1811 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for January 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Tuesday, 1 January, 1811

A very dull looking morning and hard frost.  C very kind.  Mr Coles came directly after breakfast to take directions for making Cooper’s Will.  It snowd a little last night and was extremely slippery from freezing, as it fell.  Mr Phillip Ball calld and sat a long time.  Mr Henderson sent a very bad Cod fish and some excellent oysters for sauce for today’s dinner.  I cut out and made a flannel waistcoat for Cooper.  He and My Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  My Aunt P and I sat up some time after they went to bed to finish his neck cloths.  I heard from my mother.  Phillip Ball very kindly offerd to come and sleep here every night, if it would be any comfort to us, after Cooper was gone.  Of course my Aunt did not accept his offer, but the attention was the same as if she had.

Wednesday, 2 January, 1811

A very dull morning and intensely cold.  We breakfasted earlier than usual on Cooper’s account.  He wrote many letters before breakfast and at half past eleven kissd us all and drove off for Devonshire.  The whole day appeard dismal and forlorn.  I brought all the miniatures out of the library and hung them up in the dining room and removed all the small ornamental things for fear anybody should make their way in there and carry them off.  In the evening I made a pair of oil skin socks for my chilblains, as Cooper desired.  We went to bed early.  My Aunt Neate removed into my room to sleep, to be nearer to us in case of any alarm.

Thursday, 3 January, 1811

Intensely cold.  It was with difficulty we could keep ourselves tolerably warm, even by the fire side.  I bathed my feet before dinner, rubbed them with Hartshorn and Laudanum and put on the oilskin socks.  The time passes very heavily to what it did when our beloved Cooper was here.  It appears a month at least since he went away.  I made a pair of flannel socks in the evening.  My Aunt had a very nice letter from dear Cooper, in verse, from Exeter, where he arrived at six o’clock.

V0011589 An unscrupulous chemist selling a child arsenic and laudanum Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org An unscrupulous chemist selling a child arsenic and laudanum. Wood engraving after J. Leech. By: John LeechPublished: - Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
V0011589 An unscrupulous chemist selling a child arsenic and laudanum Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

Friday, 4 January, 1811

I think I never felt cold so severe as this morning.  I waterd the plants after breakfast, which was not till one o’clock, as we did not come down stairs till twelve o’clock.  Mr Kimberly came for a poor Rate.  He sat down in the parlor and had some hot Brandy and water.  It was too cold to think of going out.  I workd all the evening.

Saturday, 5 January, 1811

As cold as yesterday.  I workd all the morning and did not go out at all.  I workd hard also in the evening.

Sunday, 6 January, 1811

A very fine day, but intensely cold.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church, as it was Communion Sunday.  We calld at Mrs Strangways, as we were too early and sat there till Mr Strangways went by.  Miss S and Miss Miriam Ball went to Church and staid with us.  After the Service was over we all went back to Mrs Strangway’s and had some hot Elder wine, bread and butter and cake.  While we were there, Mr R Burridge and Master Comber came in.  They had been trying to skait, but thought the ice not quite strong enough.  Before we came home we went down to old Joan Wilmot’s, but she was not at home, so my Aunt left 2/- with Mrs Furber for her.  When we came in we found Mrs Ball, Miss Miriam, young Mrs Strangways and her little girl here.  Mrs B looking better than I ever saw her.  They came to bring Miss Lack, who had followd Mrs S down the Lane, and were afraid of turning her back by herself, for fear she should be lost.  They did not sit down after we came in.  I neither read or wrote all the evening.

Winter Scene (Landscape with a Village and Figures Skating) by Joseph Francis Gilbert, 1834 (c) Chichester City Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Winter Scene (Landscape with a Village and Figures Skating) by Joseph Francis Gilbert, 1834
(c) Chichester City Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Monday, 7 January, 1811

A beautiful day, but as cold as yesterday.  The Miss Grosetts calld and sat some time, both looking remarkably well.  Soon after they were gone, I took a walk between the two gates for half an hour and, tho very cold, it was very pleasant.  I workd hard all the rest of the day and evening, mending things for the wash tomorrow.

Tuesday, 8 January, 1811

A very fine day.  Miss Strangway calld but did not stay long.  She did not appear in good spirits, nor did she on Sunday.  Mr P Ball brought my Aunt a letter from Cooper, in which he beggd me to copy his letter to Dr Clark, which was a remarkably witty, clever reply to a droll letter of Dr C to Mr Porcher.  My Aunt P very unkindly (I think), would not allow me to do it, but chose to copy and sent it to him herself.  It made me more angry than anything has for a long time past, but fortunately I had sufficient command over myself not to allow my disgust and mortification to break forth intemperately, tho I could not entirely conceal it.  Cooper sent my Aunt three very fine looking woodcocks.  I did not go out all day, but workd hard and wrote in the evening.

Wednesday, 9 January, 1811

A fine day.  I wrote almost all the morning.  Rover brought the Taunton Paper up without our hearing the horn and the boy came up for his Xmas Box.  I did not go out all day and workd in the evening, wrote a long letter to my mother.

Thursday, 10 January, 1811

A very fine day.  Mrs Dean came down for the directions Cooper was so kind to leave for her.  She was beginning to be poorly, but I gave her a glass of wine with some lavender drops, which relieved her and she had some soup afterwards.  I workd hard mending a pair of silk stockings and did not go out all day.  A rapid thaw came on at night and every thing . . . [bottom corner of page not photocopied well enough to read] . . . damp, but not at all warmer in the house.  I workd all the evening.

Friday, 11 January, 1811

A fine looking day, but damp.  Captain Grosett and his sister ? calld, the former looking remarkably well.  Mr P Ball also calld.  They all took leave together.  I workd all day and in the evening.

Saturday, 12 January, 1811

A compleat rainy day.  I took the crape off my bonnet and new made and trimmd it.  A basket came from my mother with the Cheltenham Salts from Miss Lovelock for my Aunt P and various other things.  I had a long letter in it from dear Emma.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  When we were going to bed, Miss was not to be found and after searching the house without finding her, my Aunt told Samuel he must go down to Farmer Furber’s and Mr Ball’s, to enquire if she was there, as we should not go to bed till she was found.  As he was going by the stable, he heard her whine.  She had been shut up all the evening, poor thing, but the wind and rain was to tremendous, we could not hear her cry.

Cheltenham Salts
Courtesy of US Library of National Medicine

Sunday, 13 January, 1811

A fine, mild morning, but wet after three o’clock.  We read Prayers after breakfast and as soon as we had done, I walkd round the garden, two miles.  We had the last of Cooper’s woodcocks at dinner, the very best I ever tasted.  I wrote in the evening.

Monday, 14 January, 1811

Very dull looking, but mild.  Mr Burridge calld and sat some time.  He is going to town and came to ask if he could do any thing for us.  My Aunt sent home the books Mr Standent was so kind to lend us, by Samuel, who got me a small Almanck to put into my cover, for which I gave 1/10d and twelve yards of tape for my stays, which cost me 9d.  I workd all the evening.

Tuesday, 15 January, 1811

A very fine morning, but in the middle of the some violent storms of hail, rain, wind and snow.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and staid a long time.  They eat luncheon with us.  I intended to have netted the whole day, but there seems a spite against Captain Bussell’s purse, for something always occurs to prevent my working on it.  Young Mr Chard calld for something he had lent to George and which the latter had not returned.  He was so kind to say he would come tomorrow to do something to the Cyder.  I workd all the evening.

Wednesday, 16 January, 1811

A very fine day.  Mr Chard came soon after breakfast and rackd off the Cyder into another Hogshead and doctord it.  As soon as he had done, he came into the parlor and had some luncheon with us and I thought would never go away.  I cut out three pair of pockets and my Aunt P has had them made for me by Pocock.  I workd in the evening. Rover went to fetch the Taunton Paper but Miss took it from him and brought it up.

Thursday, 17 January, 1811

It raind the whole day and was very damp and uncomfortable.  I workd all day and in the evening finished my stays.

Friday, 18 January, 1811

A fine day, with the exception of one slight shower, but excessively cold, occasioned by a cutting wind.  I wrote most part of the morning.  About two o’clock my Aunt P and I walkd to Farmer Smith’s and from there to Mr Grosett’s, where we staid till near four.  I shewd Miss Kitty how to put on a turban, in the manner I do mine and put one on for her and her sister.  We dined  at four o’clock.  Samuel gave my Aunt warning this morning, saying he intended to go this day month.  Pocock finishd my pockets and has done them very nicely.  I wrote a very long letter to dear Emma in the evening.

Saturday, 19 January, 1811

A fine day.  I began to cut out a flannel waistcoat for dear Cooper.  In the midst of it Miss Ball, Mr Phillips and Miss Anna calld and sat a long time.  After they were gone, I walkd in the garden for some time.  I workd the rest of the day and evening on the waistcoat

Sunday, 20 January, 1811

A tolerable fine day.  My Aunt sent Pocock and Samuel to Church at Ruishton.  We read at Prayers at home, after which I walkd in the garden till near dinner time, when the rain drove me in.  My Aunt read the Bible aloud in the evening.

Monday, 21 January, 1811

A very fine day.  I walkd in the garden near an hour.  It was as mild as Spring.  I workd the rest of the day on Captain Bussell’s purse and in the evening workd on Cooper’s waistcoat.  I had a long letter from my mother.

Tuesday, 22 January, 1811

A very fine day and frosty, tho not severe enough to make the road hard.  I netted most part of the morning.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s and Farmer Smith’s and calld at Mr Balls,  where we sat a long time.  We found only the three Miss B’s at home.  They very obligingly gave us a piece of three different sorts of bread, made at home, to taste and shewd us the sieves the flour is sifted thro’.  Miss Kitty Grosett came in before we came away and we left her there.  I wrote a long letter to my mother and Samuel took it to Taunton.  I finishd Cooper’s waistcoat in the evening.

(c) Bury Art Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Kitchen Interior with Still Life by Samuel Smith (c) Bury Art Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 23 January, 1811

A very foggy morning, but it cleard up towards the middle of the day and was tolerably fine, tho cold.  I netted the whole morning till half past three, when my Aunt P and I walkd as far as the Dairy House, but I thought we should have been obliged to come back without going in and indeed so we should, had it not been for the very great civility and good nature of Mrs Williams’s maid, who came and assisted us over the  mud, which is worse round their house than I ever saw it any where.  My Aunt paid her bill there and the good natured maid helpd us back again.  It raind a little as we returnd, but it turnd to fog in the evening.  Mr Poole of Taunton sent to borrow the Catalogue of Mr Anderdon’s books, to copy and send to him at Bath.

I cut out a cap and made it in the evening.  Miss fetchd the Taunton Paper quite, as well as Rover, only she did not bring it into the house.  Mrs Phillips sent us their Bath Paper.

Thursday, 24 January, 1811

A very fine day, but very cold my Aunt Neate said. I did not go out the whole day, but netted from breakfast till dinner time without moving from it.  My Aunt P superintended sifting flour and making bread at home for the first time.  We had a nice hot cake out of the oven at tea time, but it wanted that sweetness that home made bread used to have.  I went to see Molly make it up, which she did very cleverly.  Cooper sent a very nice looking lad from Buckland to take the young mare there.  She went away at half past twelve.  I trimd my cap and wrote in the evening.

Friday, 25 January, 1811

A fine day, but I did not go out, as I netted from breakfast till dinner time and workd in the evening.  I waterd the plants.

Saturday, 26 January, 1811

Not very fine.  I have put by my netting, as I find I cannot finish it for Cooper to take to Captain Bussell, when he goes to the Regiment.  I did various little things about the house and workd in the evening.

Sunday, 27 January, 1811

A fine day.  We read Prayers after breakfast and my Aunt sent Pocock and Samuel to Church.  I walkd in the garden some time.  My Aunt P read aloud in the Bible in the evening.

Monday, 28 January, 1811

A fine day.  Miss Strangways, Miss Miriam and Mr Phillip Ball calld.  I washd all the desert things and got them all ready to use against Cooper comes tomorrow.  My Aunt P and I went as far as the Dairy House (but did not go over the mud) to take the maid a ribbon for her civility to us the other day.  Mrs Williams brought out her little girl for my Aunt to prescribe for.  When we came home, my Aunt sent her an emetic of mustard.  I workd in the evening.

Tuesday, 29 January, 1811

A beautiful day and doubly so to us, as we expect our beloved Cooper at dinner.  The Miss Grosetts calld and sat a long time.  I boild up the syrup of the Oranges and some of the cucumbers.  Our dear Cooper arrived about five, looking very well, tho he had had a very unpleasant journey owing to a heavy fall of snow, which laid eighteen inches deep, the greatest part of his way and obliged him to walk a great deal.  We chatted all the evening.

Wednesday, 29 January, 1811

A fine morning, but extremely cold and very hard frost.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and eat luncheon.  C kind and affectionate and in good spirits.  He and my Aunt Neate played Chess in the evening and I began to make a baize case for a very beautiful red Morocco writing case that Mrs Bulteel has made Cooper a present of.  My Aunt askd the Strangways to dine here tomorrow and the Grosetts and Balls to come in the evening.  We had the Taunton Paper and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Chapman image - writing case open
Morocco Red Leather Writing Case (www.batemans.com)

Thursday, 30 January, 1811

When we got up this morning, it was quite a white world, it having snowd some inches deep in the night.  Cooper very kind and affectionate.  He sufferd a good deal yesterday from the nails of one of his great toes has grown into the side and the walking so much and being so long in the cold, Monday, has irritated and inflamed it very much.  He is not able to put on his boot or even to bear his shoe up at heel.  It began to rain and thaw while we were at breakfast and did not cease pouring the whole day, so that we gave up the idea of seeing the Strangways, or indeed any one, but Mr P Ball who, we thought, would not be prevented coming by the weather.  We did not dine till six o’clock and had just done when the door bell rung and we concluded it was Mr Ball, when to our utter astonishment in walkd Miss Strangways!!  She came on a double horse, braving rain, floods and all the etcetera of bad weather.  Mr P Ball and his sister Miriam came in the evening.  We playd Loo and la Peur.  I won 3/- at the former and 9/- at the latter, which I divided with my Aunt Neate.  Miss Strangways sang us two or three songs and has a very sweet voice.

Fashion plate for February 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for February 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 1 February, 1811

A wet day with intervals ( tho short ones) of sunshine.  C as affectionate and kind as he used to be.  Two of the Miss Balls calld.  Mr Collins, Mr Standent and Mr Coles dined here.  The latter brought over his clerk with him to be the third witness with Miss  ?   S and C, to Cooper’s Will, which Mr Coles has just made.  They all went away about eleven o’clock.

Saturday, 2 February, 1811

A very bad day.  I workd on Cooper’s baize case and finishd it.  Mr Coles calld to be paid for making C’s Will and tried C’s new gray horse that he bought at Totnes.  He liked him very much and when he went home he sent over a horse of his, which he offerd to exchange for him and give ten guineas, but Cooper declined the offer.  C was not in good spirits in the evening, nor indeed were any of us.  The idea of losing him so soon, made us all melancholy.

Sunday, 3 February, 1811

A fine day, but dismal and melancholy to us, as it is the last we shall enjoy our beloved Cooper’s society for many months.  Just before he left us, Mr Cooper of Hatch calld, but did not stay long.  Cooper kissd us all affectionately and drove off about three to Hinton, where he dines and sleeps.  He did not much like the visit, but   Lord Poulett and Hinton pressd it so much he could not avoid it, particularly situated as they are  and Lady P was buried yesterday.  My Aunt P read the Bible aloud to us in the evening.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Monday, 4 February, 1811

A tolerable fine day.  My Aunt P and I waded thro the mud to call on the Grosetts and Balls, the old gentleman better than I have seen him for some time past.  We found Mrs Titherby at the Ball’s, where we sat a long time.  The two Miss Grosetts came in just as we were coming away.  I lookd over my stockings for the wash tomorrow and in the evening mended a table cloth for my Aunt P.  Mr P Ball brought a letter from the Post, just as we were going to supper.  My Aunt askd him to come in and have a glass of wine, which he did, but did not stay many minutes.

Tuesday, 5 February, 1811

A dry day, but extremely cold.  I was employd almost all the morning putting up a draw bolt in my Aunt Neate’s room.  I did not go out or do a stitch of work the whole day.  In the evening I read and wrote a very long letter to my mother.  My Aunt P and I did not go to bed till two o’clock.  I naild two directions on dear Cooper’s trunk, which is to go by the Waggon to Ipswich tomorrow.  After we went up stairs, Rover barkd very much.  We both lookd out of the window but could neither hear or see any thing to disturb him.

Wednesday, 6 February, 1811

A gloomy looking day with mizzling rain.  James Stodgell came and fetchd Cooper’s trunk to go by the Waggon while we were getting up.  I cut out a shift and began to make it before dinner.  Ephraim went to town with the letters.  My Aunt P gave me a fresh supply of working cotton, which I wound in the evening.  We had the Taunton and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Thursday, 7 February, 1811

A very fine day, with the exception of two or three showers.  I went into the garden directly after breakfast and put in some sweet peas.  I staid out an hour.  I netted the rest of the morning.  Just as we were going to tea, Mr P Ball brought our letters and Paper.  He staid and drank tea, but went away before supper.  I workd on my shift after he was gone, till one o’clock.

Friday, 8 February, 1811

A tremendous high wind with driving rain.  It cleard up towards the middle of the day.  I netted all the morning and workd on my shift in the evening.

Saturday, 9 February, 1811

A very pleasant morning.  Soon after breakfast my Aunt P and I set out to walk to Mrs Strangway’s.  We calld at Mrs Tytherley’s in our way to give her the receipt for making potato yeast.  She was not at home, but her daughter, Mrs Gardiner was.  She shewd us the house, which is a very snug one.  A woman at the cottage by Thorn Water persuaded us to go the field way, as she said the water in the Lane would be over our patterns.  She very civily went part of the way with us and helpd us over the worst places, as we could not have got along, for the best part was as worse than I ever saw any thing before.  We sat a long time at Mrs S’s, who gave us some very nice luncheon and Miss S walkd back with us as far as Mrs Tytherley’s.  We came down the Lane which, tho very bad, was better than the fields.  My Aunt gave the woman a shilling, who was so kind to assist us in going.  We did not get home till past five and were coverd with mud, but our feet were not wet.  We found Mr P Ball here, who soon took his leave.  My Aunt askd him to meet the Strangways here at dinner Tuesday.

I had a nice long letter from dear Emma.

Sunday, 10 February, 1811

A pleasant morning.  We read Prayers after breakfast and I walkd in the garden till near three o’clock, when it began to rain and continued all the evening.  Samuel askd leave to go to Taunton and did not come back till after we were gone up stairs (past eleven o’clock).  My Aunt had a great mind not to have him let in, but after keeping him at the door some time, she sent Pocock down to open the door and desire him to go to bed directly, but being very tipsey, he would not, and my Aunt went down and insisted on his going up immediately, but had some difficulty in making him do so.  Fortunately he was extremely civil and respectful, but would explain what kept him out so late.  We were so cold with running about half dressed that we lit the fire in our room and warmd ourselves before we got into bed, which I did not do till near one o’clock.  My Aunt P read the Bible aloud to us in the evening.

Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835 (c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835
(c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Monday, 11 February, 1811

A very wet day, with now and then sunshine.   My Aunt spoke to Samuel after breakfast about his improper conduct last night.  He was extremely civil, but insisted he was not tipsey.  I netted a little before dinner and finished my shift in the evening and I bathed my feet in the morning.

Tuesday, 12 February, 1811

Some hard showers in the morning, but very fine the rest of the day  I was busy airing the blankets and pillows in the Oak Room for Mrs and Miss Strangways tonight.  They came between twelve and one and Mr P Ball just before them.  My Aunt sent him back to ask his sisters to come here also.  He was so kind to teach us to fire a pistol.  I fired twice, my Aunt P and Miss Strangways five or six times each.  Miss Ball came just before dinner.  In the evening we playd Loo and la Peur.  I lost a shilling.  Miss B and her brother went home before supper, as Mr P B goes to town early tomorrow morning and his father wishd to see him before he went to bed.  He was so obliging to take my Aunt’s watch with him to be repaired in London.  Miss Strangways was so kind to hem some sleeves for me.

Wednesday, 13 February, 1811

Showery in the morning, but fine afterwards.  I netted a little and Miss Strangways workd on my sleeves.  We all, except my Aunt N, assisted in dyeing some muslin for Miss Strangways in Anchil and succeeded tolerably, but not so well as Kitty used to do.  Young Mr Chard was so obliging to come and fine the Cyder.  I was backwards and forwards in the cellar, while he rackd it off.  He tappd the Elder wine for us and it proves very good.  We had some hot at supper.  We workd and chatted in the evening.  Little John Boait had the excessive civility and good nature to walk to Taunton to get some oysters for my Aunt, without being employd by her to do so, because he heard she wanted them.  We had the Taunton and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.  I had a pleasant letter from my mother.

Thursday, 14 February, 1811

A very fine day, but the wind excessively cold and it blew tremendously  all night.  Mrs and Miss Strangways left us about one o’clock.  Daniel Williams bought my Aunt two cows at Mrs Tythenley’s sale yesterday, one of them with her calf was brought home this morning, for which she gave £14.5.0,  and sold the calf for £1.2.6. The other is not come home yet, but she is to give £5 or £10, I know not which.  I wrote to my mother and in the evening workd.   I heard again from my mother.

Friday, 15 February, 1811

A dismal, wet day.  It began to rain soon after breakfast and did not cease the whole day.  I dippd some small things in the dye and hung them in the laundry to dry.  I then wrote a long letter to dear William, which I did not finish till the evening.

Saturday, 16 February, 1811

A fine day with a very high, cold, drying wind.  I finishd dipping the handkerchiefs in the dye and after that my Aunt P and myself went out.  We calld at Mrs Tythenley’s to ask her to save some change for a draft of my Aunt’s and then went on to Mrs Strangway’s.  We found her house in great confusion, being cleand.  Miss S was gone to Taunton.  We sat some time, had some cake and wine and then Mrs S walkd as far as the road with us.  My Aunt and I went on to Mrs Williams’s to see their youngest child, who is very ill and then came home.  I workd in the evening.  Emma’s poor little rabbit got out of its house and Rover killd it, bur fortunately a man brought a nice little dormouse to my Aunt Neate, who bought it on purpose for Emma, to supply the place of her rabbit.

Sunday, 17 February, 1811

A tolerable fine day, but very cold.  We read Prayers after breakfast.  Pocock and Samuel went to Church.  Mrs Strangway’s Jenny brought a young woman to speak to my Aunt, as under servant, who my Aunt has agreed to take and then offerd herself in Pocock’s place.  My Aunt thinks she will suit, but would not settle with her till she has spoken to Mrs S.  My Aunt read the Bible aloud in the evening.  Rover dug up the rabbit this morning and I tyed it round his neck and whipd him well.  It was not taken off till we went to bed.  The two Miss Grosetts calld in the morning to borrow a small trunk to pack Miss G’s clothes in, who is going to Clifton Thursday to spend six weeks with her uncle.

Monday, 18 February, 1811

A fine day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and slept here.  My Aunt spoke to them about Jenny.  They had nothing to say against her, so my Aunt has agreed to try her.  Miss S brought her worsteds and canvas to begin a stool like my Aunt’s, who traced the pattern for her.  I workd in the morning and so we did all in the evening.  I began a letter to my mother, but did not finish it.  We did not go to bed till near two o’clock.

Tuesday, 19 February, 1811

A fine day.  I alterd some neck cloths of Coopers, one of which Miss S hem’d.  My Aunt P workd very hard to finish tracing the pattern of the stool.  Mrs and Miss S had some luncheon with us and went home about four o’clock.  We walkd with them as far as Mrs Tythenley, where we went to pay for the second cow and got the change they had saved for my Aunt.  In the evening I finishd a very long letter to my mother.

Wednesday, 20 February, 1811

A fine day. My pretty ewe produced a remarkably fine lamb this morning.  I went with my Aunt Neate to look at it.  I found thirteen eggs in the Hen House and we had ten a day or two ago, so that we shall have plenty now I hope.  I coverd the sofa cushion this morning, which had been taken off to be washd and in the evening lined my Aunt P’s straw bonnet and prepared a shift for Pocock to put the gore in.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath and the Taunton Papers.

Thursday, 21 February, 1811

It did not cease raining and blowing the whole day.  I was employd the whole morning assisting my Aunt P in folding up and packing away the mourning we have just left off.  The gore of the shift that Pocock has sewd and felld I shall be obliged to cut out again, as she has forced all the fullness to the top and puckerd it so much it is impossible to do any thing with it.  I workd on my shift in the evening.

cat-1122_241_0
Regency Sewing Box (www.theriaults.com)

Friday, 22 February, 1811

A beautiful day, with the exception of a violent hail storm.  I cut down some of the plants and washd others;  Pocock and I moved the long bench from the front of the house and put it in the Oak Room and I put as many of the plants on it as it would hold, as I do not suppose there will be frost severe enough to hurt them again this year.  I workd on my shifts in the evening.  My Aunt’s share in the Lottery is drawn a blank.

Saturday, 23 February, 1811

A wet day with bright sun shine now and then.  I workd very hard all day on one of my shifts and nearly finishd it in the evening.  I fed the rabbits and poultry, which I have done for this week past, as my Aunt Neate is now so much taken up with her lambs she has not the time.

Sunday, 24 February, 1811

A wet, cold day.  We read Prayers soon after breakfast and I boild some Arrow Root for my Aunt Neate’s lambs.  The rain came down in torrents the whole afternoon.  A man brought a note from Mr Badcock’s to say they received the two hundred pounds my Aunt expected last Thursday 21st.  My Aunt P read the Bible aloud in the evening.

Monday, 25 February, 1811

A very fine day, but I was very little out, as I netted the whole morning.  Just in the middle of our dinner, Mr Collins calld.  Of course we said “Not at home”.  I brought in 14 eggs from the hen house, which makes 39.  I workd on my shifts in the evening and finishd another.

Tuesday, 26 February, 1811

A very wet day, in storms.  I letterd all the Encyclopedias and arranged them on the book shelves in the parlor and dusted and put the rest of the books to rights.  Farmer Furber calld to have his account settld.  I workd in the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Papers.

Wednesday, 27 February, 1811

Quite an April morning, violent storms of hail and rain, followd by bright sunshine.  Miss Strangways calld and sat a long time.  I workd in the evening, continuing to alter my workd cap.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Thursday 28 February, 1811

A showery day.  My Aunt Neate and I went to see a farm that is to be let near Chard.  We got into the Chaise before ten o’clock, but did not get there till one.  It is thirteen miles from here and part of the way the very worst road I ever went in my life, with such tremendous hills, they were like precipices.  I sat with Mrs Pike (the wife of the owner of the Estate) while my Aunt Neate walkd over the land, which luckily she did not like, for it is a deplorable place altogether.  We got back to dinner about half past five.  I workd on my shifts in the evening.  My Aunt had the cream intended for the butter brought into the parlor at tea time and stird it herself till the butter came.

Fashion plate for March 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for March 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 1 March, 1811

A very fine day with a high, drying wind.  I wrote a very long letter to dear Emma and put some of the Marvel of Peru roots into pots.  Pocock askd leave to go to Taunton.  It raind a very hard shower about six o’clock, but did not continue.  I workd on my shifts in the evening.

http://www.albion-prints.com/botanical-print-1797-common-marvel-of-peru-371-curtis-hand-col-3639-p.asp
Marvels of Peru (www.albion-prints.com)

Saturday, 2 March, 1811

A very fine day, but the wind so high it was with difficulty I could stand in the field, where I went with a message from my Aunt P to my Aunt Neate.  I finishd Captain Bussell’s purse, ready to go to him and it really lookd very pretty.  I workd all the evening.

Sunday, 3 March. 1811

A day with a very high wind.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast.  Molly askd leave to go with her sister to enquire about a place.  I read most part of the day and my Aunt P read the Bible aloud in the evening.

Monday, 4 March, 1811

A very fine day.  I was out a little and walkd the rest of the morning.  I fed the chickens.  While we were at dinner Mr Grosett sent to say he would come and drink tea with us.  It was so mild and pleasant after dinner that my Aunt P and I walkd in the garden for an hour before they came.  We played at Pope Joan after tea.  I lost 3/6d.  The old gentleman tookd remarkably well and was in good spirits, but Miss Kitty was not so chearful as she usually is.  They went home a little after eleven.  My Aunt’s (original) cow calved.

Pope Joan
Courtesy of Lewis Walpole Library

Tuesday, 5 March, 1811

A very gloomy, threatening day.  Miss Strangways calld and staid till near four o’clock.  She is suffering a good deal of pain from having been thrown from a horse on Sunday and, tho not materially hurt, yet the jar has affected her whole frame and I daresay she will feel it a long time.  It began to rain just before she went away and continued most part of the afternoon.  Samuel went to Taunton and brought back Mrs Phillip’s Bath Papers.  I heard from my mother.  I sent the purse I have been netting to Captain Bussell in the hamper of tongues and hams my Aunt has prepared for Cooper and which goes by the Waggon tomorrow morning.

Wednesday, 6 March, 1811

A fine morning with occasional showers.  I went into the garden directly after breakfast and cut all the rose trees round the house, tied back some of the Laurels and cut others and workd very hard till two o’clock, when it began to rain too hard for me to stay out any longer.  I workd the rest of the day and evening.  It was a dreadful night.  The rain pourd down in torrents and I thought part of the house would have been blown down.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Thursday, 7 March,1811

Quite an April day, bright sunshine and raining extremely hard all the time.  I put the Orange tree out to be washd.  It is coming into blossom.  I workd all the morning and in the evening too. I sent a little parcel containing 3 one pound notes, some pills and  a piece of salve to my mother in a basket  Farmer Furber sent to Mr Anderdon and wrote to my mother.

Friday, 8 March, 1811

A shocking day.  It did not cease pouring the whole day.  I workd all the morning.  Just as I had made the tea in the evening, we discovered the chimney was on fire.  My Aunt sent Samuel to Mr Garett’s to fetch Daniel who came, and he and Daniel drew a mop up and down the chimney till they had got all the soot down.  We had a fire lit in my Aunt’s room, where we sat and suppd. Fortunately it was a beautiful night.

Saturday, 9 March, 1811

One of the most beautiful days I ever saw.  My Aunt P went down to Mr Grosett’s and Mrs Ball before ten o’clock.  All the furniture was taken out of the dining room and the mason came to take down the stones at the back of the grate, where there was nearly a bushel of red hot soot lodged.  I had all the plants taken out and I cut, washd and put some new mould to each, which took me from ten o’clock till three.  My Aunt P brought Miss Strangways back with her, who dined and suppd here.  Miss Kitty Grosett calld, just before dinner, but did not stay long.  Miss Strangways and my Aunt P workd very hard all the evening on Miss S’s stool, but could not finish it.  I netted.  Miss S did not go home till past twelve.

Sunday, 10 March, 1811

A very dull looking day, but dry.  I brought the birds into the library, where we are living till the dining room is cleand.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast.  My Aunt P and I walkd about the garden and shrubbery by the water, where I gatherd a great many white violets.  I read the rest of the morning and my Aunt P read the Bible aloud in the evening.  Daniel Williams came for some more bark for his little girl, who has the Ague again.

Monday, 11 March, 1811

A beautiful day.  I was out in the garden till dinner time, cutting up the Laurels to make room for some flowers in the clumps.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld, but did not stay many minutes.  My Aunts were both in the field, so did not see them.  I put three pots of Mignonette seed into the cucumber frame.  My mother has had the happiness of hearing from our beloved William, after a silence of more than two years.  I had a letter from her this morning, which was written in too great a hurry to mention particulars.  I was too much tired to do any thing but read in the evening.

mingnonette-info
Mignonette

Tuesday, 12 March, 1811

A very dull looking day.  I workd all the morning.  After dinner my Aunt P and I walkd down to Mr Grosett’s, saw all his sheep and lambs, walkd about his garden with him and Miss Kitty, but did not go into the house.  We went to Farmer Smith’s about some barley for the poultry and stopd at old Joan Wilmot’s to ask her how she did.  It was quite dark when we got home.  My Aunt gave Joan 2/-.

Wednesday, 13 March, 1811

Dull looking and very cold.  I was out most part of the morning with Samuel, who dug up and manured some of the flower beds.  Mary Mallard began to weed the strawberry beds.  I did not do a stitch of work till after tea, when I cut out some sleeves for my Aunt P.  Rover fetchd the Taunton Paper beautifully.

Thursday, 14 March, 1811

Fine, but cold in the morning.  I workd till we had our luncheon, after which my Aunt P and I walkd to Heydon to ask Betty about bottling the Mulberry wine.  We went to Mrs Chard’s also about Cooper’s Cyder. Mrs Chard gave us a glass of her excellent Grape wine and the young man, a bunch of beautiful Mezerian.  We did not come home till past five o’clock.  I workd in the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Friday, 15 March, 1811

A fine day, but cold out of the sun.  Samuel took a great many empty bottles to wash.  I unpackd the hamper of wine from Dorchester and put it away.  It containd 3 doz of Port and 11 bottles of Sherry.  I workd the rest of the morning.  In the evening I began a letter to my mother, but did not finish it.  Mr Standent calld and sat a long time.

Saturday, 16 March, 1811

A beautiful day, as warm as Summer.  My Aunt P and I walkd to the Blacksmith’s to bespeak a small light spade and rake for me to use in the garden.  He promised to finish them on Tuesday and in the mean time has lent me one of his.  I was in the garden the rest of the day and finishd my letter to my mother in the evening.  Miss Strangways calld in the morning.  My Aunt wanted her to stay and dine, but she said her mother was quite alone, so she could not.

A Country Blacksmith Disputing upon the Price of Iron, and the Price Charged to the Butcher for Shoeing his Poney by Joseph Mallord William Turner (exhibited 1807) Tate; (c) Tate; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Country Blacksmith Disputing upon the Price of Iron, and the Price Charged to the Butcher for Shoeing his Poney by Joseph Mallord William Turner (exhibited 1807)
Tate; (c) Tate; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Sunday, 17 March, 1811

A lovely day.  I was down stairs before nine o’clock and fed the ducks, rabbits, pigeons and poultry before breakfast.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Ruiston to Church.  We met Miss A Ball and Miss Kitty Grosett there.  The latter sat in our Pew.  Mr Winslow joind us after Church for a few minutes.  The Misses B and G walkd to the bottom of the Lane with us, where we parted.  My Aunt P read the Bible aloud to us in the evening.  Jenny came for our letters and commissions for Miss Strangways to take to Taunton tomorrow.

Monday, 18 March, 1811

A beautiful day.  I workd the whole of it in the garden, digging and breaking the earth in one of the flower clumps.  I was so tired in the evening I could neither work and read and went to bed before supper.  My Aunt and I went to the Dairy house to taste some cheese and my Aunt bought one.  From there we walkd on to Berry’s Cottage.  We met two of the children in the road, clever little creatures.  The eldest daughter was the only person at home and I never saw a tidier, neater girl.  My Aunt left 2/6d with her for her mother and promised to look for something to make the little boy a jacket.  In our way home we calld at Mrs Titherleys and brought little Mary home with us, who was delighted with every thing she saw.  She went out with me to feed the ducks and rabbits and was as happy as possible.  My Aunt sent her home after tea.

Tuesday, 19 March, 1811

A fine day, but very cold.  I and my Aunt P went up to the Rick yard to see the men take in my Aunt N’s wheat Rick.  We took Rover and Miss with us.  They killd and eat an innumerable number of mice and 9 rats.  I workd in the garden the rest of the morning, putting in flower seeds.  Samuel went to Taunton in the evening and brought back Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.  I was so compleatly knockd up that I determind I would not fatigue myself so much again.  My Aunt P sold her calf for £1.5.0 to Daniel Williams.

Wednesday, 20 March, 1811

A cold, raw, uncomfortable day.  It being the day appointed for the Fast, we had intended going to Church at Ruishton, but Mr Winslow sent his servant over before we were up to say he had receivd a nail in his foot and there would be no Prayers!!  So we walkd to Thorn.  We calld at Mrs Strangways.  They were just returnd from Taunton.  We saw Mr Ball and two of his daughters and Mr and Mrs Strangway.  It raind a little when we came out of Church, so we would not go into Mrs S’s again for fear it should increase.  The Miss Balls walkd across the fields with us.  I fed the poultry after we came home.  After dinner my Aunt P and I took old Joan some very nice rice milk.  The old woman was as chearful as a bird.  Her daughter, who lives at service at Taunton, was come over to see her.  We askd Mrs Furber how she did and went as far as Mrs Bartlett’s to ask if they had any wallet to spare, but they had not.  We did not do a stitch of work the whole day or evening.  We had the Taunton Paper.

The Church of St George, Ruishton (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)
The Church of St George, Ruishton (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)

Thursday, 21 March, 1811

A fine day.  Did a good many things about the house in the morning.  Mrs and Miss Strangways and the Misses Anne and Miriam Ball dined here.  Mrs S was extremely unwell all the day.  She laid down while we dined, but was better in the evening.  I began to make some tassells for Miss S’s stool.  We playd Loo in the evening.  I lost 3/6d.  The Strangways slept here.  The Balls went home about twelve o’clock.

Friday, 22 March, 1811

A showery morning, but fine afterwards.  My Aunt would not let Mrs and Miss S go home today.  I workd all day making the tassells and finishd and put them on the stool in the evening, to which they are a great improvement.  We had some of the Mutton ham boild for breakfast and it proves an excellent one.  My Aunt P and Miss S went to Mr Grosett’s after dinner to ask Miss Kitty to do some commissions for them at Taunton tomorrow.  Mrs Strangway’s cold a good deal better.  Miss Anna Ball was so kind to send us some Hyacinth roots and some double lilac Primrose.

Saturday, 23 March, 1811

A very fine day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways went away directly after breakfast.  Little Benny came down to have his jacket measured and I was employd all day cutting it out and beginning to make it.  I mended some dusters for my Aunt in the evening.  I went to Mr Grosett’s after dinner to fetch the change for the Draft Miss Kitty was so kind to get for my Aunt at Taunton.

Sunday, 24 March, 1811

A very fine day.  Miss Strangway calld soon after breakfast.  She staid and had some Mutton ham for luncheon and then we walkd to Thorn Church with her, as Mr Winslow sent again to say there would be no Service at Ruiston, his foot being too bad for him to stand!!  We did not get to Church till the Sermon had began.  We saw Mrs, Miss and Miss Anne Ball.  The two former walkd on and we stopd at Mrs S’s for a few minutes to look at her parlor, which Miss S is colouring blue.  She was going to dine at Mr Ball’s, so Miss Anna and she walkd part of the way home with us.  The white hen that has been sitting under the barrow, brought out five chickens today.  My Aunt P and I read the Bible aloud in the evening.

Monday, 25 March, 1811

A very fine day.  I workd all the morning on little Benny’s jacket and trousers.  Samuel and Molly went away and John and Jane came in their places.  I mended some more dusters for my Aunt in the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper to day.  He enclosed a letter from Mr Porcher, with an extract from one from Mr Harrington to Mr P, which says that our dear William was living with him and recovering fast from a severe illness.  It was dated 21 October, 1810.  My Aunt and I walkd to Mrs Strangways  late in the evening, to speak to Jenny.  We did not go in, as they were not at home.

Tuesday, 26 March, 1811

A beautiful day.  I was employd the whole morning bottling Mulberry and Elder wine.  Miss Strangway calld in the afternoon and brought us some red violet, heartsease and white campanula roots, which I put in the ground before tea.  She did not stay long.  I mended some more cloths for my Aunt in the evening.

Wednesday, 27 March, 1811

A beautiful day.  I wrote all the morning.  As soon as we had dined I took my letter and a note from my Aunt to Miss Strangway’s down to Ball’s to ask the Misses (who were going to drink tea at Thorn) to take them over for us.  I met Mr Ball at their door, who was so obliging to send their maid up the Lane after Sarah Poole (who was going to Taunton for them), with my letter, which will save a day’s Post.  Miss Anna and Mrs Ball insisted on my going in, which I did for a few minutes.  They gave me a beautiful bunch of Hyacinths.  I workd in the evening.  I wrote to my mother.  Rover brought the Taunton Paper as far as the gate and Miss brought it in.

Thursday, 26 March, 1811

A beautiful day.  I waterd the flowers  Misses Ball and Strangway have given us and some of the seeds I have put in.  It was so very warm and pleasant, I put the birds out and the Orange tree for a few hours.  Miss Strangways calld in her way to Taunton, but did not sit down.  I workd on little Benny’s clothes.  Mr Phillip Ball was so obliging to send us the Globe News Paper from London.  Mrs Strangway’s maid came before tea with the things Miss S was so kind to get for us at Taunton, two pieces of calico, a pound of tea and a little parcel that Miss Lovelock had left at Mr Cox’s for us in her way to Devonshire, containing two letters from my mother, a pound of Cheltenham salts and two very pretty ruffs, a present from Miss Silverthorn to my Aunt and me.  I workd in the evening.  I heard from my mother.

Friday, 29 March, 1811

A very dull looking morning, but it cleard up afterward and was very fine.  I workd hard the whole morning on little Benny’s clothes and finishd them.  He was here to pick up sticks.  I walkd a short time in the garden after dinner, as I was not out in the morning.  In the evening I wrote to my brother Henry.

Saturday, 30 March, 1811

A beautiful day.  I put the birds and the Orange tree out for some hours and after having waterd all the plants I sat down to cover my parasol.  While I was hard at work, I was very agreeably surprised by seeing Mr W Williams ride down.  He calld in his way from Taunton to Weymouth.  He had some Mutton ham for his luncheon, which he relishd very much.  He did not stay more than two hours.  I never saw him look better and he was as friendly as he always is to us.  I finishd my parasol in the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.  Stevens came in Pocock’s place.

Sunday, 31 March, 1811

A very cold, foggy, uncomfortable day.  Pocock went away with a very heavy heart while we were at breakfast, and told my Aunt whenever she was in want of a servant again she should be glad to come back.  My Aunt P and I went to Thorn Church, where we saw the two Mrs Strangways, the three Miss Balls and their brother, who returnd last night.  We calld at Mrs S after Church to see Miss S, who is unwell.  While we were sitting there, Mr Wiltshire and Mr Allen went by.  Mrs S very good naturedly ran out and told them we were there and they came in.  They had been here and sat some time with my Aunt Neate and then came in search of us.  They had some bread and cheese and then came away with us.  We parted at Mrs Tythenley’s.  They went back to Taunton, as they were engaged to dine at Sir John Lethbridge’s, but come here tomorrow to dine and sleep.  We calld at the Grosett’s in our way home and Miss Shaw (who returnd from Clifton last night) and Mrs Griffiths, who came also last night from London with Mr P Ball.  She appears superior to the rest of the family, but very second rate.  Mr P Ball came in while we were there and came away with us.  We went into Mr Ball’s with him for my Aunt’s watch, which he has had the kindness to get put to rights for her in London.  We found all the family assembled, except Mr B, waiting dinner for Mr Strangways.  We did not stay long.  Mr Wiltshire brought me a letter from my mother, which I answerd in the evening, for fear I should not have time tomorrow.  Miss produced nine pups this morning.

Fashion plate for April 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for April 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

1 April, 1811

A very cold, dull looking morning, but it cleard up in the middle of the day and was very fine.  I took all Miss’s puppys out of the place they were in and carried the into the house in the garden, where I have had a very nice bed made for them.  She is just as good natured and gentle as she was before she pup’d.  I was busy all the morning getting things ready against Mr Allen and Mr Wiltshire came.  We expected them early, but they did not come till four o’clock.  They went out with my Aunt P fishing as soon as they arrived and we did not dine till six o’clock.  They were not fortunate enough to have even a bite, which Mr Allen, in his droll way, attributed entirely to its being the first of April.  I never saw him pleasanter or in better spirits.  We chatted in the evening and did not go to be till past twelve.

Tuesday, 2 April, 1811

A dull looking morning, but very warm.  Mr Allen’s servant brought a Chaise from Taunton to take them to Borough Bridge.  They left us directly after breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire took my letter to my mother and my Aunt P gave him some white strawberry plants.  Mr Allen was so kind to say he would get some cards at the York House for my Aunt, for which she gave him a one pound note.  I waterd the flowers in the garden, fed the poultry and then went down to Mrs Garett’s to ask them to come tonight, instead of tomorrow, but the old man was not well enough to come out.  I saw Miss Anna Ball there and askd her family to visit the Garetts tomorrow.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld.  My asked them to come and dine tomorrow.  Both my Aunts were very not well the whole day.  My Aunt P has the gout flying about her and my Aunt Neate has the rheumatism in her arm.  From luncheon time till dinner and from dinner till supper I was in the laundry making wafers and went to bed compleatly tired.  Five of Misses puppys were drownd this morning.

Wednesday, 3 April, 1811

A pleasant day, but not fine looking till the afternoon.  I went into the laundry directly after breakfast to finish the wafers and had not done till two.  Mr P Ball calld and sat some time, but I did not see him.  He came to make his mother and sister’s excuses for tonight.  The Grosetts also sent to say the old man was too unwell to come out.  I did not sit down from breakfast till dinner and was so tired when I went to dress I could have cryd.  Mrs and Miss Strangways came to dinner and were very pleasant.  We chatted in the evening and they did not go home till twelve o’clock.  My Aunt Neate’s arm better, but my Aunt P’s cold very indifferent.  We had the Taunton Paper and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Thursday, 4 April, 1811

A dull looking morning and it began to rain after breakfast.  I made two cheese cloths and two cream cheeses Miss C Yeatman’s way, one with scalded cream and the other with raw.  Miss Ball calld and staid some time.  We were to have drank tea there, but my Aunt P’s cold was too indifferent for her to go out.  I workd in the evening.

Friday, 5 April, 1811

A beautiful day.  Mr Grosett and his three daughters calld.  After sitting a long time they walkd round the garden.  As we were coming in, Stevens came to say Mr and Mrs Collins were in the parlor.  Luckily the Grosetts took their leave, without returning to the house.  Mrs Collins was extremely pleasant, much more so than I expected to find her and he delightful, as he always is.  They staid more than an hour.  The contrast between them and the Grosetts is so very great I can hardly persuade myself they are the same human beings.  I workd all the evening.

Saturday, 6 April, 1811

A very fine morning.  John dug up the bed in the garden that I had the flowers in last year and I parted and new planted the wind flowers and put in a great deal of their seed that I saved last year.  Mr Anderdon calld and sat with us while we breakfasted.  Miss Strangways and Mr P Ball calld while my Aunt and I were in the garden.  They came there to us and walkd round it.  Miss S brought my Aunt a beautiful nosegay and a Frogmore rug, of her own making.  As soon as they were gone I went into the garden again and staid till lunch time.  When I came in I turnd the cream cheeses and then my Aunt and I walkd to Thorn with a pound of butter and some wind flower roots for Miss Strangways, who was not returnd from Henlade.  We staid a little time with Mrs S and in our way back stopd at Daniel Williams to ask for some ? ? to turn some cream cheese, which Mrs Williams gave us.  While we were at dinner, Mr Collins’ servant brought some capsicums, which Mr C has very kindly sent for the birds.  After dinner I waterd all the plants and went into the garden to finish the wind flowers.  While I was out, a Mr King calld about a farm he has to let near Lyme.  I did not see him.  I workd in the evening and went to bed very much tired.

Anemone simple

Sunday, 7 April, 1811

A dull looking morning, but fine after dinner.  It was so cold and the wind so piercing we were obliged to wrap ourselves up very much to go to Church. There was a slight fall of snow early in the morning, enough to make the hill quite white, but it was all gone before we were up. The two Miss Grosetts and Mrs Griffith calld just as we were having our luncheon.  They staid till it was time for us to go to Church, which we did, to Thorn.  The Service was half over before we got there.  We sat some time at Mrs Strangway’s after Church.  Mr P Ball walkd to our gate with us.  The hen under the calve’s house brought out one little chick and I found one alive and one dead in the nest in the hen house.  I brought the live one in and nursed it by the fire in a basket, but my Aunt Neate would insist on taking it to put under the hen (who has not done hatching yet) for the night.  I daresay it will be dead tomorrow.  Young Mr Chard came to bring back the book my Aunt lent him.  He walkd about the garden till we had done dinner and then came in and drank some wine.  He staid two hours.  My Aunt gave him some Sea Kale and a bottle of Elder wine to take home to his mother.  My Aunt P read the Bible aloud in the evening.

Monday, 8 April, 1811

A fine day, but as cold as it was at Christmas, with a very severe frost.  I turnd the cream cheeses.  The poor little chick was dead, as I supposed.  I wish I had persisted in keeping it in the house.  I workd all day.  I turnd my cream cheeses, which begin to look very nice.  Farmer Furber came to speak to my Aunt in the evening and sent us his Sherbourne Paper.  I workd in the evening.

Tuesday, 9 April, 1811

Fine, but very cold, with a severe frost.  The ice was so thick on the ponds that throwing a stone on it did not break it.  I turnd my cheeses and workd the rest of the morning.  Mr Grosett, his three daughters, Mrs and Miss Strangways and Mr P Ball drank tea and suppd here.  We playd Pope Joan and Loo.  I neither won or lost.  They went home about twelve.

Wednesday,10 April, 1811

A very cold, wet day.  I was in the cellar the whole of it, bottling the rest of the Mulberry wine.  I turnd my cheeses and read all the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s and the Taunton Paper.

Thursday, 11 April, 1811

Dry, but very cold.  Miss Strangways came directly after breakfast to spend the day.  One of the hens hatchd two chickens, which I put to the pullet that was sitting.  I turnd my cheeses and then cut out the heels and sewd one on of the pair of boots Miss S brought with her to make.  As soon as we had had our luncheon, my Aunt, Miss S and I walkd to Ruiston.  My Aunt bought five chickens there.  We were all so tired we could not work in the evening.  Mrs Brown brought the chickens my Aunt bought of her in the morning.  Miss Strangways went home a little after eleven.

Good Friday, 12 April, 1811

A very windy, cold and wet day, more like Winter than Spring.  I turnd my cheeses and then sat down to work.  We read Prayers at home, as the day was too bad to to go Church.  I cut out a new morning gown and began to make it.  I wrote a long letter to dear Emma in the evening.

Saturday, 13 April, 1811

A dull looking day.  I workd all the morning.  One of the hens hatchd another little chicken, belonging to the same brood I gave to the pullet and I put it her.  My Aunt P and I went to Mr Grosett’s before dinner.  There was only him and Miss Shaw at home, but Mrs Griffiths and Miss Kitty came from Taunton before we left them, the latter more vulgar  (if possible), than ever.  Ephraim took my letter to Taunton.  We tasted one of the cream cheeses, which is very disagreeable, so we have put it away to get more dry.  I workd in the evening.

Easter Sunday, 14 April, 1811

A threatening morning, but very warm.  My Aunt P and I set out to walk to Ruiston Church.  It raind a little when we left home and increased so much by the time we got half way that I returned, my Aunt P went on.  My plaid was quite wet through and my black feather compleatly spoilt.  My Aunt Neate and I read Prayers at home.  The rain ceased before my Aunt returnd and it was fine the rest of the day, but rained again in the evening.  John askd leave to go to Church, but returnd before supper.  My Aunt P read the Bible aloud in the evening.

We cut a very nice cucumber and had it at dinner.

Monday, 15 April, 1811

A delightful, pleasant day, tho not fine looking.  I let the pullet with the three chicks out of the basket and do not mean to confine her any more.  I was out in the garden till two o’clock, putting in flower seeds and workd the rest of the day.  Farmer Furber was so obliging to bring us the Sherbourne Paper.  It began to rain fast after dinner.  I workd in the evening.

Tuesday, 16 April, 1811

A showery day.  After feeding the live things, I sat down to work and workd also in the evening.

Wednesday, 17 April, 1811

A fine morning.   My Aunts both set out to go to Mr Grosett’s, but saw Mrs Ball, Miss Miriam and Mr Ball’s sister coming here, so my Aunt P returnd with them.  They staid more than an hour.  When they took their leave, my Aunt P went with them to meet my Aunt Neate.  I workd all the morning and evening.  The rain pourd down in torrents at night.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and the Taunton Paper.

Thursday, 18 April, 1811

A showery day.  I workd very hard the whole of it, to finish my gown, which I accomplished after supper.  My Aunt P has scallopd a trimming for it, which looks very neat.  Daniel Williams came to ask if my Aunt wanted any veal.  He told us that Farmer Furber’s house was very near being burnt down last night.  Fortunately a man riding by discovered the fire and alarmd the family, or they would most probably have been burnt in their beds.

Friday, 19 April, 1811

A very showery morning, but fine in the afternoon.  I began to alter a bonnet.  As soon as we had dined, my Aunt P and I went to ask poor Mrs Furber how she did after her fright and to see a man of the name of Hentenhall, who cut his leg shockingly in assisting at the fire the other night.  We found Mrs F very poorly and hysterical.  My Aunt gave her some Laudanum to take and desired Hentenhall to send one of his children for some rag and a bottle of Laudanum to wet the wound, with which he did.  I workd in the evening.

Saturday, 20 April, 1811

A beautiful day.  I was out in the garden till near two o’clock transplanting some of the Mignonettes from one of the pots in the hot bed to two others.  When I came in I went into the cellar to bottle the black currant wine, which employ’d me till dinner time.  I finishd my bonnet in the evening.

curtis-1787-antique-hand-col-botanical-print.-sweet-scented-resda-or-mignonette-29-183573-p[ekm]416x554[ekm]
Curtis 1787 Antique Hand Col Botanical Print. Sweet Scented Resda Or Mignonette (www.albion-prints.com)
Sunday, 21 April, 1811

A showery day, but fine between showers.  My Aunt P and I set out at one o’clock to go to Thorn Church.  It began to rain very hard, just as we passd the kennel.  I returnd and took shelter in the Summer house till the rain was over, my Aunt went on.  I read Prayers when I came in.  After dinner my Aunt and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s.  In our way we met Miss Strangways, two Miss Balls and Miss Tolson.  In our way back we stopd at Daniel Williams’s to speak about a roasting pig and met Mrs and Miss Strangways going home.  They turnd back and walkd a little way with us.  The Nightingales were singing enchantingly and my Aunt Neate heard a Cuckoo today.  I wrote in the evening.

I put the Daphne Laurel in the Melon bed.

Monday, 22 April, 1811

A fine day.  I was out in the garden all the morning.  Farmer Furber was so kind to send us the Sherbourne Paper.  I workd in the evening.  It raind all the afternoon.  I finishd bottling the black currant wine.

Tuesday, 23 April, 1811

A fine day with now and then a shower.  I was in the garden till near dinner time, putting in seeds.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and spent the evening with us.  We playd at Loo.  They left us about twelve.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Wednesday, 24 April, 1811

A beautiful day, but so hot it was quite oppressive.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorne.  In our way we calld at Farmer Furber’s and Hentenhall’s to see his leg, which is much better.  We found Phillip Ball at Mrs Strangway’s.  My Aunt askd Miss S if it would be pleasant to her to accompany us as far as Bath tomorrow and she could go on to Bristol the next morning.  She was delighted with the proposal and said she would be ready.  They all went with us to Farmer Dyer’s to enquire if my Aunt could have some wood there for heating the oven.  We walkd round their garden.  We took leave to the S’s at their door.  Phillip accompanied us to Mr Grosett’s, where we saw only the old man and Miss Kitty.  From there we went to Mrs Ball’s and sat a little while.  Miss Anna gave me the pattern of a beautiful collar she is working.  Phillip went with us afterwards to Daniel Williams’s to look at his pigs and then walkd home with us, but did not sit down.  We were compleatly employd the whole afternoon and evening packing up.

Thursday, 25 April, 1811

We got up very early to prepare for our journey.  It was fine when we got up.  I fed all the poultry and brought in five little chickens that were hatchd last night.  Miss Strangways came while we were at breakfast, soon after which it began to rain a torrent.  It was more like a water spout breaking than rain.  We waited till twelve o’clock, in hopes it would abate, but it did not, so my Aunt P and I kissd my dear Aunt Neate and with Miss S got into the Chaise.  I never saw any thing like the water in the roads and if we had not set out as we did, we should not have been able to cross Creech Moor, as the water was rising very fast.  The rain did not cease till we got near Street.  We had a very comfortable journey and arrived at Bath at nine o’clock.  We found my mother and dear Emma waiting for us at No 9 Westgate Buildings, both looking very well and very glad to see us.  We had our supper and went to bed, not so much tired as I expected.

View of Bath by Edmund Garvey (1740-1813) (c) Number 1 Royal Crescent; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
View of Bath by Edmund Garvey (1740-1813)
(c) Number 1 Royal Crescent; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 26 April, 1811

A fine morning.  Dear Emma took a place for Miss Strangways in the Bristol Coach before we were up.  Mama and she came while we were at breakfast and Emma was so kind to go with Miss S to the White Hart and saw her safe into the Coach.  My Aunt P and I went in Chairs to Michells, but walkd back .  We did not go out afterwards the whole day.  Mama and Emma did not leave us till past eleven.

Saturday, 27 April, 1811

A showery day, but fine between.  My Aunt and I walkd to Michells, where we staid a long time and afterwards we all four walkd about a great deal.  We went to Else’s to enquire about his house in the Bristol Road, calld on Mrs Phillip, who was not at home, met Mrs Eyre and Sophy, Mrs Beckford and Miss E Wiltshire in the street.  We calld on the Workmans, found only Rebecca at home, who had been to call on us.  She was delighted to see us.  As we were coming away, we met Mary on the stairs, who had not heard we were in Bath.  I never saw any one more astonishd and I thought she would never have done kissing us, she was so glad to see us.  I lined a bonnet for my Aunt in the evening.  We went to Miss Louella in the morning and saw all sorts of smart things.  I wrote to Henry.  We calld on the Suttons after dinner.  They were very friendly and she and Jane shewd us the whole house.

Sunday, 28 February, 1811

A fine day, with now and then a shower.  My mother, Emma and Rebecca Workman came in while we were at breakfast.  We all went to St. James’s Church and heard Dr Philott preach an excellent Sermon.  My mother, Emma and I calld on Mrs Cross.  I gave my letter to Mr Auther’s son in law to Mrs Cross and a particular friend of Henry’s to take to him.  We found Rebecca with my Aunt when we came back.  Mrs Phillip sent a note to ask us to drink tea there, either this evening or tomorrow.  My Aunt fix’d tomorrow.  We went to Church again in the evening and heard a very good Sermon from Mr Warner.  We had our supper a little after nine and went to bed early.

Monday, 29 April, 1811

A very showery day.  My Aunt and I went to Michell’s directly after breakfast, but were not detained there long.  Mr Wiltshire and Captain Chivers calld, the latter askd us all to dine with him next Friday and very kindly took my Aunt and me to see Mr Else’s cottage in the Bristol Road.  It is a sweet little place, but is only to be sold, not let.  My mother and Emma drank tea out and we went to the Admiral’s.  We found Mrs Phillip looking remarkably well and he better than I expected.  There was only ourselves.  We playd two rubbers at Cassino and then walkd home.  Fortunately it did not rain, but was very muddy and uncomfortable.

Tuesday, 30 April, 1811

A showery day again.  We went to Michell’s after breakfast and then walkd about a good deal.  While we were out, Mrs Sutton, Miss Wiltshire and Dr Davis calld.  We met Miss Savage in the street, who appeard glad to see us.  We calld on Mrs Flinn.  She knew us and said she was glad to see us, but wanderd very much while we staid.  As were were coming away, we met Mrs Williams, who said she had not been at home since the morning, tho I heard one of the children speak to her and heard her answer, as we went up the stairs.  My Aunt, Mama, Emma and I playd Cassino in the evening.  Miss Silverthorn came to take a gown of my Aunt’s to make and, as I fancied, some Lilac Sansenet to make her a pelisse, but instead of that my Aunt desired she would make it for me and a bonnet to match it.  We all went up to Miss Lovelock’s to chuse a trimming and the pattern of the bonnet.

Fashion plate for May 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for May 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, 1 May, 1811

A very wet morning.  We went between the showers to Michell’s where we were more than two hours.  He finishd the teeth and put them, after which my Aunt and I went to Lucas’s and chose a gown for Mrs Giles and one for my Aunt Neate.  I took my veil to Cox’s to be washd.  We went to Arnold’s the shoemakers.  My Aunt was in so much pain after dinner that she and I went to Michells.  He made a little alteration and as we came out of his house we met Dr Davis, who walkd back with us, but did not come in.  Emma and I went to Mr Webb’s for some Myrrh and burnt Allum for my Aunt’s mouth and got some powderd pumice at Hunt’s.  While we were out in the morning, Lady Durbin and the Major calld.  He left a note to say he would breakfast here tomorrow.  My Aunt was in a great deal of pain all the evening and her face swelld very much.  Arnold brought some Bath pattens.  I took a pair and gave him 2/6d for them.

Thursday, 2 May, 1811

A wet morning.  Major Durbin breakfasted here, but left us directly after.  Miss Silverthorn came and tried on my Pelisse and Lucas’s man brought some table cloths for my Aunt to look at.  As soon as they were gone, we went to Michell’s, who made an alteration that relieved my Aunt a little, but she was in so much pain she did not go out again and we said “Not at home” to Mr Wiltshire, Mr Anderdon and Dr Davis, who calld.  Emma and I went up to Mr Else’s to say my Aunt declind his cottage.  We also went to two or three other places.  Rebecca Workman calld after dinner and staid till near tea time.  Emma and I went to the library and to Bodes for some trimming for a cap I cut out and made for my Aunt.  I bought some purse twist there, for which I gave 4/-.  I cut out the skirt of a gown for Emma, which she made in the evening and I workd on my Aunt’s cap.

1812-neoclassical-Young-Ladies-at-Home - Wiki Images https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1812-neoclassical-Young-Ladies-at-Home.png
Young Ladies at home – Henry Moses

Friday, 3 May, 1811

A dry morning.  Miss Lovelock sent here my Pelisse and bonnet.  My Aunt P and I walkd as far as her house to have some alteration made in the bonnet.  In our way back we met Miss E Savage, who came to speak to us, looking very pretty and pleasant.  Mrs Cross was so kind to call with a letter for me from Henry, which she received from Mr Auther.  Mr and Mrs Williams calld and sat more than an hour and a half.  Luckily Mary Workman was here at the time.  My Aunt was much more friendly and obliging to Mrs W than I should have been.  I think he is very much improved.  Mr ? calld to say Mr Else has alterd his mind about the cottage and would let it, if she liked to have it.  Mr King and Mr Wiltshire calld.  The latter fixd with my Aunt for our going to Shockerwick Sunday, to stay till Monday.  I finishd my Aunt’s cap.  It began to rain about two o’clock and continued the rest of the day.  We were obliged to go in Chairs to Captain Chivers’, where we met the Workmans, Dr Davis and Major Durbin.  The Captain gave us a very handsome dinner and every thing very comfortable.  Dr Davis, my mother, Mary Workman and my Aunt playd one rubber at Whist and then the two Workmans, my Aunt and the Captain sat down to Quadrille.  The Major went away to a musical party.  Our Chairs came at half past nine and we came home.  It raind extremely hard all the way.

My letter from Henry was as affectionate as possible.

Saturday, 4 May, 1811

A wet morning.  My Aunt was very unwell and breakfasted in bed.  Rebecca Workman calld and sat a long time.  While she was here, Mr Anderdon calld.  When they were gone, we went to Michell’s and two or three other places.  My mother was not well, but came in to us before we went out.  Emma got me a yard of Black velvet for my head.  We playd Cassino in the evening.

Sunday, 5 May, 1811

A wet morning with a tremendous wind.  My mother’s cold was so indifferent, she did not get up all day.  Emma went to St John’s Church with us.  We calld at my mother’s in our way home, but could not stay long, as we expected the Wiltshire’s to send the Carriage for us at three o’clock, and we had to dress.  Major Durbin calld, but I did not see him.  He did not stay long.  After he went away we were denied to Captain Chivers, for fear of not being ready in time.  Miss Maria Wiltshire calld for us about four o’clock.  There was only a family party at Shockerwick.  Mrs Savage and her three daughters.  Poor Charlotte Wiltshire, I think, looks worse than when we saw her last year, but both herself and family think her much better.  The day went off much better than I expected.  Miss Helen was particularly pleasant and attentive and Mrs Savage is always agreeable.

Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards
Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards

Monday, 6 May, 1811

A dull looking morning.  We were down stairs in very good time for breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire went to Bath early in the morning, so we did not see him.  My Aunt was taken very unwell after breakfast, with great faintness and sickness.  I went up stairs with her and gave her some Hartshorn and water, which relieved her.  When we returnd to the Library, we found Charlotte there, looking very pretty, but certainly pale and thin.  We did not stay long after breakfast, as my Aunt wishd to go to Michell as soon as she could, she was in so much pain.  Miss Wiltshire and Miss E Savage accompanied us in Mrs Savage’s Carriage to Bath.  I was very unwell in coming home and thought I should have fainted.  When I got up stairs my Aunt gave me some Lavender drops, which did me good.  We went to Michell’s, who appointed us to go to him at five.  From there we went up to Jaggers, to see Cooper’s picture, that he is painting for Charlotte Wiltshire.  It is as like him, as it is possible for a picture to be, but altogether I like the one my Aunt has better.  We were caught in the rain in our way home and went into Mallards and had a cake.  From there we went to Lucas’s to chuse some table linen.  While we were there, Miss E Savage came in for some sprigd muslin.  I calld at my mother’s and found her in bed, but she got up and came in to us to dinner.  My Aunt and I went to Michell’s at five.  He was not quite ready, so we walkd about a little while and then went to him again.  He succeeded in relieving my Aunt very much.  We playd at Cassino all the evening.  The Wiltshire’s were so kind to lend us Wallace.

Tuesday, 7 May, 1811

A showery, uncomfortable day.  My mother and Emma came in directly after breakfast.  Miss Silverthorn came to try my Aunt’s gown.  She alterd my bonnet again and did something to my Pelisse. We lookd at the table linen and my Aunt chose those she meant to keep.  The Misses C and L Savage calld to bring us Mrs Wild’s publication, which the Wiltshire’s had lent us and we forgot.  My Aunt P read it aloud to us and I never was more surprised, as the whole of it makes completely against herself.  We did not go out the whole day, the weather was so wet and uncomfortable.  I workd on Emma’s gown all the morning and till supper time.

Wednesday, 8 May, 1811

A finer morning than we have had since we have been here, but it began to rain about one o’clock and continued the rest of the day, which prevented our going out.  Mrs Beckford and Mrs and Miss Eyre calld, but we had said “Not at home” as my Aunt was writing.  We all drank tea and suppd at the Workman’s.  My Aunt P went and came home in a Chair, but we braved the rain, which fell very fast when we went, but luckily had abated at night.  The Workmans, my Aunt and mother playd Quadrille.  Emma and I lookd on.  We spent a very chearful, pleasant evening.

Thursday, 9 May, 1811

A very showery day.  My Aunt and I went to Market.  From there she went to Lucas’s and I to my mother’s to ask if she would like to join us there, but it was so wet and muddy she declind it.  Miss E and L Savage came in while we were there.  We went to Dunns to order a cake and other things and from there to Admiral Phillip’s.  We met him and Mrs P in the Circus.  While we were speaking to them, Miss Baker came up, who said she had been to call on us, but could not find where we lodged.  The Admiral insisted on going back with us and it was fortunate for him he did, as it began to rain violently soon after we got in and continued a long time.  While we were there, Miss Fitch came in.  She had been to call on us and come to see the Admiral in search of us.  She kissd us very affectionately and appeard very glad to see us.  We sat there a long time.  We met Miss Wiltshire in the street, who was very friendly and pleasant.  We were caught in a violent shower coming home and I was so wet I was obliged to change my clothes as soon as I got in.  The Workmans dined and spent the evening with us.  They, my Aunt and mother playd Quadrille.  They did not leave us till twelve o’clock.

Arthur Phillip (1738-1814), Vice-Admiral, first Governor of New South Wales by Francis Wheatley, oil on canvas, 1786 (National Portrait Gallery).
Arthur Phillip (1738-1814), Vice-Admiral, first Governor of New South Wales by Francis Wheatley, oil on canvas, 1786 (National Portrait Gallery).

Friday, 10 May, 1811

It began to rain at eleven o’clock and did not cease till night.  Miss Silverthorn, Mr Lewsey and Mr Morris (from Lucas’s) came on business.  Mrs and Miss E Savage and Miss Helen Wiltshire calld.  They were all as pleasant as it was possible to be.  My Aunt and I got as far as Michell’s after dinner, but were obliged to wait some time in Bath Street in returning, owing to the violence of the rain.  I workd all day.  In the evening we playd Cassino.

Saturday, 11 May, 1811

A tolerable fine morning, which my Aunt and I took advantage of, to go to the Upper Crescent.  In our way we calld at the Admiral’s, who was not at home and at Mr Hartley’s.  He knew us and was very glad to see us.  We met Mr Eyre and Major Coffin.  The latter was very friendly and begd we would call on Mrs C, which we did, but she was not at home.  Mrs Eyre received us very kindly and gave us a very nice luncheon.  We sat there a long time.  In our way down the hill, we calld on Miss Fitch, who was out and left my Aunt’s veil at Mrs Fry’s to be mended.  It began to rain soon after we left Mrs Eyres and continued so hard we were obliged to stand up twice.  We calld at Captain Chiver’s.  He was not at home and we met him in the Carriage, after my Aunt bought a bottle of Vancourne’s cement.  By the time we got home, it was fine again.  My Aunt and I drank tea at Admiral Phillip’s.  We met a Mr Best and Miss Fitch.  The Admiral was very unwell, but playd Cassino.  We came home at half past nine o’clock. I bought a tuft of hair of Lewsey, for which I gave 7/-.  Captain Chivers calld.

Sunday, 12 May, 1811

A very fine day and very hot.  We all went to St. Michael’s Church, where we had a very good Sermon from Dr Phillott.  My mother and I sat in Mr Lye’s Pew with Mrs L and her son, my Aunt and Emma in another Pew.  After Church my Aunt and I calld on the Suttons and Mrs Gibson, who appeard very glad to see us.  The Dr was not at home.  When we came home, we found cards from Miss Baker, Sir Robert and Captain Baker and a note from Mr Wiltshire to ask us all to dine and sleep there next Wednesday, but my Aunt says she shall decline it.  We all went and sat half an hour with the Workmans before dinner and went to St. James’s Church in the evening,where we hard Mr Warner.  I was not so much pleased with him as last Sunday.  I wore my pretty new Pelisse for the first time.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Pelisse+1811&rlz=1C1CHWA_enGB625GB625&es_sm=93&biw=1517&bih=665&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=A3-LVZfePMSuUcnqpqAB&ved=0CCAQsAQ&dpr=0.9#imgrc=-zoOwznAqsBn-M%253A%3BkHS5qJj02C9oBM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fmedia-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%252F236x%252F3e%252F4f%252F7f%252F3e4f7fd280f07fffaf575e05d9118b9f.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.pinterest.com%252Fpin%252F395894623465513987%252F%3B236%3B380
1811 Pelisse

Monday, 13 May, 1811

A very fine day, but excessively hot.  My Aunt and I went out directly after breakfast to Miss Lovelock’s and walkd half over Bath before dinner.  We finishd almost all our commissions and calld on Mrs Davis, who was very glad to see us.  The Dr came in before we left her and my Aunt gave him a pressing invitation to Henlade.  My Aunt bought some gloves for herself and me.  The Workmans drank tea and suppd with us.  Just as we had done tea, Kitty calld to see us.  She only heard last night that we were in Bath.  I never saw her looking better or, indeed, so well.  How many exquisitely happy days were brought to my recollection by seeing her.  Days gone, never, never to return.

My Aunt, mother and the Workmans playd Quadrille.  I cut out a gown for Emma and she and I workd on it.

Tuesday, 14 May, 1811

A fine day with now and then a shower.  My Aunt and I went up to Miss Lovelock’s directly after breakfast.  We calld on my mother in our way, who was just coming to us.  As soon as my Aunt’s gown had been fitted, we went to Sir R Baker’s and found the whole family at home.  Sir R, Maria, Louis, Emma, George and Henry, the latter a very handsome, fine young man.  We staid there a long time and Sir Robert would shew us the house, which is a very pretty one.  Captain Chivers calld to take us to Lady Durbin’s.  She was not at home.  We took a ride on with him to Bathford Bridge and had a glimpse of the beloved Villa.  He set us down at the bottom of Mrs Beckford’s hill and we walkd up.  She was gone to Bath, but we saw the two Miss Hays, who were very kind to us.  They gave us some very nice luncheon.  Captain C was so kind to wait for us at the bottom of the hill and took us to the top of Broad Street.  We met Mr Wiltshire on horseback, who shook hands with us.  We calld on Mrs Wilkins and sat more than an hour with her.  She was very friendly, as was Mr W, who we only saw just as we were coming away.  It raind very  fast as we went home, but cleard up after dinner.  My Aunt and I drank tea at the Admiral’s.  We met Miss Fitch and a Mr Best.  They playd Cassino.  Mr P and I lookd on.  We came home at half past nine and fortunately had a fine night.

Batheaston Villa c 1825, courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston Villa c 1825, courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Wednesday, 15 May, 1811

A showery day.  My Aunt went out directly after breakfast by herself and brought me one of the handsomest Coral necklaces I ever saw, as a present.  Mrs Beckford calld, but did not stay long.  We packd a good many of our things.  In the midst of it, Admiral and Mrs Phillip calld, the latter ran up stairs, but did not sit down.  We all went out together, but divided in the Abbey Church Yard.  My mother and Emma went to Lucas’s to wait for us and we went to Market and two or three shops.  My Aunt bought two very pretty workd tippets for my mother and Emma.  In our way to Lucas’s, we met Major and Mrs Coffin, who detaind us a long time.  We went to Lucas’s and found my mother and E there, who joind and walkd about with us.  Met Miss E Savage, who stopd and had a little conversation.  It began to rain before we got home and was very muddy and uncomfortable.  While we were out, Miss Fitch, Captain Chivers and Mr Wiltshire calld.  After dinner my Aunt P and I went to the Workmans.  They were not at home.  When we returnd, we found them sitting with my mother and Emma at our lodgings.  They staid with us till past eight.  As soon as they were gone, we returnd to our packing.  Miss Lovelock very civily came down to wish us a pleasant journey.  We did not finish our packing till near twelve.  Dear Emma worked as hard as ourselves.  We went to bed so tired, we could not sleep sound.

Thursday, 16 May, 1811

A showery morning.  We were up early.  Dear Emma made our breakfast for us.  As soon as we had had it, my Aunt sent up to Butcher to come and pack the grocery, which he did.  As soon as it was done, my Aunt and I went to Michell’s to get a pair of springs.  In our way back, she bought a row of beads for bracelets.  My Aunt hired the servant of the house, (who was strongly recommended by her mistress as the best creature that ever existed) in Stevens’s place, who my Aunt does not mean to keep.  I took leave of my mother and beloved Emma with a heavy heart and we got into the Chaise about twelve o’clock.  On our return home, after having spent three weeks at Bath, as comfortably as possible, my mother and Emma being with us every day, immediately after breakfast and staying till bed time. We got home about nine after a very quiet journey, the latter part of which the road was so bad, it was really dangerous and the water was out at Creech, which made it appear more terrific.  We found my dear Aunt Neate very well and all the live things equally so, except my poor unfortunate dormice, who all three had made their escape last night.  I could hardly help crying when my Aunt N told me, but had command enough of myself to prevent it.  We sat up late, telling my Aunt all that has past since we went away, and went to bed so tired I could not sleep.  I had a long and complimentary letter from Captain Bussell to thank me for his purse.

Friday, 17th May, 1811

A dry day, but heavy and gloomy.  I got up much tired and with a bad headache.  One of the dormice was found asleep on the sopha this morning and, what is extraordinary, it has lost part of its tail, but apparently some time ago, as it is quite heald and the hair grown on it.  I walkd about the whole day and put in the seeds of the Convolulus major and nasturtiums, ones that we brought with us.  The dear pups are very much grown and are beautiful.  There are a great many young chickens and the Muscovy ducks lay every day.  The rabbit has got six young ones.  I was very lazy all day.  In the evening I began to line a straw bonnet for my Aunt P.  I wrote to my mother.

Diary 1811 Muscovy Duck and ducklings
Muscovy Duck and ducklings (hedgecombers.com)

Saturday, 18 May, 1811

A dull looking morning.  I fed the chickens before breakfast.  Miss Strangways calld in her way to Taunton while we were at breakfast, looking remarkably well.  It began to rain soon after she went away and continued all the morning.  I finished my Aunt’s bonnet and was very lazy all the rest of the day and evening.  Farmer Furber calld while we were at tea to speak to my Aunt Neate about the sheep.

Sunday, 19 May, 1811

A showery, uncomfortable day.  We read Prayers at home.  I did not feel well, having a very bad cold in my head, which was coming on when I left Bath.  I read after dinner, but in the evening we were not any of us well and we went to bed early.

Monday, 20 May, 1811

A fine day, tho a gloomy looking morning.  Mr Phillip Ball calld, just as the Chaise came to the door, to take my Aunt and me to Taunton.  Of course he did not sit down.  We walkd about a great deal and did all our commissions.  My Aunt paid all her bills.  I never in my life saw any thing so awkward as John.  He has not the least idea how to open a Chaise door or, in short, do any thing that a servant ought to do.  We came home at four o’clock, very much tired.  I took a nap after dinner which refreshd me very much.  In the evening I made part of a cap for my Aunt P from C Savage’s pattern, but she has mislaid the paper pattern, so I cannot finish it till we find it.  We went to bed early.

Tuesday, 21 May, 1811

There was a most tremendous storm of thunder, lightning and rain this morning at four o’clock.  The rain pourd in such torrents that it quite flooded the back part of the house and ran in a large stream into the parlor.  The day was gloomy and hot, with a mizzling rain in the morning.  We were agreeably surprised by seeing William Vassall just before dinner.  He is looking ill and the shadow of what he was the last time I saw him, but not at all alterd in manner.  He shook hands very kindly with me, but calld me “Miss Chapman” all day.  He told us a great many very amusing anecdotes about the French.  My Aunt could not prevail on him to sleep here, but he said if he did not go on tomorrow, he would spend the day here.  He left us at eight o’clock and shook hands very kindly with me.

Mrs Strangway’s maid came for one of the pups.  My Aunt sent them one like Miss.  I cut out a pattern of a bonnet in the evening.  A very fine Dorset ewe of my Aunt P died this morning of the black udder.

Wednesday, 22 May, 1811

A fine day.  I was out in the garden some time after breakfast.  One of the Muscovy ducks began to sit.  I gave her thirteen eggs.  I began to make a bonnet.  William Vassall did not come till three o’clock and was so ill he was obliged to lay on the sopha till dinner time.  He pressd my hand very kindly when I shook hands with him and calld me “Fanny” two or three times in the course of the day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways and the two Miss Grosetts calld before William came.  He left us at eight o’clock and paintedly avoided shaking hands with me when he went away, tho I twice held my hand out to him;  I workd in the evening.  I heard from my mother.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and the Taunton Paper.

Thursday, 23 May, 1811

A fine day.  I was some time in the cellar unpacking and putting away the wine that came from Taunton, after which I was out with the poultry and in the garden.   I wrote the rest of the morning and workd in the evening.

Friday, 24 May, 1811

A fine morning.  I was out the whole of it, nailing up the Rose trees and honeysuckles in front of the house.  My Aunt P and I attempted to go to Mrs Ball’s after dinner, but were caught in the rain and obliged to come back.  Mr King calld on my Aunt Neate and she fixd to meet him at Uplyme next Monday.  The other Muscovy duck began to sit on thirteen eggs today.  I workd in the evening.

Honeyusckle
Honeysuckle (bellebotanica.com)

Saturday, 25 May, 1811

A very fine day.  My Aunt P and I calld at Mr Ball’s, on Mr and Mrs Marsh.  We saw them, Mrs Ball, Miss B, Miss Anna, Mrs and Miss Strangways, their little girl and a Mr Palmer.  From there we went to Mr Grosett’s.  Mrs Griffiths and Miss Kitty were gone to Taunton.  We walkd round their garden and then came home.  Mr and Mrs Marsh, two Miss Balls, Mr and Miss K Grosett, Mrs Griffith, Miss Strangways and Mr P Ball drank tea and suppd here.  We had Whist and Pope Joan.  I won 5/6d at the latter!!!  The evening went off remarkably well.  Every body was in good spirits and appeard pleased and happy.  They did not leave us till after twelve.  Farmer Furber was so obliging to take my letter to my mother to the Post.

Sunday, 26 May, 1811

A showery day, but very fine between.  We read Prayers at home.  I was out in the garden a good deal.  Mr Chard calld after dinner, but I did not see him.  Miss Strangways, Miss M Ball and Mr P Ball came in after tea for a few minutes.  My Aunt P was not well enough to read in the evening.  My Aunt sent Mrs Ball two cucumbers.

Monday, 27 May, 1811

A beautiful morning, but very hot.  We all got up before six o’clock, as my Aunt Neate was going to see a farm at Uplyme belonging to Mr King.  We could not get the breakfast till near eight and at ten minutes past my Aunt Neate and I got into the Chaise.  We changed at Chard, which is a remarkable neat pretty town.  The hills between that and Uplyme are tremendous.  Mr King met us at the Turnpike near the farm, and we got out and walkd, as the road is impassable.  There is a very pretty view of the sea from the house, which is a poor cottage, very much out of repair.  I sat in the house with the farmer’s wife, a very nice, pretty, young woman, while my Aunt walkd over the farm with Mr King.  Just as we were going to to get into the Chaise to return, it began to rain very hand, with thunder at a distance.  We waited an hour in hopes it would hold up.  The rain did abate a little, but not enough for us to walk to the Turnpike.  The farmer very civily sent a boy to shew us the way, by a road which, he said, was a safe one, but I never saw such a one before and hope I never shall again.  When we got to Chard, they had no horses at home, so we were obliged to wait an hour while those that brought us were baited and they brought us home very well at a little after nine.  My Aunt had them put in the stable and gave the man a good supper.  He staid till day light, that the horses might rest.  I went to bed very much tired, as we had made fifty miles.

Tuesday, 28 May, 1811

A fine day, with the exception of two or three showers.  I was out in the garden a good deal.  Miss Ball, Miss Miriam and Mr Pine calld.  He is in the Navy, a handsome young man and appears pleasant.  Jenny caught six of the new ducks and I put them in the place with the fatting chickens.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld after dinner, but did not stay long.  Mr King calld on my Aunt Neate in the morning.  My Aunt P askd him to dine, but he was going on to Bridgewater.  I wrote in the evening.  My Aunt gave Mrs S a cucumber for her to take home with her.

Wednesday 29 May, 1811

A fine day, but a tremendous wind.  I was out in the garden after breakfast and workd the rest of the morning, after having broke some sugar.  We had the Taunton Paper.  I workd in the evening.  My Aunt sent Mrs Ball two cucumbers.

Thursday, 30 May, 1811

A fine day, with the exception of one shower.  We left off fires for the first time.  I finishd my bonnet and was out in the garden from dinner till near tea time, nailing up the Honey Suckles and Rose trees and cutting the grass by the house.  I workd in the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.  My Aunt sent Mr Grosett some asparagus.

Friday, 31 May, 1811

A gloomy day and very hot.  I cut some of the Geraniums and put the cuttings in pots.  The white hen began to set on five of the duck eggs my mother gave us.  Mr and Mrs Marsh, Miss Miriam Ball and little Strangways calld.  They walkd round the garden.  I gatherd a beautiful full blown cabbage rose.  There are four or five.  It raind a little after dinner.  I workd in the evening.

Fashion plate for June 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for June 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Saturday, 1 June, 1811

A very fine day.  I was out some time after breakfast in the garden and gatherd three ripe scarlet strawberrys.  Mrs and Miss Strangways came unexpectedly in the afternoon and drank tea with us.  The latter had walkd to Taunton and back to have a tooth out and was in a good deal of pain, but lookd remarkably well.  They went home about nine.  I mended a pair of stockings in the evening.

I had a very nice letter from my mother.

Whit Sunday, 2 June, 1811

A very wet day, which is unlucky for the poor holyday peaple.  We read Prayers in the morning.  It held up after dinner and was very fine all the afternoon and evening.  Mr Phillip Ball came in after tea.  My Aunt askd him to stay and sup, which he did.

Monday, 3 June, 1811

A fine day.  I was out after breakfast with the poultry, which I am every morning and wrote the rest of the morning.  We walkd to Mrs Strangways after dinner.  I took Miss S a root of Marvel of Peru and strawberry spinach.  They were not at home, so we put them down in the garden.  We calld at Mrs Furber’s, to ask her how she did. She was as merry as a Grig.  I finishd my Aunt’s cap that I began at Bath.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 4 June, 1811

A dull looking day with a very high wind.  I gatherd a great many roses and other flowers and made up the nosegays.  I brought in two pots of very nice Mignonette that I have raized in the hot bed.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and spent the evening here.  The Ruishton Club, with Farmer Furbers at their Head, came about six o’clock and paraded round the front of the house.  The farmer made some of the children dance.  One of John Thomas’s sisters, a very pretty little girl, danced very well.  One of the Miss Dyers of Thorn, a little girl with her and two of her brothers’ in law came to see the Club.  My Aunt askd Miss Dyer in. She did not stay long.  The farmer was  very tipsy and as gay as a Lark.  When they went away, they all gave three cheers and playd God Save The King.  The farmer threw his hat in the air and roard out “God Bless George, God Bless George”  We had a very nice Syllabub after dinner.  It began to rain about eight o’clock and was very wet all the evening.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 1/-.  The Strangways staid till near twelve in hopes the rain would cease and when they went away it was very slight.  I lent Miss S my boots and plaid.  We sat up till near one for Ephraim, who is Standard Bearer to the Club.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day.  We had a couple of very nice chickens of our own breeding and fattening.

Wednesday, 5 June, 1811

A fine looking morning, but after breakfast we had a very heavy shower with thunder, but at a great distance.  We had frequent showers in the course of the day, but I continued to be out in the garden between them.  I workd in the evening.  We had the Taunton Paper and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.  Miss Strangways sent to borrow Robinson’s History of Scotland.

Thursday, 6 June, 1811

Fine in the morning, but hard rain in the afternoon.  I was out till one o’clock.  The two Miss Grosetts calld and sat a long time.  My Aunt sent some asparagus and a cucumber to the old gentleman, who is very unwell, by them and I lent Miss Kitty a pair of pockets for the pattern.  I workd in the afternoon and evening.

Friday, 7 June, 1811

A very fine day and extremely hot.  I workd in the garden a little.  I took up two beautiful Indian rose trees and put them in pots.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and had some luncheon.  As soon as they were gone, my Aunt and I went to Mr Grosett’s to enquire after him and take him some strawberrys.  They were just set down to dinner, so we did not go in.  We saw Miss Shaw and Kitty.  We went into Farmer Smith’s and paid for the barley my Aunt had had, then we calld at the Balls.  The family were all gone out, except Mr Ball and Miss Miriam.  Mr B chose to come in and have a little chat with us, a thing he never did before, so often as we have been there.  We staid a long time.  Miss Tolson came in while we were there to spend the afternoon with them.  Miriam lent my Aunt the Sherbourne Paper.

One of the hens who had stolen her nest, brought out eight very nice strong chicks.  I workd in the afternoon and evening.  I heard from my mother.

Saturday, 8 June, 1811

There was a violent storm of thunder before we were up, which continued at a great distance for some hours.  It raind very hard and there was one shower of very large hail.  I cleard out the Muscovy ducks house and gave the one under the basket (who I let out) a new nest and washd all her eggs, but I fear she will not hatch, as they were quite cold.  We went to see Mr Grosett after dinner and my Aunt took him some asparagus.  We found him looking very ill.  He was down stairs, sitting on the sopha.  Mrs Ball was with them and Mrs and Miss Strangways came in before we came away.  As we came home, we saw Mr and Mrs Strangways getting out of their Gig at Mr Ball’s door and stopd to speak to them.  I workd in the evening.

Sunday, 9 June, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I went to Church at Thorne and were in very good time.  Mrs and Miss Strangways overtook us in the Lane.  We sat a long time at their house after Church and had some very nice cake and wine.  Miss Kitty Grosett sent up to beg a few wafers and a little wine for her father.  My Aunt P read aloud to us in the evening.  Jenny went home early this morning to her brother’s wedding, but returnd between ten and eleven o’clock at night.

Monday, 10 June, 1811

A fine day.  Mr Standent calld before we were up and left word he would go fishing and call again, which he did about one o’clock and had some broild mutton ham.  He was sent for at five o’clock in the morning to Mr Grosett, who he found very bad.  He staid here till three and then went to dine with them.  He returnd here about six and staid an hour.  He left Mr G better.  I took the eggs from the Muscovy duck that is ill and broke one.  They are very good, so I shall give them to the first hen that is inclined to set.  I began to make another pair of shoes.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay of roses and honeysuckles, which smell delightfully.  Farmer Furber lent us his Sherbourne Paper in the evening.

Tuesday, 11 June, 1811

A gloomy looking day.  Old Gale came and had some beer and meat.  My Aunt Neate gave him something.  One of Pope’s daughters brought two wood pigeons, which my Aunt bought of them.  They are very young, but will be fit to kill in a week she says.  I was out a good deal.  My Aunt sent away Stevens, and Pocock came to stay in her place till the one my Aunt hired at Bath can come.  I workd a little in the evening.

Wednesday, 12 June, 1811

A finish day.  I was out most part of the morning.  Jenny came in to give my Aunt warning, the ostensible reason for going Mrs Files’s bad temper, but I fancy the real one, a sweetheart she wishes to be nearer to.  Ephraim caught a very nice wood pigeon in the orchard.  Old Gale brought some eels that my Aunt bespoke yesterday.  They were remarkably good.  I workd a little in the evening.

We had the Taunton Paper.

I found a hen’s nest in the wilderness with thirteen eggs, which I took away and put 7 of the Muscovy duck’s eggs in their place.

Thursday, 13 June, 1811

A fine day, but a cold wind.  John came back from the Local Militia.  I wrote most part of the morning.  Mrs Strangways calld.  My Aunt askd her to stay and dine, but she was engaged to Mr Dyer’s sheep shearing.  I finishd my letter to my mother in the evening.  I heard from my mother.

Friday, 14 June, 1811

A fine day, but cold.  I was out almost all the morning and gatherd a beautiful nosegay of roses.  Captain Grosett calld and sat some time.  He was so kind to take my letter to my mother to Taunton.  Mrs Strangways dined and suppd here.  A girl came to offer herself in Jenny’s place, who my Aunt has agreed to take.  Jenny was out yesterday evening and the same this evening and when my Aunt spoke to her, she was very pert, besides which Mrs S told us she allowd her sweetheart to sleep here without any one’s knowledge but Stevens’.  This has determind my Aunt to send her away immediately, but unluckily the other cannot come till Monday, so she must stay till then.  My Aunt gave Captain G some strawberrys to take to his father, who is a little better.  She also gave Mrs S some black puddings to take home for Miss S, who returns from Hatch tomorrow and is remarkably fond of them.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Saturday, 15 June, 1811

A very fine day.  I was busy the whole of it, putting new mould to some of the plants and was so tired in the evening I could hardly move, but did a little work after tea.

Sunday, 16 June, 1811

A very fine day and very hot.  We all three walkd to Thorn Church, it being Sacrament Sunday.  We saw Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam.  We sat some time at Mrs S after Church and had some cake and wine and tasted Mrs Dyer’s new Cheese, which I do not like at all.  We went into Mrs S garden to shew it my Aunt Neate, as she had never been in it.  From Thorn we all walkd to Mr Grosett’s.  The Balls left us at their door.  We met Mr Standent in the Lane on horseback.  He had just left Mr G and thought he would not live many days.  We saw the Captain, Mrs Griffith, Miss G and Kitty, all in very good spirits, except Shaw, who lookd very ill.  After dinner my Aunt and I walkd to Mr Maine’s with some cucumbers for their sheep shearing tomorrow.  We saw Mr M and one of his daughters, who wanted us to go in and rest ourselves, but we could not, as we were going on to Daniel Williams to see how his wife did.  We found her down stairs and the baby a very nice little thing, tho only a week old.  I was very tired when we came home.  My Aunt P read aloud in the evening.

Sheep Shearing by Thomas Barker, c.1810-1812 (c) The Holburne Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Sheep Shearing by Thomas Barker, c.1810-1812
(c) The Holburne Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Monday, 17 June, 1811

A very hot day in the sun, but very cold in the evening.  I was out the whole day about the plants and did not do a stitch of work.  I packd a basket in the evening to go to my mother tomorrow morning, containing a mutton ham, a tongue, a couple of ducks, four cucumbers, a bunch of sage and four cabbages.  My Aunt had the third Stilton cheese made and sent some more Caudle to Daniel’s wife.  Pocock went home and took Mrs Dyer some cucumbers from my Aunt in her way.

Tuesday, 18 June, 1811

An intense hot day.  My Aunt Neate has had one of her fields mowd and had a very fine crop.  Ephraim took the basket for my mother to Taunton.  Mrs Strangways calld, but did not stay long.  She came to say the girl my Aunt hired the other day would not do for her.  It is very provoking.  I was not out much, but did a little work.  We had a fire in the evening at my Aunt Neate’s desire, who found herself chilly after being out in the heat of the day.

Wednesday, 19 June, 1811

A beautiful day.  I workd all the morning covering my garden bonnet and making it decent.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Ruiston after dinner.  We took Mr Grosett some very fine strawberries and cucumbers in our way, but did not sit down.  We saw only Captain Grosett.  My Aunt bought two nice pigs at Farmer Hill’s and paid her subscription to the Sunday School.  We were both so tired when we came home, we could hardly move.  I took some Calomel and Rhubarb at night.  We had the Taunton Paper, but I fear  shall not have the Bath Paper for some time to come, as Admiral Phillip is gone to Clifton.

Thursday, 20 June, 1811

A very dull looking day and cold.  I was very unwell the whole day, owing to the Calomel, but ill in the morning, so much so, I did not get up till after breakfast.  Mr Coles calld and spent half an hour here and was very chatty.  I wrote all the morning and did not go out the whole day or do a stitch of work.  I heard from my mother and wrote to her.

Friday, 21 June, 1811

A dull, uncomfortable day.  I was better, but did not feel quite well and was not so much out as usual.  I began to cover a bonnet for my Aunt Neate.  Ephraim gatherd a large quantity of very fine strawberries, the best of which we pickd and put the sugar to, to be preserved whole.

Saturday, 22 June, 1811

A fine day, but a very cold wind.  I put all the plants in their places and made the entrance look decent.  I made some cheese cloths and binders for my Aunt P.  I had the happiness to hear from my beloved William, who I hope has by this time got a safe and lucrative situation.

Photo0001
William Neate Chapman, Fanny’s brother

Sunday, 23 June, 1811

A very dull looking day, but it did not rain.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church.  We were there so much too early, the Church doors were not open.  We walkd about the Church yard till the Clerk came.  We saw Mrs Strangways and Miss Miriam Ball. Mr S and the latter took leave of us at Mrs S.  We went in with her and found Miss S writing.  They gave us some cake and wine.  My Aunt took Mrs Furber some cucumbers and we calld there in our way home and lookd at her cheeses. I heard from Harry to say he had had a letter from dear William.  H wrote out of spirits, his youngest boy being dangerously ill.

Monday, 24 June, 1811

A very cloudy day and cold.  We dined at one o’clock, to accommodate the servants.  I felt very languid and uncomfortable all day and took a nap on the sopha after dinner.  My Aunt P went down to Mr Grosett’s and brought back two News Papers, with the account of the Prince’s Grand entertainment.  Farmer Furber lent us his Sherbourne Paper also.  I put the sugar to three pound more strawberries to do whole.  About six o’clock there was the most tremendous and awful looking sky I ever saw, but it pleased the Almighty that the storm should pass from us, only two showers of rain falling.  I began a letter to my mother.

Regency fête, or John Bull in the Conservatory. A farmer (John Bull) and his family gape in amazement at the arrangements for the Prince Regent's fête on 19 June 1811 at Carlton House. British Museum
Regency fête, or John Bull in the Conservatory.
A farmer (John Bull) and his family gape in amazement at the arrangements for the Prince Regent’s fête on 19 June 1811 at Carlton House.
British Museum

Tuesday, 25 June, 1811

A beautiful day, with an excessive high wind.  I waterd all the plants and wrote most part of the morning.  Just before dinner Mr Anderdon sent up a large packet of letters he had been so kind to bring from Bath for us.  One of two sheets for me, from my mother, enclosing hers from dear William and one for each of my Aunts from her also.  I finishd mine to her and Ephraim took it to Taunton.  My Aunt sent Mr Anderdon some strawberries and 2 cucumbers.  I wrote to Harry.

Wednesday, 26 June, 1811

A beautiful morning and intensely hot.  My Aunt Neate began her sheep shearing.  Mr Anderdon calld, but my Aunt and I were shelling peas and not fit to be seen, so were denied.  He left word he should go to Bath this evening and would take any letters for us.  There was a very bad storm of thunder and lightening with violent rain.  The thunder did not continue long, but it rained after most all the afternoon.  I began to write as soon as Mr A left his message and wrote a very long letter to my mother.  My Aunt send Mr A some more strawberries and cucumbers.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Thursday, 27 June, 1811

A very wet morning but intensely hot.  My Aunt P began her mowing.  It ceased raining in the middle of the day and was a very fine afternoon.  After dinner my Aunt P and I went up to the sheep house to see them shear, as we had never seen such a thing before. If one could divest oneself of the pain and fear the poor sheep suffer, it would really have been a very pretty sight.  There were six shearers, among them John Thomas, who is remarkably handsome and two other young men, equally handsome.  They all dined and suppd here, as they did yesterday and Farmer Furber with them, who was as happy as a King, doing the honors.  They drank an immense quantity of Cider and staid till near one o’clock.  How some of them got home, I’m sure I can’t tell, for they must have been nearly unequal to walking.  When they got into the Lane they sang “God Save The King”.  Those going up the hill answered and it had a delightful effect from the number of echos.  We all went to bed as tired as ever we were in our lives.

Friday, 28 June, 1811

An intense hot day, with two or three slight showers.  The Muscovy duck hatchd four little ducks, which my Aunt Neate took from her that she might not leave the rest of the eggs.  Both the hens hatchd three of their white duck eggs.  I took the six little ones and gave to one hen and put all the eggs to the other.  Both my Aunt P and I were very unwell the whole day, but nevertheless were obliged to do a great deal about the house.  I am very nearly knockd up.  My Aunt P went down to Mr Grosett’s and took him some strawberries and sent a very large dish full  to Mrs Ball.

Saturday, 29 June, 1811

A gloomy looking day with a great deal of thunder at a distance.  The mowers went on with their work and tho there were one or two slight showers, they dried as they fell.  Miss Kitty and Captain Grosett calld while we were at tea and sat near an hour.  My Aunt gave them two cucumbers, two artichokes, a very large quantity of strawberrys and a plate of raspberries to take home with them.  My Aunt P was very unwell all day and gets no sleep at night, owing to a violent pain she has in the loins.

Sunday, 30 June, 1811

A fine day, tho gloomy looking and intensely hot.  My Aunt P was so unwell she did not get up till just before dinner.  Mrs Ball, Miss Miriam and Mrs Strangways calld and staid till our dinner was on the table.  My Aunt sent Mrs Grosett a plate of white raspberrys, the first we have had and a large dish of strawberrys, and two cucumbers to Mrs Ball.  Mrs S calld again after tea and brought Miss Maine with her and an old woman, the latter recommended very strongly as  a servant, till my Aunt can get a Dairy Maid.  She has agreed to take her and she is to come on Tuesday.  Mrs Strangways has been indefatigable in trying to get a servant for us.  Miss Maine is a genteel, well behaved girl.

Fashion plate for July 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for July 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Monday, 1 July, 1811

A very fine day and intensely hot.   My poor Aunt P was so ill she did not get up till after dinner and suffered violent pain the whole day.  My Aunt N was very busy with the Haymakers.  I workd a little in the morning in my Aunt’s room, for I was too unwell to exert myself much.  The Painted hen hatchd another white duck, which I took to the six with the white hen.  The hen that hatchd it found where it was in the evening and went to it, so they have two nurses and the dark hen has taken the deserted nest, so I hope she will bring out the other four.  The four dear little Muscovys are with their mother and are going on very well.  My Aunt P and I both took Calomel when we went to bed.

It thundered at a distance.

Tuesday, 2 July, 1811

A very fine day, but it thundered a great deal at a distance.  Pocock gatherd a large basket of strawberrys.  Sarah, the new servant came.  My Aunt P very unwell, but not in so much pain as yesterday.  Just before our dinner Sarah told my Aunt she could not stay, for she was very ill and the work was too much for her, so she went away again after milking!!  Miss Grosett brought a letter for my Aunt N.  She came in just as we had dined.  Miss Miriam Ball calld after tea and staid till near dark.

Wednesday, 3 July, 1811

A dry day, but gloomy looking.  A great deal of the hay was carried, for fear it should turn to rain.  We had Farmer Furber’s and Farmer Smith’s waggons.  Mr Kimberley came to offer his assistance and very obligingly  went back to Ruiston and fetchd his wagon and horses, that it might be done quickly.  Mrs Strangways calld and sat an hour in her way from Taunton.  She eat some strawberrys and took what remained home with her.  She very kindly enquired when she went home for a servant to supply Sarah’s place and sent a very tidy girl, who my Aunt agreed to take, tho she does not understand a Dairy, till she can get one that does.  My rabbit produced six little ones, but unluckily, being in a strange place and not having a good bed for them, they all fell out and I found them on the cold, wet stones, so that they will dye.  We had the Taunton Paper.  I heard from my mother.

Thursday, 4 July, 1811

A fine day.  All the little rabbits were dead this morning.  I put the other two together.  The new servant Jenny came.  I gatherd three quarts of raspberrys, some for jam and broke a great deal of sugar.  My Aunt sent Mr Grosett some strawberrys and raspberrys.  I waterd all the plants.  Farmer Furber lent us his Sherbourne Paper.

Friday, 5 July, 1811

A very fine day.  We got up very early to go to Exeter to see a house  my Aunt had heard of she thought would suit her.  My Aunt P and I got into the Chaise a little before eight o’clock and arrived at Stoke Cottage about two, where we found the landlord waiting for us.  It is a sweet little place, but not a convenience size for servants and no possibility of making any, besides which it is on so tremendous a hill, that that alone would have prevented my Aunt’s taking it.  We drove on to Exeter and enquired about two more houses, one within a mile of the city, the other at Star Cross, neither of which being likely to suit my Aunt.  We did not go to see them.  We walkd about Exeter two hours and a half, had some tea at the Old London Inn and then went back to Culhampton with the same horses that brought us, a delightful pair, and the civilist and most accommodating driver I ever met with.  The Mistress of the Inn was so extremely obliging and attentive, it induced my Aunt to sleep there, instead of going on to Wellington, which we could have done.  We walkd about the town while our supper was getting ready, which was very good and nicely cookd and had a very comfortable night’s rest.

View of Exeter by William Traies (c) Plymouth City Council: Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
View of Exeter by William Traies
(c) Plymouth City Council: Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 6 July, 1811

A very fine day.  We breakfasted about eight o’clock at Culhampton and had the same good horses and driver that we had yesterday.  He told us of a house that he thought might be to let and drove us to it.  The Mistress of it a most interesting young woman, very obligingly shewd it us and promised if Mr Salter (her husband) should at any time let it, she would inform my Aunt.  When we changed horses at Wellington we went to see a house two miles from Wellington, but it was a miserable old place.  We also lookd at a house at Bishop’s Hall, which was worse.  We stopd at Taunton, went to the Post Office, Mr Cox’s and the Market and then came home about five o’clock, after as pleasant a ride as possible.  We found my Aunt Neate hard at work in the Hay field, all of which was carried this evening.  I went up with my Aunt to look at the Rick, which is as beautiful and as nearly as large again as it was last year.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld in the evening, the latter looking unwell.  They did not stay long.  We found Mrs Giles very unwell on our return.  I had the happiness of hearing again from my dear William.  Mr Porcher enclosed me the letter from Winslade.

Sunday, 7 July, 1811

A fine day.  Something has taken away three out of seven of the little ducks.  We dined between one and two and went to Thorne Church at three, which was as full as it could well be, partly owing I fancy, to the Ruiston Singers being there.  In our way back we went into Mrs Strangway’s with young Miss S, Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam.  We had not been there long, when Mrs Dyer, her two daughters, Mrs Jacobs and two of her children came in.  Young Miss Strangways and the Balls walkd home with us to see the Stilton cheeses.  My Aunt gave Mrs S the receipt to make them.  My Aunt took Mrs Strangways some raspberrys.

Monday, 8 July, 1811

A fine day.  Two more of the little ducks have died, so I have taken the only two remaining and put them to the Muscovy Duck.  I wrote almost all the morning and have not done a stitch of work this week past.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 9 July, 1811

A very fine day.  I wrote a good deal in the morning.  Mr King calld on my Aunt Neate and was here some hours.  My Aunt sent Mrs Strangways and the Balls some cucumbers and artichokes, also to Mrs Grosett, with some raspberrys.  I wrote to Harry.  Mr Standent came and drank tea with us.  He repeated part of Mr Southey’s poem to us.  Before he went away he lookd at another sheep of my Aunt Neate’s that died this morning, making the 5th.  After Mr S went away, my Aunt and I took Mrs Ball a plate of raspberrys.

Wednesday, 10 July, 1811

A very hot day.  Jenny (who came as kitchen maid) is very unwell.  My Aunt gave her some salts.  My Aunt had some black currants gatherd and I pickd some.  She and I went to Mr Smith’s after tea to take him a draft she owed him, but they were all gone to bed.  We staid to speak to Mrs Ball, who was at her door.  Mrs Strangways and Miss Ball also came out and we stood chatting half an hour.  We went to bed early.

Thursday, 11 July, 1811

A very fine day.  Jenny worse today and my Aunt gave her some more Salts.  My Aunt P, Pocock and I pickd all the black currants for the wine.  Just as we had done them, Miss Ball and a Miss Waters calld.  The latter a fine girl.  They staid about an hour.  Miss B brought a beautiful Bath cheese her mother had had the kindness to make for us.  As soon as we had dined, my Aunt, Pocock and I squeezd half the black currants and put the water to them.  My Aunt was so very unwell after tea, that I persuaded her to let Pocock and me finish the currants, which we did by eleven o’clock.  I was very much tired.

Friday, 12 July, 1811

An intense hot day.  Poor Jenny was so bad my Aunt sent for her mother to come and stay with her.  We took the Draft to Farmer Smith before dinner.  About six o’clock we walkd to Mr Dyer’s at Thorn to get some more wood.  We met Mrs and Miss Strangways coming to drink tea with us.  They walkd back to Mr Dyer’s and then came home with us.  They staid and suppd and did not go away till near twelve, when we went up to see poor Jenny.  She was in as high a fever as possible and suffering very severely.  We put a blister on her chest and gave her a saline mixture and were with her till past one o’clock.

Saturday, 13 July, 1811

A very gloomy day.  Jenny still very ill.  Her blister rose very nicely.  I wiped it after breakfast and let out a great deal of water, which relieved her very much.

We have had such a sick house, I have not had time to write or do any thing but run up and down stairs.

Thursday, 18 July, 1811

Not a very fine day.  I compleated my thirty sixth year.  Poor Jenny a little better today, but she has been very bad.  Mrs and Miss Comber calld.  Luckily I saw them and desired John to say “Not at home”.  Farmer Furber lent us his Sherbourne Paper.  It began to rain while we were at dinner and pourd all the evening and night.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Friday, 19 July, 1811

A tolerable fine day, but we had a slight shower in the morning.  I felt depressd and uncomfortable.  Jenny a great deal better today.  I missd one of the little Muscovy ducks, but whether it was lost in the rain yesterday or a rat has taken it, I can’t tell.  Pedro killd one of the little chickens this morning.  I had him whipt for it, so I hope he will not do it again.  I heard from my mother and wrote to her and Cooper.  My Aunt sent Mrs Strangways some cucumbers.  Just as we were going to tea, Mrs Ball, Mr B’s sister and a Mrs Pine came in.  Soon after them, Mrs and Miss Strangways.  They had all drank tea, so while we had ours they eat some fruit.  The two latter suppd here and did not go away till near twelve o’clock.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Captain Cooper
John Hutton Cooper

Saturday, 20 July, 1811

A gloomy looking morning.  Jenny came down stairs and is a good deal better.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Creech to return Mrs Comber’s visit.  We met Mr and Mrs C and Miss Charlotte in the Carriage, going to Taunton.  They said Miss C was at home, so we went on, but she was denied.  We afterwards walkd past Dr Innis’s house, which is a very ugly one.  We had not been at home half an hour when it began to rain very fast and continued to do so the whole evening.  We went to bed very much tired.

Sunday, 21 July, 1811

A gloomy looking morning.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church at three o’clock.  They were in the middle of Psalms when we went in.  The Church was extremely crowded and it was so intensely hot that a young man in the Gallery fainted away.  The Ruishton singers were there.  We saw Mr and Mrs Strangway, Mrs and Miss S, Mr Ball, his son and two daughters and all the Dyers.  We sat half an hour with Mrs S in our way home.  Miss Toulson and the youngest Dyer were there.  It rained a little in the evening.

Monday, 22 July, 1811

A fine day.  I was busy all the morning finishing the vinegar.  Mrs C P Anderdon calld and with her Miss King and Miss Jeffery.  I did not see them.  My Aunt P walkd to meet Hannah, who came from Bath by the Coach.  Betty the new Dairy Maid also came.  As soon as we had dined, my Aunt P and I went to Farmer Furber’s and sat near an hour with Mrs Anderdon and her friends before they went away.  Hannah brought a letter from my mother and three of the prettiest pin cushions I ever saw as a present also, from my mother to us.

Tuesday, 23 July, 1811

A fine morning.  Pocock and I cleard out the Store Room and made it look decent, which took up all the morning.  After dinner I mended a sheet for my Aunt.  It raind in the evening

Wednesday, 24 July, 1811

A beautiful morning.  John cleard out the hen house and I put clean straw in the nests.  Mr Grosett and his two daughters came up in the Cart and staid at least two hours.  They had some luncheon.  Just as we were beginning to eat it, Miss Strangways and Mr P Ball came in.  They went away when the Grosetts did.  I miss one of the old Muscovy ducks and cannot find her any where.  I took Calomel when I went to bed.

Thursday, 25 July, 1811

A very fine day.  My Aunt had a general search made for the Muscovy duck and John found her sitting under the stairs in the ? house.  I hope she will be more lucky than she was last time.  Mr P Ball came in the evening to assist in taking some of the weed out of the Canal, that we may have a day’s fishing tomorrow.  He drank tea and suppd here.  I heard from Cooper with the Draft for my mother.

Friday, 26 July, 1811

A very fine day.  Mrs Ball, Mr Phillip and his three sisters came up at eleven o’clock to fish.  Mrs and Miss Strangways about an hour afterwards.  They all dined here, except Mrs B, but she came up again in the evening.  We all went out after dinner and fishd till past eight.  They caught a great many fish, some very fine Carp and Perch.  They all suppd here and went home about twelve, apparently very pleased with their day’s sport.  Phillip Ball must have been very tired, as he had to bait all the hooks, take all the fish off and was indefatigable the whole day in obliging and pleasing.  I wrote to my mother and enclosed the Draft from Cooper.  Ephraim took it to the Post.

Landscape with a fishing Party by a Waterfall by George Mullins, 1772 (c) The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Landscape with a fishing Party by a Waterfall by George Mullins, 1772
(c) The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 27 July, 1811

A very fine day, but intensely hot.  I sat still a good deal, being very tired and did a little work.  One of the hens brought out eight little chickens.  There were two more in the nest, which I put in a basket.  It was the hottest night I have felt this year.

Sunday, 28 July, 1811

A very hot day.  My Aunt P and I with Pocock, Hannah and John, walkd to Thorn Church at nine o’clock.  We were obliged to wait in the Church yard half an hour.  We sat some time at Mrs Strangway’s after Church, as did Miss Miriam and Mr P Ball.  We all had some cake and wine.  The Balls walkd home with us as far as the gate, but could not come in.  I found one of the little chickens, that were hatchd yesterday, dead and we were obliged to have one of those I brought in killd.  My Aunt Powell read the Bible aloud in the evening.

Monday, 29 July, 1811

A very hot day, but gloomy looking.  My Aunt and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s in the evening and took Mrs Furber some cucumbers to pickle.  She was not at home, but we saw the Farmer.  He lent us his Sherbourne Paper.

Tuesday, 30 July, 1811

A very hot day.  Mr P Ball calld directly after breakfast to say he had been to see Binfords yesterday and gave us a long account of it.  From his description, it is a pretty place, but retirement itself.  I workd a little in the evening.  I heard from my mother.

Wednesday, 31 July, 1811

A very fine day and extremely hot.  I began to write to my mother, but was so lazy and sleepy I could not go on with my letter.  I workd in the evening.  The Balls sent us some coddlings for pies.  The boy  took back a small white Geranium, a Marvel of Peru plant and a very nice Verbena for Miss Anna.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Fashion plate for August 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for August 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Thursday, 1 August, 1811

An intense hot day.  I wrote all the morning.  After tea my Aunt P and I carried Mrs Furber some cucumbers to preserve.  We then went to Farmer Smith’s.  He was not at home.  We calld at the Ball’s, found only Miss Anna at home, but while we were sitting there the old man came in and was as obliging as possible.  Miss Anna gave me a beautiful bunch of Indian roses and jasmine.  From there we went to the Grosett’s.  The old gentleman was gone into his own room, so we did not see him.  Captain Grosett arrived yesterday.  Phillip Ball was there and walkd home with us, but did not come in.  I workd in the evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother. My Aunt Neate has suffered very much all day with the Rheumatism in her hand.

Friday, 2 August, 1811

A very fine day, but a great deal of wind.  My poor Aunt Neate’s arm was so bad this morning she could not dress herself.  I put on all her cloaths for her.  For a wonder, I workd almost all the morning and evening too.

Saturday, 3 August, 1811

A threatening morning with a mizzling rain now and then.  My Aunt Neate’s arm a little better.  My Aunt P and I got into a Chaise to go and see Binfords at nine o’clock.  We were terribly anoyd with the dust in going.  The driver did not know the way any more than we did and turnd out of the high road too soon, by which means he was obliged to take the Chaise up a mountain, where a Carriage had never been before.  My Aunt and I walkd.  The country is most beautiful and romantic, but the house bad and out of repair and so extremely retired that we should not have seen a human being but those who were coming to the house.  Mr Tynte met us there and was extremely polite and obliging.  My Aunt did not tell him the house would not suit her, but meant to write to that effect in a day or two.  From Binfords we went to Cheddon, passing in our way thro Monkton by Mr Brickdale’s, (which is a sweet place), Hestercomb, Mr Warne’s and Mr ?.

The house at Cheddon is quite new and very pretty, but not a tree or shrub near it.  I can’t say I should like to live there, but my Aunt P seems to like it very much.  A very obliging old woman who lives in a pretty cottage opposite, gave us a beautiful sprig of Myrtle in full bloom, with which her cottage is coverd.  From Cheddon we went on to Taunton, where it raind so excessively hard we could not do any thing.  It really pourd down in torrents and we got wet thro going from the Post Office to Mr West’s.  We arrived at home at five o’clock and found my Aunt Neate’s arm better.  We went to bed early, a good deal tired.

Sunday, 4 August, 1811

A fine day, with the exception of a shower or two in the morning.  While we were at luncheon, Mr Grosett, his daughters and the Captain calld.  They staid so long that we did not get to Thorn Church till the Service has half over.  We sat half an hour at Mrs Strangway’s afterwards, as did Mrs Ball, Mr Phillip, Miss Miriam and young Mrs Strangway, when we all walkd together to our gate.  They were going to Mrs Ball’s to tea and we came in to dinner.  It raind extremely hard in the evening and, I believe, all night.

Monday, 5 August, 1811

A fine day, with a very high wind.  My Aunt Neate’s arm better.  Mr Phillip Ball calld, just as we were going to breakfast, to ask for commissions for Taunton.  We were agreeably surprised at noon by a visit from Major Durbin, who is looking remarkably well.  He was going to Teignmouth and calld in his way, had some luncheon , staid two hours and then went on, saying he would sleep here Wednesday.  Mr P Ball very kindly calld again with change for a Draft, which he had got for my Aunt.  I gatherd a nosegay.  Mrs and Miss Strangway drank tea and suppd here.

Tuesday, 6 August, 1811

Tolerably fine, with a few showers in the morning.  Taunton Races are today and tomorrow.  I wrote all the morning.  After dinner my Aunt P and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s and old Berry’s.  I never saw Mrs Furber in such good spirits.  When we came home, we found Mrs Ball, Miss Ann and Miss Miriam here.  They had brought us a Cream cheese and staid till we had drank tea.  I workd a little in the evening.  We had Farmer Furber’s Sherbourne Paper. I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Wednesday, 7 August, 1811

A very fine day.  Miss Anna Ball calld to make their excuses for this evening.  They were to have drank tea here, but are going to the Play.  I was out till dinner time nailing up the honey suckles in front of the house.  Mrs and Miss Strangways drank tea and suppd here.  Major Durbin came about nine o’clock and was very chearful all the evening.  The Strangways went away about twelve.

Thursday, 8 August, 1811

A very showery day.  Major Durbin went away before breakfast.  My Aunt saw him before he went, but I was not down stairs.  Mr Phillip Ball calld and sat two hours.  I cut out and began to make a pink Tiffany cloak my Aunt Neate has kindly given me to put my black lace on.  I workd all the evening.  My Aunt P discharged John.  I am very glad he is gone, for he was the most disagreeable servant I ever saw and has done more mischief in the short time he has been here than George did the whole time he lived with my Aunt.  He broke the handsome lamp in the passage last Monday.

ma-31907582-WEB - pink cloak
A pink cloak (Los Angeles County Museum)

Friday, 9 August, 1811

A showery morning, but fine in the afternoon.  My Aunt P had another little pig killed for pork.  Mr Pinchard’s son, of Taunton, calld to enquire why my Aunt had parted with John.  They are going to take him again as a servant.  If he conducts himself as he did here, I do not think they will keep him long.  My Aunt P and I walkd down to Mr Ball’s after tea. to pay Miss Anna the postage of a letter.  We did not go in, but had a little chat with Mrs B, Miss Anna and Miss Miriam at the door.  I workd in the evening.

Saturday, 10 August, 1811

A very wet morning.  I workd almost all day mending things for the wash.  It cleard up in the afternoon and was fine.  I heard from my mother.  While we were at tea, Miss Strangway, Miss Miriam and Mr P Ball calld.  Miss S brought us some Siberian crabs to preserve and some Jack apples.  I put the two rabbits together.

Sunday, 11 August, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church at ten o’clock.  We sat a short time at Mrs Strangway’s afterwards, as did Miss Miriam and Mr P Ball.  We all walkd together as far as Mrs Balls door, where the Strangways were going to dine.  We went on to Mr Grosett’s and sat half an hour with them.  My Aunt P and I walkd up and down the Lane a long time after tea.  I wrote to my mother and Ephraim took the letter to Taunton.

Monday, 12 August, 1811

A tolerably fine morning, but it began to rain about one o’clock and continued the rest of the day.  We were engaged to spend the evening at Mr Comber’s, but were obliged to send an excuse on account of the rain.  I workd all the morning making a pair of long sleeves for my ? gown and in the evening mended stockings.  We had Farmer Furber’s Sherbourne Paper.

Tuesday, 13 August, 1811

A mizzling rain most part of the day, with intervals of sunshine.  I workd all the morning.  Mr Gale came to look at my Aunt Neate’s lambs, some of which he has agreed to take.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld after tea and brought us some plumbs.  They did not stay more than a quarter of an hour.  I workd in the evening.

Wednesday, 14 August, 1811

A beautiful day.  While we were at breakfast, my Aunt P determind to go to Ashhill to look at a house that is to be let there.  She went to ask Mrs Strangway to go with us, as she has a friend who lives at Ashhill.  Just as were going to step into the Chaise, Mr Collins calld.  He was as polite and agreeable as usual, but looks ill, I think from his late fall.

The house we went to see has too many disadvantages to make it eligible for my Aunt.  Mrs Strangways insisted on our going to her friend, Mrs Summers to see their house, which they have just taken.  It is very comfortable, but not the kind of place we should any of us have liked.  We set Mrs Strangways down by Thorn Water and them came home.  I workd in the evening.  I heard from my mother, two letters.

Thursday, 15 August, 1811

A beautiful day.  I took Pedro to the Marle pond to try to teach him to go in, but he would not.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  My Aunt P and I went fishing after dinner and staid out till near eight o’clock.  We each caught one small fish, but had not a bite besides.  When we came home, we found Mr Grosett and his two daughters here.  They staid and drank tea, but went away before it was dark.

Friday, 16 August, 1811

A fine day.  Mr Phillip Ball calld and staid two hours.  I workd in the morning.  In the afternoon, Mr P Ball, Miss Miriam and Mr Marreat calld, the latter brought his account for the newspaper.  My Aunt askd them to stay and drink tea, but they declined it.  We had nearly finished ours when Mrs and Miss Strangways came in.  They had some tea with us and staid and suppd.   They went home a little after eleven.  Miss S brought us three beautiful roses, which are a rarity now.

Saturday, 17 August, 1811

A fine day.  I workd hard all day making a new covering for my parasol and putting it on.  My poor Aunt P has a bad pain in her face.  I workd on my stockings in the evening.

Silk parasol, made 1810-1811, V&A
Silk parasol, made 1810-1811, V&A

Sunday, 18 August, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt P’s face so much sweld and so painful, she breakfasted in bed and did not go to Church, but Pocock and Betty did, to Ruishton Church.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld while we were at tea and had some with us, but would not stay to supper.  Miss S brought us a beautiful little bouquet of roses, mignonette and geranium.  My Aunt sent them some plums and greengages in the morning.  While we were at supper, Mr Perry sent up a letter to me and a Bath Newspaper to my Aunt Neate from my mother.  He arrived at Farmer Furber’s this afternoon and goes away again tomorrow morning.

Monday, 19 August, 1811

A showery morning with thunder at a distance and intensely hot.  I workd part of the morning and evening.  I wrote to my mother.

Tuesday, 20 August, 1811

A gloomy looking day, but no rain. I bathed my feet in the morning.  Miss Strangways calld and had some luncheon with us.  While we were at tea, Miss Anna and Miss Miriam Ball came in.  They had some tea with us and my Aunt prevaild on them to stay and sup.  They went away about eleven o’clock.  My Aunt P had a letter from J Appleton to tell us of the death of poor Susan Blackburn after most dreadful sufferings, being literally starved to death, her complaint being a stricture on the throat, which prevented her swallowing even liquid. We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath paper again for the first time since they went to Clifton.  I took Calomel.

Wednesday, 21 August, 1811

A showery day and wet evening.  I workd and wrote in the morning.  Mr Perry calld after dinner and sat half an hour.  I workd in the evening.  I wrote to my mother and Mr Perry was so polite to take my letter to Bath for me.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Thursday, 22 August, 1811

Showery in the morning, but fine afterwards.  Just as I had made the breakfast, Mrs Strangways came in.  She had some with us and went away soon after.  Mr P Ball calld and sat an hour.  I lookd over my black things to see what I could make up again.  Poor Susan died last Thursday, the 15th.  I workd in the evening.  I took Calomel again.

Friday, 23 August, 1811

A fine day and intensely hot.  I workd all day on black work.  Miss Kitty Grosett sent for some Sal Volatile, the old gentleman was so unwell.  Daniel went to Taunton to fetch Mr Standent.  I workd till dusk and wrote in the evening.  I heard from my mother.

Sal Volt
Sal Volatile (https://collinsnoname.wordpress.com)

Saturday, 24 August, 1811

A mild, soft rain almost all day, with very short and few intervals of fine.  I workd all the morning.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and suppd here.  It was chilly in the evening and my Aunt had the fire lit in the dining room, where we playd Pope Joan till supper time.  They went away about twelve.

Sunday, 25 August, 1811

A fine day.  I read the Prayers to myself in the morning.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Ruishton Church at three o’clock.  Just at the end of the Lane we Mrs and Miss Strangways going there also.  We walkd together and they sat in our Pew.  The Miss Combers were there, looking most beautiful.  The Strangways, Mr P Ball and his three sisters walkd home with us as far as Mr Ball’s door, where we parted and we came home to dinner.  Mr Nicholson performed the Service and tho he is far superior to Mr Winslow, I do not like his delivery.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 26 August, 1811

A beautiful day.  I was down stairs just as the clock struck eight!! and workd all day, very hard at black work.  Mrs and Miss Strangways drank tea and suppd here.  After tea we walkd with them as far as Mr Toulson’s house, which we went over, as he was not at home.  It is a sweet little cottage, but very small.  After we returnd we playd Pope Joan till supper time.  Miss S brought us a pot of Mignonette plants and lent me a pair of her stays to try on.  They went away a little after eleven.

Tuesday, 27 August, 1811

A gloomy looking morning and very warm. I workd all day upon the mourning.

Wednesday, 28 August, 1811

A fine day, but one or two showers in the evening.  I workd all day and in the evening on the mourning.  We had Farmer Furber’s Sherbourne Paper, Mrs Phillip’s and the Taunton Papers.

Thursday, 29 August, 1811

A very showery morning, but a beautiful afternoon.  I workd all day again on the mourning and finishd it sufficiently to put on tomorrow.

Friday, 30 August, 1811

A very fine day.  I pickd a good many elder berries for the wine and workd afterwards.  Lord Hinton calld, but I did not see him.  He walkd here from Hatch.  My Aunt P and I drank tea at Mrs Strangways.  We met Mrs and the two Miss Combers, Miss Ball, Miss Miriam and Mr Phillip.  I lost 3/- at Loo.  We all walkd together as far as the top of the Lane, as we were afraid of coming across the fields, on account of the dew.  Mr P Ball walkd home with the Combers, and his sisters came on with us as far as their own house.  We found a comfortable fire and supper.  My Aunt N was gone up stairs, but came down again.

Saturday, 31 August, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt had the elder wine mixd and boild, which was not finishd till our supper time.  I workd all day and in the evening too.

Fashion plate for September 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for September 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 September, 1811

A cloudy day, but it did not rain.  My Aunt P and I went to Church at Thorn at three o’clock.  Pocock and Mrs Giles went to spend the day at Pocock’s mother’s.  Mrs and Miss Strangways, Miss Miriam Ball and little Eliza walkd home as far as our gate with us.  They went on and we came in to dinner.  Betty waited on us and very tidily, considering.  The Muscovy duck brought out four little ducks out of six eggs.  I wrote in the evening.  Pocock brought me a beautiful bunch of myrtle in blossom and some plants of Winter Cherry.

Monday, 2 September, 1811

A fine day.  I workd all day, after having put the plants of winter cherry in the ground and waterd the other plants.  In the evening I wrote a long letter to my mother.  We had Farmer Furber’s Paper.  My Aunt sent Mrs Dyer of Thorn a plant of Marvel of Peru.

Tuesday, 3 September, 1811

A cloudy looking day, but it did not rain.  I workd very hard all the morning altering my Aunt P’s gown.  She and I drank tea at Mrs Comber’s.  We went across the fields and calld in our way to see Mrs Furber, who has got a bad inflammation in her eye.

We met Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr Grosett and Miss Kitty and Mrs and Mr P Ball at the Combers and spent a very chearful, pleasant evening.  Mrs Comber, my Aunt P, Mrs Grosett and I playd Quadrille.  I lost 6/-, the rest of the party played Pope Joan.  We did not leave them till after twelve and had a very pleasant walk home, the Strangways and Mr P Ball coming with us as far as the end of the Lane and we did not go to bed till two o’clock.

cropped to image, recto, unframed
A somewhat early painting by Hubert-François Gravelot, 1699–1773, French, active in Britain (1733–1745), A Game of Quadrille, ca. 1740, Oil on canvas, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund.

Wednesday, 4 August, 1811

A very dull looking day and very cold.  My Aunt P and I went to Mrs Furber’s to put the leeches under her inflamd eye.  I could only make one fix.  We staid till near three o’clock and then came home to dinner.  I went there again afterward and took the leech off and staid with her till the place had done bleeding.  I read all the evening.

Thursday, 5 September, 1811

A fine day.  As soon as I had fed the poultry, I went into the laundry to make wafers and did not move out of it till dinner was on the table.  As soon as I had dined, I went in again and did not finish till tea time.  I was a good deal tired.  We had the Taunton Paper.

Friday, 6 September, 1811

An extremely hot day.  I was out in the garden a good deal in the morning and waterd the plants.  I brought in two rose trees, a Balsam and Verbena in blossom.  There were the most extraordinary number of flies collectd in one of the windows in the library I ever saw in my life.  We were obliged to have them swept out.  I had the happiness of hearing from our dear William in the evening.

Illustration_Verbena_officinalis0 - Wikimedia
Verbena Officinalis

Saturday, 7 September, 1811

An intense hot day.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay and was out a good while.  the heat was quite oppressive.  After I came in I workd till dinner time.  The Grosetts, Strangways,Combers, Mr Ball and two of his sisters drank tea here.  Mrs Comber, Mr Grosett and my two Aunts playd Quadrille, the rest of the party,except Miss Kitty G playd at Pope Joan.  She lookd on and Mr Comber read.  They did not leave us till near one o’clock.

I wrote a few lines to my mother to say I had heard from William.  I lost 1/- at Pope Joan.

Sunday, 8 September, 1811

As hot as it was yesterday.  My Aunt Neate had a bad cold and did not get up till dinner time.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church at ten o’clock and were in very good time.  Saw the Strangways, Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam.  We sat half an hour at Mrs S after Church and had some grapes and pears, but neither of them quite ripe.  The Balls walkd home with us as far as our gate.  In our way, we calld to ask Mrs Furber how she did.  She was asleep.  I think I never felt heat so great as in walking home.  My Aunt Powell went to Mrs Ball’s after dinner and took their maid (who is very ill) a few currants and two peaches and nectarines.  I read all the evening.  We went out about eight o’clock to see the comet that has just made its appearance.  It is much larger and finer than the one I saw a few years ago.

Monday, 9 September, 1811

Intensely hot again.  Mr Phillip Ball calld, but I did not see him, as I was confined all the morning in the Stone room picking elder berries.  We all drank tea at Mr Grosetts and met Mr, Mrs and Miss Charlotte Comber, Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and two of his sisters.  The old gentleman, my two Aunts and Mrs Comber playd Quadrille.  Mr C lookd on, as did Miss Grosett.  The rest playd Pope Joan.  I lost 3/-.  I spent a very chearful, merry evening.  We did not come away till after one o’clock.  The whole party walkd together to Mr Ball’s door.  The Miss Bs went in, the Combers turnd up the lane and we, Mr P B and Miss S went on together as far as the white gate, where we took leave of them. I had some supper after I came home and we did not go to bed till two o’clock.  We had ? ?paper.

Tuesday, 10 September, 1811

A very fine day and just as hot as yesterday.  While we were at breakfast we received an invitation from Mr and Mrs Collins to dine at Hatch Court next Friday, but my Aunt sent an excuse.  One of the young cats killed a little chicken and my Aunt had her drownd.  I waterd all the plants.  Miss Strangways sent me a beautiful plant of American Groundsell.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath paper.

Wednesday, 11 September, 1811

Intensely hot.  I picked Elderberries all the morning and put the wine that is finishd in the cask.  My Aunt heard from poor George Shirley.  He is in great affliction, having just lost his eldest little girl, after only five day’s illness. I workd a little in the evening.  Either a stoat or rats took away all the brood of little chickens hatched last week, seven of them.  We had the Taunton paper.

Thursday, 12 September, 1811

As hot as yesterday.  The glass has been up at 114 for two or three days past.  I workd a little in the morning and picked Elderberries after dinner.  I waterd the plants and workd in the evening.  Mr Comber sent to borrow “Hartley on Man” and the works of the author of the ‘Whole Duty of Man’, the latter we could not find to send him.

220px-HartleyObservations

 

Friday, 13 September 1811

A fine day and very hot in the sun, but a great deal of ?  I spent most of the morning in looking for the works of the author of the “Whole Duty of Man” for Mr Comber and succeeded at last.  He sent my Aunt a present last night of his “Memoirs of Dean Comber” and two of his own sermons, one for herself, the other for Cooper.  Mrs and Miss Strangways drank tea and suppd here and played Pope Joan.  I lost sixpence.

Saturday, 14 September, 1811

A very fine day and as hot as yesterday.  I finishd my bonnet.  Mr P Ball, but I did not see him.  After dinner the Miss Grosetts came up with a letter which they had brought from Taunton.  They had some cyder.  Just as we were going to tea, Miss Strangways came in and stayd till 9 o’clock.  She brought us a beautiful little bouquet.  I read after she was gone.

Sunday, 15 September 1811

Very hot and fine.  We read prayers at home, as my Aunt P was not well enough to go to church.  Miss Miriam Ball and her brother calld while we at prayers, but sat down in the library till we had finished.  I wrote all the morning.  My Aunt P and I strolled up the field as far as the sheep house, with the glass and lookd at the prospects.  I read in the evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.  Farmer Furber brought my Aunt three mackerel as a present and Miss Collins sent a beautiful pine apple and a brace of partridges.

Monday, 16 September, 1811

A very gloomy day and much cooler than it has been for some time past.  My Aunt P and I went to Taunton.  Just as we were stepping into the chaise, Miss Hall and Miss Anna calld.  They did not come in.  We went to see two houses near Taunton, neither of which we could get  into.  We walkd about a great deal and did all our commissions and came home at 5 o’clock very much tired.   As soon as we had dined, my Aunt P and I took some Arrow Root to Mrs Balls for their servant.  We saw Mr and Mrs B and three misses.  We sat there till it was quite dusk.  Mrs B, Misses Anna and Miriam strolld over with us as far as our gate, where my Aunt prevaild on them to come in and play at Pope Joan.  Miriam went back to get her father’s supper, saying she would return as soon as she possibly could, which she did, just before supper.  Mr P B came and we all had a long game at Pope Joan.  They suppd with us and went home a little past eleven.  Captain Tolson and Miss Strangways calld while we were at Taunton.

Tuesday, 17 September, 1811

A fine day.  I was busy all the morning preparing for the arrival of our dear Mrs Porcher, whom we expected today in her way to Cheltenham.  She came about half past five, looking as well as I ever saw her, and her manner as delightful as it used to be.  She told us a great deal of news of all our old acquaintances.  She brought us a pine and three partridges, one of which turnd out bad, but the other two excellent.  In the evening she produced a little ball of wood, most deliciously scented to put in our work boxes.  As she had but one she left it between us.  She brought Darwood, her maid, and John with her.  We spent a delightful evening.  George, who lived here, sent my Aunt two brace of partridges as a present.  Unluckily, they were so putrid they were obliged to be thrown away, but that was not his fault, nor did it take away from his merit in sending them.  I had a very nice long letter from dear Emma.

Wednesday, 18th September, 1811

A very fine day, but a very high wind.  We were down stairs a little after eight, as dear Mrs P was engaged to dine at Wells with the Turners.  As soon as we had breakfasted we all walkd up the field for her to see the prospect.  When we came back, the Carriage was at the door.  She went the first stage with her own horses.  Soon after she was gone, my Aunt and I walkd to Mrs Strangway’s to ask them to dine here.  We saw Miss Grosett there and my Aunt askd her to come in the evening.  The things were hardly taken from the table when they came in, so we were obliged to ask them into the dining room, where they had some wine and fruit.  Mr P Ball joind the party at tea and we all, except Miss G, playd Pope Joan.  She lookd on.  They did not go home till after twelve.

I spread two blisters for Mrs Furber to put behind her ears.  We saw her in our way home from the Strangways this morning.

We had Mrs Phillip’s, the Furber’s and Taunton Papers.

Thursday, 19 September, 1811

A very hot day.  I was out all the morning gathering and picking up apples in the orchard.  Mrs Strangways came with a poor girl who has got the Ague.  She was very ill after she came in and laid on the sopha two or three hours, before she was able to go home again.  I was very idle all the afternoon, but workd a little in the evening.

Friday, 20 September, 1811

A gloomy looking morning, with a good deal of thunder at a distance.  It began to rain very hard about eleven o’clock and continued, with short intervals, all day.  I workd partly for myself and partly for my Aunt P all the morning and evening too.

Saturday, 21 September, 1811

A very wet day.  It literally pourd all the morning.  I workd hard cutting out and partly making a gown for my Aunt P, preparatory to our going to the sea for a little while, the beginning of next week.  I workd after dinner.  My Aunt had a pig killd, which turnd out a very nice one.  I had a nice long letter from my mother.

Sunday, 22 September, 1811

A fine day after the rain.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church.  We were there half an hour before the Service began.  There was not one of the Balls at Church and only Miss Strangways.  We sat some time at Mrs S and had some grapes and wine.  We calld on the Grosetts and lookd at their steamer.  After dinner my Aunt and I went down to the Balls, intending to sit half an hour, but they prevaild on us to stay and drink tea.  Miss Strangways was there and they were all very chearful and good humourd.  The old man as well as they rest, who would shake hands with me when we came away, which we did a little after eight o’clock.  William brought our cloaks and the Lanthorn.  It was the darkest night I almost every saw, but very warm.  In our way home from Church, we calld at Bellinghams to see the poor girl with the Ague and at Mrs Comber’s, who is much better for my blisters.  My Aunt sent Mr Ball some Sigars and the girls a Tobacco plant.

Monday, 23 September, 1811

Very wet in the morning, but fine afterwards, with now then a shower.  I workd in the morning a little and cleand my Chip Bonnet and put some lighted Brimstone under it to whiten it, but with little success.  In the evening I wrote a very long letter to my mother.  We had Farmer Furber’s Paper.

Tuesday, 24 September, 1811

A fine day.  I cut down all the Mignonette and put the pots in the hot bed, afterwards collecting my clothes, which my Aunt P packd up, bound my shoes and then put the last of the elder wine in the cask.  Just after we had dined, a Mr Musgrove came from Taunton to speak about his house, which we had seen some time ago at Cheddon, but my Aunt declined it altogether.  As soon as he was gone, we went to Farmer Smith’s to pay him 7/6d my Aunt owed him.  It began to rain soon after we got into the lane and continued very hard till after we returnd.  I had the Bergamotte and Grange trees taken in for the night, for fear of a frost.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Wednesday, 25 September, 1811

A showery day with sunshine between.  The wind blew almost a hurricane all day and was still more violent in the evening.  It blew down the largest poplar tree by the stable, a branch of the horse chestnut by the library and an old apple tree in pig’s plot.  I was very busy covering my bonnet with some pink mode my Aunt Neate was so kind to give me to do it with, besides which I collected the things together that are to go with us.  I heard from poor Harry, to inform me of the death of his youngest boy, after a very lingering illness.  We had the Taunton Papers.

Thursday, 26 September, 1811

A very wet day, with a good deal of sunshine, but in the afternoon it pourd for an hour or two.  Ephraim went up to see if there were any pigeons.  There is only one, but the other pair are sitting.  I packd up a very fine goose, the giblets and a dozen fine pears, a present from my Aunt P to my mother.  I also packed a basket to go with us tomorrow containing a ham, a loin of roasted pork, a goose, some tea and sugar, a bottle of brandy, some Salts and Verjuice.  It was so damp and uncomfortable my Aunt had the fire lit.  We got every thing ready to set out tomorrow morning, so that there would be nothing to do but load the trunks.  I was very much tired.

Friday, 27 September, 1811

A fine day.  We were up early that we might have our breakfast comfortably and not detain the Chaise.  When it came, William loaded the trunks very nicely.  We took an affectionate leave of my dear Aunt Neate and got into the Chaise at eleven o’clock.  Just as we had passed the Nag’s Head, my Aunt recollected she had not taken the money she intended.  The road was so narrow we could not turn about, so my Aunt P sent Pocock back with the key to my Aunt Neate to get the notes.  She returnd in less than half an hour and William with her, but without the notes.  I wrote with a pencil exactly where they were and William brought them in less time than I thought it possible he could have returnd to Henlade.  All this detained us near an hour.  We changed the Chaise at Chard and arrived at Lyme at five o’clock, having walkd down and up the last two hills, which are tremendous.  We drove to the Cups, left Pocock there, while my Aunt and I went in search of lodgings.  One of the Waiters very civily went to shew us the way to two.  We lookd at one, which was directly over the sea, but so miserable it was impossible to think of it.  The other we did not look at, but went further up the street and got a very comfortable one, tho’ much larger than we want, there being six bedrooms, but they would not divide it.  Unluckily no view of the sea, but from the bed rooms, but very good sea air, a very short walk to the open sea and close to the warm bath, which appears a very indifferent one.  We went back to the Inn to desire our things sent here and came immediately.  The Master of the Lodgings, (whose name is Edward), very obligingly got us a servant, some coals and other things.  We had a good fire made and air’d our blankets, had some supper, which we all stood very much in need of of and went to bed a little after twelve, very much tired.  We had not been asleep long when we were waked by a horrible noise, which I fancied to be the old part of the house at Henlade falling down.  When we recollected ourselves, we found it was a cart rumbling by the house, but we were both exceedingly frightened.

Saturday, 28 September, 1811

A very fine day.  We unpacked our things after breakfast and when they were all put away, we walkd about till near dinner time.  There is a very long walk, bankd up by the sea side, in manner of the Esplanade at Weymouth, which leads to the Cobb, a long Pier, built out into the sea, to which we walkd.  We afterwards went up Broad Street, which is the principal street and, from what I have yet observed, the most fashionable part of the town.  It stands on so very steep a hill that the houses (most of which have bow windows), look over each other.  My Aunt subscribed to a Library, which appears a very bad one, but I fancy “bads the best”.  After dinner we walkd on the top of the cliff over the sea, where we met a very civil man, who told us the names of the different points of land and with whom we had a long conversation.  We also went to the Post Office and I left directions where to send our letters.  After tea, I trimmd a cloak for my Aunt, which I had cut out in the morning.  She wrote part of the evening and I afterwards read aloud part of a novel called “Human Beings”.

Lyme Regis The Cobb
Lyme Regis The Cobb

Sunday, 29 September, 1811

A fine day.  We went to Church in the morning.  We had a motley group in the Pew we sat in, a decent old man and woman, a footman in livery and a young man who lookd like a Countryman.  The Clergyman is the most unpleasant I think I ever heard.  His person is very much against him, but his manner more so.  After church my Aunt wrote a letter and then we walkd on the cliff till dinner time.  After dinner we walkd by the sea, behind the warm bath.  It was a very cold evening.  My Aunt took Pocock with us, as she was afraid to go by herself.  We had not been out more than half an hour when it began to rain.  We luckily got home before it came on fast, but there was a very hard rain for two hours in the evening.  I read till we went to bed.

Monday, 30 September, 1811

A very wet, cold, uncomfortable morning.  My Aunt had the fire lit after breakfast.  It cleard up in the middle of the day and was fine.  We walkd before dinner.  I had a glass put in my watch, for which I gave 1/6d.  The watchmaker came and put the glass to rights, for which he charged my Aunt 1/6.  After dinner we went to walk by the sea.  It was a very high tide, with a rough wind and mountainous sea, so fine that I came back to fetch Pocock to see it.  It broke over the Cobb and the walk most beautifully, the foam and the spray flying in clouds.  A great number of peaple were on the shore looking at it.  I read in the evening.

Fashion plate for October 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for October 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Tuesday, 1 October, 1811

A fine day.  I workd a little after breakfast and then we walkd till dinner time.  We walkd again in the afternoon and just escaped a violent shower, which fell soon after we came in.  I read and workd in the evening.

Wednesday, 2 October, 1811

A beautiful day.  We were out almost all the morning and walkd to the end of the Cobb, where we had seen that sea breaking over on Monday.  It is Lyme Fair today.  Of course went thro it.  My Aunt bought some of the best Gingerbread nuts I ever tasted.  They were so good that we went back and got a pound more.  We walkd after dinner, but a very short time, as we were both tired.  I wrote a very long letter to dear Emma in the evening and took Calomel when I went to bed.

Thursday, 3 October, 1811

Very wet.  It raind without interruption the whole day.  Of course we did not go out at all.  I was very uncomfortable from the Calomel, which always disagrees with me. I read most part of the day and evening.

Friday, 4 October, 1811

Wet again, with intervals of sunshine and a very high wind.  We walkd before dinner by the sea and went to the Apothecary again for some bark, rhubarb and Laudanum.  It was too wet to go out in the afternoon and a very tempestuous evening.

Saturday, 5 October, 1811

Showery all the morning, but we continued to walk before dinner, tho driven in by a very hard shower of rain.  I workd all day, trimming my pink cloak.  Last night was more tempestuous than has been known here for twenty years.  The sea was tremendous, beating over rocks, that I should have supposed it could never have reached even the base of.  We are very much vexd we did not know of it, as we may never have another opportunity of seeing so fine a sight.  Mr Edward says there were hundreds of peaple looking at it.  A woman brought some beautiful small mushrooms yesterday, which I prepared for pickling and finishd them this evening.  We went up on the cliff between ten and eleven o’clock to look at the sea, which was very fine, but not at all like what it was last night.  When we came back, I prepared some more mushrooms for pickling.  I took Calomel when I went to bed.

Sunday, 6 October, 1811

A fine looking morning.  I was very uncomfortable from the Calomel.  My Aunt went out for half an hour after breakfast.  When she came back, we read Prayers.  It continued fine all day.  My Aunt took a long walk after dinner.  I did not go out all day.

Monday, 7 October, 1811

A thick fog that fell and made it very damp and uncomfortable, with frequent small showers of rain.  My Aunt and I went out directly after breakfast to look at the devastation the storm of Friday night made.  It has completely ruind the walk by the sea to the cobb, in many places having made deep holes that will require may loads of gravel to fill them up and in other places thrown up with immense quantities of large shingle and sea weed.  We staid out an hour and then the fog began to wet, so we came in.  I bathd for the first time.  The Baths are tolerably comfortable, but not like Weymouth.  My Aunt went as far as the Post Office after dinner, but would not let me go with her, as it was very damp.  I workd a little in the morning and read all the evening.

I pickled some more mushrooms and partly did some ketchup.

Alcove, Assembly Rooms and Walk, Lyme Regis, Dorset by Reed, 1815 (c) Lyme Regis Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Alcove, Assembly Rooms and Walk, Lyme Regis, Dorset by Reed, 1815
(c) Lyme Regis Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 8 October, 1811

A fine, pleasant morning.  I bathed the second time, after which my Aunt and I took a very long walk (too long for me, for I was very much tired) up the Sidmouth Road and round by the Cobb home.  We lookd at a small house that is to let, but it is not pretty.  My Aunt walkd out again after dinner, but I was too much tired.  I read all the evening.  It was fine all day.

Wednesday, 9 October, 1811

A fine morning.  My Aunt and I went to Seaton.  The road is very good, but the hills tremendous and very little level road.  Seaton is a remarkably pretty village, a beautiful shore with an excellent gravel walk by the sea, nearly x mile long, but there are no houses looking to the sea.  We walkd all over the place, lookd at a good many lodgings, all very uncomfortable and very dear, except one, which was excellent.  We dined at the Inn and did not get home till between seven and eight, after a very pleasant excursion.  It raind a little just before we left Seaton, but not enough to incommode us.  I read in the evening.

Thursday, 10 October, 1811

A mizzling rain that made it damp and uncomfortable most part of the day.  I bathd for the third time.  When I went to the bath the water was not hot enough and the woman beg’d me to wait an hour, which I did, but when I returnd I was obliged to wait again some time, but when I did get the bath it was a very comfortable one.  My Aunt and I went out before dinner, but the rain drove us in again.  We went out again in the afternoon, but it was so damp, I came in almost directly.  I pickled some more mushrooms in the evening and finishd the ketchup.  I heard from my mother.

Friday, 11 October, 1811

A damp, uncomfortable looking morning.  I bathd the fourth time.  The woman served me was the same as yesterday and I was obliged to wait an hour before the water was hot.  It raind fast when I went and returnd from the bath and the wind was so high I could hardly stand.  It continued wet all the morning.  I workd a little, my Aunt took a walk by herself after dinner and it was a tolerable fine afternoon.  I read all the evening.

Saturday, 12 October, 1811

A very high wind and dry till twelve o’clock.  We put on our cloaks, intending to take a walk, but it began to rain, so we only went as far as the Watch makers next door, to look at his lamps, one of which he very civily offerd to lend my Aunt this evening and, if she likes it, she means to buy one.  It was fine all the afternoon, Hallet going out to send in the lamp.  My Aunt and I walkd after dinner.  It was a beautiful night and the comet more brilliant than I ever saw it before.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

0017 13.tif
1811 Comet

Sunday, 13 October, 1811

A very fine day.  My Aunt proposed going to the Chapel at the top of the town, instead of the Church. The Minister preachd nearly an hour, the same thing, over and over again and ranted and groand very much.  We walkd about an hour and I bathd the fifth time.  We took a long walk after dinner and did not return till near six o’clock.  There were a great many smart peaple collected on the Cobb walk.   I read all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper, the first time.

Monday, 14 October, 1811

A damp uncomfortable day.  I was very unwell with a giddiness in my head and did not get up till one o’clock.  My Aunt P bathd and walkd out after dinner.  I did not go out the whole day, indeed I think it was too damp, even for my Aunt, but she does not mind it.  I read all day and in the evening.

Tuesday, 15 October, 1811

A very fine day.  I felt better than yesterday, but not well or equal to much fatigue.  We took a long walk directly after breakfast on the sands under the cliff.  When we came in I was so overcome and faint I could hardly speak.  I bathd the sixth time and it did me a great deal of good.  My Aunt walkd again after dinner, but I did not.

We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Wednesday, 16 October, 1811

A fine morning.  My Aunt bathd, as I did also, the seventh time.  It began to rain about one o’clock and continued to pour till between four and five.  My Aunt walkd after it cleard up, but I did not go out again.  I wrote a long letter to Henry.  We did not have C’s Paper.

Thursday, 17 October, 1811

A very fine day.  My Aunt and I walkd directly after breakfast, along the Cobb walk, but the stench of the sea weed was so intolerable it was impossible to bear it.  It is really enough to breed putrid fevers.  We walkd up and down the cliff some time and then came in.  My Aunt went out again by herself before dinner and took a long walk.  I read and workd.  We walkd for an hour before tea.  We did not have C’s Paper.

View of the Cobb and the Bay, Lyme Regis, Dorset by unknown artist (c) Lyme Regis Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
View of the Cobb and the Bay, Lyme Regis, Dorset by unknown artist
(c) Lyme Regis Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 18 October, 1811

A very fine day.  I bathd the eighth time.  We walkd before dinner.  I did a little work. Between dinner and tea we walkd up and down behind the baths.  We did not have Cooper’s Paper.

Saturday, 19 October, 1811

A very fine day.  I bathd the ninth time.  I workd in the morning and we walkd before dinner about the town and took a letter to the Post Office.  It was quite a Summer’s day, every body exclaiming  “How hot it is”.  We walkd till very late. Behind the baths an old lady and gentleman, who are generally there every evening, spoke to us and we had a good deal of common place conversation with him.  He appears to be a genteel old man with a remarkably soft, pleasant voice, his wife not so much of a lady in her manners.  I workd in the evening.  I had a delightful long letter from my mother, full of news.  We did not have C’s Paper.  My Aunt gave Susan at the Bath 2/6d to buy something for her sister’s dinner tomorrow, who is come to see her from Bridport.

Sunday, 20 October, 1811

A dry day, but not so fine as yesterday.  The wind was very high and cold. We went to Church and sat in the same Pew we did the first Sunday we were there. We attempted to walk behind the baths, but the wind was so rough it was uncomfortable, so we walkd up and down the town, as being the most sheltered.  Before tea we walkd behind the baths again.

We had Cooper’s Paper and my Aunt heard from him enclosing a dinner invitation to him from Mr Roberts of the Comment, which he had declined  but evidently very much against his inclination and I have not a doubt he will accept the next, if he should have another!!!!  such things are!!!!!

Monday, 21 October, 1811

A fine day.  I bathd the tenth time and my Aunt also.  She intended Pocock should have had a dip, but when she went to the shore the guides were dressing themselves and said it was so cold and rough they could not go in any more that morning.  My Aunt was in extreme low spirits in consequence of Cooper’s letter and Mr Robert’s note to him.  It recalld all the distress and misery she had suffered from the machinations and contrivances of that detestable wretch, who is a disgrace to society and ought to be shund by every man who has the least particle of principal or honor in him.  I workd a little in the morning and we went up the town and paid for the Chaise, which took us to Seaton.  I took my watch to be cleand at Mr Hallet’s.   He is to let me have it Wednesday morning.  We walkd behind the baths before tea, but did not stay long, as it began to rain a little.  I heard again from my mother.  We did not have C’s Paper.  I gave Susanna 1/- to pay for her sister’s going back to Bridport.

Tuesday, 22 October, 1811

A miserable wet day.  I bathed the eleventh  time.  Pocock went, intending to bathe, but met the guides coming home, so was disappointed again.  I read and workd all day.  It ceasd raining in the afternoon and my Aunt went out for a little while, but it was very wet and damp.  I workd in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  My Aunt heard from George, agreeing to come back to live with her again.  I wrote to my mother.

Coombe Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, before 1803 by unknown artist (c) Lyme Regis Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Coombe Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, before 1803 by unknown artist
(c) Lyme Regis Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 23 October, 1811

A very fine day, but an excessive high wind.  Pocock bath’d before breakfast.  My Aunt and I went out as soon as we had finishd ours to a good many places, among others, the Post Office, where my Aunt gave the Post Man 2/6d for himself.  The sea was so beautiful it induced us to go to the end of the cobb walk to look at two brigs which were sailing very near.  The first vessel we have seen near enough to distinguish what they were, since we have been here.  We walkd till twelve o’clock and then both bath’d, after which we packd till dinner time and continued it afterwards till after five, when we walkd behind the baths half an hour.  The wind was so rough we could hardly stand as we were walking.  Mr Davie, to whom the baths belong, addressd us and after talking a little while, wishd us a pleasant journey.  We calld for my watch as we came home, but it was not done.  I bought a pair of very pretty purse sliders, for which I gave 1/6d.  I finishd packing the basket and my Aunt the trunk.  Hallett brought in my watch, for which I paid 5/6d.  We did not have Cooper’s Paper.

Thursday, 24 October, 1811

A very fine day.  We had our breakfasts and left the lodgings a little past ten o’clock.  My Aunt and I walkd up the town.  Pocock ? Susanna brought one of the plants from the sea shore that my Aunt had desired her to get for us, for which my Aunt gave her 6d.  We all walkd up the long hill from Up Lyme and arrived very well at Chard, where we changed Chaises.  Just as we got to Hatch, it began to rain a torrent and continued till a short time after we got home.  We found my Aunt Neate very well and all the stock the same.  Miss has got two very fine puppys.  I lookd at all the live things and went into the garden after dinner.  The trees are most of them as green as when we went away.  We did nothing but talk all the evening.

Friday, 25 October, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I calld on the Grosetts and Balls, the former were all well, but poor Phillip Ball is confined to his bed with a Typhus Fever.  We saw Mrs B and her three daughters as we were coming home.  We met Mrs and Miss Strangways in the Lane, who had been to call on us.  I gatherd a good many flower seeds and was busy about the house all day.

Saturday, 26 October, 1811

A very wet day.  We were all bustle, preparing for Mr and Mrs Porcher and the two Misses Chamiers, whom we expected to dine and sleep here.  We waited dinner till near seven o’clock, but they did not come.  I read in the evening.

Sunday, 27 October, 1811

A very showery day.  We read Prayers at home.  Pocock and Betty went to Church.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 28 October, 1811

A very wet day with violent showers.  My Aunt P went down before dinner to the Ball’s and found them in the deepest distress.  They did not expect Phillip to live till night.  When my Aunt came home, I spread a Blister and sent down to them.  My Aunt had taken them some gibblet soup for Phillip, as he was ordered to eat every thing rich and nourishing.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined here and the Grosetts came in the evening.  My two Aunts, Mrs S and Mr G playd Quadrille.  Miss S, the two Miss G and I Pope Joan.  I won 1/-.

I wrote to my mother.  We had Farmer Furber’s Paper and one of Cooper’s that had been sent to Lyme.

Tuesday, 29 October, 1811

A finish day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways slept here last night, but went away directly after breakfast.  We had a few showers in the course of the day.  My Aunt and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s.  Mrs F has got a little return of the inflammation in her eye and Ann is not well.  I workd all the morning cutting out the last of my shifts.  My Aunt P went down to the Ball’s after dinner and staid till eight o’clock.  She drank tea there and found Mr and Mrs Strangways of Hatch and Miss S there.  Philip is better.  James Stodgell came for the medicine for Ann.  I workd all the evening, but was not well.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and a few lines enclosed to know if we were dead or alive.

Wednesday, 30 October, 1811

Such an excessive hard rain all the morning, that the yard at the back of the house was quite under water.  I workd all day, as it was impossible to go out.

Fashion plate for November 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for November 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Monday, 4 November, 1811

From laziness I have neglected writing since Wednesday, but nothing material has occurred.  My Aunt has been down almost every day to the Ball’s and I went with her once.  The family were in the depth of distress, as poor Phillip was considerd in great danger and is so still, tho they sent word just now he was a little better.  This morning was very fine, but soon after breakfast it pourd a torrent, which lasted about half an hour and then it was fine again.  I brought in one of the young Muscovy ducks that was put up to fat and had him put by the kitchen fire.  He is very ill and I am afraid will die.  Four of the young rabbits died last week.  I was employd till near two o’clock mixing lemon jelly for Philip Ball.   I workd from that time till supper, excepting the time I went with my Aunt to carry the jelly to the Ball’s and to call on the Grosetts.  We had the Farmer’s Paper.

Tuesday, 5 November, 1811

A very bad day.  It raind almost incessantly.  Philip Ball a little better today.  They sent to ask for some wafers, as he had taken a fancy to them.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  We had Mr Phillip’s Bath Paper and one from Cooper.

Wednesday, 6 November, 1811

A wet day with very short intervals between the showers.  Philip a little better.  They sent for some more wafers.  We had but four left, but my Aunt sent word she would have some more made tomorrow.  The sick Muscovy duck died.  We had the common one that was fatting killd.  I workd all day and playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate in the evening.  She gave me one pound sixteen shillings, the profits of my sheep and wool, after having paid my Aunt P for their keep.

Thursday, 7 November, 1811

A fine sunshine day.  While we were at breakfast Miss Grosett calld.  She said the Lane was so bad, the mud and water was over her pattens.  She did not stay long.  When she was gone, I began to make the wafers and did not sit down till the dinner was on the table.  I made seven dozen.  Pocock assisted.  My Aunt took three dozen to Philip Ball, whom she saw for the first time since his illness.  He lookd better than she expected, but is miserably weak.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day.  I playd at cards with my Aunt Neate and read.  Mrs Strangways sent us a plate of beautiful grapes.

Friday, 8 November, 1811

Such excessive hard showers in the course of the day, that the fields in the front of the house were under water, as was the yard and pigs plot.  I never saw such storms.  I combed Rover and Pedro and did not work at all before dinner.  I workd a little before tea and playd cards with my Aunt Neate till supper time.  I wrote a long letter to my mother in the morning.  We had a Paper from Cooper.

Saturday, 9 November, 1811

A showery day with intervals of very fine sunshine, which continued from twelve o’clock till evening.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  My Aunts playd at Gosch.  We had a Paper from Cooper.  William took in the plants and arranged them on the stand in the parlor.

Sunday, 10 November, 1811

A very fine day, after a terrible night.  It raind a deluge and the fields and common between this and Creech are so much under water that the road is impassible.  We read Prayers at home.  Pocock, Betty and William went to Church.  My Aunt went down to the Ball’s and found Philip better, who afterwards walkd up the hill.  I read all day and in the evening also.

Monday, 11 November, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt and I walkd to Farmer Furber’s and saw him and his wife.  It raind a little as we came back, but not enough to wet us.  I workd the rest of the morning.  My Aunt went to the Ball’s after dinner to take them some more wafers.  Pocock and Betty were employd all the morning baking them by themselves for the first time and did them very nicely.  I mixd them.  I workd all the evening.  My Aunt playd Gosch.  We had Farmer Furber’s Sherbourne Paper and two from Cooper.

Tuesday, 12 November, 1811

A very fine day.  My Aunt had a note from a gentleman at Taunton to know if she was going to part with William, as he wishd to have him if she was.  She wrote word back it was uncertain whether the servant she expected returnd, if he did not, she meant to keep William.  Mrs Furber and Ann came up to put out some bottles for my Aunt for Cooper’s Cider.  She lookd at the library and Oak Room, which she had not seen since they were new done and had a glass of wine and some wafers before she went home again.  I put the little puppys out of doors for the first time since they were born and they were delighted.  Mrs and the two Miss Combers calld and staid more than an hour.  Charlotte lookd more beautiful than I ever saw her, Miss C very plain, but all very pleasant and agreeable.  I workd after they were gone and in the evening playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate.

Wednesday, 13 November, 1811

A very fine sunshine day with a high drying wind.  Miss Strangways calld soon after breakfast and sat some time.  She had on a new green stuff gown, which lookd well enough upon her, but I should not like it for myself.  I walkd round the garden for half an hour and then workd the rest of the day and evening.  I heard from my mother and we had quite a packet of News Papers, two from Cooper, Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and four of Mr Grosett’s.

Thursday, 14 November, 1811

A very fine day with an excessive high wind.  The weather is so mild that the large strawberry bed in the old garden is in full blossom.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay of sweet peas and mignonette.  Poor Philip Ball is again very bad, the complaint in his head worse than ever.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld just as we were going to dinner.  Of course my Aunt did not ask them to stay.   I wrote and workd in the morning and playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate in the evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother and enclosed a one pound note to pay for some paper and oil of lavender that George is to bring with him when he comes.

Friday, 15 November, 1811

A tolerable fine day, after a most tempestuous night.  I thought the house would have been blown down.  I workd all the morning.  My Aunt went down to Mrs Ball’s before dinner and in coming home in her new, very high pattens, her foot twisted in the field and she fell down.  Fortunately she did not hurt herself, except the foot which turnd, that was very much straind and bruised.  I workd in the evening and my Aunts playd Gosch.  We had Cooper’s Papers.

Saturday, 16 November,1811

A fine day, but a piercing cold wind.  A man came from Taunton to bottle Cooper’s Cyder, which he finishd before dinner.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  My Aunts playd Gosch after supper.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 17 November, 1811

A dry, but very dull looking day.   We read Prayers at home.  William and Hannah went to Thorn Church.  Pocock went home to see her mother.  My Aunt P and I walkd in the garden and down to the gate and back.  Mrs Strangways calld and sat an hour before dinner.  She came again after dinner to bring the Taunton Papers and my Aunt prevaild on her to stay and drink tea and sup.  Miss S is at Mr Ball’s, nursing Philip.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 18 November, 1811

A very dull looking day and very cold.  The man came again from Taunton to cork and pack the Cyder.  Bennet  brought the hampers for it.  I workd the four new shifts that Molly Giles has been assisting me to make, that they may be washd tomorrow.  I workd in the evening.  We had Farmer Furber’s Paper and one from Cooper.  Mrs Ball sent to beg some preserved strawberrys for Philip.

Tuesday, 19 November, 1811

A dull looking, cold morning, but a very fine sunshine afternoon.  We have had the Misfortune to lost our beautiful little Rose Hill Parrot.  Mrs Giles found him dead at the bottom of his cage this morning.  Poor little fellow.  He was apparently in perfect health yesterday.  I do not know any that has grievd us so much a long time.  We all passd our breakfast in tears.  I hope  the other will not pine after the one that is dead.  Mrs Strangways sent to ask my Aunt to spare her a skim milk cheese.  My Aunt sent her one as a present.  I put some new mould to the bergamot and orange trees and had them brought into the parlor and the large myrtle and oleander taken up stairs into my lady’s closet.  I workd on my gown in the evening.  My Aunts playd at Gosch after supper.  My Aunt sent our poor little pet over to Mr Standent, who has very kindly offerd to stuff it, as well as he is able.

Courtesy of the British Museum
Courtesy of the British Museum

Wednesday, 20 November, 1811

A very fine sunshine day, after a white frost, the first we have had.  I brought in some of the small geraniums that were left out and afterwards bottled 4 dozen of Cyder, all but four bottles and afterwards set down to work, a little tired.  My Aunts playd Gosch in the evening and I workd.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 21 November, 1811

A very thick fog.  We could not distinguish the trees and gate by the Lane, with a white frost.  It cleard away at noon and was very fine the rest of the day.  My Aunt had one of the Muscovy ducks that was fatting killd.  I corkd some of the Cyder that was bottled yesterday and unpackd and put away the 3 doz of Port wine that came from Exeter, which took me till dinner time.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day, but in the evening took my Danish Stuff gown to pieces

to alter the body.  My Aunt went down to the Ball’s after dinner.  Philip is a good deal better.  My Aunts sent him some more wafers, coffee and some soup.

Friday, 22 November, 1811

A beautiful day, but so severe a frost that the water in pans about the house for the poultry was frozen solid.  I took up the three roots of Marvel of Peru that were in the garden and gave the ducks and rabbits a nice warm bed of hay and workd the rest of the day and evening.  Miss Strangways calld.

Saturday, 23 November, 1811

A very hard frost in the morning, but it went off after breakfast and continued to thaw the rest of the day and was very cold and gloomy.  I workd all day and in the evening.  Mrs Ball sent my Aunt a very fine woodcock.

Sunday, 24 November, 1811

A gloomy looking day, but dry.  We read Prayers at home.  Before we had quite finishd Miss Strangways calld.  She did not stay long, as she was going to Hatch with Mrs S in the Gig.  I felt very unwell all day and my spirits very low from my mother’s account of dear Emma’s health.  Captain Tolson sent my Aunt a beautiful cock pheasant.  I heard from my mother and Uncle James.  The latter sent a receipt for me to sign for £13.13.0, more of Miss Whithers’s legacy.  We had three of Cooper’s Papers.

Monday, 25 November, 1811

A fine day.  I wrote till two o’clock, when my Aunt and I went to Mrs Ball’s where we saw Mr, Mrs and Miss Strangways.  We went up stairs and sat with Philip more than half an hour.  It is the first time I have seen him since his illness.  He is so much alterd, I should not have known him and so strikingly like Mr Bryant, it quite startled me when I first went in.  When we came home we found a young man waiting with a very fine hen pheasant which he brought as a present .  My Aunt accepted it and gave him 2/-.  My Aunt is going to send it tomorrow to my mother and I was busy all the evening preparing a pot of honey, one of raspberry jam and one of preserved black currants to go with it.  We had one of the Muscovy ducks for dinner, the most delicious  thing of the kind I ever tasted and so large it was like a small goose.  I wrote two letters to my mother.

Tuesday, 26 November 1811

I got up very early, almost as soon as it was light, to pack the basket to go to my mother’s.  Ephraim took it to Taunton and saw it bookd.  I workd the rest of the day and evening.  My Aunts playd at Gosch after supper.

Wednesday, 27 November, 1811

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I went to Taunton soon after breakfast.  We drove thro Taunton and went to see a house close to Truell.  It is not quite finishd and pretty, but very inconvenient and surrounded by roads, which in the Summer must make it very dusty.  We went two or three times from one end of Taunton to the other and did a great many things.  I bought 14 yds of calico for 6 petticoats and 13 yds of Dimity for 4 under petticoats.  The first cost me £1.8.0, the Dimity £1.1.8.  While we were buying some shrimps and oysters, Miss Strangways came up to us.  She had walkd into Taunton and was going to walk back, but my Aunt offered to take her in the Chaise, which she accepted.  We did not get home till past five.  My Aunt persuaded her to stay and dine, which she did and suppd also.  Her maid came to fetch her and she went home a little past ten.  The Chaise driver was so civil to take back the hamper with four dozen of Cyder that is to go to Dorchester in the waggon Friday.

We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and four of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 28 November, 1811

A very fine morning and as mild as Summer.  Mr West sent the doz of Sherry and some common brandy.  My Aunt went down to the Ball’s.  Phillip is a great deal better.  Mr Ball was so obliging to say his horse and cart should take the 4 hampers of Cooper’s cyder to the blacksmith’s for the waggon to take them up, which he did in the dusk of the evening.  I workd the whole day.  My Aunts playd cards after supper.

Friday, 29 November, 1811

A middling sort of a day.  My Aunt had a fire in her room and we all sat there to work on our gowns.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld, but did not stay many minutes.  My Aunts did not come down to them.  I workd hard all day and evening too.  I heard from my mother and we had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Saturday, 30 November, 1811

A very fine morning, but it began to rain soon after breakfast and continued the rest of the day.  I wrote all the morning and workd in the evening.  William went away to his place at Taunton.  We were all very sorry to part with him.  He is so particularly obliging and anxious to please.  I wrote to my mother and Uncle James.

Fashion plate for December 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for December 1811 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 December, 1811

A showery day.  My Aunt P went to Church at Thorn at eleven o’clock.  My Aunt N and I read Prayers at home.  I read in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 2 December, 1811

A very cold day with showers now and then.  Miss Strangways calld while we were at breakfast.  She very obligingly offered to go to Taunton for my Aunt to make more enquiries about a house my Aunt has heard of in Devonshire, belonging to a Mr Clapp, whose brother lives at Taunton and with whom Miss S is acquainted.  She borrowd Mr Ball’s horse and Benjamin rode before her.  She returnd at half past four.  We had dined, but my Aunt had the dinner kept hot and she dined here, but went home directly after, as they had company at tea.  She got me a pretty little plated collar for Gheta, for which I gave her 1/6d. I have put a strip of scarlet cloth round it and she looks beautiful.  I workd all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  My Aunt P and I sat up till past twelve o’clock, expecting George, but he did not come.  Pocock and Betty made wafers all the morning.

Tuesday, 3 December, 1811

A tremendous high wind with very hard showers.  I did not sit down till dinner time, I was so busy getting the things in order for the evening, when we expect our neighbours at tea.  George arrived between four and five.  He bought me a little parcel from my mother, with a note and a 4/- Bath token as a keep sake.  He saw poor Emma Monday.  She was lying on the sopha and looking very ill.  My mother says she has been blooded twice and she hopes found relief from it.  Mr, Mrs, two Misses and Master Comber, the three Miss Balls, Mr Grosett and Miss Kitty and Miss Strangways drank tea and suppd here.  Mr and Mrs C, Mr G and my Aunt P playd Quadrille, my Aunt N, Miss Ball, Miss Kitty G and Master C playd Pope Joan.  The two Miss C, Miss S, Misses Anna and Miriam Ball and I, Speculation.  I lost 4/-.  They all went away about twelve o’clock.  It was a tremendous evening.  It blew quite a hurricane and raind and haild with such violence it was dreadful.  The Balls and Miss S went home in Mr Grosett’s cart.  I had a very long letter from my mother, besides the note by George.

Wednesday, 4 December, 1811

A very wet cold day.  We expected Cooper at dinner on Friday the 6th, but he did not arrive till half past seven, long after we had given him up.  We were at tea.  He had some dinner as soon as it could be got ready.  I never saw him look better, but he has lost that delightful affectionate manner he used to have, at least to me.  Saturday he compleated his forty sixth year.  We dined alone.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and sat some time in the morning.  Cooper brought me a very pretty set of Chess men from the French Prison at Norman Cross, a band box for my Aunt P, which Mrs W Williams gave him, but not any thing to my Aunt Neate.

Rare carved bone French Napoleonic Prisoner of War Sand or Cushion Chess Set of 32 pieces (www.antiquechess.co.uk)
Rare carved bone French Napoleonic Prisoner of War Sand or Cushion Chess Set of 32 pieces (www.antiquechess.co.uk)

He also brought my Aunt P a very fine looking French pie, from Mrs W W, but good for nothing and a cod and oysters, the two latter excellent.  Mr Collins calld Sunday and was very pleasant.  He frankd a letter for me to my mother.  We dined alone.  Monday, the Strangways, Captain Tolson and Mr Standent dined here and the three Miss Balls, Mr Grosett, Mrs Hancock and Miss Kitty came in the evening.  I lost 7/- at Speculation, but my Aunt P, who had won, gave it me again.  Tuesday my Aunt P ad I were going to Taunton with Cooper but the water was so much out at Black Brook that he did not like to venture, so we went with him to Hatch Court.  Mr Collins was just gone to Weymouth, but we got out and went all over the house, which is beautiful.  C was in very good spirits all day and very kind.  We dined alone.  Wednesday my Aunt and I went with him to Taunton and on to Trull to look at the cottage.  He would not get out there, but waited for us in the Carriage.  We got some neckcloths for him and Allen at Taunton and he gave my Aunts a pocket book apiece, the same as he did last year.  Mr Comber and his son calld on Cooper before we went to Taunton.  We dined alone.  Thursday, I workd very hard all day and till one o’clock in the morning getting Cooper’s neckcloths done and  altering two waistcoats.  He and my Aunt P calld on the Balls before dinner.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate played Chess in the evening, as they have every night since he has been here.  Friday, we were agreeably surprised by Captain Denmans coming from Taunton in Cooper’s Carriage, which had been sent there to have something done to it.  He is looking remarkably well and is very much improved in his manner.  Cooper left us between two and three to go to Lord Paulett’s.  Captain D is going to London, thro Bath.  My Aunt pressd him to stay and sleep here, which he did and we talkd over old times.  After tea we playd Whist.  I lost  14/- which I paid Captain Denman. We have had a good deal of game since Cooper came and Mr Henderson sent him a Stilton cheese.  Cooper gave me the gold purse Mrs Bastard knitted for him a long time ago.  I have heard almost every day from my mother and written as frequently to her.  I have also heard from Mr Touray and answerd his letter. My Aunt Neate made me a present of a very pretty tippet trimd with brown fur.  Captain Jeffries sent my Aunt a very fine haunch of venison.

Hatch Court, Hatch Beauchamp An elegant house in Bath stone, graced by an arcade and four corner towers. It was built in 1755 to the designs of Thomas Prowse. Grade I listed. © Stephen Richards
Hatch Court, Hatch Beauchamp
An elegant house in Bath stone, graced by an arcade and four corner towers. It was built in 1755 to the designs of Thomas Prowse. Grade I listed.
© Stephen Richards

Saturday, 14 December, 1811

A very fine day.  Captain Denman breakfastd here and then walkd to Taunton to go to Bath by the Coach.  I wrote for some time in the morning and then began to cut out a new stuff gown, which I workd on the rest of the day and evening.

Sunday, 15 December, 1811

A very rainy, cold day.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast, soon after which Captain Tolson calld and staid about half an hour.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 16 December, 1811

A showery day.  I workd the whole day and most part of the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Rebecca Workman to announce the death of poor Mr Brampton last Wednesday.  I had two letters from my mother and we had three of Cooper’s Papers.

Tuesday, 17 December, 1811

A wet melancholy looking day.  I wrote all the morning and workd in the afternoon and evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Wednesday, 18 December, 1811

A very cold, showery day, but we continued to call at Mr Grosett’s, as we had not been there since Mrs Hancock came.  The old man and Miss Shaw were looking very ill.  We sat there some time and calld at Mr Ball’s in our way home.  We saw only Miss Ball and Miss Anna.  Mrs B was gone to Bar and Mr Philip and Miss Miriam to Hatch.  I workd all the evening.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Thursday, 19 December, 1811

A dull looking day, but dry.  I workd in the morning.  Miss Ball and Miss Anna dined and suppd here.  We playd Pope Joan in the evening.  I lost 1/-, but my Aunt Neate gave it me back again.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Friday, 20 December, 1811

A wet day.  I workd the whole of it.

Saturday, 21 December, 1811

A fine morning, but it began to rain about three o’clock and continued all the afternoon.  I workd hard all day and finished my new brown Stuff gown.

Sunday, 22 December, 1811

A most beautiful day, with a very sharp frost.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld, just as we had done breakfast.  As soon as they were gone, we read Prayers, soon after which Mr Grosett, Miss Shaw, Miss Kitty, Mrs Hancock and her little boy calld and staid a long time.  When they were gone, my Aunt P and I walkd to the white gate, but it was so wet we finishd our walk in the garden.  My Aunt read the Bible aloud all the evening.

Monday, 23 December, 1811

A beautiful day.  I mixd a quantity of wafers and Pocock and Betty baked them.  I wrote the rest of the morning.  The two Miss Balls calld and sat till near four o’clock.  I workd in the evening.  I wrote to my mother and had a delightful long letter from her.  We had three of Cooper’s Papers.

Tuesday, 24 December, 1811

A very dull looking day.  I broke some sugar and did two or three little odd jobs before I sat down to work.  It being the day before Xmas, between thirty and forty peaple came for Charity, all of whom my Aunt relieved.  I workd and finishd a cap I was making in the evening and afterwards wrote .  Two bushels of barley were ground for the dogs.

Wednesday, 25 December, Christmas Day 1811

As fine a sunshine day as I ever saw at this season of the year.  My Aunts went to Ruishton Church, I read Prayers at home and afterwards prepard the wine and desert for dinner.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined with us and in the evening we had Mr, Mrs, Miss’s and Master Comber, Mr Grosett, Mrs and Master Hancock and Miss Kitty and two Miss Balls.  We playd Quadrille, Pope Joan and Speculation.  I lost 6/- at the latter, Miss Charlotte Comber won £1.1.0.  The evening went off very chearfully to our guests apparently, but I have spent very many much more so.  They left us between twelve and one.  It was an intense cold night.  We sat up till past two warming ourselves.

Thursday, 26 December, 1811

It had snowd a little in the night and while we were at breakfast it snowd so fast that there was every appearance of our having a heavy fall of it, but in the middle of the day it turnd to rain, which continued some hours, with a long clap of thunder.  I workd all day and evening.  I heard from my mother.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.

Mail Coach in a Snowstorm by Charles Cooper Henderson, c.1835-1840 Tate; (c) Tate; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Mail Coach in a Snowstorm by Charles Cooper Henderson, c.1835-1840
Tate; (c) Tate; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 27 December, 1811

A very wet day.  I workd the whole of it.  It cleard up in the evening and was frosty.  My Aunt had a bacon pig killd.  It is a very fine one

Saturday, 28 December, 1811

A very fine, frosty day.  I hemd three or four of my new petticoats.  I playd at Gosch after supper with my Aunt Neate.  George got me an Almanack, for which I am to give 1/9d and a yard of Stuff, like my new gown, to make an apron to it.  It came to £1.10d

Sunday, 29 December, 1811

A beautiful day with a very hard frost.  My Aunt P and I, with Mrs Giles, Pocock and George, went to Thorn Church.  We did not get there till the second Lesson.  My Aunt P and Miss Strangways staid to the Communion.  I went to Mrs Strangways, who was not at Church, and sat with her till my Aunt came. While we were there, the two Miss Grosetts and little Hancock calld.  They did not stay long.  We all had some cake and wine.  We did not come home till near three o’clock.  I wrote to my mother and we had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Monday, 30 December, 1811

A beautiful day.  Miss Strangways calld.  She had some hard cheese with us, after which my Aunt and I went as far as the basket makers to get a basket to send to Bath.  We parted with Miss S at Mr Brown’s door.  My Aunt sent my mother a sparerib, a small piece of Stilton cheese and a piece of brawn.  I put a letter in the basket with Cooper’s Draft of £25.0.0 for my mother.  George did it up very nicely and took it to Taunton to go by the Coach.  I mended my blue gown and washed my feet in the evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 31 December, 1811

A very fine day and excessive hard frost.  We got up very early and between nine and ten o’clock my Aunt P and I got into the Chaise to go to Charlton to see a house belonging to Mr Dickenson that is to let.  George went with us.  We did not get out of the Chaise, but changed horses at Langport.  We lookd over the house, which my Aunt appears to like very much.  I cannot say it is at all to my taste.  We staid there near two hours and then went back to Langport, where we took the horses that we had from Taunton in the morning and came home about six o’clock.  It was intensely cold, but we were well wrapt up and had the eiderdown quilt, which kept us comfortable to what we should have been without it.  We were very hungry and had some dinner after we came home.

 

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The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

 

 

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