooper took a long walk before dinner.  Only Cooper and Mr Bussell dined with us, but Lord Clinton and Mr Macintosh joind them after we had left the table and did not come up to us till near ten o’clock.  Cooper and Mr Bussell were very tipsy, but Lord Clinton did not appear at all so he did not go away till twelve o’clock and was extremely pleasant and gentlemanly.  The Band playd till past nine.

Monday, 24 July, 1809

An intense hot day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Cooper with Lord Clinton.  Mrs Porcher took us all and Mrs Henderson up to Radipole Lake to the field day of the 2nd Somerset, which they performed very well.  We afterwards went into the Riding school of the 16th, but my Aunt P and I were very soon satisfied.  I expected every moment the horses would get loose and run amongst us.  Mrs Archer was so kind to walk back to their rooms with us where we waited till the rest of the party joind us and Mrs Porcher’s carriage came back to fetch us, as she and Mrs Henderson went home when we went to see the horses leap.  On our return we calld on Mrs Porcher, where we met Mrs E Williams who afterwards calld on us, but we were not at home.  Mr and Mrs Clovel and Miss Richards also calld.  My Aunt and I walkd about and sat a little while with Mrs W Williams, where we saw Major Durbin.  Cooper and Mr Bussell dined at Mr Buxton’s.  Mr Porcher, Mr Atkins, his daughter and niece and Mrs Henderson dined with us and in the evening we had Captain and Mrs Simmons and Mrs Porcher with all the little Simmons’s, Cornwalls, Hendersons, Porchers and W Williams’s. A happier set never met before I believe.  They danced nine Couples till ten o’clock, when they sat down twenty two to supper and we all waited on them.  They were as merry as grigs.  The party all went away about eleven.  Mrs Henderson staid last and lingering as long as she could, in hopes Cooper would come home, but was obliged to go at last without seeing him, very much against her inclination it was evident.  She had not been gone more than five minutes when he came extremely drunk, but in tolerable humour.  He eat a very hearty supper and we did not go to bed till after twelve.  The Band playd.

View of the Town of Weymouth and the Isle of Portland, taken near the Cavalry Barracks at Radipole (British Museum).
View of the Town of Weymouth and the Isle of Portland, taken near the Cavalry Barracks at Radipole (British Museum).

Tuesday, 25 July, 1809

An intense hot day and in the evening there was violent rain and thunder at a great distance.  Dr Cooper, Mrs Bussell and Henry and Charles Porcher breakfasted here.  Cooper was not in good humour before breakfast but mended afterward.  I bathd and in going met him coming out of Mrs Henderson’s.  He walkd to the Bath with me, an honor he has not conferrd this year before.  Mrs Porcher and Mrs Henderson sat here a long time after I came home from the Bath and Captain Sanders calld.  Cooper went to dine at Mr Phillips’s, about 16 miles off and is to sleep there.  Mr Bussell dined with us.  After dinner my Aunt, he and I joind Captain and Mrs Nash and Miss Lintern on the Esplanade and walkd till the rain drove us in.  Captain Chivers came in and sat some time.  Mr Bussell went away early.  My Aunt N and I playd two games at Chess, both of which I won.  We went to bed about twelve.

Wednesday, 26 July, 1809

A showery day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us and went directly afterward to Sydling.  Mrs Henderson sat some time here, with only me, and calld again afterwards.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Cooper returnd at four o’clock.  We had a large party at dinner;  Lord Clinton, Sir John and Mr Hawkins, Mr Buxton, Major Archer, Mr Grimes, Major Durbin and Mr Bussell.  Allen was not well and could not wait at table, so Cooper borrowd one of Mr Porcher’s men.  We had the best haunch of venison I ever tasted, sent to Cooper by Mr Wardell.  Captain Simmons came in the evening to play Whist and my Aunts, he and I playd two rubbers before the gentlemen came up.  They joind us at ten, some very drunk and some middlingly so.  Lord Clinton, Major Archer, Mr Hawkins and my Aunt P playd at one table, Sir John, Captain Simmons, Mr Grimes and Sir Robert Baker (who arrived from Bath this morning and joind the party before we left the table) playd at the other.  Mr Bussell and Major Durbin went away early.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess and I lookd on.  Cooper was very drunk, but much more kind than he has been since we came here.  Mr Grimes was so drunk that he fell asleep on the sopha before he went away.  Major Archer and Lord Clinton staid till past twelve and eat supper.  When they went away they found Mr Grimes fast asleep on the stairs.  Upon the whole it was the pleasantest evening I have spent since I came here.

Thursday, 27 July, 1809

An intense, hot, gloomy day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  I was taken very unwell after breakfast and was obliged to lay down on the bed almost all day. A great number of peaple calld, but I did not see them.  Cooper and Mr Bussell only dined here.  They and my Aunts spent the evening at Captain Nash’s.  I was not well enough to go, but took some Calomel at night, which was of great service to me.  I was kept awake till one o’clock by Mr Devenell who made more noise than he has done before.

Friday, 28 July, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Cooper in a quear kind of a humour.  He walkd a long time with Mrs Porcher and Mrs Henderson, after which he and Mr Bussell went to Jordan Hill.   My Aunt P and I calld on Lady Hawkins and Mrs Richards, neather of whom were at home.  We sat some time with Mrs Scot and Miss Cussons, who were very chearful and pleasant.  Cooper and Mr Bussell dined with Captain Chivers.  We dined alone.  Mrs Marsh and Miss Greenly sat some time with us to hear the Band.  Cooper came home about ten o’clock, not in a very conversable humour and went to bed before we had our supper.  He had been to see Mrs Henderson in his way home.  I heard from my mother and wrote to her.  Mr W Williams, Captain Simmons and Mr Porcher calld.  We saw Mrs Henderson while we were out, but cut her as soon as we could.

Saturday, 29 July, 1809

A gloomy day.  Mr Bussell and Henry Porcher breakfasted with us.  My Aunt Powell ? to ask Mrs W Williams how she did.  Captain Simmons, Mr Fickens, Mr Porcher, Mrs Pritchard and Madelina calld.  We dressd early and set off for Sydling about two o’clock.  Cooper went on horse back.  We calld at Dr Cooper’s in our way, intending to change horses at Dorchester, but were obliged to go on with the same, as there were none to be had.  We went slowly but safely.  Cooper was there before us.  We were very kindly received by all the family.  Mr and Mrs Williams of Herringstone dined and suppd there,  she playing all sorts of tricks with Cooper at supper.  There was a Casino table and music.  I was of the latter party.  It rained hard all the evening.

Sunday, 30 July, 1809

It raind before breakfast but was very fine the rest of the day. Mr Bussell came to breakfast.  We all went to church and afterwards divided into parties to walk.  My Aunt P, Miss Smith and Mr Bussell went on the Downs, Miss Emily and I contented ourselves with walking about the grounds, which are extremely pretty.  We staid out till it was time to go to church again, after which we had some lunch and walked and sat in the garden till it was time to dress for dinner.  Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mr Fener, Mr Trawbridge and Mr Bussell dined there.  In the evening we had music.  Miss Smith playd on the organ and sang to us, both which she does very well.  Mrs Adney drank tea there, but went away early.  The Hendersons and Mr Bussell staid till after supper and then went to Dorchester to sleep.

Monday, 31 July, 1809

It raind fast before breakfast, but was fine afterwards.  We had music and books in the morning and after eating some luncheon took leave of our kind friends, after spending two days very pleasantly and experiencing the greatest attention and kindness.  We drove to the Inn at Dorchester where we dressd.  Cooper overtook us on the road, as we were walking up Charminster Hill.  He got off his horse to hand us into the Carriage again!!!!!  We dined at Morgan Geatman’s where we met Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mr and Mrs Williams.  After dinner we went into the Dr’s for half an hour to take leave of old Mrs Cooper and Grace, who leaves Dorchester tomorrow.  There was Whist and Speculation in the evening.  I won three shillings.  Mrs Williams was in very ill humour at not sitting by Cooper at cards and hardly spoke a word.  He was obliged to coax and caress her to bring her round.  Cooper, us three and Mr Bastard sleept at the Inn,  where we went about twelve o’clock.

Fashion plate for August 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for August 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Tuesday,  1 August, 1809

A fine day.  The same party breakfasted at Mr Geatman’s.  My Aunt Powell and I sat an hour with the Coopers before we came home.  We left Dorchester about one o’clock.  The Hendersons overtook us and passd us on the road.  We calld on Mrs Porcher and Mrs W Williams, where we met Mr and Mrs Robert William, who was very friendly and obliging.  We had a large party at dinner, Lord Hinton, (who arrived to day), Sir Robert Baker, Mr and Mrs Phillips, Mr and Mrs Chamberlain, Mr Whately, Dr Cooper, Morgan and Frank Geatman and Mr Bussell.  Lord Clinton came in to shake hands with Lord Hinton, but did not stay five minutes.  We were rather crowded at dinner, but I was very comfortable.  Cooper kinder than he has been since we came.  The Hendersons joind the party in the evening and we had Whist and Speculation.  Cooper and I sat together and were partners.  A delightful pleasant evening.  I have not passd so chearful one since we have been here before.  I lost 5 shillings.  The party separated about twelve.

Wednesday, 2 August, 1809

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mr Porcher, Mrs Phillips, Miss Richards and Henry calld.  Cooper and Mrs P went on horseback to Dorchester.  We dined at Dr Cooper’s, where we met Mr and Mrs Porcher and Mr and Mrs Henderson at dinner and Morgan and Miss Geatman.  Afterwards Mr Bussell went with my Aunt P and me, as my Aunt Neate would not join the party.  We walkd up Ridgeway, soon after which one of the horses fell lame, so we got out at the beginning of Dorchester and walkd round the town to the Dr’s.   Mrs Cooper was very friendly and attentive to us.  Mr and Mrs Porcher and my Aunt and I left them between eight and nine and got home very comfortably.  The Porchers passd us on the road, but were not out of sight the whole way.  The rest of the party slept at Dorchester.  It rained when we got out of the carriage.

High East Street, Dorchester, Dorset by Allen, c.1860-70 (c) Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
High East Street, Dorchester, Dorset by Allen, c.1860-70
(c) Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday, 3 August, 1809

A showery day.  We breakfasted alone.  Mr Porcher and Henry and Captain Simmons calld.  Cooper rode over from Dorchester, but returnd there to dinner.  Dr Cooper came over and was in Weymouth all the morning.  My Aunt wishd him to dine here, but he said he could not.  While Cooper was having some luncheon, Lord Clinton and Mr Buxton came in.  Lord C, in best humourd manner possible, threw me his papers and said “there’s two news papers for you”.  They did not stay long.  We dined alone.  Charles Porcher, who goes to school tomorrow, came and drank tea with us and heard the Band.  Mr Bussell came home just before supper.  He was extremely tipsy.  My Aunt and I went out before tea to enquire about a house in Belle Vue for Mrs Skeen and I wrote the particulars to my mother.

Friday, 4 August, 1809

A very wet morning but it was fine afterwards.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Simmons and sat there more than an hour.  Both she and the Captain told us a great deal about Mrs Henderson’s improper conduct in the Winter and did not spare her at all.  Major Durbin calld and askd us to go and see a house he has taken for the Cox’s, who came today.  We met Captain and Mrs Naish in our way, who went with us.  The house is badly situated, as it has no view of the sea, but it is the neatest, cleanest and most compleat baby house I ever saw.  From there the Major went with us to Mrs Porcher’s.  She was dressing, but we went into her room and askd her to come and drink tea with us and go to the Quaker’s meeting, which she agreed to do.  Mr Bussell dined with us and we had scarcely done dinner when the Simmons, Porchers and Mrs Cornwall came to go with us to the meeting.  There was a very great crowd but we got very comfortable seats.  There were fine speakers, but only two women were inspired.  One spoke very well, the other very badly, in a terrible crying tone and stoppd every two or three words, as if she had lost her breath.  All the party drank tea with us but went away before supper.  Captain Simmons, Mr Porcher, my Aunt Neate and Mr Bussell playd Whist. We chatted and the children amused themselves with tricks and the cards.  After Mr Bussell was gone and my Aunt Neate had gone to bed and my Aunt P and I was writing, we heard a poor woman and child talking about sleeping on the steps.  We put up the window and after making a few enquiries found she was a soldier’s wife going to Guernsey and that nobody would give her a lodging.  My Aunt sent George to see if he could get one for her, but he could not, so my Aunt desird her to come in and sleep in the passage.  My Aunt gave them some supper and half a crown, for which the woman was very grateful. I finishd my letter to my mother but did not go to bed till two o’clock owing to the poor woman’s keeping us a long time talking.

Saturday, 5 August, 1809

A dismal day.  It did not cease raining half an hour the whole of it.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Mr Porcher and Dr Cooper calld.  Cooper came home from Mr Brown’s so compleatly wet he had not a dry thing about him.  Lord Hinton, Miss and Mr Greenley, Sir Robert Baker and Mr Bussell dined here.  Captain and Mrs Simmons and Captain and Mrs Gyllett suppd with us.  We had two Whist tables and Casino.  I playd Whist with Captain Simmons against Sir Robert and my Aunt P, and lost two rubbers.  Cooper very kind at supper, but so sleepy afterwards he was quite uncomfortable.  The Greenleys did not stay to supper.  The rest of the party went away before twelve.

Sunday, 6 August, 1809

A very rainy day.   Mr Bussell breakfasted with us, soon after which Cooper read the prayers to us.  Mr and Mrs Porcher and Mrs and Miss Cornwall calld.  Dr Cooper was here some time.  He took Cooper to Henningston where he was engaged to dine and sleep.  Lord Hinton came in wet thro.  He evidently came to be askd to dinner, but my Aunt did not chuse to take the hint.  Mr Bussell dined with us and as it was fine in the evening we had the Band.  My Aunt sat a little while with Mrs W Williams. After dinner Mr Bussell went away about eleven o’clock.  Mrs Scot, the Captain and his brother calld.

Monday, 7 August, 1809

An uncomfortable missling rain the whole morning.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Mrs Williams brought Cooper home in the carriage with her.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Cox, but did not find her at home.  We went to two or three shops.  Mr Urquart calld and sat some time.  Captain Simmons and Mr and Mrs Henderson calld. Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate till near dinner time.  Mr and Mrs Porcher, Dr and Mrs Cooper, Mrs and Mrs Henderson, Lord Hinton and Mr and Mrs Williams dined here.  It turnd out a beautiful evening. We had the Band and the Esplanade was crowded.  There was a Whist and Speculation table.  The rival Queens sat one of each side of Cooper but Mrs W was in the dumps because he did not play the same tricks with her as he did with Mrs H, who sat almost in his lap.  I won three and sixpence.  Mr Porcher and my Aunt Neate playd Chess while we were at supper.  Dr and Mrs Cooper went away about ten and Lord Hinton did not come up to cards.  The rivals were very much mortified that Cooper did not sit by them at supper, particularly the Henningston Lady, who was evidently quite uncomfortable.  After they were all gone and we were just going to bed, Lord H came in and staid half an hour.  Mrs Porcher pulld off her diamond hoop and garnet rings, which I wore all the evening and she told me she would leave them to me as a legacy when she died.

Tuesday, 8 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Cooper sent him to Dorchester to meet the Miss Smiths while he made the other way to dine and sleep at Sydling.  Captain Naish, Captain and Mrs Simmons, Lady Hawkins, Mr Maddison, Mr and Mrs Cox, Dr Gardiner and Captain Scot calld.  The four latter we did not see.  Mr Porcher came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Porcher, walkd a little while and then went to the Bath. In our way met Mr Chamberlain, who stopd and had a little chat with us. At the Bath we met Major Porcher, with whom we also had some very pleasant conversation.  Mr Bussell returnd to dinner.  We drank tea and spent the evening at Mrs Porcher’s, where we met Sir Robert, Lady and Miss Buxton, Major Durbin, Mr Atkins and Mr and Mrs Henderson.  We had some delightful music and spent a very pleasant evening.  When the Whist table broke up, my Aunt N and Mr P playd Chess.  Captain Chivers calld upon us after dinner and walkd up to Mr Porcher’s with us, but did not go in.  I heard from my mother.

Monday, 9 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Cox, who was not at home.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt P had a note from Cooper to say Lady Smith was very poorly, so he should not return today, tho he was engaged to dine at Mr Porcher’s and tomorrow at Mr Henderson’s.  Sir Robert Baker and Captain Simmons eat luncheon with us.  I have not seen the former in such spirits for some years.  While we were altogether in the parlour, Mrs Henderson came in.  She had heard Cooper was not coming home today and probably thought he might not return tomorrow, so she came to put off our dining there, till she was certain he was come back, which my Aunt agreed to very readily, but whether she thought my Aunt did it contemptuously, or whether she recollected how very rude it was, I do not know, but she began to palavor in her sycophantic manner, of her sorrow at not seeing us and then pretended to persuade my Aunt to go there, but she steadily refused and at last we got rid of her.  We all dined at Mr Porcher’s, where we met Dr and Mrs Cooper, Morgan and Miss Geatman and Mr Herbert Brown at dinner and Mrs Cornwall and the Hendersons in the evening.  There was Whist, Chess and music, but it was very stupid.  We did not come home till after supper.

Thursday, 10 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  My Aunt P and I went out.  We met Sir Robert, who took us to see Emma.  She looks very ill I think.  Captain Simmons went there with us.  A good many peaple calld in the morning.  We dined alone, as Lord Hinton wish Mr Bussell to go to the Mess with him.  I bathed.  Mr and Mrs Porcher went into Devonshire this morning for ten days.  My Aunt and I sat a little while with Mrs Pritchard and Rebecca.  It raind a little in the evening.  Mr Bussell came here to tea and did not go away till after supper.  There was the most tremendous lightning in the evening I ever saw. The heavens appeard to open and liquid fire fell continually.  It did a great deal of damage every where.

Friday, 11 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  My Aunt P and I walkd some time.  When we came home, we found Cooper just returnd from Sydling in a Chaise, as Allen had thrown the poor Bay horse down and broke both his knees.  Of course Cooper cannot ride him again.  Many peaple calld.  Cooper dined at Mr Herbert Brown’s, Mr Bussell with us and Mrs Cox and her friend Miss Holden drank tea with us, but went away before Cooper returnd.  Mrs Cox was really very pleasant.  Mr Bussell went to the Ball, but came back before supper.  We had suppd when Cooper returnd.  I wrote to my mother and bought three pigeons to send to her with some lobsters tomorrow, but unfortunately could not get any.

(c) Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Court House, Sydling St Nicholas, Dorset, 1784 (c) Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 12 August, 1809

A wet morning, but fine afterwards.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Captain Simons and Mr and Mrs Henderson came while we were at breakfast.  Mrs H returnd to have a little private amusement with Cooper before he went away.  He took leave of us with tolerable kindness, but not with half the affection he did with Mrs Henderson.  Mr Henderson rode as far as the Turnpike with them and she lingerd here till he was out of sight, Cooper I mean, for she never wishes to see her husband I am sure.  It being the Prince’s birth day there was all sorts of amusement going forwards on the sands and the greatest crowd collected I ever saw in Weymouth.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt P walkd to the Bath with me and waited there to walk back with me.  Mr Bussell dined with us and accompanied my Aunt P and me to the Vocal Concert at Harvey’s afterwards.  Major Durbin joind us as soon as we went in and Mr Atkins, Mr Roots and Mr Bensom came to talk to us.  We sat next to Sir John and Lady Hawkins, Miss Buxton and Mrs Nash.  I have not spent so pleasant an evening since we have been here.  The singing was delightful.  Unluckily, just before it was over, Mr Deveral came in and seated himself next to Major Durbin, who was sitting by me.  He was very tipsy and would talk very loud to the Major about his dining with him.  The Major tried all in his power to silence him, which he fortunately took in good part.  The Major very kindly saw us safe home, but would not come up.  Mr Devenal had some very good fireworks let off opposite our windows about eleven o’clock.  Henry Porcher, James Simmons and the two Cornwalls came in to see them.  They and Mr Bussell went away directly afterwards and we went to bed.

Sunday, 13 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  My Aunt P and I went to church in Weymouth and sat in Mrs Steward’s pew.  We afterwards calld on Rebecca Porcher, who was not very well and then on Mrs W Williams.  Captain and Mrs Simmons, Mary and Mr Atkins eat luncheon with us.  Mr Bussell crossd the water with us to see the fleet in Portland Roads, which lookd beautiful.  Mr McGillecuddy assisted us into the boat and went over with us. When we landed Mr B introduced him.  We met Captain Eckersall on the jetty who joind and walkd some time with us. Mr Bussell and Emma Baker dined with us and Madelina Porcher drank tea here.  The Band playd at the end of the pier, so that we could not hear a note.  My Aunt, the two children and Mr B went to hear it before tea, but it was so cold they did not stay long.  The children went home before supper.  Mr Herbert Browne and a Miss Drew calld, but we were not at home.

Monday, 14 August, 1809

A fine morning.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, soon after which Miss Cussons came to teach us to make shoes.  We went down into the parlor and said “not at home” to anyone.  She very kindly shewd us the whole process and my Aunt P and I sewd a shoe round between us.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Captain Simmons calld, but we did not see them.  It began to rain about two o’clock and continued the rest of the day and evening.  Miss Cussons eat some luncheon with us.  Mr and Miss Scot came to fetch Miss Cussons home.  He playd a game of Chess with my Aunt Neate and my Aunt P playd Spillikins with Miss Scot.  Mr Bussell dined with us and did not go away till after supper.  It was a dismal evening. There was a race in the sands between Mr Grimes’s pony and another.  Mr Grime’s was beat and we heard he lost a great deal of money.

Tuesday, 15 August, 1809

It raind most part of the morning and all the evening.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  We went into Mrs W Williams directly after breakfast to see two beautiful rugs she has got.  My Aunt N and I did not stay many minutes.  Mrs Henderson and Captain Simmons calld.  Miss Cussons came to finish the shoe, which she did so compleatly it is impossible to know it from a shoe maker’s.  Major Durbin calld.  We dined, alone as Mr Bussell went with the Hendersons to Herringston.  Mrs Pritchard, Rebecca, Madelina and Henry Porcher and Charles and Louise Williams and Emma Baker drank tea here.  We playd at Forfits and Lattering to amuse them.  They went away before ten o’clock.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Naish, Mrs Simmons and Mrs Davis.

Wednesday, 16 August, 1809

A fine morning.  Captain Chivers calld while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt P and I went out early and calld on Mrs Gyllet, Rebecca Porcher and Mrs Cornwall.  The latter was at dinner.  We also calld on Mrs Scot and met Miss Cussons there.  We walkd all the morning.  I went to the Bath.  When I returnd I found Mrs Cox here.  She staid some time and was very pleasant.  We dined alone.  Captain and Mrs Simmons and James, Captain and Mrs Naish, Captain and Mrs Gyllets, Captain and Mrs Scot and Mrs Cornwall drank tea and suppd here.  I playd Casino and lost six shillings.  The party went away at twelve, after which Dr Cooper came.  He had been sent for to see a lady at Scrivers.  The Chaise he came in brokd down in coming and they could not get another in Weymouth to take him back, so my Aunt lent him hers.  He had some bread and butter and soda water and did not go away till past one o’clock.  We had the Band.  Mr and Miss Coffin calld.

Thursday, 17 August, 1809

A fine day.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast and Mr Urquart and his son. Mr Friend and Mrs Henderson calld afterwards.  My Aunt and I walkd some time on the Esplanade and calld on Rebecca, but she was at dinner, so we did not see her.  Lord Hinton calld at the window and had a little chat.  We dined alone and went in the evening to Captain Simmons, where we met Sir R Baker, Lord Hinton, Lady A Ward, her son and daughter, Mrs Cornwall, Mr Atkins and Captain Walker.  They had only one Whist table.  The party did not break up till near twelve.  Mr Atkins had the kindness to walk home with us.  The Band playd before our windows.

Weymouth and Portland, near the Turnpike, Dorset by R. K. Robens, 1814 (c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Weymouth and Portland, near the Turnpike, Dorset by R. K. Robens, 1814
(c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 18 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  He returnd last night.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Miss Sweatenham came to ask my Aunt to go to the Ball tonight to meet her and Mrs Archer, which she agreed to do.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Coffin, Rebecca, Miss Cussons and Lady Hawkins, the two latter were not at home.  We walkd till five o’clock. Mr Bussell dined with us and Dr Cooper came in while we were at dinner and eat some, but went away before we had done.  While we were at tea my Aunt had a note from Mrs Archer to say the Major had received orders to embark at Portsmouth next Tuesday, for Spain of course.  They felt no inclination to go to the Ball.  Henry Porcher, Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson went with us.  Captain Waller joind us as soon as he came in, made our tea and continued with us all the evening.  He was particularly pleasant.  Captain Eckersall askd me to dance as did Mr Radber.  We spent a very pleasant evening and walkd home about half past eleven.  Mr Porcher’s carriage took us.  Mr Bussell went on with Mrs Henderson, but came back and staid here till we had done supper.  I heard from my mother.  My Aunt gave me a dark colored gown with a workd border.

Saturday, 19 August, 1809

There was a shower in the morning but it was fine the rest of the day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain and Mrs Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Miss Cussons, Mrs Scot, Mrs Archer and Miss Swetenham calld.  They had some luncheon with us.  Dr Cooper lookd in but did not come up stairs. Mrs Cussons stayed till three o’clock.  I went to the Bath.  When I came back I found Captain Cross here, who staid some time.  We all dined at Mr Henderson’s.  Met Lord Hinton, Major Durbin, Mr Grimes, Mr Atkins and Mr Bussell and Mrs Allen and her two daughters in the evening.  One of them, the most coarse, inconsequential, affected piece of goods I ever saw.  My Aunts, Lord H and Mr Bussell playd Whist.  The Major and Mr Atkins gave us some tunes on the flute.  We came home before twelve.  The Major, Mr A and Mr B came home with us.

Sunday, 20 August, 1809

A very wet morning, but it cleard about three o’clock and was fine the rest of the day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us, soon after which we read prayers at home.  Captain Simmons and James, Henry Porcher, the two Cornwalls and Miss Cussons calld, the latter to take leave, as she goes tomorrow morning.  James Williams also calld for a few minutes.  Mr Bussell and Henry Porcher dined with us and Mr W Williams came in for a few minutes while we were at tea.  Henry and Mr Bussell both went away before supper and we did not sit up late.  I wrote to my mother.

Monday, 21 August, 1809

A very wet morning but it cleard in the middle of the day and was fine.

Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Seargent Luxmore came to teach us to make shoes.  He shewd my Aunt how to cut them out.  She began a pair of white jean.  While we were at work Mrs Stevens and the Miss Eltons sent to let us know they were at Weymouth.  As soon as Luxmore went away my Aunt and I calld on Mrs Stevens.  We saw her, the two Miss Eltons and a Mr and Mrs Slade.  From there we went to Rebecca Porcher’s and staid a short time and afterwards calld on Miss Marker who was not at home.  We met Mrs Henderson on the staircase at Mrs P’s.  She said she had calld on us and I was very glad we were out.  We met Lord Hinton on the Esplanade.  He stopd and had a little chat.  Mr William Williams and Louisa joind and walkd as far as the hotel with us.  He calld in the morning, as did Captain Scot, to play Chess with my Aunt Neate.  We calld on Mrs Simmons to ask her to dine, but she was engaged.  Mr Bussell dined with us and went home before supper.

Lord Clinton and Sir Robert Baker calld.

Tuesday, 22 August, 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Luxmore came to go on with the shoes for an hour or two.  Rebecca sent the carriage for us. At one o’clock we took her up and went to hear Miss Marker sing and play, which she did very well and very good humourdly.  We staid with her half an hour then went back with Rebecca and brought her home to have a luncheon, where we found Captain and Mrs Scot and Mr W Williams.  While we were chatting with them, Mrs Stevens, Miss Elton and Mr Clutterbuck of Isleworth (who is visiting them) calld.  After they were gone, my Aunt and Mr Bussell walkd with me to the Bath.  While we were out Captain and Mrs Gyllet and Mrs Naish calld and we afterwards met Mrs Naish and had a long conversation with her.  Mr Bussell came to meet and walk home with us from the Bath.  He dined with us.  Mrs Pritchard, Henry, Rebecca, Madelina and Miss Marker drank tea with us.  Miss M sang us two songs and Rebecca playd, after which we had Lottery till the carriage came.  Mrs Pritchard had the kindness to take Miss Marker home.  We had our supper as soon as they were gone.

Wednesday, 23 August, 1809

A showery morning.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain and Mrs Scot came while we were at breakfast.  He sat down to Chess with my Aunt Neate and Mrs S went downstairs with us to take a lesson of Luxmore, who was with us all the morning and with his assistance my Aunt P and I finishd a shoe, but owing to the last being a bad one, it did not fit.  The Scots went away at one o’clock.  After Luxmore was gone my Aunt and I went out and walkd.  We met Mr Cross, who stoppd and spoke to us.  My Aunt gave me a very pretty straw bonnet.  Mr Bussell, Mrs Simmons and Mary dined with us and about nine o’clock Mrs Henderson brought all her children, the Porchers, little Maisie and the two Williams’s, dressd in masquerade.  Henry and John, two most excellent characters and very well supported, the former a nurse, the latter a housemaid.  We had dressd little Mary Simmons very well as a Nun, and she lookd and acted the part extremely well.  Mr W Williams came in and saw them.  The two Maids, Mrs Simmons and Mr Bussell staid and suppd with us, after which the boys went away and Mrs S and us three playd a very chearful pool at Quadrille.  Mr Bussell lookd on.  They went away before twelve.  I had a note from my mother to say she was to move on Thursday, next to Cross’s in the Abbey Green.

Thursday, 24 August, 1809

Some very hard showers in the morning, but fine between.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, directly after which my Aunt P and I went into Mrs Williams’s, where we staid an hour.  After we came back Captain Scot came and playd Chess and Major Durbin calld for a few minutes Mrs Henderson calld but we were up stairs at work, so did not see her.  After we had had our luncheon we calld on Rebecca Porcher and then my Aunt went part of the way to the bath with me.  I met Mr Bussell in returning.  He dined with us and went to the Play after tea and we did not see him again.  Mrs Simmons came in after dinner, but did not stay.  We were alone all the evening.  My Aunts playd Chess.

View of the entrance to Weymouth harbour, 1823 (British Museum).
View of the entrance to Weymouth harbour, 1823 (British Museum).

Friday, 25 August, 1809

Not a very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Scot came to play Chess.  Mrs Phillips and Mr W Williams calld, the latter sent in a most beautiful haunch of venison.  My Aunt and I calld on Mr Henderson, who has been confined to the house this week.  Met Mr Benson there.  We afterwards calld on Emma Baker and saw her Governess, who I do not at all like.  She appears to me a very forward, pert Miss.  We dined alone.  Mr Bussell was engaged at Mr Henderson’s.  We all three drank tea and suppd at Mr W Williams.  Met Captain Scot and a Mr Laupent.  The Captain and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.  Mrs W worked and my Aunt P and Mr Laupent playd Whist against Mr W  and me.  We neither lost or won.  Spent a very quiet, pleasant evening.

Saturday, 26 August, 1809

A very wet, uncomfortable morning and so cold my Aunt had the fire lit.   Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mrs Williams sent my Aunts a beautiful melon and a pine by Louise, who was here all the morning.  Captain Scot and Mr Williams came in and playd Chess.  Luxmore came and gave me a lesson of shoe making.  My Aunt went by herself to call on Emma Baker.  Mr Bussell dined here.  My Aunt P took Emma to the Play; quite a large group, the Scots and their children, Mrs Henderson and hers and Mr W Williams and his and Henry Porcher.  My Aunt did not come home till near twelve, but had been very much amused.  My Aunt Neate and I workd.

Sunday, 27 August, 1809

A fine day, but windy and cold.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  We read prayers directly after.  Mrs Henderson calld.  Only my Aunt N and I saw her.  My Aunt P and I calld on Rebecca and then at Mrs Stevens’s, where we sat more than an hour.  Mrs S told us the eldest Miss Elton is very soon to be married to Mr Clutterbuck.  We sat some time with Mrs W Williams and calld on Miss Simmons, but did not see her.  Mr Bussell dined with us and we had the Band in the evening.  The Esplanade was crowded.  Mr Bussell went away before supper.

Monday, 28 August, 1809

A beautiful day.  Mr Bussell rode to Sydling before breakfast. Mrs Pritchard calld and sat a little time while we were at breakfast and Captain Simmons came in directly afterwards and staid a long time.  I went up stairs and practiced shoe making.  Mrs Henderson calld, but I did not see her.  Sir Robert Baker came and sat more than an hour.  My Aunt took Emma with her to see the Lodge.  I did not like to go, because Mrs Henderson was of the party and is always forcing herself where ever we are, that the world may believe she is very intimate and a great favourite with us.  I went to the bath.  Emma Baker dined with us.  Mr Bussell dined at the Mess and I did not see him the rest of the day.  Emma went away at nine o’clock.  My Aunt Neate sent my mother some fine lobsters.  I wrote her a long letter in the morning and a note by the Basket.  I heard from her and also from James, relating to our Legacies, a copy of which I sent my mother in the Basket.

Tuesday, 29 August, 1809

A beautiful day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  My Aunt P and I went with Harry Porcher to Dorchester in his way to London.  He very fortunately got a place in the Mail.  Dr and Mrs Cooper were just going to set off for Weymouth to spend the day with the Hendersons.  They staid a few minutes and then they left us in possession of the house, as  we were obliged to stay till the houses were rented.  We walkd about Dorchester, bespoke some soles for my Aunt’s shoes and bought some needles and a pair of garters at Miss Manfield’s.  We met the Geatmans at the top of Ridgeway.  We stoppd to ask them how they did and soon afterwards met the Henningston Williams, but did not stop to speak to them.  When we came back we calld on Rebecca Porcher.  She was in good spirits and more glad to see us than usual.  From her we went to call on Mrs Allen, but she was just going to dinner, so we did not go up.  When we came home we found Mrs Williams here and soon after Mrs Cooper and the Dr calld and sat a little while with us.  Emma Baker dined here.  Mr Bussell was engaged at Mr Henderson’s.  Just as we were going to tea, Captain and Mrs Scot came in and my Aunt persuaded them to spend the evening here.  Emma went away early.  The Scots staid till after ten.  I wrote to my Uncle James.

Wednesday, 30 August, 1809

A very showery uncomfortable day, with a violent thunderstorm at four o’clock.  We got out between the showers and calld at Mrs Stevens’s, where we sat some time.  Mr Clutterbuck and Miss Mary Ann Elton were gone to Lulworth.  We then went to Mrs Allen’s and staid there a long time.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess.  Dr and Mrs Cooper, Captain and Mrs Scot, Major Durbin, Mr W Williams, Captain Chivers, Mrs Stevens, Miss Elton and Mr Bussell dined here on the finest haunch of venison I ever saw in my life, sent to Cooper by Mr W Williams.  Two Chess tables in the afternoon, but no cards.  All the party went away before supper, except the Scots, Mr Williams and Mr Bussell and they did not eat supper, tho we did.  We spent a chearful pleasant day enough.  I wrote to my mother.

Thursday, 31 August, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here and Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  He appeard to be very much out of spirits.  My Aunt and I calld on Rebecca Porcher, Mrs Simmons and Mrs Henderson.  The latter was gone on the water.  Mrs Nash calld, but we were out.  Mr Bussell dined here.  The Princesses arrived at the Lodge about five o’clock. We all drank tea and suppd at Mrs W Williams’s.  Met Mr Davis, Mr Lampert, Mr Pell and Mr and Mrs Henderson.  They had a Whist and Chess table.  Spent a pleasant evening.  The Princess Mary walkd on the Esplanade very late, but we did not see her.  The Band playd very late.  Mr and Mrs Coffin calld.

Fashion plate for September 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for September 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 1 September , 1809

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, as did Mr Urquart.  Captain Simmons, Mrs Allen, her two daughters, Mrs Warren, Mrs Naish and Mr and Mrs and Miss Urquart calld in the course of the morning.  We did not go out.  Mr Bussell dined with us and Miss Coffin drank tea here and went to the Ball with us, where we met Mrs Stevens, Mr Clutterbuck,  Miss M Elton, the Scots and Hendersons, besides many others we knew.  We staid till twelve o’clock.  As Mrs Stevens was so kind to send us there and home, we were obliged to stay her time. I did not find it half so pleasant as the first Ball we were at.  My Aunt Neate was not gone to bed when we came home.  The Band playd here.  I heard from James.

Saturday, 2 September, 1809

A fine morning, but very wet and cold afterwards.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Major Knott, Captain, Mrs and Mary Simmons calld. Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us, but in the evening we had Captain and Mrs Simmons, Captain Chivers, Mr and the Miss Allens, Mrs Warren and the Hendersons.  Captain Chivers, Mrs Simmons, my Aunt and I playd Quadrille, the rest of the party amused themselves as well as they could, but it was very stupid work.  They all went away before supper.  I wrote to my mother and sent her James’s letter.  Mr Friend sent my Aunt a brace of partridges.

Sunday, 3 September, 1809

A very fine day, but the wind very high and troublesome.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, directly after which my Aunt and I walkd up to see Rebecca.  They were at prayers, so we walkd up and down till they had finished and then sat sometime with them.  When we came back we read prayers and afterwards walkd a long time with Miss Coffin, Mrs Stevens, Miss Elton and Mr Clutterbuck.  Mr Bussell dined with us.  He went away before supper.  My Aunt and I sat some time with Mrs Williams in the morning.  I heard from my mother and wrote to her.  Mrs W Williams sent my Aunt a brace of birds.

Monday, 4 September, 1809

A fine day. Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mrs Pritchard, Madelina and Captain Simmons calld while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt and I calld on Rebecca and were then going to see Mrs Allen, when we met George Shirley, who was just arrived to spend a few days with us.  He is looking very well.  Only he and Mr Bussell dined with us.  While we were playing Quadrille in the evening, about nine o’clock, Cooper arrived.  We none of us gave ourselves the trouble to go to the door to meet him, but went on with our game till he came into the room and receivd him just as he did us, when we arrived.  He kissd us all, but so very coldly, that any one seeing him would have supposed he had been only a slight acquaintance.  We finished our pool and then I workd till the supper came.  Cooper went to bed when George and Mr Bussell went away.  Cooper brought some fare with him, but it stunk, so it was obliged to be thrown away.  The Band playd here.

Tuesday, 5 September, 1809

A fine day.  George and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons and Mr and Mrs Henderson came in while we were at breakfast.  I thought the two latter would never go away.  General Garth calld twice on Cooper, but would not come into the room where we were, as he wanted to speak to Cooper about the Princess.  I went up stairs and wrote to James.  Afterwards, George, My Aunt, Cooper and I walkd a long time on the Esplanade.  George introduced us to Sir Harry Neale.  Only George and Mr Bussell dined with us.  They playd Whist in the evening.  I workd and Mr Bussell snuffd the candles,  the only thing he is fit for.  Cooper was more obliging in his manner today than he was yesterday.  Lord Clinton was so kind to frank my letter to James for me.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess.  The band here.

Admiral Sir Harry Burrard-Neale (1765–1840), 2nd Bt by William Beechey (c) National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Admiral Sir Harry Burrard-Neale (1765–1840), 2nd Bt by William Beechey
(c) National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 6 September, 1809

A fine day.  George and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons and Mr Henderson came while we were at breakfast, directly after which my Aunt and I went out.  We met George in the market.  He walkd home with us.  My Aunt Neate went on board the yacht and frigate.  We were to have gone also, but were too late.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd to the Barnacle to see Major Knott, who was found very ill.  Mr Henderson and Mr Bussell went with us.  We saw Captain Eckersall’s room, the walls of which he has decorated with very elegant  figures.  Captain and Mrs Scot, Captain Walter, Lord Hinton, Mr Scot, George and Mr Bussell dined and suppd with us.  We playd Whist and Speculation.  I won 11 shillings. My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Stevens in the morning and Mr Clutterbuck calld here.  Mr Friend sent my Aunt a pheasant and Lord H sent her two braces of birds.

Thursday, 7 September, 1809

A showery day.  George and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast and soon afterwards Captain and Mr Scot. The latter playd Chess with my Aunt N. Lord Cavan calld and sat half an hour.  The Scots, Captain Waller, Mr Broughton the elder, George and all of us crossd the water and went to see Captain Eckersall’s room.  The old Major was better today.  We walkd to the end of the path and then came home.  We were rowd by two Post Captains and another steerd us.  My Aunt and Cooper calld on Lady E Dormer, Mrs Jeffries, Mrs Ball and Mrs Thackery.  Cooper went up to see Rebecca.  George Shirley left us this morning, for which I was extremely sorry.  His manner was so kind and affectionate that it reminded me of old times and recalld to my recollection some of the happiest days of my life.  We all dined at Mrs Steven’s, where we met only Captain Chivers and Captain Clutterbuck, who appears a pleasant young man.  He went away directly after tea and we sat down to cards,  my Aunt P and Cooper against Mrs Stevens and Mr Clutterbuck at Whist and the Miss Eltons, Captain Chivers, my Aunt Neate, Mr Bussell and I at Vignt.  I neither won or lost.  We came home to supper after having spent a very pleasant quiet day.

Friday, 8 September, 1809

A terrible wet morning. Cooper was to have gone to Herringston to shoot, but the weather was so bad he did not go till dinner time, but is to stay till Sunday.  Mrs Henderson came in before breakfast, but did not stay long.  Mr Broughton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here and Lord Cavan came and playd Chess with my Aunt N.  Lord Clinton, Spillikins with my Aunt P.  Captain Simmons and Mr Williams calld.  Mr Broughton and Mr Bussell dined here.  My Aunts and Mr Bussell drank tea at Captain Scot’s.  Mr Broughton went home when they went away and I workd hard all the evening.  I heard from my Uncle James.

Saturday, 9 September, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mr Porcher and Captain Naish came in while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt and I went up to Mrs Porcher’s soon afterwards, who we found very unwell with the tooth ache.  We calld on Mrs Stevens and sat half an hour.  Met Miss Coffin there.  Saw Captain and Mrs Scot and Captain and Mrs Simmons on the Esplanade, joind and went with them to the Straw Shop where my Aunt bought one as near like mine as she could get it.  We returnd altogether and parted by the Library.  Met Mrs Henderson and spoke to her, also Captain Clutterbuck and had a little chat with him.  I went to the Bath.  Soon after I returnd, Lord Cavan came and very kindly askd us to take a sail with him tomorrow, if it should be fine.  My Aunt and I declind it, but my Aunt N is to go.  Only Mr Broughton dined with us.  Mr Bussell went to Herringston and he did not stay to tea.  Major Durbin came in and took his tea with us, but went away soon after.  My Aunt P and I went to Mrs Coffin’s for a few minutes, to ask Miss C to go with my Aunt N tomorrow, with which she was very much pleased.  I workd hard all the evening.  Major D sent my Aunt two brace of birds and a hare.  Mr and Mrs Ball and Miss Green calld.

Sunday, 10 September, 1809

A very wet morning.  Major Durbin and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Miss Coffin came with the idea of going to sea, but the weather was too bad.  Lord Cavan came and staid almost all the morning, playing Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Cooper came home about two o’clock.  Captain Clutterbuck, Mr Porcher and Mrs Thackery? calld, as did Lord Cavan again, in the most friendly and pleasant manner.  My Aunt and I went into Mrs Williams’s for a short time, saw Mr Lampert and Mr Pell there.  It cleard up about three o’clock and was very fine the rest of the afternoon.  We had a large party at dinner, Lord Cavan, Lord Clinton, Lord Hinton, Major Durbin, Captain Chivers, Mr W Williams, Mr Hodges, Mr Mitchell, Mr Nicholls (the two latter the vulgarest wretches I ever saw)  and Mr Bussell.  Cooper was not in spirits and tho there was a great deal of noise there was (to me) no chearfulness or pleasure.  Lord Cavan, Lord Clinton, Mr Hodges and Major Durbin were as polite and quiet as possible.  Most of the rest, noisy and vulgar.  Only Major Durbin (who was perfectly sober), Mr Bussell and Cooper came up stairs, and they not till eleven o’clock.  The Band playd here.

Monday, 11 September, 1809

A fine day.  Cooper went out before breakfast with Mr Wilkin to shoot at Mr Urquarts at Broad main.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Porcher.  My Aunt Powell, myself and Mrs Henderson went together to Dine at Broad Main.  Met Mr and Mrs and Miss England, Morgan Geatman, Mr W Williams and Cooper.  They had a Whist table in the evening and the rest of the party amused themselves with finding out Charades.  We suppd there and went to the Inn at Dorchester to sleep.  Mrs H in the carriage with us and the gentlemen together.  It was a stupid sort of day.  We reachd Dorchester about twelve and had a very comfortable bed.

Tuesday, 12 September, 1809

A very fine day.  Mr W Williams, Cooper, Mrs Henderson and us breakfasted at the Inn, after which the gentlemen went shooting and we sat an hour with the Dr and Mrs Cooper, where we saw Miss Geatman and Jane and then returnd to Weymouth.  As we went, we calld on Mrs Porcher, but were not admitted, and on Mrs and Miss Hughes of Cheltenham, who were out also.  We had a party at dinner.  Sir John and Miss Emily Smith, Captain Cross, Captain Clutterbuck, Mrs W Williams, Mrs Henderson and Mr Bussell.  Mrs Urquart came in the evening to go to Mr Rodbers Ball with us, where me met a great many people we knew, Captain and Mrs Scot, Captain Waller and Captain Aylmer joind our party at tea.  Mrs Stevens was so kind to send her carriage to take us to the Ball.  We came away about one.  My Aunt P, Cooper, I and Mr W Williams, Mrs Henderson and Mr Bussell walkd home.  They all took leave of us at the door.  My Aunts and I sat up late talking over the Ball.  My Aunt P made me a present of a beautiful silver band for my head.

Wednesday, 13 September, 1809

A very wet day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Sir John and Miss Emily Smith, Mrs Urquart, Captain Waller, Mr Broughton, Captain Scot (who playd Chess) Lord Hinton, Mrs and Miss Hughes and Mr W Williams calld.  My Aunt P, Cooper and I got as far as Mrs Porcher’s between the storms and she and Rebecca were both very poorly.  Coo[er and Mr Bussell dined at Mr W Williams. My Aunt and I went there in the evening.  Lord Hinton, Mr Porcher, Mr Lampert and my Aunt Powell playd Whist.  Mr and Mrs W Cooper, Mr Steward, Mrs Henderson, Mr Bussell and myself had a very chearful game at Vingts une.  I won three and six.  We came home before supper.  Mr B went home with Mrs H and then came to plague us till bed time.  Mrs Keen sent me a letter from my mother, enclosed in a note from herself.  Mrs Scot sat an hour with us before dinner.

Thursday, 14 September, 1809

A dreadful wet day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate and Mr Porcher, with Cooper. My Aunt P and I went up to Mrs Porcher’s and were detained there more than an hour by the rain.  We calld also on Mrs Stevens.  Mr Broughton and Mr Friend calld.  We all dined at Mr W Williams’s, where we met Mrs Henderson.  Poor Mrs W was very ill after dinner.  The whole party except her and my Aunt Neate went to the Play to see Laugh when you can and Blue Beard, which was very tolerably performed.  We walkd home and for a wander.  Mr Bussell did not accompany us.  He went home with Mrs Henderson.  Cooper heard today from the gentleman who is about Bath Easton.  He has agreed to Cooper’s terms and is to have it.  I could not help feeling a sharp pang when I heard it.  I went to bed before Cooper and my Aunts.  I wrote to my Uncle James and enclosed the receipt.  Lord Hinton calld.

Friday, 15 September, 1809

A fine day.  Cooper breakfasted with Mr W Williams and went out shooting with him.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here and Major Durbin came in while we were at breakfast, soon after which my Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Porcher, but she was gone to Dorchester with Mr P in his way to London.  We walkd some time on the Esplanade, where Captain Scot and Captain Simmons joind us and afterwards calld on Mrs Simmons and Mrs W Williams.  At the latter place we met Mrs E Williams, who was scarcely civil to us.  When we came home we found Mrs Henderson here with four of her stupid brats.  I went up stairs and left them.  We had a large party at dinner.  Mrs Stevens, two Miss Eltons, Miss Broughton, Mr Clutterbuck, Mr W Williams, Mr Grimes, Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson.  Cooper whispered to me after dinner “If I had had fifty thousand pounds I would have tried to persuade you to have shared Bath Easton with me”.  I do not believe a word of it Cooper.  “I would, so help me God.”  I shook my head.  “I have sworn it” was his reply.  Captain and Mrs Simmons drank tea and suppd with us.  My Aunt Powell and Mr Grimes playd Whist against Mr Clutterbuck and Captain Simmons, my Aunt Neate, Mrs Simmons, Mr W Williams and I playd Quadrille, the rest of the party Speculation.  My Aunt and Cooper had liked to have quarelld after they were all gone, because she told him Mrs Porcher wishd him to see their brother who is extremely ill.  He went to bed in a great passion. There were some very good fire works playd off in the evening in honor of the Prince’s arrival, who did not come till after twelve o’clock.  Upon the whole, this day went very chearfully.  The Band playd here.

Weymouth Bay and Esplanade, 1819 (British Museum).
Weymouth Bay and Esplanade, 1819 (British Museum).

Saturday, 16 September, 1809

A damp uncomfortable day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Lord Hinton came in before we began, but did not have any.  Before we had finishd ours, Cooper took Mrs Henderson in the carriage with him to Herringston, saying he should certainly be back at night.  I was very unwell all day with a complaint in my bowells and so cold we had a fire.  Captain and Mrs Scot, Mr Broughton, Mrs C Buxton, Miss Wheatley and Mrs Porcher calld.  We dined alone, for Mr Bussell walkd to Herringston to dinner,  There were fire works again in the evening, but not so good as last night.  Cooper did not come home.  George sat up till one o’clock, when Mr Bussell came to say he would be back till tomorrow.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.  The Band playd here.

Sunday, 17 September, 1809

An uncomfortable day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mr Broughton came in while we were at breakfast and sat some time with us.  When he was gone we read prayers.  Cooper and Mrs Henderson came home together about twelve o’clock.  She came in here, but I did not go down to see her, feeling very indignant at her having kept Cooper all night at Henningston, that she might have the pleasure of returning with him alone in the carriage, which was literally the case.  Colonel Tyrewhit, Colonel Bloomfield and Mr Bloomberg calld.  They, Lord Hinton, Mr Broughton and Mr Bussell dined with us. Lord H went away before tea but the rest of the party came up stairs and staid till eleven o’clock and were very agreeable, particularly Colonel T, who is one of the pleasantest men I ever saw.  I went to bed almost directly after they went away.  The Band playd here.

Monday, 18 September, 1809

A gloomy uncomfortable day.  I was surprised to hear when I got up that my Aunts and Cooper had determined on going to the Villa tomorrow morning.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, immediately after which my Aunt went to take leave of Mrs Porcher, Mr and Miss Hughes, Mrs Cornwell, Mrs Davies, Mrs Naish, Mrs Jeffries, Mrs Stevens and the Miss Eltons and Mrs Simmons.  Nothing could be more kind and obliging than the manner of the latter.  We sat some time with dear little Mrs Scot and left cards at Lady A Warde and Lady E Dormer’s.  Captain Scot came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt Powell and I went in to wish Mrs W Williams good bye.  Saw Mr and Mrs R W there, who were very obliging.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us.  Lord Hinton came for the evening, but I hardly saw him, I was so busy.  I had almost forgot we calld on Mrs Henderson, who was to have gone to dine at Dorchester, but as Cooper could not go, she chose to send an excuse on pretense of being ill, as she also did to Mrs England, where we were to have next Wednesday.  We did not get to bed till late.  The Band playd here.

Tuesday, 19 September, 1809

A most beautiful day.  Mr W Williams came in before breakfast, but did not stay.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  I went to see Mrs Keen and dear Ann who, came last night.  I could only stay a few minutes with them.  They were very kind and both look better than when I saw them last.  My Aunt P and I went in to Mrs Stevens, Mrs W Williams and Mrs Henderson.  I calld at Mrs Stevens’s in my way back from Mrs Keen’s, but did not sit down.  Captain and Mrs Scot came to wish us good bye.  We all left Weymouth about eleven o’clock, after passing eleven weeks there as unpleasantly as I ever remember to have spent any time.  We stopd at Dr Cooper’s, where we saw Mrs Cooper and Mrs Porcher and Miss Geatman.  The Dr was not at home.  We reachd Wincanton between six and seven, where we had a very good dinner and supper and most excellent beds, with the greatest civility and attention, both from waiter and chambermaid.  My Aunt Neate and Cooper playd Chess till the chickens were ready and we all went to bed soon after we had eaten them.

Monday, 20 September, 1809

A rainy morning, but it cleard about nine o’clock and was dry the rest of the day (except we had one hard shower), tho gloomy.  We breakfasted at Wincanton very comfortably and left it at nine for Frome.  The driver stopped to water the horses at a small village about half way, where we saw a Sergeant and Corporal belonging to the Regiment with ten recruits, all very fine lads, who came out to shew themselves to Cooper, who gave them a shilling apiece to drink and half a crown to the Sergeant and Corporal.  They all cheared him when we drove off.  Cooper, my Aunt P and I walkd up Mitford Hill and in our way lookd at a very pretty new house that Mr Broughton had pointed out to her.  It is a sweet place and she has serious thoughts of taking it, if it comes within her limits.  We stopd at Nashes in our way thro Bath and got some fish for dinner and arrived at the Villa about six o’clock.  It is looking most beautiful, tho to me melancholy from its being in, all human probability, the last time I shall ever see it.  We found Kitty looking remarkably well and dear Rover delighted to see us.  We dined as soon as the fish could be dressd.  Cooper very kind and obliging, but very much out of spirits and evidently sorry at having been persuaded to sell  the Villa.  We went to bed early, all a good deal faggd.

Batheaston Villa c 1825, courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston Villa c 1825, courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Thursday, 21 September, 1809

A beautiful day and this place looking as enchanting as I ever saw it.  We breakfasted alone.  Cooper out of spirits, but good humourd.  I went into the garden directly after breakfast and brought in some phlox to fill the flower stand and then gathered a nosegay.  Cooper and my Aunts were engaged the whole morning looking over parchments in the Iman Chest.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but I did not see him.  We dined alone.  Mr Clark came up while we were at the dinner table and drank tea here.  As soon as he was gone my Aunt P, Cooper and I spent the rest of the evening looking over and burning old bills, some of them dated near an hundred years back.  Cooper gave us all some uncut Brazil Diamonds, two half guineas, a dollar, a silver coin and some new half pence, that were my Aunt’s.  We did not go to bed till late.  I wrote a letter to my mother.

Friday, 22 September, 1809

A wet morning, but it cleard at breakfast time and was fine the rest of the day.  I came down stairs before my Aunt.  Cooper received me very kindly and kissd me, but not as he used to do.  We breakfasted alone, soon after which Messrs Bartram and Prichard came to value the fixtures and furniture.  I wanted a great many things out of the store room.  My Aunt P, Cooper and I went to the stable to see the puppies.  They are all very much grown, after which we walkd up and down the garden more than an hour.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  Cooper gave me a writing case that he used at Stamford and a crown piece he found in it.   Bartram and Prichard had some luncheon and also dined here.  We dined alone.  My Aunt Neate and Cooper playd Chess in the evening.  I wrote.  I had a long letter from my mother, forwarded from Weymouth.  We did not sit up late, at least my Aunt and I, but Cooper wrote many letters after I went to bed.  I kissd him when I wishd him good night.

Saturday, 23 September, 1809

Violent rain before breakfast, but it cleard afterwards, as quite an April day with very hard showers.  My Aunt P and Cooper breakfasted at Shockerwick.  Captain Allen calld while we were at breakfast, but did not come in.  I went up stairs directly after to rant, in the midst of which Dr and Mrs Bradbelt, their little girl and a miss Milward, Mrs B’s sister arrived to spend the day.  My Aunt Neate and I were with them till Cooper and my Aunt P returnd, when she went down to see my mother.  Mr Allen and Mr Wiltshire joind the party at dinner, soon after which the Bradbelts went to Bath.  The Dr is a gentlemanly man, but does not say much, Mrs B a plain little woman, silent, and Miss W a very fine girl, good humourd apparently, but shy and quite unaccustomed to society.  I have not a doubt they would improve on acquaintance and be very friendly.  Mr Allen was in one of his pleasantest humours.  He went away before supper.  Mr Wiltshire slept here.  He went to bed before Cooper and us.  We sat up till near one o’clock.  It is the LAST night we shall ever pass together at the Villa and very possibly any where.

Sunday, 24 September, 1809

A very wet day.  It pourd a torrent all the morning.  I was down stairs at half past six, the time Cooper had fixed (last night) to leave the Villa for Weymouth.  Mr W was to have gone the first stage with him, but it raind so hard, he did not go.  Cooper left us about half past seven.  He was very low and could not help shedding tears when he got into the carriage.  I believe he very sincerely repents having been persuaded to sell this sweet place, tho he is that kind of disposition that nothing unpleasant makes a lasting impression on his mind.  Mr Wiltshire left us at the same time Cooper did.  We read prayers soon after breakfast.  We were alone all day and a melancholy day it was.  We all went to bed early, very much tired, being up at six o’clock.

Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 14th August 1809
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 14th August 1809

Monday, 25 September, 1809

A very wet day.  My Aunt P and I were employd the whole of it clearing the store room and putting the different things for the people to value tomorrow.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  We sorted my Aunt’s Green House plants from Cooper’s and found that nearly half of them had died or been sold by the gardener.  My Aunt chose a lot of ornamental China, a lamp, some tea trays and the decanters to be set to her account with Cooper.  We went to bed very much tired. Kirkham, my Aunt’s new servant in Hunter’s place came today.

Monday, 26 September, 1809

A very fine day.  Bartram and Orchard came to finish valueing the furniture.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Bartram and Orchard dined and drank tea here.  I was out in the garden most part of the morning.  Ellen went to Bath and took a note for me to my mother, who was not at home.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper, George Shirely and Rebecca Workman and Captain Broughton.

Wednesday, 27 September, 1809

A very bad day.  We all three got into the carriage directly after breakfast and went up to see the house by Midford Castle where we staid between two and three hours, looking about and contriving how to make it comfortable.  It raind hard almost all the time we were there and it lookd melancholy and wretched.  On our return we sat two hours with my mother and Emma, both of whom were looking well and were very glad to see me.  They were just going to dinner.  My Aunt P had some with them.  My Aunt N and I had a piece of bread each.  We did not get home till late and instead of having dinner, we had our tea and a pork chop for supper and to bed very much tired.  Mr Noyes calld while we were at Bath.

Thursday, 28 September, 1809

A fine morning, but hard showers frequently in the course of the day.  My Aunt sent for horses and we all went to Bathford to see a cottage we saw advertised, but it was very miserable.  From there we went to Bath and calld at my mother’s, intending to take her and Emma with us to Lyncombe, but they were not at home.  We got out of the carriage at the bottom of the hill and walkd to the house.  The grounds are beautiful, but the house appears very old fashioned.  We could not see the inside, as the gardener was not there, but from the whole appearance of it, the rent will be very high.  On our return my Aunt P and I got out at the Post Office.  My Aunt N went on to my mother’s in the carriage, where we joind her as soon as we had done what we had to do, and calld on the Workmans, who were very glad to see us.  We met Mr Gaby of Chippenham at my mother’s.  We sat with her more than an hour, when the carriage came for us.  We calld at Captain Chiver’s in our way home, but did not see him.  We stopd at the Stables at Lambridge to enquire if my Aunt could put some of her boxes there till she gets a house.  The gardener came up in the evening to say she might.  We got home in very good time for dinner.  I took my mother and Emma two large pots of strawberry jam that Kitty made for me while we were at Weymouth.  I sent a note by the driver to Mrs Hemmings to desire she would send a fine goose to my mother for tomorrow’s dinner.  Mrs Noyes and Mrs Walters calld while we were at Bath.

Friday, 29 September, 1809

A dry day, but very cold.  My Aunt P and I were employd the whole day in the store room emptying boxes and sorting the things out of them and were so tired at night we were glad to go to bed early.  Captain Chivers calld in the morning.  I hardly saw him, but he said he would call again if he possibly could before he returnd to Weymouth.  Miss Lock brought up the cap my Aunt intended to send to Mrs Simmons as a present.  My Aunt N bought one for herself.

Saturday, 30 September, 1809

A mizzling rain all day.  I collected all the music and packd it.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but I only shook hands with him and mended his glove.  Mrs Clutterbuck sent us three white and silver favors, half a delicious cake and six pieces drawn thro the ring.  I packd all the shells and curiosities that we scatterd about the house in the evening and went to bed very much tired. I heard from my Uncle James.  A very kind letter.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs W Williams and my mother.

Fashion plate for October 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for October 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 October, 1809

A very fine day.  We read prayers directly after breakfast, after which my Aunt P and I walkd in the garden more than an hour.  It was as mild and warm as summer.  I gathered a nosegay.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but I did not see him. I wrote a note to my mother and sent her the letter I receivd from my Uncle James yesterday.  She sent word back she was very ill and had been in bed these two days.  My Aunt heard from Lady Smith.

Monday, 2 October, 1809

A wet morning, but it cleard after breakfast and was very fine the rest of the day and extremely warm.  My Aunt P and I went to Bath.  In our way down we met Dr Davis coming to call on us.  He stopd the carriage and had a little chat.  He askd if his house in the country would suit my Aunt, but she thinks it too near Bradford.  We met Mr Wiltshire in Bath, who appointed us to meet him at the Midford House between two and three o’clock.  We went first to my mother’s, who was found in bed with a complaint in her bowels and suffering a good deal of pain.  We sat some time with her and then went to call on Mr and Mrs Clutterbuck.  Both of them and Miss Mary Ann Elton received us very kindly.  They told us a great deal of Weymouth news, amongst other things that Cooper had given a very large and gay party last Friday, which did not break up till four o’clock in the morning.  Sir Charles Bamfield was one of the guests!!!!  He has taken the house Mrs Stevens has just left in York Buildings.  I don’t thing we shall hear any thing of the party from Cooper.  Mr Wiltshire met us at Midford and lookd over the house with us, after which we returnd to Bath.  We went to Mr Clarke’s to enquire when every thing would be ready for Dr Broadbelt to take possession of this beloved place.  He told us by Saturday se’nnight if Cooper would attend to the business, for it entirely depended on him.  We staid a short time with my mother, who was a little better and then came home to dinner.  We could not do any thing to the packing in the evening, so went to bed early.

Tuesday, 3 October, 1809

A warm day, with rain once or twice, but very trifling.  We hardly sat down all day except at dinner, we were so busy packing.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  I only just saw him.  I wrote a note to Emma by Gardener, who went to Bath.  She wrote in return that my mother was better.  We went to bed very much tired.

Wednesday, 4 October, 1809

A most beautiful day, fine sunshine and as warm as it has at all been this summer.  I went as far as the Fig tree in the garden and into the Hot House after breakfast, before I began fagging.  Dr Davis calld and eat some luncheon with us.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  A man came from Bally’s and took down and packd the bed in the green room and we finishd a good many things besides.  I wrote to my Uncle James and begd him to buy us some shares in the Lottery and send them to me.  Dr Davies took the letter to the Post for me.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Vassall and Mr Porcher.

Thursday, 5 October, 1809

A fine day.  We were packing the whole of it.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but I hardly saw him. I packd a large trunk in Cooper’s room and filld it with pieces of furniture and different things and went to bed very much tired and uncomfortable.

Friday, 6 October, 1809

A very fine day and we did an immense deal in the course of it.  I took up some of the bulbous roots out of the garden and put them to dry.  A great many boxes and chests of drawers were finishd, carded and taken down stairs.  We were so busy we had not time to have any tea and did not get our supper till after eleven o’clock.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper and I heard from my Uncle James, who has very kindly sent me by return of post of a part of the numbers of the different shares in the Lottery he has bought for us, not thinking a letter a safe conveyance for the shares themselves.  We went to bed almost knockd up.

Saturday, 7 October, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt sent to Bath for horses to take us to Midford to see Mr Connerly to arrange about taking his house.  Just as the carriage was coming to the door, Dr and Mrs Broadbelt calld to look over the things in the house and select those they meant to keep from those they part with.  My Aunt told them every thing was in too great confusion for them to see any thing and appointed them to come next Tuesday.  The Dr went to look at the cows and agreed to take them.  We were just driving from the door when we saw Miss Wiltshire walking up the Lane.  She would not come in, but stopd and had a little chat at the carriage door.  Both my Aunts, I and Kitty went to my mother’s, where we did not sit down, but left my Aunt Neate there and took Emma with us to Midford, where we lookd about for an hour, Kitty and my Aunt arranging and planning alterations. My Aunt sent George to the Castle to ask what time would be convenient to Mr Connerly to see her.  He brought word back Mr C was too ill to see her today, but tomorrow or any day next week that was agreeable to her, so we had our ride for nothing.  We returnd to my mother’s and I went directly to Lucas’s and got a small piece of cambric for Cooper’s shirts and then went back and had some dinner with my mother, but like the beggars, when we had got all we could, we left them (before they had finished theirs) and came home.  We overtook Kitty (who had walkd towards the Villa) and took her up.  We had some tea and toast as soon as we came home.  Dryall arrived from Weymouth about our supper time, but brought no letter from Cooper with him!!!  It was not so last year, but “no matter” as Charles Porcher says, and we shall learn to think so in all good time, I have no doubt.  Dryall is come to fetch the puppys.  He told us, amongst other things, that Mrs Henderson has moved back next door to Cooper again, now we are come away.  She had better have staid where she was, to save appearances I think, but it is evident she is not of the same opinion and sets the opinion of the World at defiance.  I went to bed very tired and unwell with the head ache and my Aunt Powell with a violent pain in her back.  I took two large pots of raspberry jam as a present to my mother.

Midford Castle near Bath, a late eighteenth-century folly purchased in 1808 by Charles Conolly; Fanny and her Aunt Neate moved to a house next to the Castle.
Midford Castle near Bath, a late eighteenth-century folly purchased in 1808 by Charles Conolly; Fanny, her Aunt Neate and Aunt Powell were thinking about renting a house near to the Castle.

Sunday, 8 October, 1809

A very fine day.  I went as far as the hot house after breakfast.  When I came in my Aunt P read prayers to us.  Before we had finished the Workmans came up, but sat down in the drawing room till we had done;  they stayed and dined with us and walkd home afterwards.  I went into the garden for a short time before dinner.  My Aunt had a note from Mr Wiltshire to say he had such a violent pain in his back and side he was hardly able to move from one room to another and it was quite out of his power to come out.  My Aunt Powell’s back was so bad today she could scarcely move.

Monday, 9 October, 1809

A very fine day,but cold.  We all went to Bath together, set my Aunt Neate down in Union Street.  My Aunt P and I went on directly to the house at Midford and walkd from there to the Castle. We were shewn into Mr Conolly’s bed room, he being confined to his bed  by an accident from a kick of a horse.  My Aunt and he talkd over the alterations she wishd made, which he has no objection to her making, but he declined laying out any more money there himself and askd so high a rent that my Aunt has given up all thought of the place.  When we came back to Bath, we went to Mrs Vassall’s first, who was very glad to see us both.  She and little Betsey are looking much better than I expected to see them.  We sat with her while she dined and my Aunt had some with her.  When we left her, we went to see two or three lodgings, all of which were very dear and then went to my mother’s.  She and Emma were going out to tea.  We did not sit down with them, but went again to search for a place to go to when we leave the Villa.  We saw a snug little lodging in Bridge Street and tolerably reasonable, but my Aunt did not agree about it till she has seen some others.  When we returnd to my mother’s they were gone, but my Aunt Neate was waiting there for us.  We staid there till the coach came and did not get home till past eight o’clock.  I did not taste a bit of any thing from breakfast time till after we came home.

We met Major Coffin on the road as we were returning from Midford.  He appeard very glad to see us and had a long conversation.  We went to bed early, very much tired. Miss Wiltshire calld while we were out.

Tuesday, 10 October, 1809

A very fine day.  We were engagd in packing the whole of it and had hardly time to sit down, even to eat our dinner, but got a great deal done.  I was not in bed till two o’clock. I had a note from my mother.

Wednesday, 11 October, 1809

A very fine day, but extremely cold.  Dr and Mrs Broadbelt came up to look at some of the things they did not wish to take.  Mr Wiltshire calld while they were here.  They did not stay long.  As soon as we had had our luncheon my Aunt Powell and I walkd to Lark Hall Lane to see if there was any house to let there, but did not find one;  soon after we returnd Mr Wiltshire calld again.  We dined late and went to bed early.

Thursday, 12 October, 1809

A very fine day, but extremely cold.  We all went to Bath directly after breakfast and took the cases of shells and clock to my mother till we go in ourselves.  We did not stay more than a quarter of an hour with them, but went in search of lodgings and, after looking at fifty I believe, my Aunt fixed on the last house in Henrietta Street, which we are to have entirely to ourselves at four guineas a week for a month certain.  When we went back to my mother we met Mrs Vassall and Rebecca Workman there.  We staid only a few minutes with them and then went out again.  My Aunt Powell and I bought a sixteenth of a Lottery ticket each with the money Cooper gave us that he had found in my Aunt’s pockets, adding eight and sixpence each to it and agreed to go shares in the chances.  We met Mrs Gibson twice, who was very glad to see us. We calld on the Miss Whately’s to give them Mrs Files’s Character.  They appear to be very lady like, genteel young women.  It began to be dark by the time we got back to my mother’s, where we found the coach waiting for us.  We had our dinner between six and seven o’clock and did not go to bed till late.

Henrietta Street to Camden (Bath). © David Lewis-Baker via flickr
Henrietta Street to Camden (Bath).
© David Lewis-Baker via flickr

Friday, 13 October, 1809

A very fine day.  We were busy the whole day packing and were tired to death, at least I am sure I was and I did not go to bed until two o’clock.  Mr Wiltshire calld.

Saturday, 14 October, 1809

A very fine day.  I was in the Green House from eleven o’clock till after six tying and marking the plants my Aunt chose to keep, but was not so much tired as I expected.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss Elizabeth and Miss Reece calld, the two latter found me in the Green House.  I went out and spoke to them, but had not time to walk round the dear garden.  Faggd a good deal again in the evening and went to bed very much tired.

Sunday, 15 October, 1809

A fine day. We were employd the whole of it, tho it was Sunday, in packing our cloaths and had not a moment to sit down.  Mr Wiltshire calld three times, but I did not see him at all.  We all went to bed very much tired.

Monday, 16 October, 1809

A fine day, but I am sure to me it was black Monday, for I took leave of the beloved Villa, most probably for ever.  If I was a person of large fortune, there is no place I have ever seen I would exchange for it.  I was up very early in the morning, indeed I did not take my cloaths off last night.  Strong came and took away the plants to Salters at Lyncomb, to be kept the winter at sixpence a plant.  I walkd round the garden and took leave of it and into all the rooms, where I have passd so many many happy hours.  there was not one that did not recall some delightful recollection.  As soon as we had breakfasted, I got into the Coach (which was pack’d as full as it could), with Harriet, to take possession of our new lodgings in Henrietta Street.  I cannot describe the sensation I felt when I drove from the door.  It was such as I most probably (and I sincerely hope) should never experience again. The same circumstances can never occur to endear any house to me again, as that was endeard.  I stopped at the Excise Office in my way, to get a permit, but Mrs Pryce was not there, so I went to the lodgings and loaded the Coach, left Harriet and then returnd to Walcot Street, where I found Mr Pryce and got the permit, which I gave to the driver to take to my Aunts at the Villa and I walkd to my mother’s to ask her and dear Emma to come with me to Henrietta Street, when to my great astonishment she said she could not come, as she would never enter a house of my Aunt Powell’s while she lived.  I never was more surprised in my life, as I had always fancied it was Cooper, and not my Aunt P she objected to visiting.  Nothing but my affection for dear Emma could have made me conceal the indignation I felt.  I came by myself to the lodgings, where I had good fires made in the kitchen and drawing rooms and brought down the beds and blanquets and aird them.  The wine and the rest of the things were brought in the course of the day.  My Aunt very kindly sent me some sandwiches and a roll when Berkham came between two and three o’clock and at the same time sent word I must not expect them till six o’clock to dinner.  I was very low and hysterical in the afternoon.  My Aunts, Kitty, Ellen and George did not come till past nine o’clock, instead of six.  We had some supper instead of dinner and went to bed tired, melancholy and dejected.  I slept with my Aunt Powell as there was not time to air all the beds

Tuesday, 17 October, 1809

A fine morning.  Rover got out before we were up and made the best of his way to Bath Easton.  Admiral and Mrs Phillip, the Miss Workmans, Mrs Vassall and Betsey Jones and Mr Wiltshire calld.  I aird the bed I am to sleep in tonight.  My Aunt sent George to the Villa to fetch Rover back.  It began to rain about four o’clock and was wet all the evening.  We did not go out the whole day.  I had a bad head ache and went to bed directly after tea

Wednesday, 18 October, 1809

A mizzling rain all day, notwithstanding which we all went out, met Mr Wiltshire on horseback going out with his Troop.  My Aunt subscribed to Gibbons’s and Savages librarys.  Went to market and then to my mother’s, where my Aunt asked her to dine, which she refused and also to allow poor Emma to come.  From there we went to some shops and then to Savage’s to read the papers and took home Cinnina? of England.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Admiral Phillips to drink tea.  Met a Major Armstrong and spent a very sociable evening.  We walkd home at ten o’clock, had some excellent bread and cheese for supper and went to bed.  My spirits were depressd and uncomfortable the whole day.  Dr Davis calld while we were out.  We met Miss Wiltshire in the market.  She was very friendly.  We sat a long time at Mrs Vassall’s, where we saw Mrs Beckford.

Thursday, 19 October, 1809

A wet, uncomfortable day.  Mr Wiltshire and the Workmans calld.  The former was in very good spirits.  My Aunt P had a great deal of gout about her.  We did not go out the whole day and went to bed early.

Friday, 20 October, 1809

A dry day, but cold.  My Aunt Powell very indifferent.  My Aunt Neate went out directly after breakfast and was out the whole morning.  My Aunt P continued to hobble as far as Gibbons’s and Savage’s to read the Papers.  Mr Wiltshire calld just as we were going to dinner and staid longer than usual.  As soon as we had dined, I went to my mother’s, but they were gone out to tea, so I had my walk for my pains.  We spent a very melancholy evening.  I felt very low and my spirits were not raised by my Aunt Neate’s declaring that if my Aunt Powell would not be prevaild on to take a house and remain in Bath, she must quit her, as she had determind on remaining to sell her Detestable quack medicines!!

Saturday, 21 October, 1809

A fine day.  The moment I had breakfasted I went as far as my mother to settle with dear Emma what number the chance to share with my 250.  She fixd on 813.  In my way back I got a paper of pins for my Aunt at Langes, met Mr Johnson who walkd down Bridge Street with me, met my Aunt Neate also, who I imagine was going to shops about her medicines.  My Aunt P was very unwell today.  Extremely low and nervous, but she continued to to walk as far as the Sidney Gardens to ask Mr Gale if he could let her have a room to put her furniture in, but they have given up the lower rooms, so could not accommodate her, but they told her of a house near Chippenham that she thinks may suit her.  Mrs Vassall and Betsey calld, but did not stay long.  When we went out we calld on them, where we met my mother and Emma and afterwards went to Gibbons to read the papers.  Met Admiral Phillip in the street, who said he was coming to us, but would put if off till another day, as he had seen us.  The Workmans dined and suppd with us.  They and my Aunts playd Quadrille in the evening.  I read.  My Aunt sent an excuse to an invitation to a rout at Mrs Gibson’s for this evening.  I wrote to my Uncles James, but as the Workmans were so kind to say they would get me a frank, I shall not sent the letter till Monday.  They left us about eleven o’clock.

The bridge over the canal in Sydney Gardens, Bath (Victoria Art Gallery).
The bridge over the canal in Sydney Gardens, Bath, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Sunday, 22 October, 1809

A dry day, but dull looking and apparently cold.  We neither of us went out the whole day.  My Aunt Powell was very unwell with a violent pain in her side, or rather, back.  She was hardly able to breathe or move.  We read prayers directly after breakfast.  Miss Baker and her sister Louisa calld and sat some time and I think I never saw  more unpleasant or vulgar manners in my life.  Louisa did not speak one word the whole time she was here, so we could not judge what hers were like.  The Workmans and Mr Wiltshire calld, the latter very kind.  He said he wanted to go and see the house near Chippenham for my Aunt.  Gardener from the Villa came with Dr Bradbelt’s compliments to beg to know how he was to procure the News Paper, as we used to have it.  My Aunt sent him word how we used to manage.  My Aunt’s foot and side very indifferent.

Monday, 23 October, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt Neate went out directly after breakfast.  Mrs Beckford and Miss Workman calld, the latter walkd as far as Ballys in Milson Street with us.  In our way we met Mr and Mrs Thackeray and Mr Maddison, who all stopd to speak to us.  From Bally,s we went to Mrs Vassall’s, where we met Mrs Horne and Mrs Beckford.  We sat there a short time and then went to the White Lion for change for a draft.  From there to the Market, where we bought some apples, then to Savage’s to read the Paper and from there home, where we found Miss Wiltshire, who was very friendly and pleasant. As soon as we had dined I went to my mother’s and sat half an hour with her and Emma.  The latter walkd to the bottom of Bond Street with me in her way to Mrs Lyes.  I came home to tea.  My Aunt Powell was very ill all night with the gout.  I got out of bed at three o’clock and gave her some Laudanum.

Tuesday, 24 October, 1809

A most beautiful day.  My Aunt was so unwell she did not get up till near dinner time.  Admiral and Mrs Phillip calld and sat some time.  He came up stairs.  They were both very friendly and kind.  I went to Mrs Vassall’s to ask if she intended to fulfill her engagement of dinner with us today.  She said she did.  Saw Mrs Horne with her.  I went and ordered a couple of chicken and then calld at my mother’s, but they were not at home.  Only Mrs Vassall and Betsey dined here.  Mr Wiltshire came in while we were at dinner, but did not stay long.  It raind fast in the evening and Mrs Vassall and Betsey went home in a Chair between eight and nine o’clock.  We went to bed early, but were disturbed after twelve o’clock by the ringing of bells and firing of guns to usher in the Jubilee, which is to take place tomorrow on the King’s entering the 50th year of his Reign.  My Aunt heard from Cooper!!!

Wednesday, 25 October, 1809

A beautiful day.  The whole town was in motion early to see the Processions of the Corporate Volunteers and different Clubs to Church.  All the servants, except Kitty, went out before breakfast and did not return till after two o’clock.  Mrs Gibson calld (for the first time) and sat an hour here.  Miss Workman came in the morning, before we were up, to say she had got a room in the square to see the Procession, where she wishd us to come.  My Aunt P was not well enough to go, but tried to persuade me.  However, I had not the least inclination and was not sorry to be able to stay at home.  I was obliged to go to the Sidney Hotel before dinner to enquire if Mr Gale had heard any thing about the house he mentiond to my Aunt. He told me the proprietor of it was come to Bath and would call on my Aunt today or tomorrow. There was a constant noise of ringing of bells and firing guns the whole day and the bouncing of squibs and crackers in the evening.  I heard from my Uncle James to say all our shares, except one, were blanks and that one was only fifteen pounds.  It began to rain about ten o’clock and continued, I believe, most part of the night.

Thursday, 26 October, 1809

A beautiful day, but very dirty, owing to the rain last night.  My Aunt went to Strong’s directly after breakfast.  My Aunt P and I went out at the same time, my Aunt to Gibbons’s and I to my mother’s, at which my Aunt was very angry and said I was always there, tho this is only the third time I have been there since we came to Bath.  She was so displeasd, she would not tell me when to meet her again and said she did not want me.  I sat two hours with my mother and Emma, met Sophia Eyre there, who appeard very glad to see me and on my return home heard my Aunt had been back, but was gone out again with Mary Workman.  I met Mrs Vassall in the street, who had just been to call on us, also Mr King, Mr C and Mr and Miss Welsford of Devonshire.  I sat down to work at my dark gown, when Mrs Thackery, Mr Wiltshire and Mrs Phillip called.  I went out with the latter as far as the Grove, but would not go further for fear my Aunt should return and want me, but she did not till near dinner time, when Mrs Noyes and Major Coffin calld.  I paid Mrs N seven shillings for my subscription to the Penny Club.  The Workmans drank tea and suppd here.  They and my Aunts playd Quadrille.  I workd and was very much out of spirits the whole evening.  Mr Gale came to speak about his house near Chippenham.

Friday, 27 October, 1809

A beautiful day, but very muddy.  My Aunt and I calld on Miss Welsford and Mrs Gibson.  The latter gave us some delicious Jubilee cake.  While we were out Dr Davis and Dr Gibson calld.  We drank tea at the Vassall’s, where we met Mrs Madain, who was extremely kind and obliging to us.  We staid there till past ten.  It was so thick a fog both in going and coming back we could hardly see across the street and it felt like rain.  I was very much out of spirits and uncomfortable all day.

Saturday, 28 October, 1809

A beautiful day, but almost too hot.  My Aunt Neate went to play Chess at Dr Gibson’s.  My Aunt P and I to pay visits.  We met Mrs Eyre and Sophy coming to us, but my Aunt did not offer to turn back with them, so they joind us, as did Mary Workman and walkd as far as Admiral Phillip’s with us, where they left us and we went in and  sat some time.  From there we went to Mrs Thackerys, Miss Baker’s, Mrs Coffin’s and Mr Hantley’s, only the latter of whom was at home.  Jones told us the whole history of Whinchcomb’s conduct and marriage before he let his Master know we were there.  The poor old man was very glad to see us, but his mind is so much gone that he askd the same thing twenty times over and Jones treats him just like a child.  In our way back we met Miss Workman again, who went into Gibbon’s with us and left us there.  We went to Savage’s, but staid only a few minutes there and then came home to dinner.  I read all the evening.  I wrote to Mr Touray to beg he would go to my Uncle James for my Legacy and buy it into the Stock.  Mr Eyre calld while we were out.

Tuesday, 29 October, 1809

A very dull looking cold day.  My Aunt P and I went to? Chappel.  In coming out we encountered Miss Hill, Mrs Sutton and Mrs and Miss Curtis.  They said they were very glad to see us and should certainly call.  Soon after we came home Mrs Vassall calld and sat half an hour.  She was looking remarkably well.  My Aunt Neate went to my ? and staid till near dinner time.  Just as we had sat down to dinner Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not stay long.  At six o’clock my Aunt proposed my going with her to Mr Jay’s Chapple, which we did.  It was so crowded we could hardly get a seat and so intensely hot I was in a compleat bath the whole time I was there.  The singing was very good and so might Mr Jay’s discourse be, for any thing I know to the contrary, but it was so long that I was compleatly tired a good while before it was over.  I read all the evening and wrote to my Uncle James to tell him what I had said to Mr Touray.

Monday, 30 October, 1809

A foggy cold day.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s directly after breakfast.  My Aunt Powell and I to Emery’s to speak about the bottles, which he has agreed to take at two and sixpence a dozen. We went all over his lodging and boarding house in New Bond Street.  We went to Gibbons’s.  While we were there Rebecca Workman came to us and staid till we came out.  She went to Mrs Haines and we to call on Mary, who was not at home.  Met Mr Wiltshire in the street.  When we came home we found Mrs Vassall, Mr and Mrs Sutton and Mrs Curtis had calld, while we were out.  At three o’clock Mr Wiltshire came and staid some time.  While we were at dinner my Aunt had a note from Rebecca to say Mr Broughton was with them and to ask us to come and drink tea.  My Aunt sent her home and we would go.  Just as we were putting on our cloaks, to our great astonishment and pleasure, in walkd Captain Saker.  He arrived at Bath at four o’clock with his wife and children, saw Mr Wiltshire in the street who told him where we were and as soon as he had dined he came to see us and is as friendly and pleasant as he used to be.  He sat here till past eight o’clock and then walkd with us to the Workmans, who had given us up, but were very glad to see us, as was Mr Broughton, who I think I never saw looking better or more chearful.  He, my two Aunts and Mary playd a pool of Quadrille, Rebecca and I lookd on.  We suppd there and did not come home till half past eleven o’clock.

Tuesday, 31 October, 1809

A beautiful day.  Captain and Mrs Saker calld directly after breakfast and after sitting here a short time, my Aunt P went out with them.  I went to my mother’s who was not very well.  I staid there an hour and when I came home my Aunt Neate went there and staid till dinner time.  Admiral Phillip calld.  I went to the door to speak to him, as he could not come in.  Soon after he was gone, I was surprised by a visit from Mrs Greame, Betsey Blenman and Mrs Vassall.  They were very anxious to see my Aunt, but could not stay as the two former were going back to Oldbury to dinner, but beg’d if she came home before three o’clock, we would come to Mrs Harris’s, where they should be.  Betsey was looking beautiful.  They had not been gone long when Major and Mrs Coffin calld with one of her little boys and the eldest of hers and the Major’s.  Both very nice children.  When my Aunt came in we went to Mrs Harnes, where we saw Mrs Graeme, Betsey B, Mrs Vassall and Mrs Hardcastle.  Poor Mrs H was ill in bed.  We staid there till the Chair came to fetch them.  We took Mrs Vassall home with us, but she would not come in.  We went on to Gibbons’s to read the papers and then came home.  Captain and Mrs Saker and the two Workmans dined and suppd here and we spent a very sociable pleasant day.  Captain Saker, my Aunts and Mary Workman playd Whist.  Mrs Saker was extremely good humoured, friendly and agreeable.

Fashion plate for November 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for November 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, 1 November, 1809

A cold, gloomy looking day.  My Aunt P and I walkd up to Mrs Eyre’s directly after breakfast and sat there for a long time.  They all appeard glad to see us, particularly Mr Eyre and wanted us to stay and dine with them.  As we came back we went all over a house which is to be let opposite Landown Grove.  It is one of the most noble and convenient houses I ever saw in my life.  We calld at Admiral Phillip;s, saw Admiral Christie and Mrs Pindano there.  We met Miss Baker in the street, read the papers at Savages and Gibbons and then came home.  We found Captain Saker, Dr Davis, Sir B Baker and his three daughters and Mr Allen had calld while we were out.  We all three drank tea at Admiral Phillip’s, where we met Admiral Man, Miss somebody, his sister and the Suttons and Jane Hill.  Jane made the tea and I pourd out the coffee.  There was no want of conversation, for Mrs Sutton’s tongue never ceased and Admiral Man is a very gentlemanly, pleasant old man.  The Suttons and we walkd home together at half past nine.

Thursday, 2 November, 1809

An extremely cold day.  Mr Wiltshire calld soon after breakfast, but I did not see him.  My Aunt P and I went to Bath, the libraries.  We met Mr Allen at Gibbons’s.  From there we went to Mrs Saker’s, met Captain S in the street, who went home with us.  Saw Miss E Wiltshire and Colonel Leigh there.  We staid more than an hour and saw their eldest little girl, a nice looking child, but too shy to come near us.  From there we went to Lucas’s, where my Aunt bought some Irish.  She paid her bill at Butcher’s and took one to Arnold? to have an alteration made in it and then came home to dinner.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s after dinner to ask her to let Emma go with us tomorrow as far as Chippenham to see some houses there, but she would not allow it.  My Aunt came back to tea.  We all read in the evening.

Friday, 3 November, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I got into a Chaise at half past nine o’clock to go to see some houses she had heard of.  We went over one at Corsham, which might be made very pretty and it has a beautiful garden, but the house is very much out of repair and they told us it was to be sold, not let.  From there we went to Lackham, which is a palace and would require at least five thousand a year to live in it with comfort.  The old Butler, who has lived five and thirty years in the family, shewd it to us, and the furniture I believe came to England (as the original proprietor of the Estate did) with William the Conqueror.  From there we went to Mr Gales at Allington and a more miserable place I never saw in my life.  We staid there two hours to refresh the horses.  Mr Gale was very civil and obliging to us, insisted on our having some bread and butter and a glass of wine and pressd us very much to have a mutton chop.  He shewd us all his drawings and some of his poetry and gave us some apples when we came away.  We did not get back to Bath till past seven o’clock, very cold and tired and not a little hungry.  We had some very nice mutton chops and enjoyd them very much.  My Aunt Neate spent the day with my mother, but came home at nine o’clock.  We had some tea and went to bed.

Saturday, 4 November, 1809

A very cold day.  Captain Saker, Rebecca Workman, Miss Wiltshire, Mrs Vassall and Betsey Jones and Admiral and Mrs Phillip calld.  The latter go to Alford on Monday.  My Aunt P and I calld on the Suttons, where we sat half an hour and then went to Mr Clarke’s.  It began to rain about three o’clock and continued all the rest of the day and evening. We all three dined and suppd at Captain Sakers and spent a very sociable, pleasant day.  We were obliged to go in Chairs.  Captain S and my Aunt P playd two rubbers of Casino against my Aunt Neate and me.  We won them both.  They did not ask any one to meet us, which to me was pleasanter than if they had.  When we came away at night they could only get one Chair which my Aunt Neate came home in and my Aunt P and I were obliged to walk.  It was extremely muddy and my feet were very wet, but I changed my shoes and stockings as soon as I came home.

I went to my mother’s directly after breakfast, but did not stay long as they were going out.  I gave Emma eight pounds and begd her to order three dozen of Port Wine in my name for my mother and pay for it. Mr Wiltshire calld while we were out.

Sunday, 5 November, 1809

It did not cease raining a moment the whole day and was very cold and dismal.  We did not go out or did we see a creature here.  My Aunt Powell packd a great many of the shells in the evening.

Monday, 6 November, 1809

A very fine day, after the rain of yesterday.  My Aunt P and I went out directly after breakfast, met the Miss Workmans coming to us.  They turnd back and walkd with us to Bond Street where my Aunt bought a little pin cushion for Betsey Jones.  As we came back to our own door Mrs Trimnel over took us.  She came to tell my aunt she had  heard of a house she thought would suit her at a place calld Willsbridge, a mile and a half from Bitton on the upper Bristol Road.  As soon as she was gone, we set out to call on Mrs Vassall and Mrs Beckford.  We had not got an hundred yards from the house when we met Mrs Beckford and Mrs Hay coming to call on us.  We returned with them, but they did not stay many minutes, as they only came in to see the birds.  When they left us we went on to Mrs Vassall, but met her and Mrs Hardcastle in our way.  However, she begd us to go on to Betsey and she would return immediately, as she was only going to the Ferry with Mrs H.  We found Hettle and her two children with Betsey.  Mrs Vassall soon returned and was followd by Mr Hardcastle, who staid with her some time.  In our way back we stopd at Strongs to shew him a trunk my Aunt wishd to have sent here from his house.  We went to Gibbons’s to read the paper and to Bases to order some cheesecakes which, by the bye, were excellent, and then came home.  The Workmans dined and suppd here.  They and my Aunts playd Quadrille in the evening and I read.  Miss Welsford calld while we were out and left her card to take leave.

Tuesday, 7 November, 1809

A beautiful day.  My Aunt Neate went to Bristol before we came down to breakfast.  Soon after we had finishd ours, Mrs Vassall and Betsey Jones came in and sat about half an hour.  My Aunt P and I into a Chaise at one o’clock and went to see the house at Willsbridge, which Mrs Trimnell mentiond yesterday.  It is a very pretty ride and beautiful country about it.  When we got there we went to a Mr Peancalls, the owner of the house.  Neither her or Mrs P were at home, but their son, a very gentlemanly lad came to us and appeard very much astonishd at the purpose of our visit, as he said his father had not heard that Mr Maundrell had any intention of leaving their house.  However, as we had gone so far, my Aunt did not like to return without seeing the house, as should it be to be let by and bye, she could not judge if it would suit her, except she saw it.  Mr Maundrell’s family were not at home, so young Mr Peancalls very politely went (and) with Mr M Servant shew us the house and garden, both of which are comfortable, but not modern.  When we had seen the whole premises, we returnd with Mr P to his father’s, where we found his mother returnd from her walk, who received us very politely, but was as much surprised as her son when she heard what had brought us there, but very obligingly said she would write to Miss Maundsell and make enquiries and let my Aunt know.  When we returnd we got out of the chaise at Mr Trimnells and told Mrs T what had passd.  She said she was sure her information was correct, but she would speak to the person who told her and know.  We calld at Mrs Saker’s, saw them and the children, but did not sit down it was so late.  We dined alone, as my Aunt Neate did not return till very near tea time and read all the evening.

Wednesday, 8 November, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt Neate went out and prevented my going to my mother’s.  The Workmans sat some time here in the morning.  Mrs Vassall came in for a few minutes. Young Mrs Beckford would bring Betsey Jones soon, which she did and sat a short time.  She left Betsey here and said she would call again to see Mrs Vassall before she went home, which she did do, but did not stay many minutes.  The Workmans came a second time to see Mrs V and brought Mr and Mrs Broughton with them to take leave of Mrs V and Betsey, who go to London tomorrow morning and who dined and slept here, as being more convenient then being taken up, at Mrs Beckford’s.

Thursday, 9 November, 1809

A dry day, but extremely cold.  We got up early that Mrs V and Betsey might have their breakfasts before they went.  My Aunt advised Mrs V to let the coach go without them and take a Chaise and overtake at a mile or two on the road, for fear any one in it should speak of Mr Jones as they passed Bailbrook, which had not occurd to her.  They did so and got into the coach at the top of Kingsdown Hill.  I sat an hour with Emma.  My mother was very unwell and not up, so I hardly saw her.  My Aunt P and I went to Shockerwick, where we saw Miss Maria, Miss Elizabeth, Miss Ellen and Charlotte Wiltshire and Miss Louisa Savage.  We staid there an hour and then went on to Ashley to see a house that my Aunt had written about, but it was let two days ago.  My Aunt was sorry, as it was very comfortable and might have done for the winter.  When we came home we found a note from the Workmans to ask us to go to them this evening, but my Aunt sent an excuse, as were were tired and wishd to be quiet.  We calld on Mrs Noyes who was not at home and met Mr Noyes in the road who stoppd and shook hands with us.  We sat a long time at Mrs Man’s bath.  She and her daughters were very pleasant and good humourd. We calld at the Villa.  Dr Bradbelt and Mr Wilshire came to the door.  The former said Mrs B was gone to Bath to call on us, so we did not get out.  I was very glad, for I felt a repugnance at the idea of going into the house.

Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards
Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards

Friday, 10 November, 1809

My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Gibson and sat some time with her, saw Mr Rye and a son of Mr Cowchers there.  We then went to market.  In our way we met Major Coffin.  My Aunt askd him to dine with us today, but he was engaged.  From the market we went to my mother’s, where we staid a long time.  My Aunt Neate came in while we were there and we left her there and went to the Workmans, where we saw them and Mr and Mrs Broughton.  In our way back, we stopd at Gibbons’s and read the papers.  Captain and Mrs Saker, David and ? suppd with us and were very pleasant. My Aunt P came into my room when we went to bed and said there was no necessity for my burning a light, as she had one in the next room, so for the future I am not to have one.

Saturday, 11 November, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I went to Bally’s and Bartmans, where she wishd to make an enquiry.  In our way home she orderd a bonnet for herself.  We met Mr Wiltshire in the street, who walkd home with us, but did not come in.  I went to my mother’s and sat with her and Emma till four o’clock.  She was a little better today.  In my way home I met my Aunt Powell going to Mr Clarke’s, so I turnd about with her.  We dined and were alone all the evening.  My Aunt Neate has so bad a cold, she did not go out all day.  Mrs Sutton sent to enquire how we all were.

Sunday, 12 November, 1809

A fine day, but very cold.  My Aunt P and I went to church at Bath Wick, which is very refined and comfortable.  We calld on Mrs Ham after church and while we were out Mrs Saker calld here and after we returnd Miss Workman, the two Miss Mans, and a young lady with them.  Mrs Croak, her sister and daughter and Dr Davis calld.  As soon as they were all gone my Aunt and I went and sat an hour with Mrs Sutton, who is very unwell.  Mr Sutton and Miss Hill were gone to Church.  It began to rain after dark and continued all the evening.  Dr Davis calld again after tea and brought the plan of his house at Bradford, which he is very anxious my Aunt should take.  He staid with us till eleven o’clock.

St Mary's Church, Bathwick (Victoria Art Gallery).
St Mary’s Church, Bathwick (Victoria Art Gallery).

Monday, 13 November, 1809

A fine day after the rain, but very muddy.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s directly after breakfast and I went with my Aunt to Bally’s to number the boxes of books belonging to Cooper.  I left my Aunt there for a few minutes while I calld on my mother to say I could not dine with her today and afterwards my Aunt and I sat half an hour with her and saw Mrs Turner there.  From her house we walkd up to Salter’s to speak about the Green House plants.  Salter was not at home, but we went into the garden, which is beautiful.  When we came back we went to Gibbons’s and read the papers.  Rebecca Workman calld and we saw Major Coffin in the street, who stopd to speak to us.

Tuesday, 14 November, 1809

A fine day, but very cold.  I went to my mother’s as soon as I had breakfasted and staid there till two o’clock.  When I came home I found Mary Workman here.  We had some luncheon and then she went out with my Aunt and me.  We met Mr Graeme at the top of the street and came back again with him as I found they were not likely to go out again for some time.  I went by myself and took my Aunt’s lace veil to Mrs Frye’s (who is gone to live in Landsdown Road above Mr Hartley’s) to be mended and then went to my mother’s to dine and spend the rest of the day.  She had quite a bevy;  Miss L Grey, Miss Kitty Flemming, Mrs Wilkinson and Mr Turner.  I waited till ten o’clock and then, as my Aunt did not send for me, Charlotte walkd home with me.  I found my Aunts, the Workmans and Mrs Broughton just going to supper, the three latter had spent the evening here.

Wednesday, 15 November, 1809

A very fine day, but very cold.   I workd very hard till three o’clock making a shift for my Aunt P.  Mr Graeme, Captain Saker, Mrs Beckford and Mary Workman calld.  At three o’clock we went to the workshop at the bottom of Pulteney Street to speak about some coals and then calld and sat some time with Mrs Saker, who wanted us to dine there tomorrow, Saturday or Sunday, but my Aunt said it would be impossible.  My Aunt Neate went to Dr Gibson’s to play Chess.  We were alone all the evening and I workd very hard.

Thursday, 16 November, 1809

A beautiful day, but intensely cold.  My Aunt Powell and I went out soon after breakfast.  We calld at Mr Wiltshire’s to know if he was in Bath and went to a great many other places.  Calld and sat some time with the Workmans and Mrs Broughton and met Dr Davis in the street, who stopd and spoke to us.  Mrs Sutton calld, as did Mrs and the Miss Allens, but we did not see them.  My Aunt packd some of the shells in the evening.  I workd very hard till near one o’clock finishing my Aunt’s shift.

Friday, 17 November, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I finishd packing the shells, after which I tyed all the hampers with red tape and seald them with my Aunt P’s Seal JP.  There were eleven of them and it fully employd me from two o’clock till five, when Samuel Strong came and fetchd them to his house.  My Aunt Powell went for the permit.  She met Miss Workman, who went with her.  I sat half an hour with my mother and Emma after dinner, but came back to tea and arranged the things in my writing box, so as to leave it to be sent where we may be.  We did not go to bed till late.

Saturday, 18 November, 1809

A fine morning and very white frost, which as it frequently does, turnd to rain, but it was so slight it hardly wet the pavement.  My Aunt Powell and I went to the Post Office as soon as we had breakfasted to get a letter back that my Aunt had written to say we should be at Isleworth Monday.  We saw Mr Price, who was very civil, but said he cannot possibly let us have it, his orders from London were to strict, so my Aunt was obliged to write another to Mr Clutterbuck by the same Post.   When we came back we found Rebecca Workman here and Mary came soon after.  I left them here and went out and got some ribbon for my Aunt’s stuff gown and some needles and two laces for myself and sold two old mourning rings, that Cooper had given me, to Mrs Atkinson, who gave me twenty shillings for them.  I went to my mother’s, but did not stay many minutes.  Rebecca was still here when I came home.  I did not take off my cloak, but went to the Permit Office and from there to speak to Strong in the market.  I then came home again and staid till two o’clock and then went to the Post Office and Abbey Green about the permit and from there to my mother’s again, to whom I took ten pounds to assist her scanty pittance a little and then came home, where I found Mr Wiltshire and Mrs Noyes.  The latter was particularly friendly and pleasant and kissd us when she took leave.  My Aunt had two small wicker cages made for the birds, which the man brought home today. The writing box that Dear William gave me was also brought home very nicely repaird.  My Aunt Powell and I calld on Mrs Saker, having heard Captain S was very unwell but did not see her, as he was in bed.  We went to two or three other places and met Mrs Sutton and Miss Hill, who stopd and spoke.  We also saw Dr Davis and Captain Clutterbuck, who calld at seven o’clock.  My Aunt and I went again to the Abbey Green and succeeded in getting the permit.  In our way there my Aunt Powell caught her heel in the curbstone of the pavement and fell with such force that she pulled me down with her.  A boy passing very civilly helpd her up and fortunately she did not hurt herself, at least not materially.  I bruisd my knee a good deal.  I sat quiet the rest of the evening and went to bed very much tired.

Abbey Green, Church Street and part of the Abbey, c.1785 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Abbey Green, Church Street and part of the Abbey, c.1785 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Sunday, 19 November, 1809

A very fine day and a hard frost.  We read prayers at home and afterwards put all our things together (tho it was Sunday) to pack.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss Hay and Miss Workman calld.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s and Mrs Gibson’s’, my Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Allen.  We saw her and Miss Allen.  From there we went to Captain Saker’s.  Mrs Saker came down and askd us to go up into his room, where we found him in his night cap and dressing gown, a little better, but still very unwell and low spirited.  We sat there an hour and then came home to dinner.  We all three drank tea at my mother’s. She was not very well and was in bed, so we sat in her room.  I ran home at eight o’clock to desire Kitty would mince a little chicken and send to my mother for her supper, which she did very nicely.  We came home at ten o’clock.  My Aunt Neate and I went to bed soon after supper.  My Aunt P sat up late writing to Cooper.  My Aunt spoke to Farmer Ede about taking Old Dragon in to grass for the winter.

Monday, 20 November, 1809

A beautiful day, but intensely cold.  The frost was so hard in the night that there was ice in my room this morning and Farmer Ede, who was here while we were at breakfast, said it was as severe as he had ever felt it.  He has agreed to take Dragon at eight shillings a week and is to fetch him today.  He told my Aunt he could not possibly keep the asses under five shillings a week the two, which five shillings is to begin today.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s.  My Aunt P had a note from Mrs Gibson to wish us a pleasant journey, fancying we were going to leave Bath today.  The two Miss Mans and the Workmans calld.  We sat an hour with Captain and Mrs Saker.  He was a little better.  My Aunt bought me a stuff gown at Lucas’s.  We went to Gibbons’s to read the papers, where we saw Captain Ball. The Workmans dined and suppd here.  My Aunts and they playd Quadrille in the evening.  I cut out part of my gown and workd on it.  The Workmans did not go home till late, consequently it was late when we went to bed.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were out.

Tuesday, 21 November, 1809

A fine day, but very muddy, there having been rain in the night.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s, directly after breakfast, where she staid till ten at night.  Rebecca Workman calld and sat some time.  My Aunt and I were packing all the morning and did not go out till late.  I sewd up my two writing cases and the little satin wood table in green baize.  My Aunt and I went to Gibbons, where we saw Dr Gibson and Captain Eckersall.  The latter would have been very chatty, but my Aunt would not let him, as there were several people reading.  From there we went to Captain Saker’s, but as they were at dinner we did not go in.  I returnd with my Aunt as far as Laura Place and then went and sat with my mother and Emma till dinner time.  Poor Emma had one of her bad head aches.  My Aunt P and I dined alone.  She sent to the Workmans after dinner to ask them to come and drink tea with us, which they very good naturedly did.  We chatted till nine o’clock and then playd at Quadrille.  George fetchd my Aunt Neate at ten.  We went to Quadrille again after supper and playd till near twelve.  My Aunt P calld at Mrs Suttons’s door to say we would drink tea there tomorrow.

Wednesday, 22 November, 1809

A damp, cold, uncomfortable day and so very muddy we could hardly get along in the street.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s, my Aunt P and I to the Workmans, where we met Mr Anderdon by appointment, who was so kind as to give her some information about a house that is to be let near Taunton. From the Workman’s we went to the Saker’s.  He was very much better and in the drawing room.  We staid there some time and then went to Vigne the Watch makers, where we met Mr Tudor and then came home.  We all three drank tea at the Suttons.  They were extremely friendly.  Jane Hill shewd us two patch work quilts and a third she is at work on and Mrs S shewd us as great a curiosity as I ever saw, a Baby basket, pin cushion stuck in 1665.  We playd at Loo (I won 1/6), had some delicious milk punch and very bad cake and came home at ten o’clock.

Thursday, 23 November, 1809

A damp disagreeable day, which turnd to rain about four o’clock.  My Aunts were busy packing all the morning.  I workd hard on my gown.  Mrs Clements calld to make some enquiries about Kirkham, who is going to leave Mrs Watkins.  My Aunt N went to my mother’s just before dinner, but did not stay long.  My Aunt P and I did not go out the whole day.  I workd hard all the evening.

Friday, 24 November, 1809

A finish morning, but some showers in the course of the day and extremely muddy.  My Aunt P and I went to Strongs and had the hay bands repaird on the tables.  From there we went to Mrs Beckford’s.  She was not at home, but we sat some time with Miss Hay.  As we were returning, we encounterd Mr Wiltshire on horse back.  He walkd his horse by our sides as far as Paragon and there we parted.  We went to Captain Saker’s.  They were out.  From there we went to my mother’s, where we staid an hour and then to Bally’s to mail some of the boxes that had come undone.  We met Rebecca Workman in Broad Street.  We did not get home till late and, as my Aunt P and I were sitting close to the fire, we were both astonished and frightend at hearing a bird flying about the room.  It proved to be the Bone hill parrot, which is so wild, it was with great difficulty that George could catch it.  I was very much afraid it would have flown up the chimney, but we hung my coat before the fire and Ellen and I stood sentry to prevent it flying that way.  We were alone all the evening.

Saturday, 25 November, 1809

A very fine day, but extremely muddy.  My Aunt P and I went out directly after breakfast.  She went to market, I to my mother’s, who I found in bed but not very unwell.  I staid there till my Aunt calld for me, which was more than an hour.  From there we went to Lucas’s and paid his bill and then to Captain Saker’s.  They came to the door just as we knockd and went in with us.  We sat with them while he eat a basin of soup and then we all came out together. They walkd with us as far as Lange’s, where we wishd them good morning, after they had engaged us to dine with them tomorrow.  We met Mary Workman in the street, who walkd a little way with us.  We saw Salter at the Pump Room door and spoke to him about the plants.  My Aunt desired he would keep them all (84) till the spring.  We were alone all the evening and I workd hard at my gown.

Sunday, 26 November, 1809

A very fine day, after a very wet night.  My Aunt P and I went to Church at Bath Wick.  Rebecca Workman and Mr Wiltshire calld.  I went to my mother’s but staid only a few minutes.  She was better.  We all three dined at Captain Saker’s and met one of the pleasantest young men I have seen for a long time, a Captain Tarlton, a nephew of the General’s.  We spent a very sociable, chearful day, but did not stay supper, as Captain S had been an invalid.  Captain Tarlton, in the most good humourd manner in the world, offerd to walk home with us and gave my Aunt Neate his arm to our own door.  It was very fine when we came home, but raind extremely hard in the night.

Monday, 27 November, 1809

A very fine day, but muddy.  I workd on my gown and my Aunt P wrote some letters, so we did not go out till late.  My Aunt Neate went out just before us and calld on my mother.  We went to Arnold’s and got a draft of Cooper’s for 130 pounds changed.  We then went to Lange’s and got some fish at Naishes and calld at Gibbons’s in our way home.  The young man in the Shop very civilly lent my Aunt two papers for an hour.  We found the Workmans here, who were engaged to dine with us.  They told my Aunt Mr Anderdon had been with them in the morning to say he had determined to let his house near Taunton, in consequence of which, my Aunt wrote him a note to beg he would call here and tell her the particulars, which he very obligingly did, just after we had done tea and my Aunt has determind to go and see it tomorrow.  My Aunts and the Workmans playd Quadrille.  I finishd my gown.  We met Captain Tarlton in the street, who bowd and spoke to us as he passd.  The Workmans did not go home till twelve o’clock.

Tuesday, 28 November, 1809

A tolerable fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I got up by candle light that we might set off as soon as possible. My Aunt Neate got up to see us before we went. We left Bath about half past eight.  We had old Dawn Horses, so that we only changed there, without getting out of the Chaise and had the same driver  on to street, where they gave us very good horses on to Burnan Bridge.  From there we went to Creech to see the house that was advertised, but it was such a compleat hovel we would not look over it, but went on to Mr Anderdon’s at Henslade.  His mother receivd us very politely, but as it was too dark to see the house and grounds, my Aunt fixed with the old lady to go there tomorrow between nine and ten.  When we got into the Chaise to go to Taunton to sleep, the driver, who was remarkably civil, proposed his remaining at Taunton and taking us back tomorrow, which my Aunt agreed to his doing.  It was nearly dark when we reachd Taunton, where we found a delightful fire at the White Hart and great civility and attention from the waiter, but our dinner was badly dressd and our tea was not good.  However, to make up for it, we had a most excellent and comfortable bed and I never passd a better night in my life, tho we were kept awake near an hour by a person’s knocking to come in when we went to bed.  The waiter promised we should have the breakfast made exactly at eight o’clock.  I put on my new stuff gown.

Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835 (c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835
(c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 29 November, 1809

A fine day.  We were calld at seven and I made the breakfast as the clock was striking eight.  We got into the Chaise about nine and drove to Place Street House, about a mile out of Taunton, but left the Chaise a short distance from the house and walkd down a muddy lane to it. We only looked at the outside, which is pretty and then drove to Henlade, where we staid three hours.  The house is a wretched place, so extremely old and out of repair, all but the sitting rooms, which are excellent and the grounds as beautiful as the house is ugly, with an excellent garden. A delightful old woman, who has been servant in the family near forty years, shewd us the house and the farmer (her husband) walkd over the grounds with my Aunt, for it was so damp I would not go, but sat with old Mrs Anderdon by the fire who, by the bye, was very obliging and gave us some very nice cake and wine.  From there we went to Burrow Bridge and then on to Street where, who should we meet, but Captain Graves.  He looks extremely well, was very friendly and appeard really glad to see us and, I am sure on my part, the pleasure was unfeigned.  It was so dark when we got to Old Down that my Aunt hesitated whether she would sleep there or go on and as the waiter appraised her, it would be a very dark foggy night and strenuously pressed her staying.  She agreed.  We had our dinner as quick as though and every thing was so clean and well dressd it was a pleasure to see it.  Our tea was delicious and I never saw any thing equal to the civility and attention of the waiter.  Our bed was good, but not quite so comfortable I think as it was at Taunton.

Thursday, 30 November, 1809

A fine day.  We were calld at seven o’clock and as we were getting into the Chaise my Aunt askd Mr Johnson if he knew of any house to be let that would suit her.  He said Harvy House was to be let and advised our going to a Mr Miles, the Attorney who had the management of it in our way home, as it made only two miles difference.  We took his advice and stopd at a very pretty house at Stone Easton, where Mr Miles lives.  We found him just going to breakfast.  He gave my Aunt the particulars of the house, but said “A Gentleman had the refusal of it”.  We did not stay many minutes there and got home to breakfast about eleven o’clock, without any accident or inconvenience occurring on the road of any kind.  As soon as we had breakfasted I went to my mother’s and sat with them an hour. The mud was terrible in the streets.  I met Jane Hill and Mr Sutton in my way.  Jane walkd as far as Bond Street.  My Aunt sent my mother a woodcock by me, one of four she received from Cooper.  When I came back I found my Aunt just going out.  I went with her to Mr Hartley’s to take a letter to him from Cooper to ask for his vote for Lord Grenville of Oxford.  He was not well enough to see us, but Mrs James said she would give him the letter and Jones should let us know his answer tomorrow.  We came home immediately from there and had hardly sat down when Mr Anderdon came to speak to my Aunt about Henlade House.  As soon as he was gone we went out again and sat an hour with my mother, who had just eat her woodcock and relished it very much.  We met Major and Mrs Coffin, who stopd and spoke to us.  The Workmans sent in the evening to ask after us.  My Aunt P read aloud the first vol of Sketches of Character, which my mother was so kind to lend us and which is excessively amusing.  She finishd it before we came to bed.

Fashion plate for December 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for December 1809 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 1 December, 1809

A fine day.  My Aunt Neate went out soon after breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire and Mary Workman calld.  I heard from my Uncle James to say he was ready to pay us another hundred pounds each and to ask Emma and me to contribute a trifle towards paying the Duty and income tax of two small annuities left by Mrs Withers to a Mrs Johanna and Maria Chapman.  Of course we could have no objection to contribute the small proportion that came to our share.  I went with the letter to my mother’s.  Unfortunately she was not at home and tho I staid there an hour, did not see her.  Mrs Phillip calld while I was out.  She and the Admiral returnd to Bath a day or two ago.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Weston to see a lodging.  When we came there it was let.  We were caught in a violent storm of rain, but took shelter in a cottage, the mistress of which very obligingly went out and borrowd an umbrella for us.  We had a very sloppy, disagreeable walk home, but no more rain fortunately.  The woman calld in the evening for the umbrella and my Aunt gave her a shilling.  We read a second Vol of Sketches of Character and were delighted with it.  I wrote to my Uncle James.

Saturday, 2 December, 1809

A fine day after the rain of last night, for it pourd.  Mrs Beckford calld, but did not stay long.  Farmer Sandall came and receivd six shilling for Tythe from Cooper to Mr Jones.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Clemment and Tugwell Bank to pay in five pounds from Cooper to Mr Jones.  We met Captain Saker coming home.  He joind and went with us to the Bank and thence to his house.  We did not stay long there.  My Aunt wanted them to come and dine here tomorrow, but they declind it, as they go on Monday instead of Tuesday and Mrs Saker said she should have so much to do, it would not possible for them to come out.  From there we went to the Workmans to ask them to come to us this evening.  We met Mr and Mrs Barkley and Mr Forbes there.  We sat with them more than an hour.  In our way home I calld at my mother’s, where I did not sit down, as they were going to dinner.  Ann Keen lookd better I think than when she went to Weymouth.  I found my Aunt Neate there and we walkd home together.  Miss Silverthorn calld to ask my Aunt to send a message for her to Cooper when she wrote.  We met Mrs Phillip and Major and Mrs Coffin in the street.  The two latter joind and walkd some way with us.  The Workmans came early. They and my Aunts playd Quadrille, I read. Poor Rebecca and was very unwell all the evening and I playd her cards after supper.

Sunday, 3 December, 1809

A fine morning but it began to rain as we were coming from church and continued the rest of the day.  My Aunt P and I went to Bathwick Church, but we were so late I had not time to taste a morsel of breakfast and we did not get there till some time after the service had begun.  Mr Wiltshire calld soon after we came home and Miss Silverthorn came again today to bring a prescription Cooper had given her for my Aunt to enclose to him.  She told us all the news of Cheltenham.  We were alone for the rest of the day and evening  I heard from my Uncle James.

Monday, 4 December, 1809

A fine morning, but it began to rain about twelve o’clock and continued showery the rest of the day.  Mr Anderdon calld directly after breakfast, but I did not see him.  My mother sent a note to ask if my Aunt would spare me to go shopping with Emma, who wanted my opinion on several things she was going to buy.  I went to them directly and found Mr Turner there, who was detaind some time by a shower.  Miss Ann Keen was gone out.  Mrs Fox calld on my mother while I was there.  As soon as the rain was over, my mother, Emma and I went to a great many shops.  Emma bought a very pretty black velvet bonnet, a stuff gown and a scarlet cloak.  It raind once or twice while we were out and was intolerably muddy.  Miss Ann came in a few minutes after us.  I pin’d a white feather in Emma’s straw bonnet and trimd my mother’s with ribbon.  She gave me a black feather.  I staid with them till near four o’clock and then came home to dinner.  Miss Ann very kindly told me to stay and spend the day.  Mr and Mrs Sutton and Miss Hill drank tea here.  We playd Loo till half past ten, when they went home.  I lost 1/6.

Tuesday, 5 December, 1809

A fine day.  Mary Workman call’d and sat some time.  Poor Rebecca’s cold was very indifferent.  As soon as we had had our luncheon, my Aunt Powell and I call’d on Admiral and Mrs Phillip.  We found him looking ill and extremely low.  From there we went to Miss Lovelock’s and from there to my mother’s.  Miss Ann had dined out and my mother and Emma were going to drink tea at Miss Guy’s and I was delighted to hear dear Emma was going to the Play with Miss Louisa Guy, who had very kindly given her a ticket to see Mr Banister.  We staid with them till very near five o’clock and then came home to dinner and were alone all the evening.

Wednesday, 6 December, 1809

A fine day, but very muddy.  My Aunt Powell and I went to call on Miss Ann Keen.  We sat there for a long time.  I cut out a scarlet cloak for Emma and promised to make it for her.  She went out with my Aunt and me to several shops.  At one we saw a beautiful scarlet and white trimming, which we fixd upon for Emma’s cloak.  She walkd about two hours with us and then went home.  We came home some time before dinner.  I sent for Emma’s cloak after dinner and workd on it all the evening.  My Aunt Neate was so kind to get out of the carriage seat for me, a piece of white sansenet to line the laced part of that Cooper gave me at Weymouth, which will save her 4/6.

Thursday, 7 December, 1809

A dreadful wet morning.  It raind but held up about twelve o’clock and was fine the rest of the day, but extremely muddy.  My Aunt Neate went to Dr Gibson’s to play Chess and my Aunt P and I to market and other places.  Mr Anderdon and Mr Wiltshire calld, but I did not see either.  Miss Wiltshire calld and sat some time.  Dr Davis, Major and Mrs Coffin and the two Workmans dined here to keep Cooper’s birth day (he completes his 44 year).  It was a stupid sort of a day, very different from the one of the year before last passd at dear Bath Easton, when we were all gaiety and happiness, or indeed from last year’s, tho that was not so pleasant a one as I have spent.  Dr Davis, the two Workmans and my Aunt Neate playd Whist.  The Coffins went away at nine, the Dr at ten and then the Workmans (who staid to supper)  and my Aunts sat down to Quadrille and I workd on Emma’s cloak.  I wrote to Mr Touray to say he would receive 97 pounds ten shillings from me of my Uncle James and the same for Emma.

Friday, 8 December, 1809

A dry day, but very cold.  My Aunt P was not very well and breakfasted in bed.  Rebecca Workman came while we were at breakfast.  Miss Silverthorn came to try on a gown for my Aunt P.  Soon after she was gone we went out and calld on Admiral Phillip.  Mrs P was not at home..  We sat there some time.  The Admiral was low.  We saw Mrs and Miss Christie there.  We were out till near dinner time and my Aunt increasd her cold very much.  My Aunt Neate was so kind to go to the Walks to get the trimming for dear Emma’s cloak, which I finishd this evening and it really looks beautiful.

Saturday, 9 December, 1809

A dry morning.  My Aunt P’s cold was so bad she breakfasted in bed.  I wrote a note to my mother and sent home Emma’s cloak.  I went out as soon as I had breakfast to do a great many commissions that my Aunt wishd done.  I went first to my mother’s, where I found Emma ready to go out with me in her old Pelisse, but I insisted on her putting on her new cloak, which she did.  We had not been out half an hour when it began to rain, so I sent her home and went about by myself till I had done every thing that was set down and came home almost up to my knees in mud.  Mr Anderdon calld to tell my Aunt she might have his house at Henlade if she thought it would suit her and askd 130 guineas a year for it.  She begd a little time to consider.  She wrote him a note in the evening and offerd him 120 pounds.  He came down immediately and said if she would make it guineas, she should have it and he would allow her the six pounds difference the first year, to paint.  She agreed to his terms and we are to go to it in about ten days for three years, if we should live so long.  I workd very hard all the afternoon and evening making a cloth cloak for my Aunt Powell, which we finishd after supper.

Sunday, 10 December, 1809

A very fine morning, after a tremendous night, for it pourd and blew a hurricane.  My Aunt P and I went to church at Bathwick, but in the middle of the Litany she was taken so ill we were obliged to leave the church.  The New Opener very kindly came out with us and went to Mr Gunnings and brought us a tumbler of water and one of Mrs Gunning’s servants came with some Hartshorn and persuaded us to go in there, which we did, and nothing could be more attentive and obliging than she was.  I gave my Aunt some Hartshorn and water, which relieved her a good deal.  Mrs Gunning came down stairs and wanted to persuade my Aunt to have a glass of wine but she declined it.  As soon as she understood my Aunt wishd to receive the Sacrament, she very obligingly begd us to sit there till the church service was over and then go in to the Communion, which we did.  When we came home we found Miss Ann Keen here, who did not stay long.  As soon as she was gone I went to my mother’s to take her 5 pounds 17 shillings and 8d, her dividend Mr Touray had enclosed to me, with 27 pounds ten shillings of the 97.10.00  he receivd of my Uncle James for me, twenty four of which I gave to her, sincerely wishing it had been two thousand. It raind extremely hard while I was there and was uncomfortably muddy as I returnd.  I found Rebecca Workman here and Mr Wiltshire calld.  He brought my Aunt a letter from dear Mrs Porcher, in which she say she has just heard from her brother Henry in India, who tells her our beloved William was well the 15th of May and going to sail for the Manillas the next day with a valuable cargo.  God in his great mercy grant he may be fortunate and prosperous.  It raind a torrent all the evening.  I heard from Mr Touray and wrote to him.

Thursday, 14 December, 1809

I cannot remember all we have done since Sunday, except that we drank tea at the Suttons on Monday and the Workmans drank tea here last night.

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I were out the whole day shopping.  We calld at Admiral Phillip’s.  He was in better spirits, met Mrs Batten and Mr Sutton there.  We drank tea and suppd at Miss Ann Keen’s, only ourselves, my mother and dear Emma, who was very unwell. We playd Loo and spent a very chearful evening.  We were detaind there till twelve o’clock by torrents of rain and were obliged to walk home in it at last, for it continued all night and blew such a gale, I should not have been able to stand up if my Aunt Neate had not held my arm.  I would not have come home in a chair for a great deal.

Friday, 15 December, 1809

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell went out directly after breakfast.  I staid at home to line her new straw bonnet.  As soon as I had done that I went to Miss Lovelock’s to have my scarlet pelisse tried on.  Miss Silverthorn was not at home.  I waited till she came in and fitted in on me.  From there I went to my mother’s and Miss Ann was not at home.  Poor Emma was very unwell.  I did not sit down there, as my Aunt was waiting for me to go to Bath Easton with her.  We drove to the Villa.  Mrs Bradbelt was not at home, but the Dr was.  We were shown (by a Drab of a maid servant) into the drawing room, without a fire, while she went to find her Master who, when he came in, begd us to sit down there, instead of taking us into a room with a fire.  After sitting a short time, my Aunt offerd to walk into the field with him to explain something he wanted to know.  While we were there, we were joind by a pleasant young man who was introduced as Mr Bateman.  We lookd at some alterations the Dr is making in the garden and Greenhouse and then went thro the dining room and up into the breakfast room, which they inhabit as their common sitting room.  The Dr rang the bell for little Maria, who was very sociable.  After staying there more than an hour we went to Selman’s to get some gloves.  While we were there Mr Wiltshire, Mr Williams, Mr Scrim and Mr Savage rode up and had a little chat.  Mr W was in remarkably good spirits. We calld at Mrs Maundar’s.  She was not at home.  We stopd at Mr Jones’s Lodge to deliver a message to Ettles and then at the chair makers at the bottom of Guinea Lane, but it was so dusk we could not see them to advantage, so are to go there tomorrow.

When we came home we found the Workmans here, who were engaged to dine with us.  They and my Aunts play’d Quadrille in the evening.  Mary went home in a Chair, as she had a bad cold.  My mother sent me a present of a Plaid.

Saturday, 16 December, 1809

A fine day and a hard white frost.  I went to Lange’s as soon as I had breakfasted and bought some ribbon, needles and laces.  Miss Silverthorn sent home my Pelisse, fitting beautifully.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Strong’s and took a quantity of chalk out of a box belonging to my Aunt Neate and desired the box sent here to have other things put in it.  From there we went to Wilcox’s and chose some chairs, then to Bally’s (where my Aunt bespoke two rugs). We went to a great many other places and then came home just, as it was beginning to rain and it literally poured all the rest of the evening.  Miss Ann Keen, my mother and Emma drank tea and suppd with us.  My mother came as Miss Keen’s guest.  I wish with my heart she had been her guest when we first came to Bath.  We spent a very chearful sociable evening and nominally playd Loo, but Mr Bartram came with patterns of papers and borderings and was here backwards and forwards all the evening.  After our friends were gone my, Aunt askd him to sit and have some supper which he did and staid till after twelve o’clock.  My Aunt selected a great many patterns of borders to take with her.  I heard from Mr Touray with Emma’s, Mary and mine in two Bank Post Bills, one for 100 pounds the other £21.5.9.

Sunday, 17 December, 1809

Incessant rain through the day.  While we were at breakfast Jane Hill came to ask if my Aunt would like to go to a Launa Chapel with her, as she had a seat at her service, which she accepted.  Miss Silverthorn came and staid till my Aunt returnd from Church.  Lady and Miss Emily Smith calld, but we had said “not at home”.  Mr Wiltshire came to shake hands before we went, but was so wet he would not sit down.  We were obliged to have a coach to go to Admiral Phillip, where we were engaged to dine. When it came to the door the rain pourd down in such a torrent we could not get into it till it had abated a little.  The Admiral was in very good spirits and Mrs Phillip also. They both kissd us.  When we came away, we sat an hour with the Workmans in our way home, to take leave of them.  Saw Rebecca’s pelisse, which is very handsome.  She gave me some seeds of the Indian Teak tree and one of an Indian flowering shrub, which they say is very beautiful.  As we stopd at our own door, Mrs Gibson’s servant was giving a message from her to us, wishing us a pleasant journey tomorrow.  We had some bread and cheese and went to bed.  It was a beautiful moonlight night when we came home.

Arthur Phillip (1738-1814), Vice-Admiral, first Governor of New South Wales by Francis Wheatley, oil on canvas, 1786 (National Portrait Gallery).
Arthur Phillip (1738-1814), Vice-Admiral, first Governor of New South Wales by Francis Wheatley, oil on canvas, 1786 (National Portrait Gallery).

Monday, 18 December, 1809

A terrible wet day and it did not cease raining at all till the evening.  Croker came in the morning to say we might stay till tomorrow, if it would be more convenient, which my Aunt agreed to do, if it did not hold up.  Miss Lovelock came while we were at breakfast.  She had very kindly gone to the Coach Office to get some Cheltenham Salts for my Aunt, which she had sent to Cheltenham for, and was desirous they should arrive in time to go with us.  Morris brought the fringe and very civilly shewd me how to make it up.  Mrs Harrison sent the little taper candlestick my Aunt had bought of her.  About the middle of the day Croker came in again to know if my Aunt meant to go, as Mr and Mrs Ensor would take the house for a week, to be near the Smiths and wishd to sleep in it tonight.  My Aunt said if that was the case, she would certainly go, of course.  We were in a great bustle to get every thing packd and done.  We had some beef fried to answer for a dinner, but had hardly time to eat it.  Samuel Strong came to receive his Bill.  As soon as we had swallowed our beef, we all went in Chairs to wish my mother and beloved Emma goodbye.  My Aunt Powell calld on the Smiths in her way, but only saw Miss Emily.  Dear Emma was very unwell and very low at parting with us, as I was leaving them. We did not stay half an hour with them.  The Chair waited and brought us back.  Wilcox the Chair maker came and brought a pair of the ornaments for the curtain cornices.  He askd for my Aunt’s directions, which I gave him, but he was so tipsy he left it behind him.  We got into the Carriage about half past five and, luckily for Ellen and George (who was on the Box), reachd Old Downe in less than three hours, without a drop of rain.  We had four excellent horses belong to Old Downe.  Every thing was as comfortable as if we had been at the dear Villa, which is saying as much as can be said for any place.  We desired to be calld early, as my Aunt intended to breakfast at Street.  The two large birds and Ghita came in the Carriage with us.  Rover ran by our side and was a good deal tired.

Tuesday, 19 December,  1809

A dry day.  We got up by candle light and had four horses to Street, where we breakfasted.  Mrs Maynard was all civility and attention.  We had the same driver to Burrow Bridge we had when we went to see the house at Creech and the same driver from Burrow Bridge, who drove us to Creech.  When we arrived at Hendlade we found Mr Anderdon up to his ears in confusion and instead of our being able to sleep there tomorrow, he told us it would not be possible for us to take possession till Saturday!  We drove to Sth Castle at Taunton, which was so full they gave us a very uncomfortable room, looking into the yard and such small bedrooms, we could hardly walk round the bed.  My Aunt told them if she could not have a better room tomorrow, she should go to the White Hart.  Mrs Sweet (the Mistress) was not very civil or attentive, but our dinner was very nicely dressd.  Poor Rover was so tired and stiff, he was obliged to come on the Box, between George and Ellen from Street.  We had our tea late, by way of supper.  I wrote to my mother.  Kitty and Harriet arrived at nine o’clock by the Stage.

Wednesday, 20 December, 1809

A fine morning, but very showery in the course of the day.  They put us into the great Ballroom to breakfast, which was as uncomfortably large as the room last night was too small.  Mr Anderdon calld while we were at breakfast and soon after he was gone, the waiter told us he had got a better room for us and shewd us into a delightful one, with windows looking both ways.  My Aunt Powell and I went out to three or four shops to enquire the price of furniture and were caught in the rain.  We stood some time under the Market for shelter, but I found it was not likely to hold up, so I came back to the Inn and sent George to my Aunt with the umbrella and she staid out some time after me.

We had our dinner and tea, as yesterday, and went to bed.

Thursday, 21 December, 1809

A showery day, as yesterday.  As soon as we had breakfasted, we got into the Carriage and went to Henlade, where we staid looking about three hours.  My Aunt Neate walkd over every part of the ground my Aunt P is to have, and is more delighted with it every time she sees it.  On our return to Taunton, my Aunt P and I went to some shops, amongst others, to the Pastry Cook’s, where we eat some cakes, bought a shilling one and I bespoke a dozen and a half of mince pies.  I bought a 16th and my Aunt an 8th of a Lottery Ticket.  Mine cost me £1.11.0.  We dined and drank tea, as yesterday.

Friday, 22 December, 1809

A wet, uncomfortable day, notwithstanding which my Aunt P and I went out.  She bought a washstand stand and a Pembroke table, chose some stair carpeting and Blanquets and a great many things for the kitchen use.  We went to the Brewers and bespoke some beer, which he promised, but did not send.  We were out till it was nearly dark and dined and drank tea as yesterday.

Saturday, 23 December, 1809

A dry day, but excessively muddy.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Market, which was one of the largest and best supplied I ever saw.  Indeed, it was more like a Fair than a Market and so crowded and we were knockd and pushd about so much, that I was glad to get out of it and hope I shall never go to Taunton Market again.  My Aunt sent all she bought to Mr Cox’s, the ironmonger, of whom she bought her kitchen furniture, who is the civilist and most obliging creature I ever saw, and said he would at any time take in anything for her and take care of it till she sent for it.  We waited some time for the Cart Mr Anderdon said should come from Henlade to fetch our purchases.  At last Farmer Furber came to say it was on the road and would be here in a quarter of an hour.  My Aunt left George to see everything put into it and then followed us on the poney she has bought of Mr Anderdon.  Kitty and Ellen went on the Box and we overtook Harriet on the road and the driver very good naturedly stopd and desird her to get up behind, which she did.  We found a woman here to let us in and every thing in such a state of FILTH it was impossible to move about without dirtying one’s clothes.  As one walkd along, we had some bread and cheese that we brought with us for our dinner and tea for our supper and went to bed, very uncomfortable.  Mrs Furber came up from her lodgings for a few minutes, but did not stay.

Sunday, 24 December, 1809

A dry day and quite mild.  Tho it was Sunday we were obliged to unpack some of our things and bustle about a great deal.  It is impossible for imagination to picture the downright nastiness and state of filth that the kitchen and offices are in.  How the peaple could walk about in them I cannot think, much more live in them.  Kitty said if she could have lookd thro a glass and seen the condition they were in, not a million of money would have tempted her to come here.  She contrived to roast us a chicken very nicely for our dinner.  My Aunt Neate went to bed early, before we had our bread and cheese.

Christmas Day, Monday, 25 December, 1809

A dry day and quite warm.  My Aunt had intended going to Church and orderd the horses from Taunton, but when she found there was no Sacrament, she sent the horses back and read Prayers at home.  The Singers came and sung a Psalm.  My Aunt gave them 2/6d.  A poor woman brought a letter from the Post.  My Aunt gave her a 1/- for a Christmas Box.  Farmer Furber, his wife and maid and old Ephingen? dined here.  Neither the beef or turkey were half done enough, but the oyster sauce and plum pudding were excellent.  My Aunt gave them a bottle of red and white wine in the kitchen.  Mrs Furber came into the parlor after dinner and told us a great deal about old Mr Anderdon.  We went to bed early.  I had a nice letter from my mother.  She says dear Emma is better.

Tuesday, 26 December, 1809

A dry day, after a very wet night and as mild and warm as Spring.  Some women came begging.  My Aunt gave them 2/6d, but told them she did not think it right or proper of them to come the moment she came into the house.  Two men came from Taunton to sort and arrange the books.  This house is so very old and out of repair, I doubt its standing even for the three years my Aunt has taken it for, and I am sure it can never be comfortable, for it requires a great deal of money laid out on the bedrooms, to make them even decent at present.  They are more like rooms in a Parish Work House, than like those inhabited by a genteel family and my Aunt cannot afford even to new paper and paint them, much more new furnish them.  My Aunt P and I placed and cut the new carpet for the stairs and my Aunt bound it in the evening.  I workd on my shift.

Wednesday, 27 December, 1809

A most beautiful day.  Mr Pool came from Taunton to take a catalogue of Mr Anderdon’s books and a bell hanger also came to alter the bell.  Martin arrived with two waggon loads of goods from Bath about three o’clock and unloaded them, part by day light and the rest by candlelight.  We all workd hard in the morning to clear the Oak Room to receive them and were much tired at night.

Thursday, 28 December, 1809

A lovely day.  My Aunt Neate, who walkd all round the fields after breakfast, said it was like Spring and quite warm in the sun.  I was employd all day cutting out and making a new carpet for Cooper’s bed, which is to be put up in one of the sitting rooms as a spare bed, and very hard work it is.  Mr Poole came and finishd the books.  He took my Almanack to have a new one put in.  After tea I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 29 December, 1809

A fine morning, but after breakfast directly rain came on, which continued the rest of the day.  The whitewasher came and whitend George’s pantry and the ceiling of the staircase.  The carpenter put up the board to fill the vacancy at the top of the book case in the Library.  I workd very hard all the morning, fitting a green baize to the floor of the small ante room to the Library and getting it ready for Kitty and Ellen to make in the evening,  I was very much tired in the evening and my spirits so low, I could hardly refrain from crying.  I went to bed before my Aunts.  The bell hanger was so civil to take my letter to my mother to the Post.

Saturday, 30 December, 1809

A fine morning.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Taunton as soon as she had finishd her breakfast. I went without, at least with very little, as she could not wait till I had eat mine.  We went thro the Market three or four times.  It was very full, but not near so crowded as last Saturday.  The streets were perfectly dry when we went in to Taunton, but it began to rain soon after we got out of the Chaise and continued most part of the time we were there however.  We walkd to all the shops we wanted to go to (not a few) and brought the Chaise home so full we had hardly room to sit.  There was a whole piece of carpeting from Davey’s for the Library, a large basket of glass, some tin ware, plants, apples, butter, eggs, Rind? seed, oats for the fowls, peas and beans for the Gander, two sheep skin mats, a bottle of Capers, a quart of spirit of wine, a pint of Verjuice and three quires of elephant paper. We came home coverd with mud about three o’clock and went into the garden directly to show Ephraim where to plant the honeysuckles and clematis.  In the evening I planted a great many of the bulbous roots we brought from the Villa with us in pots, that they might bloom early.  I hope they will flower well.  Most of the Hyacinths are spoilt, I am afraid.  I also put the essences to the spirit of wine to make the Lavender Water.  I got my Almanac from Mr Poale’s, very nicely done.  He charged 2/2d.  At Bath they made my Aunt pay 3/6d.

Sunday, 31 December, 1809

A fine morning and as warm out of door as Summer.  I fed and dressd the birds before my Aunt read Prayers.  My Aunt Powell and I took a long walk.  We went to the top of the lawn, thro a small field and up part of the Lane that leads to Stoke.  It began to rain soon after we set out and raind quite fast all the time we were coming back.  We came in and had some luncheon and then went to the Pleasure ground, the other side of the road, which is really very pretty, by the side of the river.  We put Rover into the water two or three times to wash off the mud with which he was covered, and brought him in quite clean.  We dined at half past three o’clock and I wrote and read in the evening.

 

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

 

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