1810 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for January 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 21 January, 1810

We have been so compleatly taken up for the last three weeks, I have not had a moment to do anything but work.  The house has been full of peaple, white washing, colouring and cleaning the latter of which was particularly necessary, as I never saw (and I am sure could not picture to myself) any place so very filthy as this was.  It now begins to be a little more comfortable, tho I cannot yet fancy it home.  I have cut out and made a new carpet for the Library and very nearly compleated the fringe for the curtains, which are put up, as they also are in the Dining Room.

A most beautiful day, bright sunshine and hard frost.  We all went to Church for the first time and saw some smart looking peaple there.  Farmer Furber was so obliging to go in with us and opend the Pew door, as we did not know which it was.  It is a most comfortable Pew, large and private.  There was a great deal of ice in one part of the road, which alarmd my Aunt P very much in going, so we did not get into the Carriage until we had passd it on our return.  We had some very nice peas soup for our luncheon when we came home.  Our dear Cooper arrived at half past seven to dinner (intending to stay here a few days) in his way from Devon to Weymouth.  He is looking remarkably well and is in excellent spirits and just as pleasant and good humourd as he used to be.  He told us a great deal of news.  He had seen the Vassalls of Totnes, Mrs Fanwell and dear Maria Bent, all of whom, he says, enquired in the most affectionate manner after us.  We did not go to bed very early.

Monday, 22 January, 1810

A very cold day and dull looking, but dry in the morning.  Cooper received me very kindly before breakfast and was affectionate and attentive afterwards, as he used to be.  Both my Aunts accompanied him with his dogs and gun.  Farmer Furber was so obliging to go with them.  I staid at home to write to my mother.  Cooper shot one of the ducks that belong to the premises and which are a breed between the wild and tame.  My Aunt Neate did not go far with them, as it began to snow and they came in about two o’clock, without having seen anything but the ducks.

We had Cooper’s Taunton Paper, which was a great treat, as we have not seen one before, since we came here.  He has very kindly said we may have it every week, sending it to him afterwards.  He and my Aunt N playd Chess before dinner and some games after, but not all the evening.  He shewd us some Charades and poetic epistles he and others had written while he was in Devonshire.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 23 January, 1810

Quite a white world when we got up this morning, as it had snowd very much in the night.  As soon as we had breakfasted Cooper, notwithstanding the snow, took his gun and, accompanied by the farmer, walkd out for some hours, but was not fortunate enough to see a bird of any kind and came home quite disappointed.  He and my Aunt Neate playd Chess before dinner and after tea.  We dined in the Library and sat in the Dining Room, as Cooper thought the latter the warmest.

Captain Cooper
John Hutton Cooper

Wednesday, 24 January, 1810

The snow nearly all gone, but very cold and wet.  Cooper and my Aunt Powell walkd for some time and both came in very muddy and draggled.  My Aunt P lookd over Cooper’s cravats and handkerchiefs, a great many of which want replenishing.  I assisted in getting some more ready for him to take with him.  He made us a present of a dozen between us, beautiful ones that he thought too fine and delicate for his wear.  He was a merry as a grig all the evening.  He and my Aunt playd Chess till supper, after which he wrote a prescription for my Aunt P.  I workd hard to tack a shirt together for him to try on tomorrow morning when, I am sorry to say, he leaves us.  We did not sit up late.

Thursday, 25 January, 1810

A very dull day, at least it appeard so to me.  We got up earlier than usual, as Cooper had ordered his horses to be here at ten exactly.  I was down stairs before my Aunts.  C received me very affectionately.  He had seen Sarah Poole and her husband and was prescribing for them.  When my Aunt Neate came down he desired to have the stamps to give her, my mother’s, and her own half year annuity.  As he was going to write the Drafts, she very indelicately (at least to my feelings) told him he had never paid them the first quarter’s annuity after my Aunt C’s death.  He said he was not aware of it, but if it was so, he would do it now.  She made a very slight objection to his so doing, but it ended in his giving the money, very much to my mortification, as he was evidently very much disconcerted.  He has given my Aunt Powell a Newfoundland dog which he gave seven guineas for at Weymouth.  He is a very clever fellow, but very ugly.  Cooper took with him my Aunt C’s picture.  He sent Allen back for it, having left it on the breakfast table and we none of us saw it till he was out of sight.  I was very much out of spirits and uncomfortable the whole day.  Cooper made each of us a present of a ewe and lamb, which Framer Furber is to chuse for us from Mr Anderdon’s famous flock, and which the former has the conscience to charge Cooper eighteen guineas for.  I shall not accept the one he kindly intended for me, which will take off six guineas from the twelve he has given my mother.

Lion: A Newfoundland Dog by Edwin Landseer, 1824 (V&A)
Lion: A Newfoundland Dog by Edwin Landseer, 1824 (V&A)

Friday, 26 January, 1810

A heavy day, but not wet.  My Aunt Powell and I went as far as where the old orchard stood with the farmer, to look at the wood, all of which my Aunt has agreed to take.  The farmer very obligingly brought a fleece of the real Merino ram, for us to look at and gave us each a small lock of the wool.  George went to Taunton for the Paper and brought a letter directed here for my mother.  It is one written by her to my brother in N.S.W. and dated 1803.  I workd all day making a pair of pockets.  I had a very kind letter from my Uncle James.

Saturday, 27 January 1810

A frosty day.  I did not go out at all.  Finished my pockets and new bound a pair my Aunt Neate was so kind to lend me.  Ephraim took the Paper for Cooper to Taunton and brought my Aunt P a letter from him.  He had a very pleasant journey and got to Weymouth in good time for the Mess Dinner.

A man brought a fox he had caught, to ask my Aunt to give him something.  It was so very fine a one, that she told him if he could stuff, it she would buy it, which he did tolerably and she gave him 10/6d for it.

Sunday, 28 January 1810

A very hard frost and intensely cold.  The fog, which was very thick, froze as it fell and coverd all the trees with an ice that lookd beautiful.  We all three went to Church at two o’clock (for the Service here is alternate, as at Bath Easton).  George and Ellen went on the Box.  We had a much better Clergyman than last Sunday.  Sarah Poole came to fetch the medicine for her husband and the ointment for her finger.  I wrote all the evening.

Monday, 29 January, 1810

Still frosty and very cold.  I workd hard all day at my shifts and did not stir out.  I wrote a long letter to my mother, which George took to Taunton.  The Blacksmith came to measure the grates to make some spikes to the top bars to prevent the wood falling off.  I bathed my feet when I went to bed.

Tuesday, 30 January, 1810

A damp, cold thaw.  I was up in my Aunt’s room most part of the morning, as the carpenter was there mending chests of drawers and she did not like to stay with him alone.  The rest of the day and evening I workd hard.  It was our monthly wash.

Wednesday, 31 January, 1810

A compleat thaw and as mild out of doors as Spring.  I walkd in the garden a short time and in the course of the day partly made a curtain for my Aunt Neate’s room of two dark colored ones belonging to Cooper.  I put it up before dinner and in the evening finishd my shift. While we were at dinner the Blacksmith sent up the Taunton Paper, which had been left at his house.

Fashion plate for February 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for February 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Thursday, February 1, 1810

A beautiful day, quite warm.  I dressd the birds after breakfast and went to the tool house and had a China rose and another plant brought in.  I put the bulbous roots out of the window to have the air and also the little bird.  After he had been out some time, one of the nasty cats saw him and jumpt on the cage and would have killd him if I had not, very fortunately, been in the room.  I do not know which was most frightend, the bird or myself.  I finishd the curtain in my Aunt Neate’s room.  A soldier came from Weymouth with a letter from Cooper and to fetch Tiger, whose original Mistress has begd so hard to have again, that Cooper could not refuse, but has promised my Aunt a puppy of Tiger’s sisters.  The man led him away with a collar and chain.  It began to rain about dinner time and continued all the evening.  I workd hard.

Friday, 2 February, 1810

A compleat wet day.  I do not think it ceasd raining once.  I workd hard all day and evening too, preparing the curtains for my Aunt Powell’s room.  I partly put them up, but the rod was so badly made I was obliged to heat one end of it in the fire to punch the hole longer, before it would go on the hook.

Saturday, 3 February, 1810

A fine day.  I was out in the garden and pigs’ plot with my Aunt Powell some time.  I saw the little pig for the first time.  When I came in I partly varnished the Paper coverings for the flower pots and was just gone up stairs to wash my hands to go to work, when my Aunt Neate (who was painting the stair case) came to say somebody knockd at the door.  George was gone to Taunton, so Kitty was obliged to see who it was.  My Aunt, desiring if it was any visiters, she would say we were not at home.  It proved to be Mrs and two Miss Balls, who live in the village.  It was very fortunate we were none of us in the parlor when they passd the window, as we could not then have been denied and the room was in such confusion, I do not know how we could have received them.  I workd very hard from two o’clock till ten at night and finishd my third shift.  It began to rain about five o’clock and continued all the evening.  I had a nice long letter from dear Emma.

Sunday, 4 February, 1810

A beautiful sunshine day.  We read Prayers at home, that is my Aunt Powell and me, for my Aunt Neate walkd over the fields instead.  I dressd the birds and put the remainder of the bulbous roots in glasses of water to make them shoot, if I can, before I put them in pots.  I fear I shall not save more than two of the Hyacinth roots out of the number I brought from the Villa.  I took a few turns in the garden and was very much surprised when I came in to find the soldier here, who came last Thursday to fetch poor Tiger.  He has lost the dog and came to see if he had returnd here.  He says he slept at home last night, about 17 miles off (at which time he ought to have been at Weymouth with the dog) and that somebody who has a spite against him let the dog out of the stable, where he was tied up, at twelve o’clock last night.  That he traced him this morning by the marks of his chain and footsteps as far as Ilminster, eight miles from Stoke where he slept.  There he lost the track and tho he enquired, could hear nothing of him, so came here in hopes the dog had found his way back.  The man appears excessivly stupid and almost an idiot.  My Aunt advised him to make the best of his way to Weymouth, as his Furlough expired last night and she sent George to Ilminster on the poney to make enquiries about poor Tiger, have him Cried and offer half a guinea reward for him.  George is to sleep there and return in the morning.  I wish he may be so fortunate to find the dog, which he may, if the man has told the truth.  I began a letter to dear Emma.

Monday, 5 February, 1810

A very fine day.  We had the boxes of books belonging to Cooper taken out of the room where they were standing, to the gravel in the front of the house to unpack, as my Aunt had found some cockroaches several evenings in the room where they stood.   One large case had hundreds in it and a few in another, but all the rest were free.  George came home about twelve o’clock, but had not been so lucky as to find poor Tiger.  At two o’clock my Aunt P and I went to Mr Ball’s to return their visit.  They were denied.  We calld on Mrs Furber and sat a few minutes and then came home.  It was so terribly muddy we could hardly get along, and at one place my Aunt thought she should be obliged to return. I finishd the rest of the books that were out after we came home.  A man brought a very handsome Gray Hound that had followed him on the road, to know if it was the dog we had lost.  I workd in the evening.

Tuesday, 6 February, 1810

A fine day, but a very cold wind.  The remaining two boxes of books were taken out after breakfast and my Aunt P, I, Kitty and Ellen were hard at work wiping them when we saw two ladies in mourning coming to the house.  We came in to receive them.  They were the two Miss Balls, the eldest of whom (who is the image of Miss Geatman and appears a pleasant girl, the younger a little ugly whipper snapper, always setting her sister to rights, but very obliging to us).  They staid an hour and a half.  Ellen and I finishd the books after they were gone, which is a good job done.

A gentleman farmer came to the  house with Farmer Furber, to ask my Aunt if she knew any lady who wanted a good Mansion House with eighteen acres of land, three miles from Wincanton, as he had such a one to let (she could not hear of any thing of the kind when she was in search of a house for herself).  I workd hard on the Fringe all the evening.

Wednesday, 7  February, 1810

A mild day with now and then a drizzling rain.  My Aunt P and I went to Farmer Dean’s after breakfast to get some barley for the poultry.  The mud was so deep we had great difficulty to get along, but still greater to into their house, for it is a perfect pig stye all round it and my Aunt made their son shovel away some of the mire at their gate for us to return.  I never saw a more obliging civil woman than Mrs Dean in my life.  We sat there a short time, bespoke the barley and some chickens and then pickd our way home again. I came in and began to alter the draping of the curtains in the library and my Aunt Powell went up the lawn to my Aunt Neate, who was out with the farmer.  We all workd on the curtains in the evening.  We had the Paper at breakfast.

Thursday, 8  February, 1810

A very fine, mild day.  My poor Aunt Powell was so unwell she did not get up the whole day, except to have her bed made, with  a violent pain  and swelling in her throat and glands, from which she sufferd very much.  I did not sit down from breakfast till dinner, except to eat my luncheon and was working the whole time on the drapery.  We drank tea in my Aunt’s room and I workd there till supper time.  Landford the gardener came from Taunton to prune the Wall Trees.  He brought some jonquille roots that my Aunt had bespoken. I went to bed quite tired.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Friday, 9 February ,1810

A beautiful sunshine day, as warm as Spring.  My Aunt Powell a little better, but not much.  Mr Grassett and his two daughters paid us a visit.  My Aunt Neate and I received them, for my Aunt P was not come down stairs, but did long before they went away, for I believe it is the fashion of the place to make long visits.  The old gentleman appears chearful and good humourd, as does the youngest Miss G who, by the bye, is as old as either of my Aunts.  The elder was more silent, but all very obliging.  From the specimen I had, I think they are second rate, but it is hardly possible to judge in a first visit.  I finishd the drapery of one curtain and Mr Langford (who was here again today) was so obliging to assist George in putting it up.  My Aunt Powell was a little better in the evening.  She and my Aunt Neat playd Gosch.  I wrote. James the head carter bought a 16th of a Lottery Ticket at Taunton for my Aunt Powell.

Saturday, 10 February, 1810

A very fine sunshine day.  My Aunt Powell better.  Farmer Furber brought two cows with their calves for my Aunt to see, but I do not know if she fixd on either of them.  I was very busy all the morning bordering the library, which is a troublesome piece of business.  In the midst of it I was interrupted by a Mrs Strangways and her daughter coming to call.  I do not like either of them much, but the daughter the least of the two.  She is a fine girl, about eighteen, but there is a pert, flippant boldness about her, that disgusted me very much.  She is a second Miss King of Hackington exactly, such a bold pullet.  They did not stay a long time. The Farmer brought the letters from Taunton for us.  Among them was one for my mother, directed here.  I put it with the other.  My Aunt Powell had a nice letter from dear Mary Taylor to say she is to be married the sixth of March.  I workd all the evening.

Sunday, 11 February, 1810

A compleat wet day.  It did not cease raining once.  My Aunt Powell a great deal better.  We read prayers soon after breakfast, after which I dressd and fed the birds.  I put some of the small bulbous roots that are growing into pots.  I opend the note which came yesterday for my mother and copied the contents into a long letter which I wrote to Emma.  It was from Mr Jamieson.  While we were at supper we heard a shocking squeaking and skuffling.  I rung the bell to know what was the matter and after some time George came in and said it was a very large rat the cat had got. The cat had maim’d it and Rover very soon dispatchd it.  I never saw a larger one and the noise it made was so shrill and horrid I fancied it was Ellen in a fit.

Monday, 12 February, 1810

It was wet in the morning early, but fine afterwards.  I was the whole day in the library, doing the border.  We were surprised by Dryall arriving from Weymouth on horseback with a letter from Cooper, in consequence of the one my Aunt wrote him Thursday to say she was ill and desiring to know what she was to do, not reaching him till Sunday afternoon.  He very kindly dispatchd Dryall immediately with directions, thinking he would be here much sooner than the mail would convey them, which was the case.  While we were at tea Farmer Furber brought us a packet conveyd from Bath to Taunton, by Mr Anderdon in his way to Devonshire.  It containd a nice long letter from Rebecca Workman and another from Major Durbin to my Aunt Powell, one from my mother to my Aunt Neate and one from my mother, another from Emma and a very kind one from Harry for me.  They all brought a great deal of news.  I workd all the evening on my shifts.

Tuesday, 13 February, 1810

A most tempestuous day with violent and almost incessant hail and rain, storms, and at times so dark we could hardly see what we were about.  I was the whole day in the library.  Dryall went away early this morning.  I did not see him at all.  George went to Taunton before we were up and did not return till two o’clock.  I workd all the evening on my shifts, which get on but slowly.

Wednesday, 14  February, 1810

A beautiful warm sunshine day.  I spent the whole of it in the library.  My Aunt Powell a little better.  We had the Taunton Paper.  It raind very hard all the evening and we were very much astonishd on looking out when we went to bed, to find it was snowing very fast.

Thursday, 15  February, 1810

The snow nearly two feet deep and the shrubs (many of them) weighd down and almost buried under it.  My Aunt Powell and I workd very hard all day and in the evening too, hanging the pictures and putting up part of Cooper’s books in the library and were both very much tired at night.  She put a blister behind her ear when she went to bed.

Friday, 16  February, 1810

A very hard frost and none of the snow gone.  My Aunt Powell (notwithstanding her blister), Kitty, Ellen and I were employd the whole day putting up the books, all of which we were not able to finish.  Mr Anderdon, who arrivd at Farmer Furber’s today, sent up to beg my Aunt to give him a bottle of Port Wine, which she readily did and begd he would dine here tomorrow, but he sent up a note of excuse and to say he should go back to Bath tomorrow, but would call in the morning.  I have not been so tired a long time as I was tonight, at least my spirits were so fatigued and low I could scarcely help crying.  I wrote a long letter to my mother to go by Mr A and began one to Emma.  My Aunt wrote a note to Mr and the Miss Grosetts to apologise for not having calld on them.  Kitty gave my Aunt warning, not liking to live so far from Bath and is to go in 6 weeks.

Saturday, 17  February, 1810

A very severe frost and the snow fell about two inches deep again last night.  Mr Anderdon calld and very kindly offered to take any letters or parcel for us to Bath.  He was going immediately to Bridgewater, but his Portmanteau is not to be sent till tomorrow so, he said, if our letters were at his lodging tonight it would be time enough.  I compleated the books, but have not quite done the border in the library, as there are some corners want ornamenting.  I wrote a long letter to dear Emma and sent her a bit of the merino wool in it and a bit of stuff calico for her to get us some ribbon to hang the miniatures up with.  In the evening I mended a shift and pair of stays, to put on tomorrow.  Mr Grosett sent to enquire after my Aunt P.

Sunday, 18  February, 1810

The most severe frost we have had yet, which turnd to a rapid thaw about eleven o’clock.  We read prayers, after which I dressd and fed the birds and read the rest of the day and evening.

Monday, 19 February, 1810

Still thawing, but not fast enough to perceive the decrease of the snow and, I believe, chiefly owing to the sun, which had great power, for George and Ephraim went on the top of the house to throw off the snow and they said it froze very sharply in the shade and at night it was as severe as yesterday.  I did two or three little odd jobs about the house in the morning, such as putting the pegs up in the parlour to hang any thing on, fixing Cooper’s Skreens together and taking up a corner of the  carpet in the library where the wet had come in. Afterwards I sat down to work and continued at it all the evening.

Tuesday, 20  February, 1810

A very severe day, tho fine sunshine.  Poor old Gale walkd from Creek to ask Charity.  My Aunt Powell was not up, but she sent him a shilling by me and a pint of ale, for which the old man was very thankful.  I could not persuade him to come in to warm himself, as he said that would make him feel the cold more when he went out again.  I askd my Aunt for a pair of woolen gloves for him, but when I went down he was gone.  However, I went after him as quick as the ice would let me, but the old man had got to the gate in the lane before I overtook him and he is so deaf I could not make him hear me.  He was very grateful for the gloves and said they felt “pure hot”.  A man came to ask my Aunt to give him the receipt to have some of the same medicine made for his brother, as she had give Farmer Deane, which had cured him entirely and he was sure it would his brother. He lookd exactly like a handsome, smart young farmer on the stage.  My Aunt gave him some of the mixture.  Six women came begging.  My Aunt gave a shilling apiece to four of them, but when she found so many of them came, she said she should not give to any more till she had made inquiries about them.  The two that came last would not take a denial, but said it was very hard she would not give them, as well as the other and staid full half an hour at the door.  I cut out a pair of pockets and workd on them the whole day and evening.  Ephraim went to Taunton.

Wednesday, 21 February, 1810

A very fine day, but very cold.  Two men brought another fox here that they had killd.  My Aunt gave them sixpence.  I finishd my pockets and workd on a shift.  George went to Taunton with the cart to get some wine and other things.  He brought us word that our shares in the Lottery were Blanks.  We had the Taunton Paper.  I workd all the evening.  My Aunts playd Gosch.

Thursday, 22  February, 1810

A dull very cold uncomfortable thaw.  Quite as cold, if not more so, than the frost.  I cleand and wiped all the bulbous roots that are in glasses and threw away the rotten ones and did not do any work till the evening, when I finishd my fourth shift.

Friday, 23  February, 1810

A fine sunshine day, quite warm out and the snow decreasing very fast.  Cooper sent my Aunt a pair of Muscovy ducks by a soldier who had more sense than to lose them.  He arrived before we were up and did not see him, but he is to call in his way back a fortnight hence.  George went to Taunton to get medicines for my Aunt Powell (who still continues very ill).  The flood was so much out in the Turnpike Road that he was almost afraid to venture thro.  It was up to the skirts of his horse’s saddle.  My Aunt sent the Taunton Paper and a letter to Cooper in a parcel by George.  I workd in the evening.  My Aunts playd cards.  I naild the tester and valance on the head of the brown bed.

Saturday, 24 February, 1810

A very fine day.  What snow was remaining disappeared in the course of the day.  I was very busy from breakfast till dinner, putting up the brown bed and divided curtain.  George went to Taunton.  The flood was quite gone down in the road.  The wind was high all day, but at night it increased and blew tremendously.  I was very lazy in the evening and did not do any work. We had the Bath Paper.  My Aunts playd Gosch.

Sunday, 25 February, 1810

A fine day, but the wind continued a perfect hurricane.  It was with difficulty I could stand against it.  I took two or three turns in the garden, but was not out more than a quarter of an hour.  I dressd and fed the birds.  My Aunt P was so unwell today she was obliged to lay down again after she had got up and did not come down stairs till two o’clock.  She had a fire in the Oak room and I aird the bed there for Kitty and Ellen to sleep in to night, in case Cooper should come in a day or two, which is not improbable.  I wrote part of a letter to my brother Henry.

Fashion plate for March 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for March 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, March 4, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I went out after breakfast with my Aunt Neate to see her feed the chickens.  We went into the stable and  their house.   I had never been in either before.  We did not stay out long as it was almost the first time my Aunt Powell had been out since her illness.  When we came in we read prayers and afterwards I fed and dressd the birds and then I wiped and cleand all the bulbous roots.  I wrote a long letter to my mother in the evening.

I have been so much engaged the whole of the past week I have not had the time to write my daily Journal, but nothing very material has occurd, except that Cooper has sent my Aunt a pair of Muscovy ducks, which are very tame and sociable.  I new coverd the old sopha and it looks very well and it is a great comfort, particularly to my Aunt Powell, who has enjoyd it since her illness very much.  I have heard twice from my mother and have written to her once.  Poor dear Emma has been extremely ill, but is now getting better.

Monday, 5 March, 1810

A very fine day, but rather cold.  The man brought the bars for the grates in the dining room and library and fixd them on, but not very well.  My Aunt Powell and I calld on Mrs Ball and the Miss Grosetts and found them both at home.  Mrs Ball is a very friendly, good sort of a woman and was extremely obliging to us.  We met Mr B at the door, but he did not go in with us, only the youngest, Miss B, was at home.  Her sister is on a visit some where.  I think she improves on acquaintance.  The Balls very good naturedly let us thro their garden, which took us very near Mr Grosetts.  We sat there a long time and they were very chearful and obliging.  We walkd round their garden and then came home.  The old gentleman walkd as far as the gate with us, but would not come in.  At Mr Grosett’s we saw a man selling shoes and begd the Miss G’s would send him to us when they had done with him, which they did.  He had a large collection of shoes very neatly made which he brings from ? four times a year.  My Aunt P bought a pair of black leather boots for 11/- and gave me a pair  and a pair of black leather and a pair of brown jean shoes. She gave 5/3d for the first and 4/9d for the latter, trimd.  The man was the civilest creature I ever saw.  My Aunt sent Mr Grosett the prescription for the camphor mixture and some spirit of wine and almonds to make it.  In the evening I made some of the border of the library match for the corners of the book cases, ready to paste on tomorrow.

Tuesday, 6 March, 1810

A wet damp morning.  I workd all day pasting and ornamenting the corners of the door and book cases in the library and did nothing else.  In the evening I took off the colord prints from the skreens Mrs Williams gave my Aunt so many years ago, but which she had never made any use of till now and turnd them the contrary way so as to make them wide, instead of long, and my Aunt means to put them on the beautiful poles Mrs Porcher gave Cooper, as they suit the furniture here better than his pink ones.  Farmer Furber came in to speak to my Aunt about some hay and had some wine.

Wednesday, 7 March, 1810

A very showery day.  I finishd the border in the library and put up the drawing from Lambridge in the passage room, which improves it very much.  George went to Taunton and got the parcel from Bath with the worsted for the scarlet fringe and the balls to finish that in the library.  We were all employd the evening in winding worsted.

Thursday, 8 March, 1810

A fine day.  We were agreeably  surprised by Dryall’s bringing a letter from Cooper before we were up in the morning to say he and Mr Bussell would be here to dinner and stay till Saturday morning.  This put us in a little bustle.  I put up the bell pulls in the library and two brackets for flowers or candles. I put up the drapery of the window curtain in my room and got it ready for Mr Bussell.  He and our dear Cooper arrivd a little past five, both looking reasonably well, particularly Mr Bussell who is grown quite fat.  Cooper was all affection  and kindness, just as he used to be.  We spent a very chearful happy evening. Cooper brought a great many very fine lobsters with him, two of which my Aunt sent to Mrs Furber, who had been so kind to send us some apples in the morning.

Friday, 9 March, 1810

A very showery morning, but fine in the middle of the day.  Cooper and my Aunt had a long medical conversation in the dining room after breakfast.  As soon as that was over he, Mr Bussell and I took a delightful long walk, the first I have had since I came here.  I was literally up to my ankles in mud, but was beautifully warm and pleasant.  Cooper was all kindness.  When we got to the gate Cooper thought we might as well have had an umbrella, so Mr B was so obliging to go back and and fetch one. We went to the Pillons and round by the Blacksmith’s home, about two miles and a half.  As delightful a walk as I ever had in my life.  While we were out Cooper mentioned my sheep, which I objected to have, on account of the price being six guineas.  He said he must insist on my having it and should be seriously angry if I did not.  When we returnd he and Mr Bussell went with the Farmer to chuse it.  Cooper certainly fixd on the handsomest and finest in the flock, but the farmer made him give the enormous sum of ten guineas for it, which has vexd me very much.  C had the flock driven down that I might see his present, the wool of which is beautiful.  In the evening Cooper shewd us a very extraordinary letter he had had from Mrs Whilde and gave us a beautiful little poem called “Love and Reason” written by Mr Moore.  We had the Bath Paper.

Saturday, 10 March, 1810

A showery morning.  Our dear Cooper and Mr Bussell left us about nine, promising to come again as soon as Lord Cavan had him to inspect them, who was expected at Weymouth every day.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Taunton and calld in our way on Mrs and Miss Strangways at Thorne.   Miss S I thought pleasanter than when I first saw her, but her mother appears to me a very vulgar woman.  There was a young person with them, whose name I did not hear, but it was not of much consequence, as she spoke but once the whole time we staid.  We did a great many things at Taunton.  My Aunt bought two gowns for Ellen, one a present from Cooper, the other from herself.  I got some pasteboard and paper make a blotting book for Cooper.  We did not get home till near six o’clock and were so sleepy and tired after tea that my Aunt and I went to bed before supper.

Sunday, 11 March, 1810

A fine morning, but it began to rain about two o’clock and continued wet all the rest of the day and evening.  We read prayers, after which I fed and dressd the birds.  The rest of the day and evening I read.  I began the bark prescription Cooper gave me.

Monday, 12 March, 1810

A very wet morning, but quite warm out.  My Aunt P walkd a little while between the showers.  I filed and fixd the brass fastenings on the back of the skreens and put them on the poles, after which I made up the scarlet and black worsted for the head of the fringe, which I finishd in the evening.

Tuesday, 13 March, 1810

A dry day, but very cold.  As soon as breakfast was over I began a letter to dear Emma.  In the middle of it Miss Kitty Grosett calld and brought with her Mr Standert of Taunton, their medical man.  He appears a sensible young man, but very pedantic.  My Aunt Neate and the farmer went with them into the field to chuse an ewe which he wanted for Mr Worthington, his brother in law.  After tea I playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate till my Aunt P was ready to take the cards and then made some of the tufts for the fringe.

My Aunt Powell began her asses milk from the ass she has,  I had a glass and am to have, every morning.

Wednesday, 14 March, 1810

A dry day, but extremely cold.  The dear Ewe Cooper had the goodness to give me, brought forth two lambs this morning.  I went with my Aunt Neate and the farmer to see them.  They are the prettiest little white things I ever saw, brother and sister.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd thro the orchard and we afterwards all three went up the field with the farmer for my Aunt Powell to chuse a sheep for herself.  I finishd my letter to Emma and George took it to Taunton.  After I had had my luncheon I took two or three turns in the garden, but it was too cold to stay out long.  My Aunt P heard from Minah.  Our darling Mary Taylor was married last Tuesday to Mr John Plummer.  We had Cooper’s Taunton Paper.  I gave Jene the sheep boy sixpence.

A Sunlit Barn with Ewes, Lambs and Chickens by Eugène Joseph Verboeckhoven (c) Haworth Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Sunlit Barn with Ewes, Lambs and Chickens
by Eugène Joseph Verboeckhoven
(c) Haworth Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday, 15 March, 1810

A fine, dry day, but very cold.  I workd all day on the scarlet and black fringe.  I went to see my ewe and her lambs, who look very well, but rather pinchd.  I workd all the evening on the fringe.

Friday, 16 March, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I went to Farmer Boyt’s to enquire about some potatoes.  We went up into Mrs B’s room, who is lying in and saw her and the baby.  In our way back we calld to ask Mrs Furber how she did.  When I came back I went into the Orchard to see my sheep.  I workd morning and evening on the fringe.

I heard from my mother and Rebecca Workman.  We had the Bath Paper.

Saturday, 17 March, 1810

A fine day, but still cold.  My Aunt Powell and I walked to Farmer Deane’s.  His wife was very ill  while we were there with one of her hysteric fits.  Mr Grosett’s man brought a box from Taunton for us, containing a piece of jean, Mary’s Bride Cake and three favors, the meanest I ever saw, made of three quarters of a gown of sham lace, friggled about with the same quantity of silver twist.  The cake also was very dry and bad.  I saw my sheep and lambs.  I workd all the evening on the fringe and wrote to my mother in the morning and George took it to the post.  I gatherd a great many violets in the shrubbery, the other side of the road and also brought from thence three shoots of honey suckle and planted here.

Sunday, 18 March, 1810

A beautiful day, tho a sharp white frost in the morning.  We read prayers, after which I fed and dressd the birds and then we all three went across the fields to Farmer Boyt’s to look at his sheep, which we could not find, but saw a very clever little boy of his in the wheat field.  We had our luncheon as soon as we came in and then Aunt N and I went to Farmer Deane’s to carry some arrow root to his wife.  I went to look at my lambs, but they were not in the orchard, so I did not see them.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 19 March, 1810

A most beautiful day.  I was so anxious to finish the fringe, I could not go with my Aunts and the farmer to Farmer Boyt’s to chuse some sheep.  They were gone more than two hours.  My Aunt Neate bought three ewes and lambs and my Aunt P one.  Soon after they returned, Mr Winslow, the Clergyman of the Parish calld.  I did not see him.  He stayed about half an hour.  As soon as we had had our luncheon, I went into the garden and orchard with my Aunt P, but could not afford to stay long.  My little lambs were skipping about as strong again as they were yesterday and enjoying the warm sunshine.  I saw a beautiful butterfly basking in the sun.  Just as we were going to dinner, the man who has been making the hedge for my Aunt Neate, came to be paid and brought with him a beautiful little Dormouse, which he had found rapt up in some long grass in the copse at the top of the lawn and which he calld one of the seven sleepers.  My Aunt Neate very kindly askd him to give it to me, which he readily did and I gave him sixpence to drink.  I workd hard all the evening and finishd the fringe all ready to put the drapery up tomorrow morning and after supper made a card house for my dormouse, till I can get one at Taunton for it.

Tuesday 20 March 1810

A dull looking, cold day.  My Aunt Neate went to Farmer Boyt’s with Farmer Furber directly after breakfast and chose two more ewes and lambs.  The farmers came in to be paid for them.  We had the cornice with the new fringe put up and it looks beautiful.  My Aunt P and I took a walk as far as Farmer Boyt’s.  We calld at the Basket Makers to see if he had any pretty work baskets.  He had none at home, but said he would send one up tomorrow for my Aunt to see.  In our way back we askd Mrs Furber how she did and then went down the Walk by the river and cut some shoots from the honeysuckles that had rooted and I planted them in the front of the house when we came back.  I workd in the evening.

Wednesday, 21  March, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt wrote many letters in the morning and as soon as she had finishd she and I went up to see a poor woman of the name of Hutchings who is going to lye in. Between this and Stoke, we stopd at John Truby’s cottage to ask the way and his daughter very civilly said she would shew us, as the Lane was too wet for us to go along it and she was sure we could not find the way across the fields.  She walkd with us till we came in sight of the house and then left us.  When we got near it, we found it impossible to get over a piece of dead hedge, which is put up by way of a stile. After trying some time to find a better way, we encounterd a little girl keeping the birds from the corn, who offerd to shew us the right way, but led us to the same place.  However, she tumbled over and desird Hannah Hutchings to come out to speak to my Aunt, which she did and was the picture of cleanliness, tho very much patchd.  My Aunt gave her 2/6 and told her to send one of her boys down in the evening for some barley water and drops for her cough, which is very troublesome to her.  She sent a very clever little fellow, who brought with him some nuts as a present to my Aunt, for which she gave him 6d.  We had a very pleasant walk.  The Basket Maker sent down the basket in the evening.  It was not a pretty one and he askd 5/- for it, so my Aunt did not have it.  I workd all the evening and wrote a long letter to Emma in the morning, in which my Aunt P enclosed a letter from Molly Giles and my Aunt N a Bank Post Bill for 21 pounds odd shillings.  George took it to the Post.  I gave the little Scare Crow in the field a penny.

Thursday, 22 March, 1810

A very fine day, but a cold wind.  I had the head ache all day and was very idle.  My Aunts calld on the Grosetts, who engaged us to drink tea there tomorrow.  They afterwards went with Farmer Furber to Farmer Boyt’s to see some more sheep, but were disappointed, as the sheep were gone to Bristol.  However, to make themselves amends they walkd to the top of the lawn to look at their own flock with the farmer and were out three hours and a half.  While they were gone I wrote the names of the different flower seeds on strips of card to mark the places where they are to be put in the garden, but did not go out all day, except for a few minutes.  I have not seen my ewe and lambs since Monday and do not mean to see them till next week, as then I shall perceive whether they grow much better than when I lookd at them every day.  I did not do a stick of work all day.

Friday, 23 March, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunts went to Farmer Boyt’s and chose some more sheep.  I did not go.  When they came back my Aunt N mixd some batter to make wafers. We baked a few, but as we were to go early to Mr Grosett’s we had not time to finish them.  We set off as soon as we had dined, intending to be there before seven, but they said it was eight, the clocks differ so much.  It was as mild as possible when we went, but piercing cold as we came back, tho a beautiful moonlight .  We met Mrs and Miss Strangways and Mr Standent, the former as vulgar a woman, I think, as I ever met with.  They did not produce cards and indeed they were not wanted for the conversation never flagd.  Mr Standent talkd incessantly and is really a remarkably pleasant, well informed young man.  He told a great many chearful anecdotes and kept up the spirit of the conversation all the evening.  It is evident the Grosetts have never been accustomd to very refined society, any more than the Strangways or Balls and they are all very well suited to each other.  They gave us abundance of very good cake, wine and jellies before we came away, which was not till after eleven o’clock.  When we rose to take leave, Mrs Strangways askd us to drink tea with her on Monday, but my Aunt begd they would come to us on that day and excuse her till the next moon, which they agreed to so, and the Grosetts and Mr Standert are to meet there, provided it does not rain.

I heard from my mother.  Mrs Powell Collins of Hatch calld, but we said “not at home”.

Saturday, 24 March, 1810

A very cold, gloomy day with an excessive high wind.  The frost was so severe last night that the ice was the thickness of a Crown piece this morning.  I cut out the curtains for the two rooms leading to the library and began to make them, but was calld off to assist at the wafers, which we finishd, but it took almost all the morning.  I workd very hard all the evening and my Aunt P and I finishd the two curtains and I put up one and the cornice, but not the drapery.  We had some of the best shrimps I ever tasted for supper that George brought from Taunton with him.  He also brought a nice bunch of pink hyacinths, which Mr Langford had the civility to send me.  We did not go to bed till one o’clock.  It raind very fast all the evening and night and blew a storm.

Sunday, 25 March, 1810

A dry day, but very cold and windy.  We read prayers, after which I dressd and fed the birds.  I read most part of the morning and all the evening.

Monday, 26 March, 1810

A very fine day.  I finishd the curtains for the two outer rooms and put them up and made two buff bags for the skreen weights.  A man came to receive the poor rate and I thought he would never go away again.  Mrs Strangways and her daughter, Mr Grosett and his two daughters and Mr Standent drank tea and suppd here.  Miss S and Miss Kitty G were extremely smart.  We playd Pope Joan and I won 2/6 and spent a chearful evening enough.  We had a very smart tray brought in for supper, set out in the desert dishes and plates.  they did not go away till near one o’clock.

French Drapery Window Curtains, Ackermann's Repository, 1810
French Drapery Window Curtains, Ackermann’s Repository, 1810

Tuesday, 27 March, 1810

A very wet morning.  My Aunt had a parcel, before she was up, from Cooper, brought by my Lord of Hinton who is at Hatch for a fortnight.  C says he has not been well, but is getting better.  The parcel containd a piece of patent net to make shirts and long sleeves, a present from Mrs Porcher to my Aunt P.  I workd in the morning and read in the evening.

Wednesday, 28 March, 1810

A fine day, but the wind rather cold in the morning.  Soon after breakfast I went with my Aunt Neate to the turnip field to see my ewe and lambs.  They were skipping about and are very much grown since I saw them last.  In my way back I gatherd a great many violets in the upper garden.  As soon as my Aunt P had finishd some letters she was writing, she and I walkd to Stoke to enquire the Character of a young woman who came here to offer herself as cook.  John Truby’s daughter was so civil as to shew us the way till we came in sight of the house.  I never saw anything more beautiful than the view from the hill before you go down into the valley, which is very neat and clean.  We saw Miss Burridge only, a very pretty, genteel girl, who said she was very certain the servant would not suit my Aunt,  but offered to walk with us to her brother’s, where the young woman had lived and where Mrs Burridge was then staying, but my Aunt declind giving her the trouble, as the person would not do.  We sat there more than half an hour and Miss B pressd us very much to have a biscuit and a glass of wine.  In our way back my Aunt bought two Geraniums and a Myrtle at a cottage in Stoke, for which she gave 4/6.  We stoppd at John Truby’s to see his wife, who is very ill.  They seem to me a disagreeable set altogether.  It was near six o’clock when we got home to dinner.  We met Mrs Deane in the Lane, who stopd to thank my Aunt for having cured her.  She says she never was so well in all her life and I am sure she lookd as if nothing ever aild her.

I mounted a little of the Buff Fringe in the evening.  John Truby came for the medicine for his wife.  We had Cooper’s Taunton Paper and my Aunt sent it to him by today’s Post

Thursday, 29 March, 1810

A very fine day.  I mounted some more of the Fringe and sewd it on the droops.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Farmer Boyt’s to get some eggs and finishd our walk by the water side.  Little Jem Boyt brought up the eggs after dinner and sat here near an hour, telling us all the news he could think of.  He is a very nice boy.  My Aunt gave him some of Mary’s wedding cake and a glass of wine and the remainder of the cake to take to his sister Ann.  My Aunt Neate heard from my mother.  Poor dear Emma is very ill indeed.  Mr Turner thought it necessary to call in Dr Davis, who pronounced her complaint to be dysentery, but not a dangerous kind, tho she suffers dreadfully.  I long to hear again.  I read all the evening.

Friday, 30 March, 1810

A very fine morning till one o’clock, when it began to rain and continued almost all the rest of the day and night.  I was out from breakfast time till it raind, putting in flower seed, but did not half finish.  I workd the rest of the day and evening.  John Truby’s daughter came down for the medicine for her mother and brought some duck eggs as a present, but my Aunt insisted on paying for them.

Saturday. 31 March, 1810

A very wet morning and the rain continued with very little intermission all day.  George went to Taunton and got compleatly wet thro.  I workd all day and in the evening too.

Fashion plate for April 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for April 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, April 1, 1810

A very warm day, but showery.  We read prayers, after which I dressd and fed the birds.  My Aunt Neate brought in three beautiful little chickens, just hatchd, to shew us and another was dead in the shell.

As this is mid Lent Sunday, we had some Frummitty at dinner, but not having any wheat to make it up, it was done with arrow root instead, which was not half so good.  Farmer Furber came to speak to my Aunt after dinner and she desird him to come in and have a glass of wine, which he did.  She sent a basin of the Frummitty to his wife.  I read all day and evening too.  We did not have Thursday’s Bath Paper till this morning.

Monday, 2 April, 1810

A very fine day till five o’clock, when it began to rain and I believe continued all night.  I was out in the garden from breakfast time till one o’clock, putting in mignonette seed.  I then went up the field with my Aunt Neate to the sheep pen to look at my ewe and lambs.  They are all looking remarkably well.  I felt quite tired when I came in and sat down to work for some time and then hung some more pictures in the room going to the library.  I workd the remainder of the day and evening.  We expected the pleasure of seeing Mr Wiltshire at dinner tomorrow, but my Aunt had a letter from him to day, to say Maria was so very bad he feard he should not be able to come, certainly not, except she mended between the time of his writing and Tuesday.

Tuesday, 3  April, 1810

A cloudy morning, with now and then rain, but warm out.  I was employd most part of the morning washing the painted molding round the dinning room, but was obliged to leave off before I had half finishd it, I was was so tired.  We did not dine till very late, expecting Mr Wiltshire, but he did not come.  I workd all the evening.  It was wet most part of the day and the wind rose in the evening and blew a perfect storm all night.

Wednesday, 4  April, 1810

An excessive high wind and showery.  I wrote and workd all the morning and evening also on my shifts.  I wrote to my mother and George took the letter to the Post.

Thursday, 5  April, 1810

A very showery day with high wind, but mild out.  George went over to Taunton before we were up in the morning, by way of a holiday to hear Leworthy’s trial of Bath against the Globe Fire Office.  He came back before dinner having seen Mr Wiltshire in Court, supposing he would come here to dine and sleep, but he did not. I was out some part of the morning, but not long.  In the evening I finishd another shift.  It raind a torrent all night.

Friday, 6 April, 1810

A wet uncomfortable morning and the rain continued with very little interruption all day.  We were very agreeably surprised about one o’clock by a visit from Mr W Williams, who has been on the Circuit and would not leave Taunton, he said, without seeing us.  He is looking remarkably well and was very chearful and pleasant.  My Aunt wanted to persuade him to dine and sleep here, but he said he must be at Weymouth tonight.  He had some luncheon and my Aunt gave him some sea Kale to put in his pocket for dear Mrs W. It was really very kind of him to call, particularly as it was out of his way.  I cut and made a pair of pockets.  George went to Taunton but brought no letter back from my mother!!  I do not know what to think of it.  Gale began to take up the stones in the passage room, preparatory to its being floord.  Mr Williams told us Mr Wiltshire went to Bath in a Chaise at two o’clock this morning, so that I fear Maria must be very bad indeed.

Saturday, 7  April, 1810

A miserable wet morning. Ellen gave my Aunt warning this morning, while she was dressing her.  Her reason for going not being able to live with Mrs Giles.  It cleard up after breakfast and was dry and pleasant the rest of the day.  I workd but little, as I helpd my Aunt pack a Box to send to Cooper, with some of the plated things of his that were here.  Farmer Furber sent my Aunt a present of the finest leg of mutton I ever saw, of the Spanish breed.  She gave Ann, who brought it, a shilling.   We heard from dear Mrs Vassall, who is at Bath, that Emma is better, but have had no letter from my mother. 

Sunday, 8 April, 1810

A fineish day, but in the evening and night it raind a torrent.  Hannah Richards came down for the things my Aunt had collected for her lying in.  We read prayers, after which I dressd and fed the birds and read the rest of the day.  Hannah Richard’s husband came down in the evening to speak about his Rheumatism.  No letter again from my mother.

Monday, 9  April, 1810

It raind most part of the day and sometimes excessively hard.  My Aunt Powell and I went to return Mrs Powell Collins’s visit at Hatch.  I wishd all the way there we might not be admitted and fortunately we were not.  The servant said Mrs Collins was gone to Taunton, tho we heard the sound of a Harp. It is a most beautiful place and the house appears superb.  Two servants, out of livery, came to the door and every thing was in equal stile.  In our way home we calld on Mrs Strangways and sat some time with them.  When we came home, we found Mr Standert had been here to offer my Aunt a window at his house to see the procession of the Free Masons on Wednesday.  My Aunt wrote him a note in the evening, accepting his polite offer.  I workd all the evening. Hallett began the floor in the passage room.  A poor man came to beg some medicine for a bad cold and a pain in his chest, which my Aunt gave him and a blister.

Hatch Court, Hatch Beauchamp An elegant house in Bath stone, graced by an arcade and four corner towers. It was built in 1755 to the designs of Thomas Prowse. Grade I listed.  © Stephen Richards
Hatch Court, Hatch Beauchamp
An elegant house in Bath stone, graced by an arcade and four corner towers. It was built in 1755 to the designs of Thomas Prowse. Grade I listed.
© Stephen Richards (Geograph)

Tuesday, 10  April, 1810

A very wet day.  While we were at breakfast a Serjeant arrived from the Regiment with one of the most beautiful Tea Chests I ever saw, a present from Cooper to my Aunt Powell, in consequence of her having askd him to lend her the black vein? with the silver caddies that my Grandmama gave my Aunt Cooper, which he wishd to keep at the Regiment for his own use.  The one he has sent my Aunt is Tortoise Shell with Ivory edges, something like the caddy my mother gave her some years ago.  The Serjeant also brought one of Cooper’s silver soup ladles, which my Aunt has borrowd, as she has not one of her own.  I workd hard all day cutting and partly making a pair of stays.  In the evening I wrote to my mother.

Wednesday, 11 April, 1810

A tolerable fine morning.  We got up earlier than usual that we might be at Jane’s in good time.  My Aunt P and I (for my Aunt Neate would not go) got to Mr Standents about half past ten.  Mr S came and handed us of the carriage and introduced to his mother, who is a pleasant old lady enough and to Mr and Mrs and two Miss Combers, who are very pretty girls.  The Miss Grosetts and Miss Strangways were there and a great many other strangers to us.  We were introduced to Mr and Mrs Worthington, both pleasanter than any peaple I have seen since we came here.  The procession did not answer my expectation.  The best part was the Troop of 9th Dragoons that proceeded it.  Between their going and returning we went down stairs and had some luncheon and as soon as the procession had paraded back again, we took our leave, after being there from half past ten till near three.  We went to some shops and got what we wanted and then came home.  It pourd with rain all the way back and we had two hail showers in the morning, but fortunately not while the procession were walking.  I workd in the evening and heard from my mother.

Thursday, 12  April, 1810

A dry day, but extremely cold.  I put in some more flower seeds.  My Aunt P and I calld on the Grosetts.  They were at dinner, so we took a walk and returnd to them after they had dined.  We sat there a long time.  Miss Kitty shewd us the house and how well they had contrived to accommodate all their family, who they expect on Saturday.  Mr Grosett lent us his newspaper.  I wrote a long letter to my mother which George took to Taunton after tea and brought back the Bath Paper.  I workd all the evening.

While we were at Mr Grosett’s it snowd quite fast for a few minutes. My Aunt Powell cut a cucumber, the first we have had.

Friday, 13 April, 1810

Dry, but very cold  Mr Langford brought me the most beautiful large white Hyacinth I ever saw as a present, only the blossom.  He asks 5/- for the roots. Mr Grosett sent us his paper and a letter he had had from  London saying every thing was quiet now, tho the riots had been dreadful.  Now they have succeeded in taking Sir Francis to the Tower and have collected so many military in London I hope there will be no more disturbance.  I found the sweet pea seed we had mislaid and put a great many of them in round the house.  I workd on my stays the rest of the day and evening.  Samuel’s wife brought their little boy down for my Aunt to see.  She gave her some medicine for him and some old things for herself.  It showerd a little while we were at dinner.  The poor dear old mare was shot by James Studgale and put into a gave dug for her in the orchard.  She is not to be coverd till my Aunt and I see her tomorrow.

The arrest of Sir Francis Burdett from Cassell’s Illustrated History of England (via www.magnacartaexhibition.wordpress.com/)
The arrest of Sir Francis Burdett from Cassell’s Illustrated History of England (via http://www.magnacartaexhibition.wordpress.com)

Saturday, 14 April, 1810

A tolerable fine day, tho we had a shower or two, but not enough to wet much.  The sun shone so bright while we were at breakfast, that I put the large birds out, but it was too cold for them to stay long.  I was out the whole morning putting in flower beds and finishing them all.  I also put in the two roots of Marvel of Peru we brought from the Villa.  I was so tired when I came in I could hardly move.  The poor man, to whom my Aunt gave the Blister last week, came down.  He thinks it has been of service to him.  He had some more Barley water to go on with the other medicine.  His son came down in the evening to fetch some Manna for his father.  My Aunt Neate gave him a pocket handkerchief, his own being a perfect rag.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mr Wiltshire of the death of poor Maria.  It is a blessing to her family, as well as herself, tho just at present their distress is too great to allow them to consider it as such, I dare say.  I read and workd in the evening.  My Aunt P and I went to see the dear mare for the last time.  She lookd just as handsome as when she was alive, poor thing.  George and Ephraim covered her as soon as we had seen.  She was not skinnd.

Sunday, 15 April, 1810

A very fine day, tho cold.  I fed and dressd the birds, after which we read prayers and then I went up stairs and put on a Leech under my left arm, by Cooper’s advice when he was here, to try it if will dispense the swellings, which are very painful.  It continued on two hours and a half, but being a very small one it did not draw much blood.  While I was up stairs and my Aunts were out, Mr and Mrs Strangways calld.  They came in for a few minutes, but would not let George go for my Aunts, saying they should see them in their way out, but neither of my Aunts did see them, tho they were in the field by the water.  My Aunt sent to enquire how Mr Grosett’s son and daughter did after their journey.  I read and wrote in the evening.  I heard from my mother a better account of dear Emma.  Cooper wrote my Aunt this morning that Mr Fickers would dine and sleep here tomorrow.

Monday, 16 April, 1810

A very fine day.  Soon after breakfast my Aunt P and I went to call on the Grosetts, where we were introduced to Captain Grosett and his wife and Mrs Hancock, Mr G’s other daughter.  Mrs G is a very lady like woman, but looks as if she was dying in a consumption.  Mrs Hancock is like her sisters and very chatty and good humourd.  While we were there, the three Miss Balls and their brother from London came in, so that the room was quite full.  Mr B appears a pleasant young man.  Just as we returnd, Mr and Mrs Comber calld.  They staid some time and had some luncheon, soon after which they went away.  Mr Fickers arrived, looking remarkably well and in excellent spirits.  He told us all the news of the Regiment and Weymouth.  We took a walk with him to the top of Stoke Hill and he told us a great many places that we did not know the names of, for being a Taunton man, he is perfectly acquainted with all the neighbourhood round.  He staid and dined with us, but went away before tea, being obliged to go to Wellington tonight.  He had so much to tell us and was so amusing, I should not be sorry if he was to come once a month, if it was only to tell us what is going forward.  We had the leg of mutton for dinner that Farmer Furber sent my Aunt and it was the very best I ever tasted.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day.

Tuesday, 17 April, 1810

A very fine day.  Mrs Strangways sent us an invitation for Thursday, which my Aunt accepted.  My Aunt Powell and I set out with the intention of going to Heydon, but after walking a mile and a half we found ourselves at Stoke.  Luckily we met a very civil, odd sort of an old woman picking sticks in a field, who very obligingly walkd across the fields with us to Heydon, or I am sure we should never have found our way.  We went to Mr Cross’s, the Pork Merchant and bespoke three hams and he took us to Farmer Chard’s to see some very pretty little pigs. My Aunt bespoke three.  Farmer Chard is a very great oddity, but extremely obliging.  He would walk part of the way home with us, to shew us the best way, by way of inducing us, as he said, to go there again.  His wife is a very nice woman and they have got a sweet, pretty house and every comfort about them.  We were quite tired when we came home.  I workd in the evening.

Wednesday, 18 April, 1810

A tolerably fine day, tho we had one hard shower in the middle of the day and it raind for about an hour in the evening.  I was out in the garden part of the morning.  We had the Taunton Paper at breakfast.  George went to Taunton with letters after dinner.  I workd in the evening.  The wind was frightfully high in the morning, but abated after dinner.

Thursday, 19 April, 1810

A very fine day.  Hallet finishd flooring the room yesterday and I put up the curtains again today.  Captain and Mrs Grosett, the old gentleman, Mrs Hancock and Miss G calld and sat some time.  They lookd at the birds and walkd round the garden.  My Aunt gave them a very fine cucumber.  Captain Grosett, Miss Kitty, Mrs Hancock, one of the Miss Balls and us three walkd to Mrs Strangways to tea.  Miss S was very smart and lookd better than I ever saw her.  We playd at Pope Joan.  I won 6d.  When the maid was bringing in the refreshments she, by some accident, threw them all down and Miss S apologised for our having only cake and wine. The latter was very nice, of their own making from ripe grapes.  We did not come away till past twelve, when Miss Kitty persuaded us to get into their little cart with them, which we did, till we came to the end of the Lane by Mrs Titherly’s, where we got out and walkd across the fields home.  It was very light and mild.  We did not go to bed till two o’clock.

Good Friday, 20 April, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell, I, Ellen and George set out to go to Thorn Church.  When we had got more than half way, we saw two little girls returning who told us there was no service there today.  We deviated from the path in our way back and had a pleasant walk.  We read prayers and then I went into the garden and naild the honeysuckle against the wall of the library, took out some of the bulbous roots and put Mignonette in the pot and carried it into the Cucumber garden.  I gatherd a bunch of cowslips, sweet brier and wall flowers and walkd about the garden with my Aunt Powell and did not come in till near three o’clock, quite tired.  About ten o’clock in the evening we were very much alarmd by the appearance of a tremendous fire, tho at a great distance.  We watchd it thro the glass till one o’clock and George went up the hill with Farmer Furber and Farmer Waterman, where they saw it very plain. It proved to be burning firze. It was a beautiful moonlight night and the nightingales were singing delightfully.

Church of the Holy Cross, Thornfalcon (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)
Church of the Holy Cross, Thornfalcon (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)

Saturday, 21 April, 1810

A beautiful day and very hot.  My Aunt P and I went to Taunton to fetch Molly, who came by the Coach.  After we had done all our shopping, we walkd to a gardener’s ground just out of Taunton, where my Aunt bought a beautiful pot of jonquils, a sweet scented Cinneraria, a Daphne, Roses and a pink Clematis.  Nothing could be more obliging or take more pain than Mr Cox did, to pack them carefully for us.  We saw Captain and Mrs Grosett, Miss G, Mrs Hancock and Mr, Mrs and the two Miss Combers in the street.  I bought some tape, for which I gave 6d and some blotting paper and red Morocco paper to cover a book for Cooper, which cost me 4/11d.  We took Molly up at Mr Cox’s.  She is looking remarkably well and in very good spirits.

Easter Sunday, 22 April, 1810

A beautiful day.  We all walkd to Ruishton Church.  The Service was so badly performd it was quite shocking.  My Aunts staid to the Sacrament.  I walkd home with George.  As soon as my Aunts returnd, my Aunt P and I calld on the Grosetts and Balls.  There were only two Miss Balls at home.  They took us into their garden and gave us some beautiful Hyacinths.  I was a good deal tired when I came home and read all the evening.  I dressd and fed the birds after church and began to write to my mother, but I did not finish the letter.

Monday, 23 April, 1810

A beautiful day.  My Aunt P and I walkd across the fields to Creech to call on the Combers.  We stoppd at Mrs Tithenly’s to ask if the cows were quiet, when a very lovely girl (a grand daughter of Mrs T) came out and in the most obliging manner in the world, offerd to walk across the field with us, if we were afraid.  She walkd from field to field (tho she had no bonnet on) till we came in sight of Creech, for fear she said we should lose our way.  My Aunt insisted on her taking her parasol to shade her, in going back.  We found the Combers at home, who were very obliging;  theirs is a very pretty neat little place.  In our way back we calld at Mrs Titherly’s for my Aunt’s parasol.  Miss Gardener and her mother were very anxious we should come in and sit down, but my Aunt said it was too late.  I finishd my letter to my mother and George took it to Taunton after dinner.  Serjeant Vicky calld in his way to the Regiment to know if my Aunt had any thing to send to Cooper.  She sent Mrs W Williams some Sea Kail.

Tuesday, 24 April, 1810

A very fine day.  I was out in the garden most part of the morning and was very much tired.  I gathered two nosegays.  George went to Taunton before breakfast for some cakes for the evening.  Mr and Mrs Strangways, Captain and Mrs Grosett, the old gentleman, Miss Kitty and Mrs Hancock spent the evening with us.  We playd Whist and Pope Joan.  I lost 1/6d.  They went away about twelve.

Wednesday, 25 April, 1810

A very fine day, but a high wind and cold.  We had the Taunton Paper.  I did not go out much the whole morning.  We drank tea at Mrs Ball’s and met Mrs Grosett, Miss Kitty, Mrs Hancock and Mr Grosett.  Mr Ball, who had dined out, came home before we left them.  He is a very odd sort of man apparently, and quite the Farmer, but was very civil.  The young peaple were very much disconcerted at his making his appearance.  Upon the whole, it was a very stupid evening, for we had no cards and very little conversation.

I put three pots of Mignonette and of Marvel of Peru in the cucumber garden.

Thursday, 26 April, 1810

A fine day, but a very high wind.  My Aunt P and I calld at Mr Gosett’s in our way.  We stop’d at Mr Ball’s, with a brace of cucumber, but did not go in.  We sat some time at Mr G’s and had some very nice jelly.  Mr P Ball came in while we were there.  Mrs Hancock, Mr and Mrs Gosett, the children and maid returnd with us to fish.  They staid till dinner time and caught a few eels and perch.  Mr Gosett and Miss Kitty joind us.  Mrs Hancock came up to the house to see Kitty make the wafers.  A little after six o’clock Mr and Mrs Gosett and Mrs Hancock returnd to fish and drank tea here but went home before it was dark.  I workd in the evening.

Friday, 27 April, 1810

A fine day, but a very high wind and rather cold.  I was not very well.  George caught a very fine carp and a nice Perch before we were up in the morning.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Haydon.  We went first to Farmer Chard’s to see the pigs.  They are too big for roasting, but my Aunt means to have two to fat.  From there we went to Farmer Bond’s and walkd round his gardens.  I never saw finer walls or better clothed.  My Aunt bespoke some fruit when it is ripe.  His house keeper was particularly civil and obliging.  She gave us some bread and butter and some mulberry, grape and raspberry wine of her own making, all excellent, but the mulberry the nicest made wine I ever tasted.  She was so civil to spare my Aunt a bottle of it to bring home with us, who made her a present of 5/6d.  She also gave us some delicious woodbine.  I workd in the evening.

Saturday, 28 April, 1810

A beautiful day.  I did not do a stick of work the whole day, but was out a good deal and busy getting the things ready for the evening.  Mrs Ball, her son and two daughters, Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mrs Hancock, Mr Gosett and Miss Kitty spent the evening here.  Mrs G was not well enough to come and Miss G staid at home with her.  I playd at Whist with Miss Strangways and my two Aunts  and won 4/-.  We had a very nice supper and every body was very chearful and appeard pleased and happy.  Miss Strangeway flirted and coquetted with Mr P Ball in perfection.  They left us about twelve o’clock.  I heard from my mother and wrote to her.

Sunday, 29 April, 1810

A very fine day, but intensely hot.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn to Church.  Two of the Miss Balls and their brother overtook us in our way.  We all calld at Mrs Strangways’ and walkd in her garden, which is a very pretty one, till the Service was begun, which was unpleasant.  Mrs S had got a headache and did not go to church.  We sat in their pew and were introduced to young Mrs Strangways, who is very pretty and pleasant in her manner.  My Aunt P staid to Sacrament and I walkd back to Mrs S’s with one of the Miss Balls and Miss Gardener and sat there till we were joind by the rest of the party.  Miss Strangways and Miss Gardener walkd as far as Mrs Titherley’s with us and young Mrs S and her little girl came on to Henlade to dine with her father.  My Aunt and I calld at the Gosett’s, found only the old man and Mrs G at home, the rest were gone to Church.  When we came back I fed and dressd the birds and my dormouse.  After dinner I put on two Leeches under my left arm.  They both drew very well.  I read the Bible in the evening and went to bed early, as I found my arm troublesome.  It bled again when I took off the bug.  My Aunt took a cucumber to Mrs Strangeway’s.

Monday, 30 April, 1810

A very fine day, but too hot to be out much in the sun.  Mr Cox came over before we were up to look at the place my Aunt means to have the Iron oven fixd in.  He breakfasted with us.  Young Mr Charles brought the two Hogshead’s of Cyder.  I walkd round the garden to look at my flowers.  Mrs Hancock, Mr Grosett and the children calld and sat a long time with me alone, for my Aunt Neate was out and My Aunt Powell had the assessor of the taxes with her.  I packd up most of our things to go to Bath tomorrow morning and was quite tired and not very well when I went to bed.  I bathed my feet.

Fashion plate for May 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for May 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Tuesday, 1 May, 1810

A very fine day.  We got up early to set out for Bath.  My Aunt Powell, Kitty and I got into the Chaise about ten o’clock and arrived safe and well at Bath at six.  We drove to my mother’s, found her pretty well, and dear Emma better.  She was very much agitated at seeing us.  We staid with them near an hour and then walkd up to Admiral Phillip’s.  Both he and Mrs P received us very kindly.  Admiral Macdonal was  there, also Captain Munn arrived, just after tea, to stay a little while with them.  He is a very chearful nice old man.  We had a comfortable little supper and went to bed rather tired.  My Aunt brought my mother some asparagus and cucumbers.

Wednesday, 2 May, 1810

A fine day, but cold.  We went out directly after breakfast and did a great many things we had to do.  We calld on the Workmans and my mother, saw Mrs Keen with the latter.  We returnd to the Admiral’s in very good time to dress for dinner.  Admiral Macdonal dined there, but not Captain Munn.  He came in before supper.  My Aunt, the two Admirals and Mrs Phillips playd Cassino, I read.  My Aunt bought a new gown and took it to Miss Silverthorn to make by dinner time tomorrow, as she has forgot to bring a dress gown with her.  We went to bed early.  We calld on Mr Hartley, who was very glad to see us.  Mr Wiltshire calld on us while we were at dinner.  He is looking very well.

Thursday, 3 May, 1810

A dry day, but cloudy and very cold.   My Aunt and I walkd about the whole morning.  We calld on my mother, but had a very little time to sit with her.  Met Mary Workman in the street.  Mrs Mabyn is to have my bonnet today and has promised to turn it by tomorrow at two o’clock.  We went to the Mail Office and there were luckily two places for tomorrow, which my Aunt has taken.  We did not get back to the Admiral’s time enough to dress for dinner, so were obliged to sit down as we were.  Only Captain Munn dined there.  When we went up stairs after dinner my Aunt proposed to Mrs Phillip my going to spend the afternoon with my mother, which she very good humourdly agreed to and desired me to go directly, which I did.  I found Edward and Emma Lye there.  They did not stay long.  I spent a comfortable evening and walkd back about nine o’clock, accompanied by a very obliging lad, the son of the mistress of the house.  Mrs P was just going to supper, so I was in very good time.  Miss Wiltshire calld while we were out, but luckily we met her in the street and had a very long conversation with her.  She was extremely friendly.  Mr Charles Anderdon also calld while we were out.

Bath High Street, mid nineteenth-century Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Bath High Street, mid nineteenth-century
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Friday, 4 May, 1810

Dry, but still very cold.  My Aunt and Captain Munn went to call on Mr Hartley.  I staid at home and packd the trunk.  Kitty, who has calld every morning and made herself very useful, did twenty little things for us.  As soon as my Aunt came back from Mr Hartley’s, I went out with her.  We sat some time at the Workmans and then went to my mother’s, where we staid as long as we could.  In our way back we calld on Mr Anderdon and were introduced to Mrs A, who is a pleasing little woman.  When we returnd to the Admiral’s, we found a very nice luncheon ready for us, to which we sat down directly and made a very good dinner and then went to the Mail Office.  We were in very good time.  Kitty went with us and my mother met us there.  We were fortunate in our companions.  One was a very gentlemanly man who, I fancy, is an Officer, the other a lawyer from Taunton.  We got out of the Coach at Marlborough, where the gentlemen drank tea, but we did not have any thing.  I did not close my eyes all night and the gentleman next me did not sleep much I believe.  The lawyer slept the whole way and my Aunt dozed a good deal.  We reachd London at half past six and luckily got a Hackney Coach and drove directly to Hatton Gardens, where we were most kindly receivd by dear Mrs Vassall and Miss Jones.  Little Betsey is grown quite fat and looks remarkably well.  Mrs Jones came to see us soon after breakfast and kissd us with great warmth and affection.  My Aunt and I walkd to Mr Henderson’s.  He appointed us to be there between ten and eleven on Monday.  We then lookd about for lodgings and were fortunate enough to get a very comfortable one at 109 in Great Russell Street for three guineas a week and 14s for fires.  We returnd to Miss Jones’s for dinner, where we found two little companions of Betsey’s come to dine with her, two Miss Bells, the eldest fourteen, a most interesting sweet girl and the youngest five, a perfect little angel.  I never saw so fascinating and graceful a little creature in my life.  They went away a little after eight and we soon followd them.  We found every thing very comfortable at our lodgings.  The servant a nice tidy girl and particularly civil and obliging.  We went to bed very much tired and I found myself the next morning exactly in the same position as I went to sleep in.  I wrote a few lines to my mother.

Gateway of Montagu House, the old British Museum; view looking east long Great Russell Street, with the gateway of Montagu House at left, a coach coming along the road, a sedan chair on the left pavement, and children at a fruit-stall against the wall, other figures in the street. 1778 Watercolour, with pen and grey ink (British Museum).
Gateway of Montagu House, the old British Museum; view looking east along Great Russell Street, with the gateway of Montagu House at left. 1778 Watercolour, with pen and grey ink (British Museum).

Sunday, 6 May, 1810

An extreme cold day.  We laid in bed very late.  As soon as we had breakfasted we read prayers and then I unpackd the trunk and put our things in the drawers.  We dressd and walkd to Hatton Garden where we found Betsey at dinner.  We had some luncheon with her and then she, Mrs Vassall and us two (for Maria was gone before) walkd to Mr Jones’s.  He was very glad to see us and a good deal affected.  Mr Greame and Val dined there.  I never saw the latter in better spirits.  Mr Jones is looking very well, but is more quiet and composed than he used to be.  They have got the most comfortable apartments.  We spent a very sociable day and returned to Hatton Garden with Mrs V, Maria and Betsey and came from there home.  Had a biscuit and a glass of wine and went to bed.

Monday, 7 May, 1810

A cold, wet, uncomfortable day.  We were to have been at Mr Henderson’s early, but could not get a Coach till after one o’clock.  When we got there he took out two of my Aunt’s teeth, but would not do anything more till tomorrow, that the gums might harden, so that we were not there long.  When he had done we went and sat with Mrs Henderson till Betty brought a Coach and we came home, for it was too wet and cold for my Aunt to venture to stay out.  I wrote to my mother in the evening.

Thursday, 8 May, 1810

A fine day.  As soon as we had breakfasted we walkd to Hatton Garden.  There was no one at home there, so we went on to Mr Jones’s.  Found him, Mrs J and Betsey together.  Mrs V and Maria were gone to St. Pauls.  We sat there till two o’clock and had a very good luncheon with them.  Mr Greame came in before we left them and was very pleasant.  We walkd from there to Mr Henderson’s, where a Gentleman was having a tooth taken out, and cried out so loud it went to my heart and made me quite nervous the rest of the day.  I don’t wonder he screamd , for it was the longest tooth I ever saw.  Mr H did not keep my Aunt long.  In our way back she bought some sans net and ribbon and in the evening I new trimd her bonnet.

In our way to the Jones’s, my Aunt bought three pots of most beautiful Mignionette I ever saw and three pots of heaths in full bloom.

Wednesday, 9 May, 1810

A very fine day.  The moment we had breakfasted My Aunt and I went as far as the Fish Monger’s, where she bought some salmon, as we expected our dear Minah Warren to spend the day with us and found her arrived on our return.  It was impossible for any one to be more affectionate in their manner than she was, or more happy to see us.  Mr Taylor also calld and was equally kind, but more affected at seeing us, I think, than she was.  They are both looking remarkably well.   Unluckily  just as Mr T came in, Mr Vassall calld and staid till dinner time, which was a great interruption to us.  He is looking better than I ever saw him, but was very distant and polite in his manner.  My Aunt askd him to dine, but he said he was engagd.  Minah brought John Short to join with her to see us.  He is looking just as he used to do at Swanage.  She withstood all our entreaties to sleep here and left us at four o’clock.  Soon after she was gone my Aunt and I set out in search of Pen Saker.  We found her house, but she was just at dinner, so we were not admitted and we came home to tea, tired to death after walking three hours.  I bespoke a cage for my Dormouse, made smaller and lighter than those in the shops.

Thursday, 10 May, 1810

A very warm fine day.  Mrs Vassall, Maria and Betsey  calld to ask us to dine at Mr Jones’s.  They did not stay long.  As soon as they went away my Aunt and I walkd to Mr Touray’s Counting House, where we saw him, Peter, Miss J and another brother.  Peter is amazingly improved.  He is grown a fine young man, very handsome and extremely pleasant in his manner.  Miss Touray is a very fine girl and extremely handsome.  They were all very glad to see us and Mr T was very kindly pressing for us to dine with them at Hackney any day that we would fix.  From there we went to Mr Pugh and bespoke some grocery to go to Henlade and then walkd to Mr Jones’s.  I was so tired when I got there I could hardly move.  There was nobody there but us and themselves and I spent a very comfortable pleasant day.  We went to Hatton Garden with Mrs V and Maria and came home from there in a Coach, had an egg and went to bed.  We met Mr Brown of the Isle of Wight in the street, who was delighted to see us and had a long chat.

Friday, 11 May, 1810

A fine day.  While we were at breakfast Mr J Plummer and Pen Saker calld.  Mr P appears a gentlemanly pleasant young man.  They talkd a great deal to my Aunt about dear Mary, but Pen, whose tongue was incessant, prevented my hearing much of what he said.  I never saw Pen look better and she is just as good temperd as ever. She walkd as far as Mr Henderson’s with us, where she left us.  Mr H had not time to do any thing for my Aunt, so we returnd immediately and calld on Mrs Henderson in Montague Street in our way home.  Fortunately she was out.  Soon after we came in Mrs Vassall calld and was prevaild on to stay and dine.  She went with us to Flint’s, where my Aunt bought a stock of Haberdashery and silk for her two pelisses and one for herself and the other she gave to me.  We walkd part of the way home with Mrs V.  In the evening I mended a pair of stockings before I went to bed.  I bought 7 yards of white ribbon for which I gave 6/5d.  The man sent home the Dormouse cage, which came to 7/-.

Rudolph Ackermann The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Politics, 1809  - Fabric shop
View of the interior of Messrs. Harding Howell & Co., a draper’s shop on Pall Mall, 1809 (from Ackermann’s Repository).

Saturday, 12 May, 1810

A fine day, but so cold we were glad to put on our scarlet cloaks.  We went to Mr Henderson directly after breakfast and staid two or three hours.  My Aunt Powell was very unwell while we were there, but had a glass of wine and a piece of bread, which relieved her.  We walkd home from his house and then walkd to Mr Jones’s to dinner, calling in our way in Hatton Garden, but they were gone thence.  We found Mrs Matherson and Miss Farquar at Mr J’s, but they went away as we came in.  Val Came in when the dinner was half over.  We left him there.  When we came away with the Hatton Garden party it began to rain about ten o’clock and Thomas had some difficulty  in getting a Coach for us.  We had some bread and butter when we came home and did not go to bed till past twelve o’clock.  I heard from my mother.

Sunday, 13 May, 1810

A very wet, cold uncomfortable day with an excessive high wind.  We read prayers directly after breakfast and did not go out the whole day.  Mr and Mrs Vassall and Maria Jones dined here.  They went home soon after tea.  V not a bit alterd, just as haram-skarams as ever.

Monday, 14 May, 1810

Dry but cold and very windy.  We walkd as far as Holborn, got into a Coach there and rode to Friday Street, where we got Mrs Phillip’s stockings, but could not get the silk ones she wishd from there.  We walkd to the back of the Change, got into the Hackney Stage and arrived very comfortably at Mrs Touray’s a little after four.  She receivd us in the kindest manner and is looking just as she did many years ago, except that she is grown enormously large.  There were only ourselves and a young Clergyman of the name of Viven, who appears to me to be an admirer of Betsey’s, who is a lovely girl. Mr T was all kindness and attention.  It chanced to be Peter’s twenty fifth birth day. We returnd to town in the Stage at half past eight, after spending a very pleasant day and walkd home from the Change.  We had hardly been in the house half an hour when it began to rain and continued almost all night.  While we were out Mrs J Plummer calld and left a note to say dear Mary was too unwell to come out, but wishd us very much to go there.

The Strand, Looking Eastwards from Exeter Change, London by Caleb Robert Stanley, 1824 out of copyright; (c) Museum of London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Strand, Looking Eastwards from Exeter Change, London by Caleb Robert Stanley, 1824
out of copyright; (c) Museum of London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 15 May, 1810

A fine day.  Mrs Henderson calld directly after breakfast.  As soon as she was gone we went to Mr Henderson’s, where we staid till dinner time.  I bought a bit of Sarsenet to line my bonnet, for which I gave 1/4d.  We were at home alone the rest of the day.  I wrote a long letter to my mother in the evening.

Wednesday, 16 May, 1810

A fine day.  We were engaged to dine with Pen Saker and set out earlier than we should otherwise have done, that we might call in our way on Maria Bent, who we found at home and going also to dine with Pen to meet us.  She received us with the greatest affection and kindness and is just the same warm hearted, sweet creature she used to be.  We all three walkd to Mr Saker’s.  The old lady appeard delighted to see us and is as well as Mr Saker, looking better than I ever saw them.  Little Jude too is much grown.  We met Mrs Sam Saker and her daughter, who is a very fine girl.  Mr and Mrs Forth were engaged out to dinner, so we only just saw them.  We had a most elegant dinner, every thing the best of its kind and given with the greatest hospitality.  Mr Bent’s servant came for Maria about nine and we went home with her.  If I had spent the time we have been in London in the most disagreeable manner it was possible to spend it, the pleasures of this day would have compensated for the the disagreeable, for dear Maria’s manner was so affectionate, attentive and kind, it went to my heart and gave me more real pleasure than I have experienced for a very very long time.  We were but just in time to see her, for she goes out of town tomorrow morning.  Mr Henderson calld while we were at breakfast.  He kissd us both when he came in and was very friendly and pleasant.

Thursday, 17 May, 1810

A miserable, wet, uncomfortable day.  While we were at breakfast Mr Touray sent a young man with my Aunt Neate’s and my mother’s dividend.  It raind so hard all the morning we did not go out till near dinner time, when we went in a Coach to Hatton Garden and took up Mrs Vassall, Maria and Betsey and dined at Mr Jones’s, where we met only Mr Vassall.  Spent a pleasant day and went to Hatton Garden at night, where also Mr V went, as he wanted my Aunt P to make enquiries for him about the family of a young lady, to whom William has made an offer and who lives at Plymouth.  We came home in a Coach, had a biscuit and a glass of ale and went to bed.

Friday, 18 May, 1810

A fine morning.  Mrs Henderson and two of her brats calld while we were at breakfast.  As soon as she was gone we went to enquire at the Museum what days the public were admitted.  They told us Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, from ten till two and that tickets were not now necessary.  From there we went to Mr Henderson’s.  He was not at leisure, so my Aunt said we would go and call on Mrs Poone (who, Mrs Henderson of Montague St had told us, was in town and in Mortimer St) and return to him afterwards.  We calld at four houses in M St. but could not find her.  Mr Forth overtook us in Mortimer St and very kindly offerd us his umbrella, for it raind very fast, but we declind it and returnd to Mr H, where we staid till dinner time and came home in a Coach and were alone all the evening.  I new lined my bonnet.  My Aunt subscribed at the library to have the Paper every day.  It raind the whole evening.

Saturday, 19 May, 1810

A fine day, but muddy.  As soon as we had breakfasted we went to Mrs Henderson’s to exchange our engagement at dinner there today for tomorrow.  From there we walkd to the Jones’s.  Saw Mr and Mrs J, Maria and Val, the latter in excellent spirits, playing all sorts of tricks and antics.  He shewd us his picture, which is, and is not, like him.  It is intended as a companion to the one he gave them of Betsey.  We had some very nice luncheon there and staid with them till three o’clock.  We then went on and my Aunt bought an assortment of cottons.  She bought two pr of silk stocking and I one, for which I gave 7/-.   We then went to Friday Street, but I could not get the stockings I wishd. From there we walkd to Oxford Street, where my Aunt bought a pr of spectacles.  We eat some cakes, for we had had no dinner and sent home some pickled salmon for our supper.  We then calld at Mr Henderson’s, who was not at home, but we saw his son who said if we would call tomorrow between ten and one his father would speak to my Aunt.  On our return home we found cards from Mr Porcher, Pen Saker, Mr Geatman and notes from Mr E Bastard and Mr Henderson.  We had some pickled salmon for our supper and did not go to bed till very late.

View looking down Oxford Street, from Stratford Place, looking towards Hyde Park; coaches and carriages passing down the wide street. 1815 Watercolour by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd (British Museum).
View looking down Oxford Street, from Stratford Place, looking towards Hyde Park; coaches and carriages passing down the wide street. 1815
Watercolour by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd (British Museum).

Sunday, 20 May, 1810

A very fine day. Mrs Henderson came in while we were at breakfast and staid till we had done. As soon as she was gone we went to the other Mr Henderson’s.  He was so obliging to do what my Aunt wanted done and we then walkd to Mr Porcher’s, who we found with his Gouty shoe on, but looking remarkably well, in excellent spirits and temper, very friendly and apparently very glad to see us.  While we were there, Mr Henderson and Jon and Colonel E Bastard calld, the latter grown so fat and looking so well and handsome, I should hardly have known him.  He also was very glad to see us.  From Mr Porcher’s  we went to Mr Saker’s.  They were all out.  We walkd home very much faggd, only just time enough to dress and go to Mr Henderson’s. He was engaged out, so we had only her and John at dinner.  She shewd us the house, which is an excellent one.  Soon after dinner Mr and Mrs Urquart calld for a few minutes, both looking very well.  Mr H came home to tea and we had a pleasanter evening than I expected.  He walkd home with us after supper.

Monday, 21 May, 1810

A fine day. Soon after breakfast Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall, Miss Bell and Betsey came to go with us to the Exhibition, where we met Val, Maria and Miss Anna Blenman who, by the bye, never opend her mouth, at least I did not hear the sound of her voice.  We spent two hours very pleasantly, left them there and after doing a great many things went to Mr Henderson’s.  It was so late when we got there he could not attend to my Aunt, but begd she would come again between nine and ten in the evening.  We then walkd part and rode the rest of the way to Mr Jones’s to dinner, where we spent a very chearful, pleasant day.  After dinner Mr J, Val, my Aunt and I went to the Platform at the top of the house, where Mr J showed and explaind all the different buildings to us.  It is a most wonderful place and very well worth seeing and we never could have seen it to such advantage.  We went to Hatton Garden with Mrs V and Maria, walkd from there till we came to a stand of Coaches and then rode to Mr Henderson’s, where we staid near an hour and came home in the same Coach, which my Aunt had kept.  Had some pickled salmon and went to bed very late.  I bathed my feet.

We met Mr Henderson in the Strand and while we were talking to him Mr Peter Richardson passd us but, the moment he saw my Aunt’s face, came back and was really delighted to see her and had quite a long chat.  My Aunt bought two 16th of Lottery Tickets.  Col. E Bastard and Mrs Vassall calld while we were out.

Lottery ticket 1810
Georgian State lottery ticket 8th June 1810, in a glazed black painted oak frame, ticket 13cm x 22.5cm, frame 27cm x 31.5cm wide (www.reemandansie.com).

Tuesday, 22 May, 1810

A fine day.  Mrs Henderson and little Cooper came in just as I came down to breakfast and, soon after her, Mr J Plummer. He did not stay long, as he was anxious to see to dear Mary, to let her know we were still in town that she might come and see us.  As soon as he was gone my Aunt and I walkd to Mr Henderson’s.  He did not keep us long and we returnd home to wait for Mary Plummer.  We had hardly been in the house five minutes when it raind a violent shower, which must have wet us thro if we had been caught in it.  We arranged our things and had nearly packd them when Mary, accompanied by Mr J Plummer, came.  The dear creature is looking better than I expected, but was very much agitated at seeing us.  She is very much improved in her appearance since I saw her last and is now a very pretty woman.  Mrs J P is very handsome and remarkably pleasing in her manners.  They could only stay half an hour.  As soon as they were gone my Aunt and I walkd to Hatton Garden where we found Mrs V and Maria, both of whom walkd with us, the latter as far as her brother’s, the former on to Lad Lane, where my Aunt took our places for tomorrow in the Mail for Weymouth.  We all went together to Friday Street, where I was again unsuccessful and Mrs V left us in a shop, fearing she might keep Mr Jones’s dinner waiting. We calld at Mr J’s as we went by and found them in the middle of their dinner, Val with them.  We only shook hands and came away.  It was very late when we came home to dinner and we were completely faggd.  Mrs Henderson calld but did not sit down.  She brought a little parcel for Cooper and some needles she had got for my Aunt.  My Aunt bought me a very neat little chip bonnet, for which she gave 9/-.  Mr Vassall calld while we were out.  We went to bed very much tired.  My Aunt bought two pair of very handsome wine coolers as a present for Cooper.

Wednesday, 23 May, 1810

A very fine day.  Mrs Henderson and some of her brats came while we were at breakfast, but did not stay long.  Mr Edmund Bastard calld and sat half an hour and was very friendly and pleasant.  Soon after he went away, dear Mrs Vassall came to assist us in packing and did a great many things for us.  When we had finishd, she walkd with us to the city and I at last succeeded in getting my stockings.  I bought six pair of cotton and three pair of silk, for which I gave altogether 2.14.9d.  My Aunt bought a plate of beautiful artificial grapes, as a present for Mrs Porcher.  Mr and Mrs Vassall dined with us and Mr and Mrs Henderson came after dinner and staid with us till we went to the Mail.  Mr and Mrs V saw us into the Mail and staid till we drove off.  We had two gentlemen, neither of them at all pleasant.  The night was very fine and we were as comfortable as most peaple are, I suppose, travelling all night in an inconvenient carriage.

Thursday, 24 May, 1810

A fine day.  We breakfasted between six and seven at Salisbury.  The two men jumpt out of the Coach and left us to get out as we could.  We went up stairs first and when we came down we found them washing themselves in the breakfast room, one of them without his coat.  This was rather disgusting, but peaple who travel in public coaches must put up with inconveniences.  We reachd Dorchester about one, got out at the Inn, orderd a Chaise to go to Weymouth and then went up stairs to wash our hands.

We calld on Dr and Mrs Cooper in our way, who received us with great kindness.  When we got to Weymouth neither Cooper or Mr Bussell were at home to receive us.  However, when the former came in he was very obliging and said he was glad to see us.  We dined at Mrs Porcher’s, where we met Mrs Bastard and Mr Atkins at dinner and Mrs Hodge (who was very glad to see us) and Mrs ? (a very pretty, pleasant woman).  In the evening we playd at cards and I lost six shillings.

Georgiana Chaumier is staying with Mrs P and is just as pleasant as she used to be. We did not come home till past twelve, a good deal faggd.

Friday, 25 May, 1810

A fine day.  All the World and his wife calld here.  It is impossible to enumerate them.  We went with Cooper to the Parade directly after breakfast, where we met Mrs Porcher and Georgiana and were introduced to Colonel and Mrs Colson, both very pleasant.  We dined and spent the evening at Mr Warne’s, where we met Dr and Mrs Cooper, a Mr and Mrs Wood (very pleasant peaple), Mrs Coates, Miss Henning and Major Steward and passd a very chearful, pleasant day.  I was obliged to play at Cassino and lost 4/-.  We came home about twelve.  We calld at Mrs W Williams in the morning and found her looking very pretty, but very ill.  I heard from my mother.

Saturday, 26 May, 1810

A fine day.  We went in the Carriage to Radipole Barracks to see Cooper manoeuvre the Regiment.  Calld in our way on Mrs P, but neither she or Georgiana would go.  When we went into the Barracks Gard, Mr Atkins, Mr Terry and Mrs Fickers joind and staid with us the whole time.  It was an excellent field day.  Mr Bussell and Mr McGillycuddy came home with us on the Box of the Carriage.  When we returnd we paid some of our visits and had a large party at dinner, Captain and Mrs Scot, Major Knott, Major Steward, Mrs Porcher, Georgiana, Mr Scot, Mr Hume, Mr Atkins and Mr Bussell.  The party was increased in the evening by Mrs Bastard, a Mrs Velly and her two daughters and a Miss Hamilton.  I playd Whist and lost 4/-.  They did not go away till past one o’clock.

View of the Town of Weymouth and the Isle of Portland, taken near the Cavalry Barracks at Radipole (British Museum).
View of the Town of Weymouth and the Isle of Portland, taken near the Cavalry Barracks at Radipole (British Museum).

Sunday, 27 May, 1810

A fine day.  Cooper read prayers to us directly after breakfast, after which we all three got into the Carriage and went to Herrington to see the Scots.  Found them all at home.  Miss Scot is very much alterd for the worse in her appearance.  Mrs Scot’s dear children all looking very well.  They gave us some very nice luncheon and we walkd all over the garden, which we had not seen when Mrs Williams was there. They shewd us the house also, but the best bed  is taken down, so I shall never see that.  It was too late when we returnd to go any where but to Mrs W Williams’s and Mrs Porcher’s.  We dined alone, that is, only Mr Bussell with us and did not sit up late.  I wrote to my mother, to go by tomorrow’s Post and enclosed the half of a five and one pound notes.

Monday, 28 May, 1810

A fine day. We went to the Parade with Cooper and I paid a great many visits afterwards and a great many peaple calld on us.  We had a large party at dinner, Lord A Beauclerk, Sir B Graham (to whom we were introduced at the Parade in the morning), Dr and Mrs Cooper, Captain and Mr Scott, Colonel and Mrs Colson, Captain Chivers, Mr Warrington and Mr Bussell.  Mr Coates  was to have dined here, but sent an excuse and said he would come in the evening, which he did and also Mrs Bastard, Mrs Porcher,Georgiana, Mrs Goodford and her daughter.  Colonel Colson amused us very much in the evening with his tricks on the cards, which he performs quite as well as Breslaw.  The Coopers went away before supper, the rest of the party did not leave us till one o’clock.

Tuesday, 29 May, 1810

A fine day.  We went up with Cooper and Mr Bussell to the look out to see the ships fire the salute, which they did not do till two o’clock, as they waited for a very large party of ladies going on board.  We dined at Mrs Goodford’s, where we met only Lord A Beauclerk and Mr Hume at dinner, but in the evening the party was very large, Sir B Graham, Mr Richards, Colonel and Mrs Colson, Mrs Porcher, Georgiana, the four Miss Willis’s, Miss Brabaxon and Mrs Ross.  We suppd there.  Georgiana, Colonel Colson, Mr Bussell and I sat at the side table. The party did not break up till one o’clock.  One of the little Drum Boys brought Cooper, my Aunt and me a present of a bouquet of Gilt Oak in the morning.

Wednesday, 30 May, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I went to the warm Bath at twelve o’clock and made some calls afterwards.  We dined at Dr Cooper’s at Dorchester, met Sir John, Lady and the two Miss Smiths, Captain Churchill and Mr Frank Geatman.  The Smiths went away soon after tea.  We suppd there and did not get home till past one. It was a beautiful night.  Cooper slept most part of the way back, but was very good humoured and kind before he went to sleep.  Mr Bussell’s Commission as Captain in the Regiment arrived today.  The Mrs Hodges, Captain Eckersall and Mr Morant eat Luncheon with us.

Thursday, 31 May, 1810

A fine day.  I did not walk at all.  The Mrs Hodges calld and persuaded my Aunt to go out with them, but she did not stay long.  We all dined at Mrs Scott’s at Herringston.  Captain Bussell went on the Box with us.  We stopd at Mr Daniel’s door in our way and left our cards, met Captain and Mrs Scott and Dr and Mrs Cooper at dinner and spent the pleasantest day we have passd since we came to Weymouth.  I lost three shilling at Commerce.  We suppd there and had a delightful ride home, Cooper in the best and kindest humour possible all the way.  He promised faithfully if he got his leave to come to Weymouth, he would see us at Henlade in his way home or back.  We stopd at Mrs Porcher’s in our way home and Cooper got out for a few minutes, but desird we would wait for him, which we did.  Captain Bussell came on the Box.  I heard from my mother.

Fashion plate for June 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for June 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 1 June, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell Bathed, after which we came home and found Sir B Graham and Mr W Williams here, the latter only came to Weymouth yesterday.  He eat some luncheon with us and then we calld on his wife, Mrs Porcher and Mrs Goodford.  I bought a pair of gloves and gave 1/10- for them.  We walkd with Mrs Porcher and Georgiana to Mr Warne’s, for the child’s medicine.  Cooper gave me his arm and was very kind.  Mrs Bastard dined here, but went away at eight o’clock, as we were engaged to spend the evening at Mrs Calvan’s, where we met the Goodfords, Colonel and Mrs Ross, Mrs Porcher, Georgiana, two Miss Williams, Sir B Graham, a Mrs Butler and Mr Sims.  We sat down nineteen to supper.  I lost 5/6d at cards.  It was one o’clock when we came home.  I sent my mother the other half of the notes and wrote to my Aunt Neate to beg she would send me some cloaths to go to the Ball in on Monday.

Saturday, 2 June, 1810

A fine day.  Mr Fickers breakfasted with us.  We saw a great many peaple in the course of the morning and dined at Mrs Porcher’s, where we met the two Mrs Hodges and Mr W Williams.  We suppd there but did not stay late, as poor little Ellen was very unwell.

Sunday, 3 June, 1810

A very fine day.  Cooper read prayers after breakfast, soon after which we went to walk on the Esplanade with him and were joind at different times by all our acquaintances in Weymouth, who came out to hear the Band.  We walkd till it was time to dress for dinner.  The two Mrs Hodges,  Sir B Graham and Dr Cooper dined here.  The two Beaux did not come up to tea.  Mrs Porcher and Georgiana came in the evening.  They all went away a little after eleven.

Weymouth Bay and Esplanade, 1819 (British Museum).
Weymouth Bay and Esplanade, 1819 (British Museum).

Monday, 4 June, 1810

A beautiful day.  We went up to Mrs Porcher’s directly after breakfast, as Ellen was much worse.  We staid there till one o’clock, when we came home to see the Regiment on the Nathe which we did to great advantage from our window.  Cooper gave them a pint of beer each to drink the King’s health.  The two Mrs Hodges and Mrs Colson came and sat a long time here.  Mrs Colson was so kind to say her Carriage should take us to the Ball. The Regiment lookd to great advantage on the hill and fired remarkably well.  Miss Smith came from Sydling to dine and sleep here, to go to the Ball with us.  Mrs Scott and Mrs Bastard also joind our lady party at dinner and went to the Ball, which was a very chearful, pleasant one.  All the men were tipsy, but not unpleasantly so.  Sir B Graham and Cooper gave a party of party and supper and we did not break up till five o’clock.  We walkd home in a bright sunshine.  Cooper was very kind and affectionate.  We had some breakfast before we went to bed and I did not go to sleep till past six.  Cooper had the two Flank Companies out before the Esplanade at night, each man with a candle in his hand to light the company to the Ball, which had a very good effect.

Tuesday, 5 June, 1810

A fine day, but a very high wind.  Miss Smith breakfasted with us and Mr W Williams and Sir B Graham came in while we were at breakfast, as did Mrs Cooper.  I went with Miss Smith to pay visits and shopping.  We calld on Mrs Phillips, Mrs Cornwall, Mrs Goodford, Mrs W Williams and Miss Haynes.  Miss Smith gave me a pretty little bottle of Otto of Roses.  As soon as she left us I calld on Georgiana, who walkd more than an hour with me and Captain Bussell.  We dined at Mrs Hodges, met only Mrs Bastard.  I won 6/6d at cards.  We calld at Mrs Porcher’s in our way home.  The child very bad.

Wednesday, 6 June, 1810

A fine day and very hot.  We had a great many visitors and were out on the Esplanade a good deal.  I Bathd.  We, that is Cooper, my Aunt and I dined at Mrs Daniel’s at Upway.  Captain Bussell was not askd. The party consisted of the Colsons, Mrs Warrington, the Balls, the Goodfords and Captain and Mrs Boyce and ourselves, in all sixteen.  They gave us a magnificent dinner and desert and every thing elegantly conducted, but Mr D is, I think, as disagreeable a man as I ever saw and Mrs D not a woman I should ever wish to see again.  Upon the whole I passed a pleasanter day than I expected.  Miss Ball, Miss E Goodford, my Aunt and I walkd in the garden after dinner, till near nine o’clock. Most of the men were very tipsy when they came up stairs, Mr D ? so.  We stopd at Mrs Porcher’s in our way home, but only Cooper got out of the Carriage and we waited for him.  We had some bread and cheese after we came home and Cooper was in very good humour and not inclined to go to bed.

Thursday, 7 June, 1810

A fine day.  The morning passd as it usually does when in visiting and being visited and we dined at Mrs W Williams’s, where we met Mr Chudleigh-Haynes, who talkd incessantly and appeard as mad as a March Hare.  We did not stay to supper, for fear of fatiguing Mrs W, who was a good deal overcome by Mr H’s noise.  We calld at Mrs Porcher’s, the child was still alive.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 8 June, 1810

A fine day.  We were out some part of the morning and a good many peaple calld.  We all dined at Mr Chamberlayne’s and met the two Mrs Hodges, Captain and Mrs Scott and a Mr and Mrs Halton at dinner in the evening, two of the Miss Willis’s.  I lost 10/6d at Cards.  We suppd there, but did not stay late and calld at Mrs Porcher’s on our way back. The child alive.  I bath’d.

Saturday, 9 June, 1810

A very fine day.  Mr Fickes breakfasted with us.  We sat some time at the Goodford’s and saw Miss G’s drawings, some of which are beautiful.  We had a large party at dinner, Sir Montague Burgoyne, Sir Bel Graham, Mr Richards, the two Mrs Hodges, Mrs Bastard, Dr and Mrs Cooper, Major Steward and Mr W Williams.  Lady E Dormer came in the evening.  The men were all quite drunk when they came up stairs.  I went partner with Cooper at Cards and lost 3/-.  Only Mrs Bastard, Major Steward and Mrs Richards staid supper and I thought they intended to breakfast with us.  The day passd off better than I expected.

Weymouth from the Lookout, Dorset, May 1812 by R. K. Robens (c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Weymouth from the Lookout, Dorset, May 1812 by R. K. Robens
(c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Sunday, 10 June, 1810

A very fine day, but intensely hot.  Cooper read prayers to us, soon after which the Miss Goodfords calld to walk with us to the Barracks.  We calld on the Major and Cooper, shewd them Captain Eckensall’s and the Map Room.  Before we crossd the water, Mr Haynes, Mr Atkins and Mr Whately calld and had some luncheon with us. When we returnd, the Miss’s came in to hear the Band and after they were gone the two Mrs Hodges came and sat till it was time for us to dress.  We all dined and suppd at Mr W Williams and met Mr Herbert Brown, one of the pleasantest men I ever met with.  We did not stay late and calld at Mrs Porcher’s, where Cooper found the child so bad, he said it could not live more than two hours.

Monday, 11 June, 1810

A very fine day.  Mrs Urquhard and her daughter came and staid the whole time we were at breakfast.  Mrs Bastard calld, but did not stay long.  The two Mrs Hodges came to ask us to spend the evening with them, but it was not in our power, we had so much to do.  Poor little Ellen Porcher died at six o’clock this morning.  Cooper sent for the Dr to be present when Mr Warne opend her, which was done in the course of the morning.  The Dr came and sat with us afterwards.  The gentlemen visitors at Weymouth gave a very grand dinner to all the Officers of the Somerset today, at which Cooper and Captain Bussell of course were present, so that we dined alone.  Mrs Goodford very kindly pressd us to dine with her, as did Mrs E Hodge, but we declind both invitations.  I bathd very late. We were busy till ten o’clock packing and then went to Mrs Porcher’s, where we staid till eleven.  She wanted us to dine there tomorrow, but my Aunt said it was impossible.  Georgiana made us promise to go there in the evening in preference to any other place.  We had not been at home more than five minutes when Cooper came in, much sooner than we expected him.  He was not at all tipsy and told us what had passd at the dinner, which was a very pleasant one he said.  He sat near an hour with us before we went to bed and was in very good humour.

Tuesday, 12 June, 1810

A very fine day.  Mr Urquart came in before breakfast, which was very troublesome, as my Aunt and Cooper were both writing and his incessant tongue interrupted them very much.  Cooper askd him to breakfast with us, which it was very evident he intended to do, and said he would, but after staying about half an hour and seeing no prospect of its making its appearance, he went away intending, as he said. to call again, but I do not think he did.  My Aunt and I were out the whole morning taking leave.  We only left cards at most places, but went in at Mrs Goodford’s, Mrs Hodge’s and Mrs Colson’s.  We both Bathd very late.  Cooper dined at the General’s, Captain Bussell with us.  After we had finishd our packing he went with us to Mrs Porcher’s, where we drank tea.  We left him there and went in to Mrs W Williams to wish her good bye.  She was just gone to bed, but would see us.  We sat half an hour with her, shook hands with Mr W and returnd to Mrs Porcher’s.  Soon afterwards Cooper and the two Miss Hodges came in and we all staid till twelve o’clock.  The whole party took leave very affectionately of us. Captain Bussell came in and had some soda water.  Cooper and we had supper.  He was very kind and obliging.

Wednesday, 13 June, 1810

An excessive hard rain.  We got up early that Cooper might have his breakfast comfortably before he marchd, which he intended to do at nine o’clock, but at that hour, just as the men had marched down opposite Cooper’s lodgings, the General sent to desire they might stay an hour longer, so they had to wait that time, in their wet clothes.  Captain Bussell was very angry about it, but was obliged to submit.  They assembled again at ten and receivd the Colors from the window.  It was really a very affecting sight, for notwithstanding the rain was pouring down, there was an immense crowd assembled to take leave of them and just before Cooper gave the word to march, he said “Now, my lads, God bless the town of Weymouth” and the soldiers immediately gave nine cheers and when they marchd the populace cheerd them.  Mrs Davis came to go in the Carriage with us.  Captain Scott and Mr W Williams came to shake hands with us.  When the Carriage came to the door my Aunt and I got into it and calld on Mrs Warner, who was extremely affected at Cooper’s going and said she owed her husband’s life to his skill.  From her we went to Mrs Bastard’s, who we found in tears and who kissd us very affectionately when we came away.  Captain Colson came in while the Carriage was packing, to see if he could do any thing for us.  He very kindly staid and put us in the Carriage and took our cards to send to Mrs Daniel at Upway, to take leave.  We stopd at Mrs W Williams and Mrs Porcher’s, but did not get out at either and arrived at Dorchester just as the Regiment had marchd in.  We drove to the King’s Arms, where we got out and left Cooper’s things to change, shook hands with him, who lookd like a drownd rat, left Mrs Davis there and then drove to Dr Cooper’s where we were engaged to dine with a lady party, the Dr of course going to the shop.  We met Mrs Davis, Mrs Boyce, Miss Geatman and Charlotte and spent a very chearful morning with Mrs C and Charlotte before dinner, for it cleard up about two o’clock and Cooper, Captain Chivers, Mr Morant, and Mr Swinfin of the 16th came to a very smart luncheon at the Dr.’s, intended for all the Officers, but only these came.  Mr Brown of Frampton came in to the Dr’s with Cooper and was introduced to us.  As soon as they all went away, Cooper, Mrs C, Charlotte, my Aunt and I went to Miss Manfield’s where we had a long chat with her.  We afterwards walkd about the town a little and then sat with Mrs Cooper till dinner time.  Miss Geatman was remarkably pleasant, more so than she generally is, and Charlotte as good humoured as ever.  At nine o’clock we all went to the King’s Arms to drink tea and play at cards with the gentlemen.  Mr W Williams came to us directly, the rest of the party not for some time and they were all so drunk they scarcely knew what they were about.  They were extremely noisey, but fortunately very good humoured.  Mrs Boyce, my Aunt P, Mr Scott and the Dr sat down at Whist, as did Cooper, Mr Grimes, Mrs Davis and Captain Eckersall.  Mrs Cooper, her two sister , Frank Geatman, Mr W Williams, Mr Swinfin, Captain Chivers, Mr Davis, Mr Rabe, Mr Morant and myself playd at Commerce, at least we attempted it, but there was so much laughing and talking we should never have finishd our pool, so when supper was ready we divided our money again.  Mr Forward, Mr Symes and Captain Bussell went to bed when we sat down to cards. Cooper was very good humourd and kind.  We slept at the Dr’s as Mrs C had kindly offerd us a bed, which was more comfortable than sleeping at the Inn.

Thursday, 14 June, 1810

A very fine day after the rain.  The dust nicely laid for their marching.  We would not breakfast at the Dr’s for fear of being delayd too long, as we wishd to reach Blandford before Cooper. Mrs David came up to the Dr, who with Mrs C took a very affectionate leave of us.  We overtook the Regiment just after they had breakfasted, half way between Dorchester and Blandford.  They divided for us to pass thro them and the Band playd.  We drove to the Grey Hound at Blandford, where we found all our rooms chosen by the Serjeant, who came on early in the morning and our names written on the doors.  Mrs Davis and we had our breakfasts very comfortably before Cooper and the Regiment arrived.  As they passd the windows we were standing at, Mr Morant lowerd the Colors to us very gracefully.  Cooper was very hot when he came in and had some soda water, which we had got ready for him.  When he went to dress, we did the same and on our return to the sitting room, found a Captain Andrews with him of the Dorset, a particular friend of Colonel Andrews, who was commissioned by him, as he was obliged to leave Blandford on business, to do the honours of his house to Cooper and offer him a bed at it.  As soon as Cooper was a little rested (for he walkd all the way from Dorchester, 18 miles), he, my Aunt, Captain Andrews, Captain Bussell and I went to Colonel Andrews, lookd over his house (which is most elegantly furnishd) and pictures, some of which are most beautiful and walkd about his garden.  We saw Major Knotts, old General Ben Major and his wife, who now lives with Colonel A.  She was delighted to see us and made a thousand enquiries after my Aunt Neate.  From the Col. we went to a shop to chuse a gown for Cooper to give to Mrs Major and then walkd to Mrs Portman’s grounds, with whom Captain Andrews is acquainted, and spent half an hour there very pleasantly, Capt A desiring the Porter to admit us in the evening if we came.  We dined with the Mess, as did Captain Andrews and a Mr Smith, a friend of Mr ?.  As soon as we had drank our wine, Mrs Davis, my Aunt and I went to Mr Portmans’ and walkd thro the most enchanting grounds I ever saw, nearly up to the house and returnd to the Lodge a different way, but equally beautiful.  All the gentlemen drank tea with us, but it was too late to play cards.  Cooper was very kind and obliging and I have not met a pleasanter man for some time than Captain Andrews or passd a more agreeable day than this.  We did not have any supper, as we had not finshd our tea till past eleven.

Thursday, 15 June, 1810

A very fine day, but extremely hot.  Cooper and the Regiment left Blandford at four o’clock in the morning, as they had 23 miles to march to Salisbury.  Mrs Davis, my Aunt and I got into the Carriage between seven and eight and overtook the Regiment at Woodgate’s Inn, where they haltd to breakfast and where we changd horses. We found an elegant breakfast set out, which we partook with the Beaux.  It was one of the prettiest sights I ever saw;  the soldiers resting and eating their breakfasts, in the shade the baggage wagons, women and children scatterd in different directions, had the effect which I have read of in novels, but never experienced before.  We allowd the Regiment to march near an hour before we had the horses put to to the Carriage, as we did not wish to overtake them till they came to the Plain, that we might get out and walk a little way with Cooper, which we did, the Band playing most part of the time.  Cooper very kindly had the advanced guard stopd twice by the sound of the Bugle, while we were walking, that we might see and understand the nature of it.  We reachd Salisbury about half an hour before them and found our rooms chosen as before, we always having the best.  The White Hart is not at all like the Grey Hound at Blandford, which is one of the most comfortable Inns I was ever in.  Mrs Davis left us as soon as we came in, to call on her friends.  We had some soda water and bread and butter ready for Cooper against he arrivd, who was very hot and very much tired, but was a good deal refreshd by his glass of soda and crust of bread and butter.  He sat near an hour and then we all went to dress.  He was too much tired to think of walking about, so we staid very quietly with him and he was very affectionate and kind to me and in very excellent spirits.  There were no strangers at dinner, but an immense number of ladies calld on Mrs Davis in the afternoon to hear the Band, to all of whom we were introduced.  Fortunately they none of them staid to tea.  Captain Bussell, Mr Davis and an acquaintance of his drank tea with us, after which Cooper, my Aunt, Mrs Davis and Captain Chivers playd a rubber at Whist, when we had some bread and butter and soda water and went to bed.  Sam (Colonel Wheat’s famous Groom) came to see Cooper.  He is looking remarkably well and was delighted to see Cooper.

View of Salisbury Guildhall, Wiltshire, from the Square, 1795 by Henry Brooks (c) Salisbury Guildhall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
View of Salisbury Guildhall, Wiltshire, from the Square, 1795 by Henry Brooks
(c) Salisbury Guildhall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 16 June, 1810

A very fine day.  We did not get up early and Cooper did not come down stairs till near an hour after us.  He was a good deal faggd with his yesterday’s walk.  The Regiment, commanded by Captain Chivers, went off between five and six.  We had not sat down to breakfast when Mr and Miss Greenley arrived in their way to Weymouth.  C sent to ask them to breakfast, but they declined it, saying they would come in and shake hands presently, which they did and sat half an hour with us while we were at breakfast.  They both appeard very glad to see us and were very friendly.  Soon after they were gone Major Knott drove in in his new Gig and Cooper, my Aunt and me went to the Market Place to see the division come in.  We walkd about a little while, calld on Mrs Eyre, who was gone to London in consequence of her mother’s death, and then returnd to the Inn to see the Major before we left Salisbury for Shockerwick, which we did about twelve.  We had a delightful ride to Devises,  Cooper all affectionate attention, exactly as he used to be.  He kissd us both when we got out of the Carriage at Devizes, where we had some cold meat in my ?  brought in a minute.  We reached Shockerwick a few minutes before six and found all the family tolerable and were very kindly received by them all.  Charlotte is looking much paler than when I saw her last, but is better.  She was lying on the sopha.  There was only the family, Charlotte Savage (who is staying here) and ourselves and after dinner Cooper was most part of the evening in Charlotte’s room hearing all that had occurd to her since he saw her last.  We suppd early and went to bed a good deal tired.

Sunday, 17 June, 1810

A very fine day, but intensely hot.  After breakfast we all walkd about the garden, which is beautiful and went to the Hot House to see the grapes, which are in the greatest abundance I ever saw.  When we came in we found Charlotte in the library ready for prayers, which Mr Wiltshire read to us, after which we left Cooper, Mr W and Miss Helen with her, that Cooper might see her standing and judge whether it would be proper for her to attempt to walk.  He has agreed to her trying a little every day.  Before he finishd with her, Mrs and the three Miss Chapmans came, for him to see Louisa, who looks a great deal worse than when we saw her last.  As soon as he had finishd with them, he, my Aunt and I got into Mr W’s Carriage and went to Bath.  I got out at Bond Street to go to my mother and they went on to Mrs Flinn’s.  I found my mother looking piety well, but Emma very indifferent.  I staid as long as I could with them and then went to the Workmans (who are at Bristol) to meet Cooper and my Aunt.  We got back to Shockerwick in very good time to dress for dinner.  Mr and Mrs Tudor and Major Durbin dined here, the latter delighted to see us.  They all went away before supper.  Cooper was in Charlotte’s room most part of the evening.

Miss Savage was very unwell all day and did not make her appearance after breakfast time.  We all went to bed early.

Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards
Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards

Monday, 18 June, 1810

Tho a fine day, yet black Monday to us, as our dear Cooper left us directly after breakfast.  He was very much out of spirits when he went away.  I do not know that I ever long more for any thing, than to go with him.  Soon after he was gone, Miss Wiltshire proposed our taking a walk to Middle Hill, which we did with her and Miss Elizabeth and calld on Mrs Thomson, Mrs Chapman and Mrs Bower.  We had some cake at the first, some excellent bread and cheese and a hearty welcome at the next and the last was not at home.  Only Miss Chapman dined at the Wiltshire’s and Mrs C and Sarah came  to tea.   They went away early and Mr Wiltshire read a pretty little Scots thing to us, which he gave to me.  Soon after he had finished it we had our supper and went to bed.

Tuesday, 19 June, 1810

A showery morning, but fine afterwards.  I packd up our things after breakfast and about twelve Miss Maria and Charlotte Savage took us to Bath.  We calld in our way at the dear Villa (for dear it will always be to me). We saw only Mrs Bradbelt and the child.  She was very obliging.  We walkd all over the garden.  They have made many alterations but not, in my opinion,  improvements.  We left Miss Savage in Paragon and drove to my mother’s, where we did not stay long, but went with Miss Maria ? to Salter’s about the plants.  We were there a long time with her and she brought as back as far as the Post Office, where we took leave of her and walkd to my mother’s, where we dined and spent the evening.  She had got a bed for us at Mr Turnon’s, two doors from her, where we went between ten and eleven, very much tired.

Batheaston Villa c 1825, courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston Villa c 1825, courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Wednesday, 20 June, 1810

It rained very hard when we went in to my mother’s to breakfast and again when we were going out afterwards, but was fine the rest of the day.  We did a great many things in the morning and in the evening my mother and Emma walkd up to Salter’s with us where we saw all that remains of our plants, a great many of them having died in the Winter, all of which Salter very handsomely says he will replace.  We did not get back to my mother’s till near ten, had our supper and went to Mr Turman’s.

Thursday, 21 June, 1810

A fine day.  Dr Davis calld.  He was very friendly and staid a long time.  Mrs Fox and Mrs (blank) calld on my mother.  Miss Silverthorn was with my Aunt a long time trying on and fitting a gown.  When we went out we met Captain Naish, who was very glad to see us and we had a very long chat.  We also saw Miss Baker and her sisters, who tried to avoid my Aunt, but could not.  My Aunt made me a present of a beautiful bonnet and tippet to match.  We calld at Mr Anderdon’s, found him at home, but Mrs A was not in Bath.  We all went to Miss Lovelock’s after dinner and calld again at Mrs Anderdon’s.  We met the two Miss Velleys in Broad Street, who appeard glad to see us.  We went to bed very much tired.

Friday, 22 June, 1810

A very fine day, but intensely hot.  My Aunt and I went up to Salter’s directly after breakfast and met my mother afterwards at Miss Silverthorns.  We calld at Admiral Phillips’s.  He and Mrs P are gone to Charmouth.  My Aunt and I walkd as far as Lark Hall to enquire if John Holbrook was well enough to go to Henlade to lead the Haymaking.  We found him looking just as he used to do, but not able to do any hard work.  He says he would have gone to Henlade with all his heart, but he was engaged to make a field of hay for Dr Robinson and could not disappoint him.  In our way back we calld on Lady Durbin, but she was too ill to see any body.  We met the Major afterwards, who turnd about and walkd as far as the end of Walcot Parade with us.  He is much out of spirits and appears to have serious thoughts of leaving the Regiment.  It was ten o’clock when we got back to my mother’s and we were so tired we were glad to go to bed directly after supper.

Saturday, 23 June, 1810

A very hot day. Dr Davis calld again, but we did not see him.  Miss Silverthorn brought my Aunt’s gown home.  We were out all the morning and came in only just time enough for dinner.  Miss Ann Keen drank tea with my mother and was as good humourd and pleasant as ever.  She went home before supper.

Sunday, 24 June, 1810

A very fine day, but intensely hot.  My Aunt and I went to the Anabaptist Chappel to see the Ceremony of dipping.  Old Mrs Evill very obligingly gave us seats in her Pew, which was directly opposite the bath and we saw the whole ceremony very distinctly.  My mother dined early and we went with her and Emma to church afterwards and sat in Mr Lye’s Pew.  In going to church we met Mr and the Miss Velleys.  In our way home we ordered the horses for tomorrow morning and calld at Miss Lovelock’s to give some directions to Miss Silverthorn.  After tea we all took a walk round Norfolk Crescent and Green Park Buildings.  When we came in I packd all our things ready for tomorrow and went to bed a good deal tired.

Norfolk Crescent, Bath c.1828 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Norfolk Crescent, Bath c.1828 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Monday, 25 June, 1810

A very fine day, but the heat quite oppressive.  My Aunt and I got up at seven o’clock and found the breakfast ready for us at my mother’s.  As soon as we had finishd, we went as far as Lucas’s for some things she had forgot and found the Chaise at the door waiting for us when we came back.  We took leave of my mother and dear Emma, who have promised to be with us at Henlade the beginning of next week and, accompanied by Quick, my Aunt’s new maid, left Bath a little after ten.  We walkd down Radstock and up part of the Hill on the other side, but after that did not get out except to change the Chaises.  We had some cold beef at Street and got home at half past seven after a very comfortable journey.  Found my Aunt Neate very well and very glad to see us.  We had our tea and supper and went to bed a good deal tired.

Tuesday, 26 June, 1810

A fine day and much cooler here than at Bath.  I went with my Aunt Neate to see the chickens and ducks and was about the house and garden all day.  It was so cold in the evening, I should liked to have had a fire.  I wrote to my mother.

Wednesday, 27 June, 1810

A fine day.  I was ? about most part of it.  Mr Grosett and his two daughters calld and staid some time.  Mrs Strangways sent to enquire after us.  I cut and naild up a great many of the rose trees round the house and was a good deal tired at night.

Thursday, 28 June, 1810

A fine day.  They began mowing the hay to day, but the crop is so bad it is hardly worth cutting.  I workd hard at the rose trees again and was at home alone all day, as both my Aunts were in the hayfield.  We went to bed early as the servants were very much tired.

Friday, 29 June, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunts and the servants were out all day in the field.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld, but did not stay long.  I wrote most part of the morning, laid the cloth and prepared the things for dinner, as there was only Molly and myself in the house.  I wrote to my mother.  I put a new border to my night cap in the evening.

Saturday, 30 June, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunts out again.  When my Aunt P came in to luncheon she and I went as far as Mr Waterman’s to speak about his pigs coming into the mowing grass.  We had a little chat with Mrs Furber, who was as brisk as bottled Ale.

Mr Creane came and gave the finishing coat of color to the two out houses and my room.

Fashion plate for July 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for July 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 July, 1810

While we were at breakfast there was a tremendous storm of thunder and lightening which lasted a long time.  It was at a great distance, but the lightening was very vivid.  As soon as it was gone by, we read prayers.  Quick and Harriet attended.  I went into the garden to see if the rain had refreshd the plants, but it has not penetrated an inch.  It thundered a great deal in the afternoon, but at a great distance.  I wrote almost all the evening.

Monday, 2 July, 1810

A threatening day and there were a few showers, but very slight.  I was employd the whole day laundering the ? room and was very much tired in the evening.  We all went to bed early.  I heard from my mother to say they should be here tomorrow.

Tuesday, 3 July, 1810

A very wet morning.  It pourd till one o’clock. I finished laundering the room, put it to rights and nailed down the two green cloths.  My mother and dear Emma arrivd in the midst of it, about four o’clock, both looking pretty well.  Seeing them here is a pleasure! I am sure I never expected.  My Aunt P shewd them the house before dinner and after Emma and I went out with my Aunt Neate to see the chickens and ducks.  When we came back my Aunt P and my mother were in the garden.  We went to them and gatherd some strawberries and raspberries for supper.  My Aunt had the fire lit at tea.  We all went to bed very early as Mama and Emma were very tired and I more than them.

Wednesday, 4 July, 1810

A very showery morning.  Mama and Emma pretty well after their journey.  We had the fire lit in the morning soon after breakfast.  We gatherd a great many strawberries and after dinner my Aunt P, Emma and I carried a large plate full to Mrs Furber and intended to carry twice the quantity to Mr Grosett, but at Mrs Furber’s we saw Daniel and sent to him with them to his Master and walkd about the farmer’s garden till he came back.  From there we went to Farmer Baytes and in our way back calld at Farmer Bartlett and bespoke two couple of ducks.  They gave us some nice flowers at Farmer Furber’s and Farmer Bartlett’s.  I workd a little in the evening.

Thursday, 5 July, 1810

A fine day.  Every lady but Mama, Emma, I and Molly were out haymaking.  Mr Grosett and Miss Kitty calld.  They found my Aunts in the field and workd hard with them till luncheon time, when they came in and had some strawberries.  I was out almost all the morning cutting and nailing the rose trees in front of the house.  My Aunt P, Mama and Emma walkd to the top of the lawn after dinner.  I workd in the evening.

Friday, 6 July, 1810

A fine day, excepting a shower or two.  Every lady in the hayfield.  I cut out and partly made a shift.  We dined at one o’clock, that the servants might dine after, as Mr Grosett and his two daughters came about five and made hay for two hours, but did not come into the house.  I workd all the evening.

In the Hayfield by George Morland, 1797 (c) Museums Sheffield; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
In the Hayfield by George Morland, 1797
(c) Museums Sheffield; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 7 July, 1810

A very fine day.  They were all very busy in the hayfield and carried it all before evening.  Mr Grosett lent my Aunt his man yesterday and today, which has been a great assistance.  My Aunt P and Emma calld at Mr Grosett’s to ask Miss Kitty to bring some change from Taunton.  I workd a little in the morning and after dinner went with my Aunt to shew Mama and Emma the walk by the river.  After that Emma and I went to Mr Grosett’s with some strawberries.  We saw the old gentleman, his two daughters, Miss Strangways and Miss Gardner and Mr P Ball.  They were at tea and wanted us to stay and take some with them, but we could not.  Miss Kitty gave me the ten pounds change. She was so kind to bring my mother’s Band Box from Taunton.  I workd in the evening.

Sunday, 8 July, 1810

A very fine morning, but intensely hot.  My mother, Emma, my Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn to church, but when we got to Mrs Strangeway’s we found the service had begun near an hour sooner than we supposd, so we sat with them till church was over, which was about a quarter of an hour.  After we got there, young Mrs Strangways, her little girl, Miss M Ball and Mr Phillip came in and sat a short time.  After they were gone we walkd in Mrs S’s garden and then came home.  We had not been in the house more than half an hour when we had a most violent storm of rain, which must almost have drownd us, if we had been out in it.  It was soon over.  We walkd about the garden in the evening.

Monday, 9 July, 1810

A showery day.  My Aunt P, Emma and I went to Taunton directly after breakfast, walkd about a great deal there and did every thing that was set down.  We were fortunate enough to have it very fine while we were there, tho it raind both in going and coming.  We left some strawberries at Mrs Ball’s as we went by.  Mrs Strangways sent my Aunt some peas in the evening and my Aunt sent her some strawberries back by the maid.  I workd a little in the evening.  It raind extremely hard when we went to bed.  My Aunt P had a very kind letter from dear Tom Porcher.

Tuesday, 10 July, 1810

A fine day.  Hallett came and put up the door he has been so long about.  Mr Standert calld and sat some time.  He lookd at the young colt and said it was a perfect beauty.  Mama, my Aunt P, Emma and I went fishing.  I did not stay long with them, but came back and transplanted my Mignonette.  They went again after dinner and staid till past nine.  My mother came in very cold.  They caught a good many small Perch.  I workd in the afternoon and evening and nearly finishd another shift.

Wednesday, 11 July, 1810

A gloomy looking morning, but very warm and there was a great deal of rain in the night I fancy, as everything is very wet.  My mother caught cold last night and has a complaint in her bowels in consequence.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and askd us to drink tea there Friday.  I was out in the garden almost all of the morning and in the evening finishd my shift.

Thursday, 12 July, 1810

A fine day with now and then a shower.  My Aunt P, Emma and I calld at the Balls.  We met Mr Ball at the door going to the Hay field, saw Mrs Ball, Mrs Parsons (the married daughter who lives at Dorchester), her three children, Miss Ball, Miss Anne and Miss Miriam.  We sat there some time and then walkd to Farmer Chard’s at Heydon about the pigs my Aunt bespoke there and which they are to send to us next Monday.  Mrs Chard gave us some delicious black currant wine and we also tasted her grape wine, which is excellent.  In our way back we met Mr Phillip Ball on horseback and stopd to speak to him.  I calld at Mrs Ball’s for a beautiful bunch of flowers she was so kind to give us.  George went to Taunton and brought back the Paper with him and in the evening we had the Bath Paper.  I workd a little.

Friday, 13 July, 1810

A very showery day.  My Aunt P was obliged to send an excuse to Mrs Strangways.  I workd all the morning and in the evening was very busy with my Aunt and Emma potting the plants, which arrived from Bath just as we were going to dinner.  It took us till very near ten o’clock and I was compleatly tired.  We did not go to bed till between twelve and one.

Saturday, 14 July, 1810

A fine day, but showery.  Part of the morning I was employd with my Aunt Powell cleaning an old musty safe for meat and the rest of it I workd.  We all walkd to Mrs Strangways to tea.  There were only ourselves and they did not produce cards.  We walkd home again at ten o’clock.  I picked up a beautiful glow worm and brought it home with me.  We had some boild chicken and artichokes and went to bed.

Sunday, 15 July, 1810

A fine day.  My mother did not get up to breakfast.  My Aunt P, Emma and I walkd to Thorn church.  Young Mrs Strangways, the three Miss Balls, Mr Phillip Ball and Mrs and Miss Strangways walkd home with us; only the two latter came in.  They staid and eat some luncheon and then my Aunt P, Emma and I went with them to Mr Grosett’s.  We sat there some time and saw all the Balls out at their door in our way home.  We stopd and had a little chat with them, left the Strangways there and came home.  We found Mama in the garden, where we staid till dinner time.  After dinner I waterd all the Green House plants.  My Aunt Powell read the Bible to us part of the evening and about ten o’clock my Aunt Neate, Emma and I went half way up the lawn to assist George to drive the lambs into the orchard, where he had just found the lamb my Aunt N missd in the morning.

Monday, 16 July, 1810

A fine morning.  I was busy the whole day cutting, tying and “putting to rights” the Greenhouse plants.  Young Mr Chard brought the two pigs and two geese.  I gave him some cuttings of Geraniums.  It began to rain at three o’clock and pourd the whole evening.

Tuesday, 17 July, 1810

A wet day, with very few intervals of sunshine.  We were busy the whole morning preparing for our neighbours drinking tea with us.  George went to Taunton to get cakes.  The Grossetts sent their excuses, the weather was so bad, but Mrs Ball (her sister), Miss Hinds, Miss Ball, Mrs Parsons, Mr P Ball, Mrs and Miss Strangways drank tea here.  We playd Pope Joan and Commerce.  I won 2/6.  The all went away about twelve.

Wednesday, 18 July, 1810

A fine day, tho it raind early in the morning.  I compleated my thirty fifth year.  I workd very hard the whole day, carrying and placing the plants on the stairs opposite the Library windows.  We dined early, as the servants dined after us.  We went in the garden till tea time.  I workd after tea and my mother read the Bible to us.  Young Mr Chard came in while we were at tea, to say he had got some barley for my Aunt.

Thursday, 19th July, 1810

A fine morning.  We were out in the garden till two o’clock, gathering currants and raspberrys.  A shower drove us in and we picked the currants.  Mr, Mrs and Miss Comber calld, but luckily we saw them coming and said “not at home”.  George went to Taunton and did not return till after we had dined.

We have been so busy gathering and picking black currants for wine, that I have not had time for any thing else.  Saturday Miss Grosett calld just as we had done dinner, to bring us a book Mr Standert was so kind to lend us.  My Aunt Powell, Mama and Emma fishd all the morning.  They caught a few small ones.  After Miss Grosett was gone they went again and I joind them.  About eight o’clock Emma caught a very large Carp and I caught one nearly the same size, the first fish I ever caught in my life I believe.  We did not come in till we could not see our floats.  George went to Bath at night to see his father, who is dangerously ill.  He is to come back Wednesday.

Sunday, 22 July, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt P, Mama, Emma and I walkd to Thorn Church, saw the two Mrs and Miss Strangways, Miss M Ball and Mr Phillip B.  Mr Strangways stopd in his Gig to speak to us.  He appears a gentlemanly man.  Mrs Strangways and Mr P Ball walkd across the fields with us.  Between dinner and tea my Aunt P, Emma and I walkd as far as the road to Heydon.  We saw all the Balls out at their door and stopd and had a little chat with them.  Calld at Mrs Furber in our way back and took her a few gerkins.  My Aunt P read the Bible to us in the evening.

Monday, 23 July, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt and Emma busy about the wine.  I workd all the morning.  Miss Kitty Grosett calld to ask us to go there tomorrow.  I waterd all the plants in the afternoon and workd in the evening.

Tuesday, 24 July, 1810

A very fine day.  I was out in the garden part of the morning and workd the rest of it.  I cut out a gown for Emma and tackd it together for her to try on.  We drank tea and spent the evening at Mr Grosett’s, met Mr, Mrs and the two Miss Combers, Mrs Strangways and Miss A Ball.  I lost 3/- at Pope Joan.  A very stupid evening.  We came home about eleven.  Mrs Comber askd us to drink tea with her tomorrow.

Wednesday, 25 July, 1810

A very showery day, which I was not sorry for, as my Aunt P sent an excuse to the Combers in consequence.  I adjusted Emma in fitting part of a gown and was out in the garden between the showers.  I workd all the evening.  George came home just as we were going to bed.  He left his father a little better.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay.

Thursday, 26 July, 1810

A fine sunshine with now and then a hard shower in the morning, but fine all the afternoon.  My Aunt P, Emma and I were very busy the whole morning continuing and putting up the drapery and blinds in the Oak Room.   As soon as we had dined we went fishing, but had not much sport.  George made Emma and me a present of a rabbit each.  My Aunt Powell read part of Isaac Walton to us in the evening and we workd.  One blossom of the beautiful Daphne Laurel we bought from Bath with us opend to day and smells delightfully.

Friday, 27 July, 1810

The rain came down in torrents the whole morning.  I wrote most part of it.  We could not any of us go out till after dinner and then it was too wet under foot to stay out long.  My Aunt and we workd in the evening.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Saturday, 28 July, 1810

A showery day, but fine between.  Farmer Furber brought the Thursday Bath Paper from Taunton before breakfast.  I was out in the garden a  long time.

Sunday, 29 July, 1810

A very gloomy, dull looking day.  We did not go to Church for fear of its raining.  We were all out in the garden for some time after breakfast and when we came in my Aunt read Prayers.  We went into the garden again afterwards and staid till dinner time.  As soon as we had dined Mama, my Aunt Powell, Emma and I walkd as far as the fish pond, when it began to rain.  We calld at Farmer Deane’s to bespoke some cream.  Mrs Deane was not at home.  We lookd at the new part of the house Mr Anderdon is building there for Mr Maine. It raind very fast as we came home and my mother fancied she got wet.  My Aunt Powell read the Bible in the evening.

Monday, 30 July, 1810

A showery day.  I was in the garden most part of the morning, put some manure to the Orange and Rhododendrons.  My mother fishd all the afternoon.  In the evening George came to tell us the ass was in one of the gardens and he could not find him.  My Aunt P, Emma, I and Harriet went out with candles to assist in looking for him and found him in the large garden.  We all workd till supper time.

Tuesday, 31 July, 1810

A fine day.  My mother, Emma, My Aunt P and I went to see George take up the eel pots, but there was only one small eel in them.  Emma and my mother staid to fish till my mother lost her hook, and then she chose to take Emma’s from her.  Emma came up to us.  I made a drapery to the curtain in my Aunt’s room and put it up.  My mother went again in the evening to fish, but did not catch any worth having.  My Aunt P, Emma and I went down late to see the Eel pots taken up, but were not more successful than in the morning.  We found two Glow Worms and walkd down the Lane in search of more, but did not did not find them.  We all workd in the Evening.

Fashion plate for August 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for August 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, August 1, 1810

A fine day.  We were busy the whole of it preparing for the Workmans coming tomorrow.  I moved all my things out of the room up stairs and my mother and dear Emma slept in it.  I hardly sat down the whole day and was a good deal tired at night.  I had a note from Mrs Keen, franked by Colonel E Bastard, enclosing a letter for my mother.

Thursday, 2 August, 1810

A beautiful morning.  I workd very hard in the garden cutting the Laurel hedge and making it look neat.  Mrs and the two Miss Combers calld, but I did not see them.  I could not help telling my Aunt Neate of my mother’s cruelty and unkindness to dear Emma, which is very great.  My Aunt P, Emma and I walkd to meet the Workmans, who we met about a mile from here, both looking remarkably well and very glad to see us.  We chatted and walkd in the evening.  Poor dear Emma went to bed before supper with one of her bad headaches.  I undid my mother’s sash and gown, not from kindness and attention to her, but that she might not scold dear Emma, for not sitting up to do it for her, which she would certainly have done.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Friday, 3 August, 1810

A showery day, but fine between.  My Aunt P, the Workmans, Emma and my mother walkd about a good deal in the morning.  I cut Emma’s hair and assisted  my Aunt and her in measuring and putting the sugar to the currant water for vinegar.  My Aunt P, Miss Workman, Emma and I walkd to Creech to drink tea at the Comber’s.  It raind almost all of the way there, but we did not get much wetted.  We met the Strangways and a Mr Simmons with then and two Miss Burridges from Stoke, very vulgar girls apparently.  I lost 3/6 at Pope Joan.  We had a tray with all sorts of nice things and left them between eleven and twelve.  All the party walkd together as far as the top of the Lane.  Fortunately it was fine till just as we turnd into our own gate, when it began to rain and soon after we came in it really pourd down in torrents and continued to do so for some hours.  We found my Aunt Neate, Rebecca and my mother at cards.  We all sat down and made a very hearty supper and did not go to bed till near one o’clock, after having spent a very chearful evening.  We had the Bath Paper.

Saturday, 4 August, 1810

A terrible wet morning.  The horses came at ten o’clock to take us to Taunton, but we were obliged to wait some hours in hopes the rain would cease.  It held up between twelve and one.  My Aunt P and I only went.  We were so fortunate as to have it fine the whole time we were at Taunton and did an amazing number of things and came home loaded.  We saw the Miss Combers, both looking very pretty.  We did not get home till near six o’clock and found the dinner ready to put on the table.  In the evening the two Workmans, my Aunt Neate and my mother playd Quadrille, my Aunt P, Emma and I workd.

Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835 (c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835
(c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Sunday, 5 August, 1810

A very showery day, so much so we were afraid to go to Church and read Prayers at home.  Young Mrs Strangways, Miss Miriam Ball and their brothers calld. There was a thunder storm at a distance.  I did not see any lightening, but heard one clap of thunder.  We did not go further than the garden, the weather was so catching.   My Aunt read the Bible in the evening.  Poor Emma was very indifferent with a pain in her stomach.

Monday, 6 August, 1810

A fineish morning, but pourd all the evening.  My Aunt P and I were busy part of the morning casking the black currant wine.  I made two nice nosegays and brought in the Daphne Laurels and the other  blossom blown.  Mr and Miss K Grosett, Mr, Mrs and Master and the two Miss Combers, Mr and Miss Strangways and Mr Simmons drank tea and suppd here.  We had Whist, Quadrille and Pope Joan.  I lost 4/-.  The Miss Combers looked beautiful.  It was a dreadful night when the party broke up and continued to pour till day light.

Tuesday, 7 August, 1810

It hardly ceased raining the whole day.  I workd all the morning trimming Emma’s gown with silver to go to the Ball.  My Aunt gave George leave to go to the places he told us that Colonel Andrews’s horse had won.  My Aunt P, the two Workmans and I went to the Race Ball at Taunton.  We saw the Combers, Miss Strangways, Mr Simmons, Mrs Strangways, Miss A Ball, Mr P Ball, Mr Standert, John Perring and his two sister and Colonel Andrews.  The latter was very much surprised to see us at Taunton.  He was very friendly and chatted to us some time.  We joind Mrs Comber and spent a very chearful, pleasant evening.  The Miss Combers lookd beautiful and were elegantly dressd.  We came away about one o’clock.  Mr Comber very obligingly went down to see for George and put us into the Carriage.  We found my Aunt N and my mother up when we came home and we all sat down to a very good supper and were as merry as grigs.  We did not go to bed till day light.

Wednesday, 8 August, 1810

A dry day with an excessive high wind, which blew very cold.  Emma and I mended the safe and I painted all the saucers belonging to the garden pots.  My Aunt P and I finishd the Black Currant wine.  My Aunts and the two Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening.  My mother, Emma and I workd.

Thursday, 9 August, 1810

A fine day.  My mother, Emma and the Workmans fishd all the morning.  My Aunt P and I bottled a great many Morello Cherries in Brandy.  I pounded all the sugar candy for them.  Just in the midst of it, Mr Grosett, his two daughters, his niece Mrs Cantzo and her two daughters, Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr Simmond and Mr P Ball calld, which interrupted as for some time.  Emma and my mother fishd again after dinner.  My Aunt P and the two Workmans walkd to Creech.  I finishd the Cherries.  My two Aunts, Mary and my mother playd Quadrille in the evening.  Rebecca lookd on.  Emma and I workd.  George caught a great many nice Perch.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Friday, 10 August, 1810

A very fine day.  I covered the Green Gage tree with old muslin and gauze to keep the wasps off and naild up some honeysuckles and sweet peas.  I was out the whole morning and did not sit down till dinner time.  The Grosetts, Mrs and the two Miss Cantzo’s, Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and Mrs Simmonds spent the evening here.  Mrs C, my Aunt N, Mary and I playd Cassino.  I lost one shilling.  Rebecca, Mr Simmons, my Aunt P and my mother playd Whist, the rest of the party, (except Miss Cantzo and Miss Grosett) Pope Joan.  They all went away early, as Mrs Cantzo leaves Mr Grosett’s tomorrow morning for Weymouth.  They had a very fine night to walk home.  We had the Bath Paper.

Saturday, 11 August, 1810

A very showery day with an excessive high wind.  I thought it would have blown the Laurels up by the roots.  I cut off the points of a pair of boots for my Aunt Neate and made them round.  We all workd together in the library all the morning.  My Aunt P and the Workmans walkd a short time after dinner, but were driven in by the rain.  We drank tea early.  My two Aunts, Rebecca and my mother playd Quadrille, Mary lookd on.  I finishd my Aunt N’s boots and Emma workd.  I don’t know when I have seen my Aunt P in such spirits.  She made us all laugh ready to kill ourselves at supper.

Sunday, 12 August, 1810

A very nice morning, but it began to rain soon after breakfast and continued some time.  We read Prayers at home and afterwards walkd about the garden till dinner time.   My Aunt P and the Workmans took a short walk in the afternoon and in the evening my Aunt read the Bible aloud.

I have been so compleatly employd the whole week gardening and putting Cherries in Brandy, that I have not had a moment to work or write.  Tuesday we were agreeably surprised by a visit from Mrs and Miss Penning, who were both as good humourd and pleasant as they used to be at Cheltenham.  Friday, Mrs Winslow (accompanied by her husband and two ugly children) did us (what she thought) was the honor of a visit.  I think I never saw a more disagreeable, impertinent, consequential  woman in my life.  I could not judge what her poor Jerry was like, as she does not allow him to differ in opinion from herself. She was dressd as if she was going to a Ball, instead of a morning visit.  Saturday My Aunt P, the two Workmans and myself drank tea at Mrs Strangways.  Poor Emma had had one of her bad headaches the day before, so was afraid to venture and my Aunt Neate and my mother did not like the walk.  We met Mr Grosett and Miss Kitty and spent a very merry evening.  I lost 1/-at Pope Joan.  My Aunt N, Emma and my mother had suppd when we came home.  Miss Strangways lent us Mrs Clarke’s new Publication to read.

Sunday, 19 August, 1810

Sunshine and showery, but warm and pleasant.  We had intended going to Church, but my poor Aunt Powell was so unwell she did not get up to breakfast and, upon the whole, I think it was fortunate we did not go, as I think we should have got wet.  Molly was also taken very ill before dinner.  She took an emetic and went to bed.  My Aunt Powell did not get up till late.  She, the two Workmans and I took a very pleasant walk to Ash between dinner and tea.  My Aunt Neate, Emma and my mother went to the Wheat field.  I read some Chapters in the Testament aloud in the evening.

Monday, 20 August, 1810

A beautiful day but intensely hot.  Emma and the two Workmans went fishing.  My Aunts, my mother and I went to the Wheat field to glean, but the heat was so great my Aunts would not let me stay long.  The fishing party were not successful.  In the evening my Aunt P, the two Workmans and my mother played Quadrille.  I did a little work.  Rebecca and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s after dinner and I watered the plants.

Boys Gleaning by William Collins (follower of) (c) Rossendale Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Boys Gleaning by William Collins (follower of)
(c) Rossendale Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 21 August, 1810

A very fine day but being at times cloudy.  It was not quite so hot as yesterday.  My Aunt Neate, Emma, my mother and I went up to the Wheat field directly after breakfast.  Rebecca came to us there, but did not stay long.  It was too warm for Emma to stay a great while, for fear of her headache coming on, but we staid till the bell rang for dinner.  Mr Phillip Ball came to a gap in the hedge and had a little conversation with us.  I was more tired than yesterday, notwithstanding which I waterd my plants after dinner, while my Aunt P and the two Workmans walkd to Farmer Bayt’s.  My Aunt Neate, the two Workmans and my mother playd Quadrille in the evening.  I gatherd five dozen and nine very fine Green Gages in the morning.

Wednesday, 22 August, 1810

A very hot day.  I workd hard all day cutting out a morning gown.  My two Aunts and my mother were in the Corn field all day.  They playd Quadrille in the evening and I workd.

Thursday, 23 August, 1810

A very hot day.  My Aunts and my mother went to the Wheat field after breakfast.  My Aunt P did not stay long.  A very unpleasant circumstance occurred today, which agitated us all very much.  As my Aunt P and Emma were walking in the garden and looking at the stockings hanging out to day, they found one pair of my mother’s and one pair of Emma’s (of the four pair they have missd some time) with the marks pickd out hanging on the line.  They brought them in immediately and I went up the field to desire my Aunt N and my mother would come in to consult what was to be done.  I found Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam with them.  They left them there and came down with me.  When we came in my Aunt sent for Quick, who positively denied any knowledge at all of them, or the other two pair.  My two Aunts and my mother went up with her to examine her Box, but did not find anything belonging to us in it, but she had on the other pair of Emma’s stockings with the marks still remaining, which was proof enough that she was the thief.  She did not appear at all distressed or agitated, but persisted she knew nothing about the others.  In consideration of her being a stranger here and so far from home, my Aunt would not send her out of the house today but we lockd the doors of all the rooms we were not sitting in, that she might not have an opportunity of taking any thing else.  Molly misses two pair of stockings and there were also two pair of my Aunts’ in the wash with the marks pickd out, which I suppose she had appropriated to herself.  While we were at tea Mr Marriet , the proprietor of the Taunton Paper came with his Bill.  My Aunt askd him in to tea.  He gave us a great deal of intelligence and has promised to send the boy round with the Paper, that Rover may bring it up from the gate for us.  They playd Quadrille in the evening and I workd.

Friday, 24 August, 1810

A very fine day. Quick was to have gone away today, but she could not have reachd Taunton in time for the Coach, so my Aunt allowd her to stay till tomorrow.  I shall be glad when she is gone, as it is so unpleasant to be obliged to lock up everything.  My mother and my Aunt Neate were in the Wheat field all day.  After dinner my Aunt N, the two Workmans and myself walkd to Farmer Baytes and back.  In our way there we saw Miss Strangways, two of the Miss Balls and Mr Phillip standing at Mr B’s door and as we came back we calld there for a bunch of Clematis they had promised us.  We sat there some time and saw Mrs Strangways and Mrs Ball.  They playd Quadrille in the evening.  I workd.  We had the Bath Paper.  My mother went to bed after tea.

Saturday, 25 August, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt P and I saw Quick pack up her Box and my Aunt Paid her wages and sent her to Taunton with Ephraim before breakfast.  She was a good deal affected when my Aunt paid her and cryd very much.  George went to Taunton to Market early.  My Aunt P, Emma, the two Workmans and my mother went fishing in the upper pond.  Rebecca caught three nice Perch and George, after he came home, caught seven.  I took them some bread and cheese and plumbs to refresh them and staid a short time.  They playd at Quadrille in the evening.  I lookd on.  My Aunt and the Workmans walkd to Farmer Baytes.

Sunday, 26 August, 1810

A gloomy morning with a shower or two, but very fine afterwards.  We read Prayers at home and afterwards took a very pleasant walk part of the way to Stoke by Farmer Baytes.  My mother did not get up all day.  We chatted in the evening.

Monday 27, August, 1810

A very fine day.  I was busy all the morning putting Cherries in Brandy and did a great many fine ones.  After dinner my Aunt P, Emma, the two Workmans and I walkd to Stoke thro the Copse.  They were all enchanted with the view.  We did not get home till quite dusk.  Mrs Bayte came in the morning with a young person she has recommend to my Aunt as an upper Maid and whom my Aunt means to take on tryal.  They playd Quadrille in the evening.  I lookd on.  We did not go to bed till two o’clock.

Tuesday, 28 August, 1810

A very fine day.  I workd very hard all the morning putting the plants to rights and assisting in sweeping and cleaning the gravel before the house.  We dined earlier than usual, that my Aunt P, the two Workmans and Emma might walk to Rushton after dinner, which they did and came home very much tired.  I workd hard at my gown all the afternoon and evening.  My two Aunts and the two Workmans playd Quadrille, my mother and Emma read and lookd on.

Wednesday, 29 August, 1810

A very fine day.  We all got up earlier than usual in the expectation of the boy’s bringing the Taunton Papers to the gate for Rover to fetch, but were disappointed.  I suppose he left it at the Blacksmith’s, as usual.  I workd most part of the morning.  The boy brought the Paper about three o’clock.  Rover bounded over the ha ha as soon as he heard the horn, but not knowing where it was thrown, did not find it till Ephraim went to shew him, when he brought it up very nicely.  Miss Strangways was so obliging to send me the “Lady of the Lake” to read and my Aunt P read part of it aloud to us in the evening, while we all workd.  I am delighted with what I have heard of it.

Thursday, 30 August, 1810

A very fine day.  I workd all the morning cutting out a gown for Emma.  George Shirley (to our great delight) arrived about three o’clock.  He is looking remarkably well.  My Aunt P, George, the two Workmans, Emma and I took a walk as far as Stoke Hill.  George went down a little way and was delighted with the view.  My Aunt P, the two Workmans and George playd Quadrille in the evening and we workd.

Friday, 31 August, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt P, the two Workmans, George, Emma and I walkd to Thorn.  We calld on Miss Strangways who was gone to Creech.  We walkd on to Thorn Hill and when we had got half way up we saw Miss Strangways coming after us.  We waited for her and then all proceeded together to the top of the hill, where we staid a considerable time admiring the prospect, which is very extensive, but not finer I think that that from the top of the lawn.  We sat a little while with Mrs Strangways in our way back and got home just before a slight shower fell.  My mother was fishing all the morning, but with little success.  It lookd so cloudy in the afternoon we were afraid to walk far from the house, so only lounged about the garden till just dusk, when my Aunt P, my mother, George, Emma, Mary Workman and myself walkd as far as Sarah Poole’s.  Some boys were burning a wasps nest at Farmer Smith’s, which had a very pretty effect.  My Aunt P, George and the two Workmans playd Quadrille in the evening, we workd.  We had the Bath Paper.

Fashion plate for September 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for September 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Saturday, 1 September, 1810

A very fine day.  George journeyed about the fields with my Aunt Neate in the morning and she workd and walkd about the garden.  The heat was intense and  there was some thunder in the morning early.  I put the Eolian Harp to rights, but there was not air enough for it to sound.  We strolled about in the afternoon.  My two Aunts, Mary Workman and George playd Quadrille. In the evening we workd.  I took Mary’s cards just before supper, to alter her bad luck.

Sunday, 2 September, 1810

A most beautiful day.  Mary W, Emma and I walkd to Ruishton Church.  My Aunt P went on the pony and George Shirley walkd by her side.  The two Miss Grosetts and Miss Strangways sat in our Pew and walkd back with us, with the addition of Miss Anna Ball.  We calld on Mr Grosett and were almost baked coming back, the heat was so intense.  My Aunt P, the two Workmans, George, Miss Strangways (who, with her mother, drank tea with us), Emma and I took a walk by the fish ponds to the top of the hill.  As we were returning we were caught in a shower, but took shelter under an Oak by Farmer Deane’s, where Ephraim brought us an umbrella and plaids and the rain ceasd before we got half way home.  We had a great deal of laughing against Rebecca, who was not come home with us, but chose to stay under a tree with George by the upper pond.  The Strangways suppd with us and had a very fine night to walk home.

Monday, 3 September, 1810

A very fine day.  George Shirley got all the fishing tackle in order after breakfast.  Mr Phillip Ball calld.  As soon as he was gone, George, Emma, my mother and the two Workmans went to the upper ponds to fish.  They caught a good many very nice Tench.  We were to have walkd to Heydon after dinner, but it raind extremely hard the whole evening.  George, the two Workmans and my mother playd Quadrille, I workd.

Tuesday, 4 September, 1810

A very fine day after the rain.  George S caught a great many nice Tench before breakfast.  We did not any of us go out much, but workd almost all the morning.  George strolld about with my Aunt Neate.  George, my Aunt P, Emma, the two Workmans and I walkd to Farmer Baytes in the afternoon.  They playd Quadrille in the evening and I workd.  Mr Grosett and his two daughters calld in the morning, but I did not see them.  They staid a long time and came to ask us to go there tomorrow evening.

Wednesday, 5 September, 1810

A very fine day.  I workd all the morning.  George Shirley left us about two o’clock for Cornwall.  We all (except my Aunt Neate) walkd part of the way to Taunton with him.  We shall miss his good humourd cheerfulness very much.  We all drank tea at Mr Grosett’s, where we met the old gentleman’s brother from Clifton and his daughter (as queer a piece of goods as I ever saw). Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and his sister Anna, in all sixteen.  I won 3/- at Commerce.  They gave us a glass of wine and a sniperkin of cake and we came home to supper.  Mr and Miss Strangways calld in the morning while we were out and brought a brace of partridges.  Rover fetched the Taunton Paper extremely well today.

Thursday, 6 September, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt finishd reading the Lady of the Lake to us while we workd.  I cut out my blue gown and partly made it.  I am sorry to say the Workmans leave us tomorrow.  Mary, my Aunt P, Emma and I walkd a new way to Stoke and were enchanted with the prospect, which is, if possible. more beautiful than that thro the Copse.  We had a lovely moon to return by.  My Aunt Neate, the two Workmans and my mother playd Quadrille in the evening.  We workd.  It was a white frost last night.

Friday, 7 September, 1810

A beautiful day.  We were up earlier than usual that the Workmans might have their breakfast comfortable before they went.  My Aunt P, Emma and I walkd with them as far as Black Brook Inn, where we sat more than an hour, when George came from Taunton to say there were two places in the Bath Coach.  They took a very affectionate leave of us and were as sorry to go as I was to lose them, I believe.  We had a very nice walk back.  We met the two Miss Grosetts with their cousin, in their Uncle’s Carriage with Mr P Ball on the Box, going to Taunton.  When we came home I waterd all the plants and naild up the honey suckles and some of the rose trees.  The three Miss Grosetts and Mr P Ball calld, but did not stay long.  We all workd in the evening.  My Aunt P, my mother and Emma pickd up a great number of apples in the orchard after dinner.  A white frost again last night.

Saturday, 8 September, 1810

A very fine day.  George went with a cart to Taunton to take the Workmans’ trunk and the wool.  I gatherd a small plate of very fine raspberries.  My Aunt Powell had the grass in the orchard mow’d to make hay and a very nice crop it will be, if we are so fortunate as have fine weather to make it in.  I workd before dinner and afterwards waterd the plants and gatherd two nosegays. All the rest of the family, Molly and all, were out in the Hay field.  We all workd in the evening.

Sunday, 9 September, 1810

A very fine day.  An extraordinary circumstance occurd to us.  My Aunt P, Emma and I walkd to Thorn to church, understanding the service would begin a quarter before twelve.  When we got to Mrs Strangways we found Miss J tete a tete with Mr P Ball.  They told us the service would not be till one, so we sat chatting with them for what I thought a very long time.  At last Mrs S went out to ask if the church had began.  The servant told her Mr Strangways had been gone by about ten minutes, so we all made as much haste as we could and got into church exactly at the end of the Blessing!!!  Mr S very politely said he was extremely sorry for the mistake.  I should have felt very awkward if it had been where the congregation was large, but luckily there were not above six or seven peaple.  We just calld to shake hands with Mrs Strangways and then walkd home again.  My Aunt P, Emma and I walkd to Sarah Major’s in the afternoon and in the evening my Aunt P read in the Bible to us.

Monday, 10 September, 1810

A fine day.  All the family were out most part of the day in the hay field.  I workd hard all the morning, finishd my blue gown.  I waterd the plants after dinner and in the evening went into the field and pickd up a basket of chips.  Lit the fire in the dining room and made it what I though very comfortable against they came in, as I thought they would be cold and damp.  My mother and my Aunt Neate were very much pleased, but my Aunt P was very angry at my taking the liberty of lighting the fire without her leave and was very uncomfortable and out of humour the whole evening.  My mother went to bed before supper.  I workd all the evening.  I gatherd five figs.

Tuesday, 11 September, 1810

It began to rain while we were at breakfast and continued the whole day and night without the least intermission.  I workd the whole day, very hard in the evening.  The rain pourd down in torrents and came into the house in a great many places.  It was very cold the whole day, but my Aunt P did not chuse to have a fire lit till the evening.  George went with a cart to Bristol this morning early to bring a Spanish Ram back that my Aunt Neate has bought of Mr Brook.

Wednesday, 12 September, 1810

A tolerable fine day after the rain and, being a high wind, the hay dried very nicely.  I workd all day, as did my mother and Emma most part of it.  I gatherd a few figs.  We had a fire in the evening and all workd.  Rover fetchd the Taunton Paper beautifully this morning.

Thursday, 13 September, 1810

A very threatening morning, but it did not rain and turnd out a very fine day.  I workd all day, as did Emma.  Every body else was in the field.  We had a fire in the evening and I playd at Chess with my Aunt Neate.

Friday, 14 September, 1810

A fine day.  They carried the barley, all but the rakings.  I was at home by myself the whole morning at work making a pink tippet for Emma.  She went fishing and caught a very find carp.  Between dinner and tea she and I went again, but did not have a bite.  I workd in the evening.  George came home about one o’clock and brought the Spanish gentleman very safe.

Saturday, 15 September, 1810

A very fine day.  The hay and barley was all finishd and pickd.  My mother and Emma fishd in the morning.  Emma caught a fine Carp.  I tried to destroy some of the swarm of small flies that are in our room by smoking them with tobacco and killd a great many.  I workd all day, the rest of the family were in the fields.  My Aunt Powell heard from dear Tom Porcher, who wrote to tell us our dear William was safe and well, tho he had had a very narrow escape from a violent storm which had dismasted his vessel.  How thankful ought we to be to providence for his merciful care of him and how kind of Tom Porcher to write immediately on hearing from him.  George brought the Bath Paper from Taunton with him.  We had a fire in the evening and I workd  I gatherd a good dish of raspberry.

Sunday, 16 September, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt P, Emma and I walkd to Ruishton church and did not get there till the service was half over.  Mr Cabble did the Duty and extremely well.  After church we walkd to Creech to call on the Combers.  We saw Mrs and Miss  C and young Comber. They only returnd from Sidmouth last night.  We staid there a very short time, as they were going to church.  In our way home we calld at the Grosetts and sat some time.  Mrs Ball and Miss Miriam met my Aunt Neate and Emma in the Lane after dinner and came in with them and sat half an hour, but would not stay to tea, as they had drank tea before they came out.  My Aunt P read the Bible in the evening.  As we were going to bed there was a violent storm of thunder and lightening which shook the house so much that the tables and chairs quite rattled in our room.

The Church of St George, Ruishton (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)
The Church of St George, Ruishton (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)

Monday, 17 September, 1810

A cold, wet, uncomfortable morning.

I have been so lazy this whole week that I have not written my journal. Mr and Mrs Comber calld one day, but were not let in, as my Aunt P and Emma were gone to Farmer Deane.  We have had the gravel walk made from the steps across the grass, which is a great improvement.  My mother has been unwell with a cold for some days past and we have playd Loo of an evening to amuse her.

Sunday, 23 September, 1810

A showery day, but sunshine between.  We laid in bed very late and when I came down to breakfast I found Miss Strangways here and, before we had done, the two Miss Grosetts calld.  Miss Strangways walkd to church with my Aunt P, Emma and me at three o’clock at Ruishton.  We saw the two Miss Combers there. Miss Strangways returnd and dined with us.  We had a fire in the parlor after dinner.  Miss S left us about nine o’clock and my Aunt P read the Bible aloud till supper time.

Monday, 24 September, 1810

A fine day.  My poor Aunt P very unwell today.  She was seized in the night with sickness and a complaint in her bowels.  She thinks it goutty.  I assisted my Aunt Neate to drive the duck to the pond and was out of doors almost all the morning.  We playd Loo in the evening.

Tuesday, 25 September, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell better.  She had the barberries gatherd to preserve and she, Emma and I took some to Mrs Ball.  We sat there some time and Miss Anna Ball gave me three geraniums, Indian pink and rose bush which I planted when we came home.  I cut out a tippet for Emma and began to make it.  We playd Loo in the evening.

Wednesday, 26 September, 1810

A fine day.  My Aunt had some of the Elder berries gatherd and we picked them.  Rover fetched the Taunton Paper very nicely.  I workd a little on Emma’s tippet.  We playd Loo in the evening.  I gatherd a very large dish of beautiful raspberries.  She sent a plate of these and a basket of barberries to Mr Grosett.

Thursday, 27 September, 1810

A fine day. We pickd some more elderberries and had the juice squeezd from them ready to put the water to.  George went to Taunton and heard of the death of his father at Bath.  We playd Loo in the evening.  George brought the Bath Paper home with him.

Friday, 28 September, 1810

A most beautiful day.  My Aunt P, Emma and I went early to call on Mr and Mrs Strangways at Hatch.  We found them just getting into their gig, so we would not get out, tho Mrs S was very anxious we should.  From there we went to Taunton and calld on Mrs Winston who was quite as disagreeable as the first time I saw her.  She has one of the most beautiful baby’s I ever saw.  When we had done all our commissions we drove to Bishop’s Hull and lookd at a house that is to let there.  It is an old bad house, but has one of the most beautiful sized hot and green houses I ever saw.  We did not get home till very late to dinner.  Poor Emma had one of her headaches come on as we were coming home, but was better in the evening and we playd Loo.

Saturday, 29 September, 1810

As fine a day as yesterday, but I was not out, as I was employd the whole day bailing the Elder wine.  We had one of the finest geese for dinner I ever saw.  I did not finish the wine till near nine o’clock.  We playd Loo in the evening.  James Studgell brought my Aunt some Elder cider.

Sunday, 30 September, 1810

Quite a Summer day.  Both my Aunts, Emma and I walkd to Ruishton church.  We saw Mr Ball and Miss Anna and the two Miss Grosetts sat in our pew.  Emma walkd home with them.  We staid to the Communion.  It was so hot that my Aunt Neate, my mother and Emma sat out in the garden till dinner time.  Emma and  I gatherd a great many raspberrys.  We were in the garden till quite dusk.  My Aunt Powell read a sermon to us after tea.

Fashion plate for October 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for October 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Monday, October 1, 1810

A very cloudy day but quite warm out.  I finishd Emma’s tippet.  She and Maria went fishing but did not stay long.  I gathered a nice nosegay.  We went to the Cyder House to see the process of grinding the apples and expressing the juice, both of which is very hard work.  My Aunt P had a letter from Rebecca Workman to say Mr Powell was at Bath dangerously ill.  Cooper had written a day or two ago.  That report said he was very ill, but did not mention his being at Bath or any particulars.  We had a fire in the evening and playd Loo.  We had a very nice syllabub.

Tuesday, 2 October, 1810

A very fine day.  We all went up to Stock’s to look at the sheep, which I have not seen for some time.  They are all looking beautiful.  Emma and I went round the main field and found a good many mushrooms.  The dogs went with us and had a nice swim.  I workd on Emma’s pink tippet afterwards.  We had a fire in the evening and playd Loo.

Wednesday, 3 October, 1810

A very fine day.  I workd hard to finish dear Emma’s tippet and cut out two more that my Aunt Neate gave her and my mother.  Mr Grosett and his two daughters calld and staid a long time.  Only Emma and I saw them.  My Aunt P was not in spirits and my mother was busy packing.  My Aunt Neate was not well with a disagreeable complaint in her stomach.  We had a fire in the evening and playd Loo.  Rover fetched the Taunton Paper very well.  We had a nice syllabub.

Thursday, 4 October, 1810

A very dull morning and rendered more so to us by the loss of my mother and dear Emma, who left us for Bath about nine o’clock.  We walkd to the top of the Lane with them.  Poor Emma, I am sure, was very sorry to go and I believe my mother was also, for she cried a good deal and took leave very affectionately of us all.  When we came back I waterd all the plants and skimd the Elder Wine.  Mr P Ball calld to ask how my Aunts did, but could not come in.  It turnd out a very fine day.  My mother and Emma were in very good time for the coach.  Everything appeard dreary and dull from the loss of dear Emma.  I workd all the evening.  The woman at Heydon sent some more mulberries for the wine, which I put into the water.

George brought the Bath Paper from Taunton.

Friday, 5 October, 1810

A very fine day.  I washd the leaves of the Orange tree directly after breakfast and that and the Bergamot tree were brought in for fear of the frost coming.  I was employd till dinner time bailing and skinning more Elder wine to fill the barrels and workd all the evening.  I bathd my feet when I went to bed.

Saturday, 6 October, 1810

Dull looking in the morning, but fine afterwards.  I was in the garden from breakfast till near dinner time.  I put the Elder wine in the cask and straind and put the sugar to the mulberry.  We had a fire in the evening and I workd.

Sunday, 7 October, 1810

Very dull with a slight shower in the morning, but beautiful afterwards and so hot it was like Summer.  We read prayers after breakfast and my Aunt P and I walkd to church at Ruishton at half past two.  We saw Miss Comber there and walkd home with Mr Ball, Miss Anna, Miss Miriam, Mr Phillip, Miss Strangways and Mrs and Miss Gardner, the latter looking beautiful.  We also met Mrs Strangways in the Lane.  The Balls wanted us to go in with them, but we were coming home to dinner, so could not.  We calld at Mrs Furbers and saw her in our way.  It was quite dusk by the time we had finishd our dinner.  My Aunt P read the Bible to us in the evening.

Monday, 8 October, 1810

A very fine day.  I workd the whole of it contriving and partly making a cloak for my Aunt P out of her green mantle.  We had a fire in the evening and all workd.  I gatherd a large dish of raspberrys.

Tuesday, 9 October, 1810

A fine day, but an excessive high wind.  Mr Comber calld to ask us to go there Thursday.  While he was here, Major Durbin’s servant came to say the Major would dine and come here tonight, if we were not engaged.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay and brought in some of the plants.  The Major arrived about four o’clock looking remarkably well.  We chatted all the evening.  I had a nice long letter from my mother.  We had a fire in the library in the evening.

Wednesday, 10 October, 1810

A dull looking morning, cold and a very high wind.  The Major left us long before we were awake, as he was engaged to breakfast some miles from hence.  I trimmd all the plants and got them ready to bring into the house for the Winter and indeed brought in a great many.  It began to rain about three o’clock and continued more than an hour.  I had the fire lit, as my Aunt P was in the orchard superintending the gathering of the apples and came in wet.  I workd before dinner and in the evening on my Aunt P’s cloak, which looks beautiful.  When I had finishd it I trimmd my new blue gown to wear tomorrow.  Rover fetchd the Taunton Paper very well.  We had a dish of very fine beans at dinner and some very fine strawberry’s and raspberrys, which is very extraordinary at this season of the year.

Thursday, 11 October, 1810

A very cold dull looking day.  My Aunt and I calld on the Grosetts.  We found the old gentleman and Miss Kitty and Miss Shirley just stepping into young Mr G’s carriage.  He was on the Box, going to drive them to Creech.  Mrs G was unwell and gone to lye down, so we did not see her.  We sat some time with Miss Shaw and Mr Phillip Ball, who came in while we were there and lent us Mr Colton’s publication against Mr Mariot, the Editor of the Taunton Paper, relative to the Sampford Ghost.  Soon after we came home the two Mr Grosetts, Miss Kitty and Miss Shirley calld to ask us to go there tomorrow.  I wrote all the rest of the morning.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Creech to drink tea at the Comber’s, where we met the Strangways and the two Miss Burridges we saw there before.  My Aunt and I playd Quadrille with Mr and Mrs Comber.  I neither lost or won.  It raind all the way home, but so mildly we did not get wet.  It was one o’clock and we did not go to bed till two.  I wrote a long letter to my mother and heard from her and Harry.

Friday, 12 October, 1810

A very fine day, but cold.  I was out a good deal in the morning and put all the bulbous roots in pots.  My Aunt P and I drank tea at the Grosetts, where we met the Combers, Strangways, Miss M Ball and her brother.  Quite a large party, sixteen.  We playd at Quadrille again with Mr and Mrs Comber.  I lost 1/6d. George waited at tea and brought in the refreshments, which were not handed about till twelve o’clock.  It was one of the most beautiful nights I ever saw.  The moon was so brilliant it was as light as daylight, but very cold.  I wrote a very long letter to dear Harry.

Saturday, 13 October, 1810

A beautiful day, but frosty.  We had the rest of the plants brought in and put up stairs in the room over the kitchen.  I straind the rest of the mulberry wine and put it in the cask.  After dinner I went with my Aunt Powell into the old orchard to see some of the apples shook down and assisted her and Pocock in picking them up till it was too dark to see them in the grass.  I workd in the evening and my Aunt P read the Bible aloud to us.

Sunday, 14 October, 1810

A cloudy threatening day and very cold.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church.  We did not get there till the service had begun.  The two Miss Strangways, Miss S and Miss M Ball sat in our pew.  We staid to the Communion Service and accompanied Mr and Miss Strangways home, where we eat some grapes, drank a glass of wine, blew up the fire and sat more than an hour.  Mrs S of Hatch was so obliging to lend a shawl of hers for me to wear home.  As we were putting on our cloaks to go to church, George ran in to say poor Muscovy Drake was dead, killd he believed by a fox, as he had found a great many of the feathers in the field.  My Aunt desired he would go and see if the young ones were safe and when when he came back he said the Drake and young ones were there but the poor dear duck was gone.  The nasty beast of a fox had killd her and carried her up the lawn, as they traced her by her feathers a long way.  We were all very sorry for her.  She was such a nice nurse and so gentle and tame.  We all read in the evening.

Monday, 15 October, 1810

A very wet day.  Mrs Strangways and her daughters were to have drunk tea here, but sent an excuse in consequence of the badness of the weather.  I was very busy all the morning arranging the plants in the dining room.  We had the sideboard moved out of the recess and the large flower stand put in its place, with the plants on it and it has a very pretty effect.  I workd all the evening.  Mr Anderdon, who came to Henlade yesterday, brought a parcel and a letter from my mother.

Tuesday, 16 October, 1810

A tolerable fine morning.  We all three went to Taunton.  It held up long enough for us to do all our commissions, but began to rain as we left the town and continued all the evening.  I bought some quilting and Irish to make me some stays, for which I gave 18/-.  I workd all the evening.  My Aunt P bought a share of a Lottery Ticket at Poole’s.

Wednesday, 17 October, 1810

Quite an April day.  I waterd all the plants and regretted they were not out, it was so warm.  I wrote a long letter to my mother to go by the Post and another to Emma, which I put in a parcel and George took it down to Mr Anderdon to go by him tomorrow.  I workd in the evening.  It raind such a torrent in the evening that it sounded like a fine water fall at the back of the house.

Thursday, 18 October, 1810

Showery, but very fine between.  Mr Anderdon and his brother Mr Perry calld and sat some time.  My Aunt Neate gave me 2.10.0 of the 5.0.0. she so kindly allows me every year.  I workd all the afternoon and evening.

Friday, 19th October, 1810

Some hard showers in the course of the day.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay and a small plate of very fine raspberrys.  My Aunt P and I walkd over Mr Maine’s field and gatherd a basket of very nice mushrooms.  When I came back I weeded part of the cucumber garden, where I intend to have flower beds.  I workd all the evening.

Saturday, 20 October, 1810

A tolerable fine morning, but it began to rain about one o’clock and continued without the least interruption the rest of the day and evening.  I put two leeches on my leg to reduce a very uncomfortable swelling and inflammation just above my ankle.  I had great difficulty in making them fix and only one did its duty.  In the evening my leg swelld very much and the inflammation was not at all diminishd.  I workd all the evening. George (who went to Taunton to get a legal notice to serve Mr Murless with, to warn him not to let his dogs loose that run after the sheep) got twice wet thro and was very ill when he came back.  I workd all the evening.

Sunday, 21 October, 1810

A very wet day.  My leg was very indifferent when I got up, but it became worse after breakfast and was so painful before night, that I could not put it to the ground.  We read prayers directly after breakfast.  I laid on the sopha all day and read.   I was obliged to sit on the stairs and rise from one to the other backwards when I went up to bed, for I could not put my foot to the ground

Monday, 22 October, 1810

A showery day with an excessive high wind, but in the night it was more tremendous than I almost ever heard. My Aunt P went to call on the Grosetts, where she staid some time.  After she came back she went to Mr Maine’s field and gatherd a great many very fine mushrooms.  I took a large dose of salts at breakfast time, but they not having any effect, I repeated the dose at one o’clock, which answerd very well.  My leg was so much swelld and inflamed at tea time that I put it into warm water, which relieved it very much.  I workd all the evening.

Tuesday, 23 October, 1810

A very gloomy morning with the blackest clouds I ever saw, but it did not rain till three o’clock.  The rain came down at that time as if it was from a water spout and before it fell it was so dark we could scarcely see across the room.  My leg was better in the morning, but the inflammation came on at the same time in the evening, tho not so bad as yesterday.  I put it in warm water again.  I have not tasted wine these three days and did not eat any meat today.  I pierced and strung a great many acorns for necklaces and workd in the evening.

Wednesday, 24 October, 1810

A fine morning with the exception of one shower, but after dinner there was such a tremendous black and dirty yellow sky that I hoppd into the library with my Aunt Powell to look at it and soon afterwards it raind such a torrent the gravel in front of the house was compleatly under water.  My leg was better but inflamed again in the evening and at tea time I put it into warm water again, which was of service to it and I was able to walk upstairs to bed, which I have not been able to do before since Saturday night.  I workd all the evening and heard from my mother, who has got a lodging on Kingsmead Terrace.  Rover brought the Taunton Paper very well.

Thursday, 25 October, 1810

A very fine day.  My leg was so much better that I was able to walk about the house.  Miss Grosett calld and sat some time.  She came to shew us a letter her father had had from Mr York to tell him his son was made Post, which has given the poor old man great pleasure.  He desird Miss G would tell us it had made him as happy as if any body had given him a thousand pounds.  My Aunt P went to Mr Maine’s field and brought home a great many mushrooms.  I workd all the evening and wrote a long letter to my mother.  In the morning George brought the Bath Paper from town.  My Aunt Powell gatherd a very fine cowslip!!! in Mr Maine’s field and a full blown blush rose in the garden!!!

Friday, 26 October, 1810

A fine day.  I went out a little, but did not stay long.  I pickled the mushrooms my Aunt got yesterday.  Mary Mallard brought a basket full and my Aunt Neate sent Jem Pavey to look for some.  He found but very few.  I got them ready for pickling tomorrow.  I workd in the evening.

Saturday, 27 October, 1810

A beautiful day.  I was out a long time and gatherd a beautiful nosegay.  My Aunt P went to Mr Grosett’s, but would not let me go, for fear of  hurting my leg.  She staid so late I began to be quite uneasy and sent George to see for her.  He met her returning.  While she was gone I pickled the mushrooms that were ready.  Jem got some more, which I prepared for doing.  I workd in the evening.  We had some very nice oysters for supper, which Miss K Grosett was so kind to buy at Market for my Aunt.  Mrs Strangways sent my Aunt a basket of grapes.

Sunday, 28 October, 1810

A very wet morning.  Mr Winslow sent a servant before we were up to say there would not be any service at Ruishton, as he was unwell!!  We read prayers after breakfast.  It ceased raining about two o’clock and was dry, tho not fine the rest of the day.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 29 October, 1810

A very fine day.  I began to cut out a black gown.  My Aunt Neate was so kind to let Jem weed the cucumber garden for me.  My Aunt P and I took a walk.  We went all over Mr Maine’s field in search of mushrooms but found very few.  We then went up the lawn to the stile at Stoke Hill and across the fields by the Oak Woods and down the lawn home.  I prepared the mushrooms for ketchup and workd in the evening.

Tuesday, 30 October, 1810

A beautiful day.  I workd on my gown till three o’clock and then took a walk with my Aunt Powell in Mr Maine’s field and got a good many very fine mushroom, all of which my Aunt P cut up for ketchup.  Mr Grosett and his two daughters drank tea and suppd with us, quite in the family way.  I lost 1.6d at Pope Joan.  They went home a little after eleven.  Jem finishd weeding the cucumber garden.

Wednesday, 31 October, 1810

A dull looking day, but very mild and pleasant out.  We were just going to take a little walk when it began to rain.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and sat some time.  They brought us some grapes.  My Aunt pressd them to stay and dine, but they were engaged to the Balls in the evening, so declined it.  Rover fetchd the Taunton Paper very nicely.  I workd in the evening.

Fashion plate for November 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for November 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Thursday, 1 November,1810

A very showery day.  We did not go out at all.  I workd all day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways drank tea and suppd here.  My Aunt wishd them very much to sleep here and had the bed made up ready, but Mrs S was going to brew the next day and therefore it was not convenient, tho Miss S wished it very much.  We chatted all the evening and shewd Miss S a good many collars and tippets which she tried on and we gave her the patterns of those she liked.  They did not go away till twelve o’clock and luckily had a dry night to walk home in, tho the wind was tremendously high.

Friday, 2 November, 1810

A fineish day.  Mrs Strangways sent home the shawls we lent her last night.  My Aunt P and I went to Mr Maine’s field and got a few mushrooms, which I prepared for pickling.  I worked the rest of the day and evening.  We had the Bath Paper and I heard from Emma.

Saturday, 3 November, 1810

A dry day, but very cold.  I found some very nice mushrooms on the cucumber bed, which I pickled with those we got yesterday.  My Aunt P was out in the garden almost all the morning, having the frames put over the bed where the mushrooms are.  She afterwards went to Mr Maines’ field, but found so few they were hardly worth going for.  George askd my Aunt to raise his wages and when she told him she could not, he said he was very sorry, but he could not stay, so we have another to seek.  I workd all the evening.

Sunday, 4 November, 1810

A fine day.  We read prayers after breakfast.  My Aunt P was not well all day.  I believe she has the Gout abut her.  I read all day and in the evening too.  The nasty chickens have scratchd up almost all my nice little cuttings that were growing so beautifully.

Monday, 5 November, 1810

A showery day.  Old Gale came after breakfast and I cut out the flannel my mother sent for him, by his waistcoat and began to make it.  My Aunt P was very irritable and uncomfortable all day.  She and I went to Mr Maine’s field to try if the exercise would be of service to her.  We found a few mushrooms.  It was so wet she did not stay out long.  After she came in I went all over Hooklands, the Orchard, Bryants, the old Orchard, Strawberry Garden, and Barton.  My feet were so wet I was obliged to change my stockings.  I workd on the old man’s waistcoat in the evening and prepared the mushrooms for pickling.  George asked leave to go out.  He did not come home till half past twelve.

Tuesday, 6 November, 1810

Sunshine and hard rain, but most of the latter.  Mrs Comber sent us an invitation to dine there, the 15th, but my Aunt declind it.  I waterd all the plants.  My Aunt P very poorly.  Her spirits so affected she could scarcely speak without tears.  She had her breakfast in bed and we did not go out all day.  A young man came to offer himself in George’s place.  My Aunt liked his appearance and has agreed to take him if his Character suits. I workd all the evening.

Wednesday, 7 November, 1810

A tolerable fine day.  My Aunt and I calld at Mrs Balls and sat an hour.  She has got a very sore mouth, poor thing and suffers very much from it.  We saw all the family and a Miss Tucker, a very fine girl who is on a visit there.  In our way home we askd Mrs Furber how she did.  She was in high spirits, James and Harris having killd the dog that has worried Mr Anderdon’s sheep twice and nearly killd three of them.  I workd all the evening.  Rover fetched the Taunton Paper delightfully.

Thursday, 8 November, 1810

A fine day.  I workd on my black gown all the morning.  The poor Princess Amelia died last Friday.  In the evening I wrote a very long letter to my mother.

Miniature of Princess Amelia of the United Kingdom (1783-1810)
Miniature of Princess Amelia of the United Kingdom (1783-1810) from the Royal Collection

Friday, 9 November, 1810

A most beautiful day.  It was quite like Summer.  My Aunt P and I walkd over Mr Maine’s field and got a few mushrooms.  The Garetts sent to ask us to go there to tea to meet the Combers.  My Aunt Neate did not go.  It was very fine when we went.  There were only the Combers and ourselves.  Mr and Mrs C, my Aunt and I playd Quadrille.  I lost 4/-.  We were all coming away about twelve o’clock but it pourd such a torrent it was impossible.  I think I never saw such a rain in my life, for it came down as if it was pourd from pails and it continued the whole night thro.  We chatted and watchd the rain till three o’clock when the old gentleman proposed our all sitting down to cards again, as it was not possible for us to think of going out.  He took my place at Quadrille and the two Miss Combers, two Miss Grossetts and I sat down to Commerce, at which we playd till past seven.  About eight o’clock we prevaild on the old gentleman to go to bed and we sat down to as comfortable a breakfast as possible, soon after which Mr Comber said they must brave the rain (which still continud as bad as ever) as Daniel told him the floods were rising and if he did not go then, he would not be able to cross Creech Moor, so they wrapd themselves up and got into the Gig, but I fear must have been wet thro long before they got home.  When they went away the water was nearly up to the horses knees.  About one o’clock the rain abated a little and the Grosetts were so kind to send us home in their cart.  I think I never saw anything more awful.  The whole way from Mr G’s gate to Mr Ball’s house was one sheet of water and it was up to the horses stomachs in the road. Our river overflowd and flooded the fields.  It began to rain as hard as ever when we had got half way home and the wind blew a perfect hurricane.  I expected the windows in the library would have been blown in .  It took off a great many slates and the rain came in in streams.  We were obliged to take down the curtain next the door and take up the carpet, which was soakd before we found it out.  The wind blew down three apple trees in the old orchard and has blown off almost all the branches of the beautiful weeping willow by the kennel.  I never remember so dreadful a day and night.  We had the Bath Paper Friday evening.  One of the pigs was killd.

Sunday, 11 November, 1810

A calm dry day.  We did not get up till two o’clock.  We read prayers after breakfast and went into the garden before dinner and gatherd a few fine mushrooms off the bed which my Aunt sent to Mr Grosett.  We all read till after tea, when my Aunt P read the Bible aloud to us.  She and I did not go to bed till near one.

Monday, 12 November, 1810

A fine day.  A servant came to offer himself from Mr Dillon at Creech.  I walkd over Mr Maine’s field but found only one mushroom.  I went as far as the Marle Pond afterwards and then workd the rest of the day and evening.

Tuesday, 13 November, 1810

A very fine day, but I had so much work to do I did not go out at all.  I continued to make a very decent mantle out of my old black velvet pelisse.  My Aunt Neate cut out a very pretty tippet of white gauze for me and I workd on it in the evening.

Wednesday, 14 November, 1810

A melancholy wet day.  It did not cease raining one minute.  I workd hard the whole of it and in the evening too.  Rover fetchd the Taunton Paper very well.

Thursday, 15 November, 1810

A most beautiful morning.  It was quite hot out.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Mr Grosetts to ask them to drink tea with us, which they agreed to do.  The Shoemaker from Bristol was there. We tried on some shoes.  There were only one pair that fitted me and two my Aunt, but he is to make some and send us.  We came home and had some luncheon and then went to Mr Maine’s field where we were caught in a hard shower, but found shelter till it was over.  Soon after we came in there was a violent storm of rain, which lasted near an hour.  The Grosetts did not come.  I do not know what prevents them, for it was a beautiful evening.  I finishd the gauze tippet my Aunt Neate gave me.

The Shoemaker by Henry Walton (attributed to), c.1800 (c) Northampton Museums & Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Shoemaker by Henry Walton (attributed to), c.1800
(c) Northampton Museums & Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 16 November, 1810

A very fine morning, but it began to rain soon after breakfast.

“I have been so much engaged I have not been able to go on with my Journal, and nothing particular has occurd, so it is not of much consequence.”

Tuesday, 20 November, 1810

A tolerable fine morning, wiping the books that were drying in the library fire, having the curtain put up again, the carpet naild down and in short, putting the room to rights and getting every thing ready for the company in the evening.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and slept here.  The latter was very unwell after dinner, but recovered in the course of the evening.  Mrs Comber and her two daughters drank tea and supped here.  Mr Comber had the rheumatism, which prevented his being of the party.  It rained so very hard in the evening I thought they would not come, but they braved it all and fortunately it was dry for them to go home.  I lost 4/- at Quadrille.

Wednesday, 21 November, 1810

A wet morning, but it held up in the middle of the day.  My Aunt prevailed on Mrs Strangways to dine and sleep here again tonight.  She went to spend the morning at the Grosett’s and my Aunt and I calld on Mrs Ball’s, for Miss S to take her with us to Taunton.  Miss Miriam and Mr Phillip came to the carriage to speak to us and my Aunt asked them to come up and drink tea with us.  We went to Mrs Vanzandt’s for the Character of the servant, who has offerd in George’s place, which was a very good one.  My Aunt gave me a pair of black silk stockings and I bought a pair of black gloves, for Miss nearly eat up one of mine this morning. When we had done all our commissions, we all walkd up and down the Parade till the Carriage was ready.  We did not get home till past five.  The waters were out every where and frightfully so in the road at Black Brook. Miss Miriam and Miss P Ball came in the middle of our dinner.  I fetched them into the dining room, where they eat some fruit and drank some wine.  We all playd Pope Joan in the evening.  I neither lost or won.  It did not rain when they went away.

Thursday, 22 November, 1810

A very showery day.  My Aunt would not let the Strangways go home.  They assisted after breakfast in putting out all the plants that they may be washed.  After we had done that, I cut out a pair of shoes, as Miss Strangways was very anxious to learn how to make them.  She assisted me in putting them together and binding them.  I put one on the last in the evening and finished it before we went to bed.  She was delighted and is determined to make some.  My Aunts and Mrs S played Quadrille.

Friday, 23 November, 1810

A tolerable fine morning, but so high a wind that it blew down many of the plants.  Mrs and Miss Strangways left us after breakfast.  My Aunt and I went down to Mr Grosett’s with them.  We found the old gentleman very unwell and looking like a ghost.   There was a violent storm of rain which detaind us longer there than we should otherwise have staid and we had not been at home long before it pourd again and continued all the evening.  I put my other shoe on the last and finished it before I went to bed.  They are really a very neat, pretty pair or shoes and fit me very nicely.

Saturday, 24 November, 1810

A most beautiful day.  Mr P Ball brought me a note before breakfast from Miss Strangways to beg to borrow my last and the screws, as she was going to Taunton and wishd to take it with her to have one made by.  I wrote almost all the morning and workd in the evening.  The farmer brought the Bath Paper from Taunton in the morning.

Sunday, 25 November, 1810

A very fine day.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Church.  It was so muddy it was quite uncomfortable.  We saw Miss Comber.  The two Miss Balls walkd as far as their house with us. We calld on the Grosetts and sat an hour with them.  There was a slight shower while we were there, but it did not last long.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 26 November, 1810

A very fine day, after a very tempestuous night.  I gathered a few very nice mushrooms off the bed in the garden and afterwards wrote most part of the morning and workd in the evening.

I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 27 November, 1810

A very wet day.  I prepared some things to finish the library curtains, which have been so long about and partly put it on.  George went to Taunton.  I cut out a pair of stays in the evening and began to make them.

Wednesday, 28 November, 1810

A fine morning, but there were some very violent showers in the course of the day, and the evening was wet.  I workd all the morning and finishd the curtains.  Rover brought up the Taunton Paper very well.  One of the Muscovy ducks died.  It had been very ill for two or three days and my Aunt Neate has been nursing it by the fire, but all to no purpose.  I workd on my stays in the evening.

Thursday, 29 November, 1810

A very cold raw day.  George and Ephraim put up the curtain in the library.  I put some of the books to the fire.  they are coverd with mold and mildew, the room is so damp.  I workd in the evening on my stays.  My rabbit produced five little ones in the night, but owing to her being improperly fed, she had not milk and so they died.

Friday, 30 November, 1810

A white frost and a very fine day, with the exception of one shower.  I was employd all the morning drying the books in the library.  The Miss Grosetts and Mr Standert calld.  They all had some luncheon.  Mr Standert was so obliging to dissect the Muscovy duck to ascertain what it died of, but there was not any thing the matter with its inside.  Mr S staid till near four o’clock and was very pleasant.  George went to Taunton and brought back the Bath Paper.  I workd all the evening.  I took in all the plants but the little cuttings after dinner.

Fashion plate for December 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for December 1810 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Saturday, 1 December, 1810

A white frost again.  It began to rain while we were at breakfast and continued some time.  When it was over, I took in the cuttings of the plants, washed the pots and put them in the passage window, by my Aunt Neate’s door.  I also put some more bulbous roots in pots.  I workd all the evening on my stays.

Sunday, 2 December, 1810

A very hard white frost.  My Aunt P and I went to afternoon Church at Ruishton.  Saw Miss Comber there and two of the Miss Balls walkd home as far as their house with us and we afterwards met Miss Miriam and her brother.  I read all the evening.

Nothing particular has occurd since Sunday and if there had, I have not had time to write, I have been so much taken up in drying books etc. etc.

Friday, 7 December, 1810

A tolerable fine day.  Our dear Cooper arrived on horseback between four and five o’clock, looking remarkably well and in very good spirits.  We drank his health after dinner and I from my heart wishd him every happiness this world can afford and a long continuance of life and all its pleasures.  After tea he made us all a Birthday present.  My Aunt P a tooth pick case, my Aunt N a gold thimble and me a ring with a crystal for hair, into which I shall have some of his put.  We chatted all the evening.

Saturday, 8 December, 1810

A fine day, but cold.  Cooper was writing when I came down, but received me as affectionately as he used to do.  We did not, any of us, go out the whole day.  We had a large party at dinner and in the evening to celebrate our dear Cooper’s Birth Day.  Mr, Mrs and the two Miss Combers, Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr Standent and Mr P Ball dined with us and Mr and the two Miss Grosetts, Miss Anne and Miss Miriam Ball came in the evening.  We playd Quadrille, Pope Joan and Speculation.  I lost three shilling at the latter game.  Altho it was Saturday night, the party did not break up till one o’clock and both dinner and evening went off extremely well.

Sunday, 9 December, 1810

A very white frost, but it went off after breakfast and was damp the rest of the day.  C was very kind when I came down.  He read the Church service to us and after that my Aunt P, he and I took a little walk.  It was too wet to go out of the fields.  We chatted in the evening and he was in excellent spirits.

Monday, 10 December, 1810

A wet morning.  C as yesterday.  George went to Taunton to put his name down in the Militia Club, the money for which Cooper made him a present of and C and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the morning and evening too.  I began a purse for Mrs Bussell.

Tuesday, 11 December, 1810

A very fine day.  C kind as usual.  He wrote a note to Mr P Ball to ask him to walk with him shooting.  They went soon after breakfast.  They had not been gone long when Mr Comber and his son calld and sat a long time.  Cooper came home before four o’clock.  They had not seen a bit of game of any sort, but Cooper killd two ducks.  Mr P Ball dined with us.  We all playd Loo in the evening I lost 1 shilling.

Wednesday, 12 December, 1810

It raind without intermission the whole day.  The new servant came in George’s place and appears preciously stupid.  George is to stay some time longer (not as an indoors servant) to break the young mare for Cooper.  We were to have drank tea at the Grosetts, but the weather was so bad my Aunt sent an excuse. My Aunt P and I spent most of the morning in the laundry making wafers.  Cooper and my Aunt N playd Chess the whole day.

Thursday, 13 December, 1810

A better day than yesterday, but not fine.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate played Chess all the morning.  I began and wrote part of a letter to my mother.  We all dined at Mr Comber’s, only ourselves and Mr Standent, rather stupid, at least it would have been so, but for Cooper.  Mr and Mrs C and my two Aunts playd Quadrille, Cooper Mr Standent, the two Misses and I played Loo.  Master Comber (who by the bye is as great a dolt as I ever saw), playd C, cards and had half his winnings. For a wonder I won 12/-.  We suppd there and came home about twelve and found Pocock, George and Allen out  farmer Boyt’s and they did not come home till some time after us.

Thursday, 14 December, 1810

A tolerable fine day.  I finished my letter to my mother and Banfield took it to the Post.  My Aunt P and I finishd the wers.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all day.  Between three and four o’clock we were surprised by a visit from Captain Toulson.  He staid a very short time and appeard to me quite one of the “Downalongs”.  Cooper was in remarkably good spirits all the evening, not so my Aunt P.

Saturday, 15 December, 1810

A fine day.  C all kindness.  He and my Aunt Neate playd Chess most part of the morning.  I read and finishd Oberon? Cooper, my Aunt P and I calld on the Grosetts.  The mud was so bad it was with difficulty we could get along, for it was over our pattens and shoes.  the man has sent our shoes from Bristol, but I have not tried mine yet.  Cooper dined with Mr Standert at Taunton.  He returned to supper, but was not in his usual good spirits.

Monday, 24 December, 1810

I have neglected to write what has been going forward since the 15th, but nothing material has occurred.  The Grosett’s calld, as did Mr Woodford of Taunton, Mr P Ball and Mr Collins of Hatch Court, on Cooper.  The latter is a remarkably gentlemanly, pleasant man, very different from what I had imagined him.  Cooper dined and slept at his house Saturday, but returnd to us time enough to read the Morning Service to us Sunday morning, in very good spirits.  I had a long and pleasant letter from my mother Saturday.

Monday, 24 December, 1810

A very wet day.  Cooper in good spirits and kind as usual the whole morning.  Mr Collins, his brother in law, Mr Cooper and Mr Standent were engaged to dine here.  About half an hour before dinner Mr Collins sent a servant to say Colonel Prowse was come unexpected to stay a few days with him and if my Aunt’s table was not full, he would bring him, which he did. Mr Cooper is a gentlemanly man, but does not say much.  They did not join us till near twelve o’clock, when Cooper, Colonel Prowse and Mr Cooper were excessively drunk.  Mr Collins not unpleasantly tipsey and Mr Standent not either, but all chearful and good humourd.  They staid till near one o’clock.  As soon as they were gone, we had some supper and Cooper went to bed.  The day went off remarkably well.  We did not get to bed till near three o’clock.  It blew a dreadful gale the whole night thro.

Christmas Day, 25 December, 1810

A very wet morning, with a tremendous wind the whole day.  We were down stairs before Cooper, who was very unwell the whole morning and did not at all recollect any thing that past last night. My two Aunts went to Church in the Carriage. Neither C or I went.  He was so kind to read the Service to me, but was so languid and uncomfortable almost all the morning, he could not settle to any thing.  There was a little sunshine about three o’clock and he mounted his horse and rode up and down between the house and the gate for a short time, till the rain drove him in again.  Mr and Mrs Strangeway and Mr P Ball dined with us.  Cooper rallied after dinner and I never saw him in better spirits, or more clever and witty.  We playd at Loo.  I lost 3/6d.  It blew a perfect hurricane the whole night.  I thought the roof of the library would have been blown off and our bed rockd so much it made my Aunt P quite uncomfortable.  I wrote a long letter to my dear William.

I made a present of a draft of £15.12.0 as a Christmas Box.  It thunderd and lightend tremendously I understand in the evening, but we took it all for wind, as we did not see the lightening.

Monday, 26 December, 1810

A finer day than we have had for some time past.  It did not rain once. C better a great deal than yesterday and very kind.  He took a ride to Thorn and heard Miss Strangeway’s complaints, for which he is so kind to prescribe.  He afterwards calld at Mr Grosett’s, but did not get off his horse there.  I wrote all day and enclosed my letter to William in one to Tom Porcher.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  I mended some of C’s neckcloths.

Thursday, 27 December, 1810

Hard showers and rain alternately.  Mr Standent calld to see the poor colt operated on.  Cooper, my Aunt P and I got into the Carriage to go to Taunton, but in going out of the gate the man drove us against the gate post and with such violence that it broke the bed of the carriage.  Of course we could not go on.  Cooper rode to Taunton and brought us each a present of a Pocket Book.  The three Miss Balls and their brother calld.  They staid till Cooper returnd and more than an hour afterwards. C dined at Captain Tolson’s.  There was the most dreadful storm of thunder and lightening I almost ever heard in the evening, but it was gone by before he came home.  He was very tipsey, but eat a very good supper and some of the best oysters I ever tasted, a present from Mrs W Williams to my Aunt.

Friday, 28 December, 1810

A very fine day.  Cooper rode to Lord Paulett’s after breakfast, but returnd to dinner.  The Canchers? calld, but we said “not at home” as we did not wish to be interrupted.  I workd all day and evening.  Cooper and my Aunt N playd Chess.

We were very much alarmd in the night by an attempt being made to break into the house.  Cooper was awoke by the noise and his pulling his bell waked us.  I jumped out of bed and ran to Allen and told him to go down, as his master was ringing violently and I feard he was ill .  C, hearing my voice calld out “Tell the man to get up directly, somebody’s breaking into the house.”   Allen, George, Bamfield and ? ran down to him immediately, naked as they were and they all went into every part of the house, but luckily no one had made their way in.  We were all very much frightened and I shall never go to bed in the same comfort I used to do.  I wrote a long letter to my mother and enclosed Cooper’s draft for £25 to her.

Saturday, 29 December, 1810

A very fine day and hard frost.  Miss Strangways calld before we were any of us down stairs.  C was not very well, indeed we were none of us very comfortable after our alarm last night.  My Aunt P and I went to Taunton and did some commissions for C, who went shooting, but only brought home a rabbit.  We saw the Miss Combers, Miss Balls, Miss Strangways, Mrs Standent and Mr and Mrs Strangways in Taunton.  Mr Standent and Mr Burridge dined with us.  Mrs and Miss Strangways, Miss Anna Ball and her brother drank tea and spent the evening here.  We playd Whist and Loo.  I lost 3/-.  The evening went off very  cheerfully, for C was in excellent spirits.

Sunday, 30 December, 1810

A very fine day and excessive hard frost.  Cooper read Prayers to us after breakfast and he, my Aunt P and I took a walk to farmer Deane’s and down the lawn home.  It was very cold and we went out too late.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.

George went away very early by the Coach this morning.

Monday, 31 December, 1810

A fine frosty day.  Cooper wrote all the morning and I workd very hard getting his things ready to go with him tomorrow.  Hallett came to put the bolts on the doors.  Mrs Strangways calld and staid a long time.  She had some luncheon with us and was so very extraordinary that My Aunt and Cooper fancied she was tipsey.  Miss Strangways walkd to Taunton to go to the Ball tonight.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate played Chess all the evening.  C was not in good spirits, either at dinner or afterwards.  My Aunt P and I workd very hard all the evening.  We all sat up till after one o’clock to welcome in the New Year and Cooper wrote some very pretty lines addressd to us on the occasion, just as he was going to bed.

 

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

 

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