1812 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for January 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, January 1, 1812

A very fine day, but not frosty.  I did not feel well all day.  Mrs Hancock, her little boy and Mr P Ball calld and sat some time.  I did very little work and read in the evening.  I was out of spirits and never recollect passing so disagreeable a New Year’s Day.  Last year Cooper was with us at this time and we always are chearful when he is here, if not so happy as we used to be, at the dear regretted Villa.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 2 January, 1812

A very fine day, but not frosty.  My Aunt P and I calld at Mrs Ball’s.  We saw the old man, Mr Philip and his three sisters.  My Aunt paid Miss Miriam £2.12.6 for three bushels and an half of wheat.  The Lane was very muddy.  I workd after we came home and in the evening.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.  I put on my new brown Stuff gown.

Friday, 3 January, 1812

A very wet, cold day.  I felt very not well and had the tooth ache very bad all day.  I workd the whole morning and evening.  I heard from my mother and we had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Saturday, 4 January, 1812

A very damp, cold day.  My teeth better.  I took some Salts, which I think was of service to them.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day, but amused myself by making a tray for my Aunt P’s new work box and some tops for her thread papers.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Captain Cooper
John Hutton Cooper

Sunday, 5 January, 1812

A very fine day, but intensely cold.  The poor little Bengaliny was very ill and I was very much afraid it was going to die, but George took it out of the cage and pricked a little pimple it had on its back, which seemed to relieve it and I hope it will be quite well tomorrow.  Miss Strangways calld and sat an hour.  She  brought me the netting twist she was so kind to get for me at Taunton yesterday, for which I paid her 1/6d.  My Aunt P walkd back with her to Thorn Church at three o’clock.  I read part of the Service at home in the morning and read all the evening.

Monday, 6 January, 1812

A fine day and still very cold, but not frosty.  I assisted my Aunt P in cutting out a new Stuff gown and did not do any work for myself all the morning and was very idle in the evening.  We had one of Cooper’s Papers.

Tuesday, 7 January, 1812

An intense cold day, without frost, but beautifully fine.  I was not well all day, but in the afternoon and evening I was tormented with the tooth ache.  My Aunt Neate also has a very bad sweld face and pain in her teeth.  Mr P Ball calld and sat more than an hour before dinner.  I did not do a stitch of work all day, but netted a little in the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Wednesday, 8 January, 1812

A very fine day, but as cold as yesterday.  I wrote all the morning.  Miss Ball, Miss Anne and Miss Tolson calld and sat an hour and a half.  I did not do a stitch of work all the morning.  My teeth were better today than yesterday.  George was very busy brewing.  I hope the beer will turn out well, as this is the first my Aunt has tried.  I workd a little in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper and Farmer Furber’s.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Thursday, 9 January, 1812

A very cold day, with a little sleet and rain.  I cut out the tail of my Aunt P’s Stuff gown and put it together for Pocock to make.  My Aunt was out in the wood house all the morning.  I workd a little in the evening and playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate after supper.  The Balls sent up to enquire after us.

Friday, 10 January, 1812

A miserably dank, damp, uncomfortable day.  I workd most part of the morning on my Aunt’s gown and afterwards for myself.  John Thomas came to see George and came into the parlor to ask us how we did.  One of the cows calved.  She has got an uncommonly fine bull calf, but was very ill and George was a good deal alarmd about her.  She is now very well again.  I playd at Gosch with my Aunt P a little in the evening and afterward workd.  The Grosetts sent to enquire after us.  My Aunt Neate’s face is nearly as much swelld as it was.

Saturday, 11 January, 1812

A fine day.  My Aunt P was so stiff and unwell, she did not come down stairs till dinner time.  Mr Philip Ball calld and staid till near dinner time.  While he was here, I began a purse for Cooper.  I workd a little in the evening.  I heard from my mother and we had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Sunday, 12 January, 1812

A fine day.  We read Prayers at home and I read in the evening.  We had one of Cooper’s Papers.

Monday, 13 January, 1812

A tolerable fine day.  My Aunt P and I calld on the Grosetts.  We saw only Mrs Hancock and Miss Kitty.  In our way home we sat half an hour at Mrs Ball’s, where we saw Mr and Mrs B, Miss B and Miss Miriam.  I workd in the evening.  We had one of Cooper’s Papers and Farmer Furber’s.

Tuesday, 14 January, 1812

A very fine day.  I workd in the morning.  Miss Strangways calld on her return from Ash hill, but did not stay long.  She lookd ill and ugly.  I netted a little while she was here and afterwards workd.  We had one of Cooper’s and Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Wednesday, 15 January, 1812

A beautiful day.  Miss Ball, Miss Anna and Mr Philip calld almost as soon as we had done breakfast, but did not make a long visit.  My Aunt askd them to come in the evening, but Mr and Mrs Strangways dined with them, so they could not.  I wrote in the morning and walkd in the garden for half an hour before dinner and workd in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Thursday, 16 January, 1812

A very fine day.  I wrote part of the morning and was in the cellar a short time.  William Dunnsford, who lived here last, calld to ask us how we did.

He looks remarkably well.  Poor fellow, he says he does not like his present place so well as he did this.  I wish he had been as clever as he was willing and good tempered and he would have been invaluable.  Farmer Furber came and lookd at the calf.  He is to give my Aunt thirty nine shillings for it, I believe.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 17 January, 1812

A fine day, with a slight frost.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Saturday, 18 January, 1812

A very fine day.  We were up very early to go to that nasty house at Charlton, where we met Mr and Mrs Dickenson, who were very polite and obliging.  She is a remarkably pretty woman.  My Aunt and they went over every part of the house and grounds.  I staid by the fire.  My Aunt pointed out the alterations she wishes made, which Mr D is to take into consideration and let her know the result.  In our way to Charlton we got out of the Chaise at Burton Pynsent and lookd at the prospect, which is beyond in imagination beautiful.  The woman whose husband takes care of the garden was very civil and obliging.  She shewd us the part of the house that is left standing and wishd us very much to go to the Obelisk, but we had not time.  We did not reach home till half past six, a good deal tired.  We had a very comfortable dinner and went to bed early.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Burton
View of the pillar at Burton Pynsent, Somersetshire c.1770 (British Library)

Sunday, 19 January, 1812

A dry day, but so dark we could hardly see to read in the dining room.  Just as we were preparing to go to Thorn Church, Mr and Mrs Hancock calld.  He appears a very good temperd man, but not at all superior to the rest of the family in manners or education.  They were going to call on Mrs Strangways, so we all walkd there together.  We did not go in there, but walkd on to the Church, where we were in very good time.  Mrs and Miss S and Miss Miriam Ball did not come in till the first Lesson.  We sat some time at Mrs S after Church and Miss Miriam walkd home with us as far as our gate.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 20 January, 1812

A find day, but very cold.  My Aunt P breakfasted in bed.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld in their way to Taunton to ask if they could do any thing for us.  I workd morning and evening.  I had the tooth aches very bad.  After tea we had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Tuesday, 21 January, 1812

A dry morning, but very gloomy looking and cold.  There were two or three very hard hail storms in the course of the day.  I workd a little in the morning and all the evening.

I heard from Mr Touray with the number of the 16th of the Lottery Ticket he has bought for me.

We had Cooper’s Paper and Mrs Phillip’s.

Wednesday, 22 January, 1812

A very fine day with a severe frost.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and sleept here.  Mr and Mrs Hancock and their son, Mrs Ball, her three daughters and Mr Phillip and Miss Grosett drank tea and suppd with us.  We playd Pope Joan and Speculation.  I lost 2/- at the latter.  They went away about twelve.  It was intensely cold the whole evening and had snowed a little.

Thursday, 23 January, 1812

A fine, frost day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways breakfasted here, but went home soon afterwards.  I covered the tray of my Aunt’s work box and some of its appendages.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Friday, 24 January, 1812

A beautiful sunshine and frosty morning, but it thawd about the middle of the day.  My Aunt P and I calld on the Grosetts.  We saw all the family, the old man looking very ill.  It was quite muddy in some places and I was sorry I did not take my pattens.  I  went on with my Aunt’s work box in the evening.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.  I wrote to my mother.

Saturday, 25 January, 1812

A very gloomy looking day and, tho very cold within, quite mild out.  I made a pin cushion and fixd it in the tray of my Aunt’s work box and workd in the evening.

Sunday, 26 January, 1812

A most beautiful day.  It was quite like May.  My Aunt P and I went to Church at Thorn in the morning.  They were reading the Psalms when we went in.  Miss Strangways and Miss’s Anna and Miriam Ball and their brother were at Church.

We saw Captain Tolson on horseback by Mr Dyer’s.  We sat some time at Mrs Strangway’s and had some cake and wine.  Captain T came in while we were there and staid after us.  The Balls walkd as far as our gate with us, but could not come in, as it was their dinner time.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 27 January, 1812

A gloomy looking day, but mild out.  Mrs Hancock and Miss Grosett calld and sat a long time.  They had some luncheon.  I workd after they were gone.  Mrs H sent up one of her caps for my Aunt to try on.  I workd in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Tuesday, 28 January, 1812

A gloomy morning with an excessive high wind and a little mizzling rain, but it did not last long and was fine after twelve o’clock.  My Aunt sent George to Taunton, in expectation of a letter from Cooper to say when he would be here in his way to Lord Paulett’s.  George returnd while we were at dinner with a letter from C, saying he would be here today at four o’clock.  My Aunt had the meat, which we had not cut, taken out to be kept till he came and I set about getting every thing in order.  He arrived about five, looking very well, but I think rather constrained in his manner, but it may be only my fancy.  We chatted all the evening and did not go to bed till near two o’clock.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Wednesday, 29 January, 1812

A dreadful day, after a most tremendous night.  It blew quite a hurricane and the rain pourd in such torrents that the fields were quite under water and it continued to rain the whole day.  Cooper was in very good spirits and as kind and affectionate as he used to be.  He playd two games at Chess with my Aunt Neate and left us between two and three o’clock for Lord Paulett’s.  Just as he was stepping into the Carriage, Mr Hancock calld “to take leave” and sat near an hour.  I copyd some of Cooper’s and Mrs W Williams’ poetry for my Aunt into her book in the morning and evening.

We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and Bell Man’s verses and Cooper’s Paper.

Thursday, 30 January, 1812

A fine day till three o’clock, when it began to rain and continued some time.  My Aunt sent George over to Lord Paulett’s very early for a letter that Cooper had taken with him by mistake.  He returnd with it and one from C, just before dinner.  I put a leech near the swelling on my neck, by Cooper’s direction, which took up my time the whole morning and as it continued to bleed the whole evening, I was not able to do any thing.  My Aunt P read aloud part of the evening, as she did not like my holding down my head to do so myself.  She bought some nice light baskets of a woman who came to the door with them.

Friday, 31 January, 1812

A rainy day.  I workd all day and in the evening too.  I heard from my mother.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Fashion plate for February 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for February 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Saturday, 1 February, 1812

A very bad day.  The rain pourd down in torrents.  I wrote all the morning and read in the evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 2 February, 1812

A dreadful day.  It pourd as hard as it did yesterday.  The fields were quite under water.  We read Prayers after breakfast and I read the rest of the day.  George went to Taunton in the evening for the letters.  The water was so much out at Black Brook, he was obliged to wait an hour and, when he went thro, it was half way up the poney’s sides.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Monday, 3 February, 1812

A dry morning, but dull looking and cold.  My rabbit has got young ones, but I don’t yet know how many.  George is brewing.  Miss’s Anna and Miriam and Mr P Ball calld.  My Aunt askd them to come and spend the evening, which they did.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 2/6d.  The Balls were very chearful and appeard very comfortable.  They went away a little after twelve. Mrs Ball sent my Aunt some black puddings.

Tuesday, 4 February, 1812

A dull looking morning, but a very fine afternoon.  I finishd my white gown, that has been so long about and workd the rest of the day and evening on my green one.  My Aunts playd at Gosch after supper and I read.

Mrs Ball sent my Aunt some eggs.  Mr P Ball calld in the morning, but I did not see him.

Wednesday, 5 January, 1812

A very wet morning.  Today is appointed as a general Fast, but the rain prevented our going to Church and indeed there is no Service at Thorn, which is a scandalous thing.  I workd on my green gown all the morning and in the evening too.  It did not cease raining the whole day.  I heard from my mother and wrote her a very long letter after supper.   We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 6 February, 1812

A very dark, dull day and very cold.  It began to rain soon after breakfast and continued the rest of the day.  I workd on my gown in the morning and netted in the evening.

Friday, 7 February, 1812

A fine day.  I put a leech on my throat directly after breakfast.  It was an hour before it fixed and did not stay on long, so that the operation was soon over.  Miss Strangway calld while I was up stairs, so that I did not see her.  I netted the rest of the morning and in the evening also.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Saturday, 8 February, 1812

A very fine day.  I workd on my green gown.  Miss Ball, Miss Anna, Mr Philip and Miss Strangways calld and staid an hour.  I netted in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 9 February, 1812

A beautiful day, with a very white frost.  My Aunt and I went to Thorn Church in the morning.  We did not get there till the second Lesson.  We sat a long time at Mrs Strangway’s afterwards, and had some cake and wine.  Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam walkd to our white gate with us.  It was so warm and pleasant, it was quite like May.  I walkd round the garden after I came home.

I read all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 10 February, 1812

A very fine morning, but not frosty.  Two of the Muscovy ducks have began to lay  and some of the hens.  Miss Grosett and a Miss Case, a very lovely little girl, who is staying with them, calld and sat an hour.  I netted while they were here and wrote the rest of the morning.  It continued dry all day, tho gloomy in the middle of it, but a very fine evening.  I netted all the evening.  I wrote to my mother.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Tuesday, 11 February, 1812

A dry day, but cold and dull looking.  We calld on the Balls, saw all the family and Miss Strangways, who is staying there.  I workd all the morning and netted in the evening.  One of my Aunt Neate’s lambs died, the first she has lost.  A nasty dog came to the house, just as we were going to bed and howld a long time after we were in bed, which made Pedro bark very much.

Wednesday, 12 February, 1812

A very gloomy looking morning, which turnd to rain and it was wet the rest of the day.  I made a shoe in the morning, but it did not fit me well, so I pulld it to pieces after dinner.  My hands were so blistered and sore with the packthread, I could not work in the evening.  Farmer Furber came to speak to my Aunt.  He had some tea with us.  I read all the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 13 February, 1812

A very fine morning, but with a very cold wind, that I was almost petrified when I went to feed the poultry. Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and sat an hour.  I netted all the morning and in the evening too.  My legs were so much sweld and so painful I could hardly walk across the room.  My Aunt P had a sheep killd, which has turnd out very well.

Friday, 14 February, 1812

A melancholy Valentine’s day.  It did not cease raining the whole day.  Poor Pedro got into great disgrace, by going to play with a lamb.  Luckily my Aunt P saw him and George ran down and rescued it.  He had not hurt it at all.  George Whipd him well, but in less than an hour afterwards, we saw him chasing the lamb again.  George went out with the Coach whip and ? him in and then whipd him well, while Ephraim held a lamb for him to know what he was whipd for.  He is now tied up and is to be for some time.  I netted all day and sat with my legs up.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.  My Aunt playd at Gosch in the evening.  My Aunt sent Mrs Ball a little honey.

Saturday, 15 February, 1812

A very cold day with a mizzling rain in the morning.  My Aunt Neate was so unlucky to have one of her sheep die in the night.  I netted all day and sat with my feet up most part of the day.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 16 February, 1812

A wet day.  We read Prayers at home.  George went to Church.  I sat with my feet up most part of the day and read.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 17 February, 1812

A fine day.  Mr Phillip Ball calld to ask if he could do any thing at Taunton for us.  My Aunt begd him to pay Mr Marriot’s bill for her and askd him and his sisters to drink tea here.  Only Miss Ball and Miss Anna came.  Miriam was at Mr Grosett’s and Mr Phillip was not returnd from Taunton.  We playd Pope Joan and I won 4/-.  They went home about twelve.  My legs were enormously swelld at night and very painful.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  My Aunt Neate had another sheep die.

Tuesday, 18 February, 1812

A very fine day.  Mr P Ball calld directly after breakfast, but I was up stairs, so did not see him.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and had some luncheon.  My Aunt askd them to spend the day here tomorrow.  I sat with my feet up all day.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and Cooper’s Paper.

Wednesday, 19 February, 1812

A dry day, but dull looking.  My legs very bad.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and sleept here.  Misses Anna and Miriam Ball drank tea and suppd here.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 2/-.  Miss Strangways was so obliging to bring us “Thinks I to myself” to read.  The Balls went home at twelve o’clock.  I sat with my feet up all day.

SONY DSC
Fanny Chapman

Thursday, 20 February, 1812

A very fine day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways left us about one.  Miss S went with my Aunt P to call on the Balls and Grosetts.  I wrote in the morning and sat with my feet up all day.  They are so bad, it is with difficulty and great pain I walk at all.  My Aunt P read the 1st volume of “Thinks I to Myself” to us in the evening and I am sure I have not laughed so much since I have been at Henlade.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  I wrote to my mother.  One of my Aunt P’s sheep died and another of my Aunt Neate’s.

Friday, 21 February, 1812

A dull looking morning, but mild.  We got up at seven o’clock, as my Aunts were going to Charlton to give ? and arrange finally every thing there.  I wish the house had fallen down before we had seen it, for it is a detestable place.  It turnd out a very bad day.  A very high wind and torrents of rain, which was very unfortunate for my Aunts.  I read all day and sat with my feet up.  My Aunts returnd at half past seven and had some dinner.  They have settld every thing about the house and we are to go to it as soon as the work people have put it in order, if it should please God, we live so long.  We went to bed early, as my Aunts were very much tired.  My Aunt Neate was very much pleased with Charlton!!!

Saturday, 22 February, 1812

A very showery day, with sunshine and hail.  My legs were very bad and I kept them up all day.  We had Cooper’s Paper.   I heard from my mother a very bad account of dear Emma.  My Aunt P finishd “Thinks I to myself”.

Sunday, 23 February, 1812

A dry day.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast.  George went to Taunton and got some leeches for me and I put four on my ancles.  They all suckd very well.  I went down stairs to dinner and lay on the sopha all the rest of the day.  My Aunt read the Bible aloud in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  I took Calomel at night.

Monday, 24 February, 1812

Sunshine with hard showers in between.  I was very ill all the morning from the Calomel and did not get up till after dinner and did not go down stairs all day.  Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam calld, but did not stay long.  My Aunts drank tea and suppd up stairs.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  My Aunt paid Miss S 3/6d for some scarlet and brown purse twist she got for me at Taunton.

Tuesday, 25 February, 1812

A very bad day, torrents of rain and three long claps of thunder, with a very vivid flash of lightening.  I put two more leeches on my ancle and laid on the bed the whole day, only got off to have it made at night.  My Aunts dined and sat up stairs the rest of the day.  The Muscovy duck began to sit on seven eggs.

Wednesday, 26 February, 1812

A most beautiful day.  I did not get off the bed till after supper.  Miss Grosett calld and brought with her another Miss Case, a sweet little girl, my Aunt said, about ten years old.  My Aunt gave her one of my dormice, with which she was very much delighted.  I vancouverd some broken China in the morning.  My Aunts drank tea and suppd up stairs.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 27 February, 1812

A miserable, dull looking wet morning, but it cleard up after breakfast and was very fine the rest of the day.  I did not move from the bed, but when absolutely necessary.  Miss Strangways and Mr P Ball calld, but did not make a long visit, either of them.  I vancouverd again and wrote to my mother.

We had Cooper’s Paper.

Friday, 28 February, 1812

A beautiful day, with sharp white frost.  I sat a few minutes at the open window, when I first got up and lay on the bed the rest of the day.  My legs are very much better.  Miss Ball and Miss Anna calld. I mended a good deal of china and walkd about the room a short time.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  Miss Anna Ball brought a small bunch of beautiful violets.

Saturday, 29 February, 1812

A wet morning, fine in the middle of the day and very wet all the evening.  I mended some more china and my mother’s wine glass, that she sent me to do.  I walkd about before and after dinner and sat up all the evening to tea and supper and playd a game of Gosch with my Aunt P after supper, besides cutting some feathers after tea, but my legs were not mended by having them down so long, for they were very painful when I went to bed.  Poor Pedro came up stairs and was so glad to see me, he would hardly go out of the room.  I began a purse for Miss Strangways, but I think she will not go on with it very well, as it is a corkscrew one.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Fashion plate for March 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for March 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 March, 1812

Wet in the morning, tolerably fine in the middle of the day and very wet in the evening.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast.  I laid on the bed all day and read the Bible while my Aunts were down stairs.  My Aunt P read a Sermon aloud in the evening.  Daniel Turner came for the dormouse for little Miss Case.  George examined them and found there were two males and two females, so my Aunt sent her a pair.  Pedro and Miss paid me a short visit at tea time.

Monday, 2 March, 1812

A most beautiful day.  I walkd about the room a few minutes at a time and lay on the bed the rest of the day.  I netted a few rows of Miss Strangway’s purse and mended China the rest of the morning. Miss Strangways calld and took her purse away with her.  I playd at Gosch with my Aunt N after supper.

Tuesday, 3 March, 1812

A wet morning and gloomy the whole day.  I laid on the bed all day, except walking about the room for a few minutes at a time.  I mended a good deal of the china.  Pedro came to see me when George brought the supper to the door.

Wednesday, 4 March, 1812

A gloomy day with rain frequently.  I came down stairs for the first time since last Sennight.  My feet and legs are a great deal better.  I mended some more china.  I walkd into the Oak Room and Anti Room.  We went up stairs after dinner and I laid on the bed the rest of the evening.

Thursday, 5 March, 1812

A beautiful day.  I came down stairs after breakfast and walkd round the garden with my Aunt.  I wrote all the morning.  Mrs Strangways sent my Aunt a Goose egg to taste. Farmer Furber came to look for some papers in the drawers in the Library for Mr Anderdon.  We went up stairs to tea and supper.  I laid on the bed part of the evening.  I heard from my mother and wrote to her.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.  Mr Dickenson sent the patterns of the papers for Charlton.

Friday, 6 March, 1812

Wet before we got up, but very fine the rest of the day.  I came down to breakfast for the first time since Monday’s s’enight.  I mended a good deal of Cooper’s Japan china, walkd in the garden for a quarter of an hour and went to see my rabbits and the ducks and drank tea and suppd up stairs.  I laid on the bed part of the evening.  We had Cooper’s Papers.

Saturday, 7 March, 1812

A fine day.  I mended china all day.  Miss Strangways, the three Miss Balls and their brother calld.  They all gave their opinions about the papers.  They staid till our dinner time.  Little Eliza Strangways came with them.  We drank tea and suppd up stairs.  I cut some feathers before tea and laid on the bed after till supper, after which I playd at Gosch with my Aunt P.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 8 March, 1812

A fine day.  My Aunt P went to morning Church at Thorn.  I read Prayers at home and sat with my feet up on the sopha most part of the day.  I read all day and in the evening we had Cooper’s Paper.  I heard from my mother a better account of dear Emma.  My Aunt sent Mrs Strangways a jug of Frummity.

Monday, 9 March, 1812

A beautiful day.  Mrs Williams brought little Charles down, who is much better.  A young woman brought her little girl from Stoke for some Calomel for the worms.  We chose the papers for Charlton and I packd them up to be sent back tomorrow.  We drank tea and suppd up stairs.  I cut feathers all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper. My legs were worse than they have been for some days past.  My Aunt sent Mrs Furber a small basin of Frummity.

Tuesday, 10 March, 1812

A beautiful day with very white frost.  I wrote all the morning.  My Aunt P went to Mrs Ball’s with the wheat she was so kind to lend us and to call on the Grosetts.  While she was out Mr Collins’s servant brought a letter from Cooper at Weymouth, which he sent by Mr Collins.  I kept my feet up a good deal, but they were very indifferent at night.  We drank tea and suppd up stairs.  I cut a good many feathers.

Wednesday, 11 March, 1812

A fine day, but very cold.  I sat on the bed with my feet up most part of the day.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld.  We sent to Mrs Ball’s for the cuttings of rose trees, to go to Bath to Miss Keen.  There was only one small one rooted.  I packd them in a little basket and enclosed my mother’s wine glass that I have mended and some cucumber seed for Emma.  George took it to Taunton to go by the Coach tomorrow.  I cut some feathers after tea and laid on the bed the rest of the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.  I wrote to Miss Keen, Mr Touray and a very long letter to my mother.

Thursday, 12 March, 1812

A gloomy looking day, but dry all the morning.  I laid on the bed almost all the morning and cut a good many feathers.  It began to rain about four o’clock and continued all the evening.  We suppd up stairs and I laid on the bed from tea till supper time and sleept most part of the time.

Friday, 13 March, 1812

A very fine morning, but very cold with thin ice.  I walkd round the garden two or three times.  I was up early and down stairs a little after eight.  I cut feathers in the morning.  We suppd up stairs.  I laid on the bed all the evening.  Mrs Ball sent my Aunt a brown loaf.

Saturday, 14 March, 1812

A fine day, but very cold.  I cut feathers all the morning and luckily we finished them all before dinner.  I sat with my feet up on the sopha and playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate all the evening.

Sunday, 15 March, 1812

A fine day, but it snowd a little in the morning early and we had two or three showers of hail in the course of the day.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast and then my Aunt P and I walkd to the white gate and afterwards I went into the garden and gatherd a Wall flower, some lilac and yellow primroses, a snow drop and some violets.  I sat with my feet up on the sopha the rest of the morning and read, which I did also in the evening.

Monday, 16 March, 1812

A fine morning, but very cold.  I was down stairs ten minutes after eight o’clock.  My Aunt wishd to go and see Mrs Boait, who is ill, but would not let me walk so far, so I went on the poney and George led it.  He went very quiet and I had a nice ride, only it was very cold coming back.  I netted a little in the evening.

Tuesday, 17 March, 1812

A fine day, but very cold.  Miss Ball, Miss Miriam and Mr Philip Ball calld, but did not stay long.  I netted a little in the morning and sat with my feet up all the evening.

Wednesday 18 March,1812

A very fine day.  The two Miss Grosett’s calld and sat some time.  I workd all the morning.  I cut out a blue cap, which Mrs Giles made for me and I trimd it in the in the evening.

Thursday, 19 March, 1812

A very fine day.  I broke some sugar in the morning and was busy getting the wine, desert, etc ready for dinner.  Mrs and Miss Strangways dined and slept here.  Miss Ball, Miss Miriam and Mr Philip came to tea and supper.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 9/-.  I never saw Miss S look so well, she was very smartly drest and very chearful.  The Balls went away a little after twelve.  I heard from Mr Touray with a draft for 8 pounds one and tenpence.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Friday, 20 March, 1812

We were surprised to hear before we were up that it had snowd very fast in the night, and when we got up it was quite a white world.  The snow round the house was about six inches deep, but up the field, where it had drifted, between two and three feet.  Of course the Strangways could not go home.  The rain pourd down in torrents all day, notwithstanding which Mr P Ball calld to bring my Aunt the Taunton Paper, which had some verses, a paraphrase on the Prince’s letter to Lords Grey and Grenville, which are very clever and severe.  My Aunt askd him to come in the evening.  He told us of a dreadful fire last night, which burnt down the Mill at BathPool, with an immense quantity of wheat and flour.  He came in the evening and we playd Pope Joan.  I lost 1/-.  He went away a little before twelve.

Saturday, 21 March, 1812

A very wet morning, with now and then sunshine.  The Strangways could not go home.  I netted all the morning.  There was the most beautiful rainbow after dinner I ever saw in my life and it was a very fine evening with beautiful moonshine, all the snow gone.  My Aunt askd the Strangways to stay till tomorrow morning.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 3/-.  They went to bed a little before twelve.

Sunday, 22 March. 1812

A wet morning, but it cleard up after breakfast and Mrs and Miss Strangways went home.  We are very much alarmd about poor dear Pedro, who we very much fear has swallowd Mrs Giles’ pin cusion, with some pins and a good many needles in it, which she has missd some days.  He was following me out of the room just now and when he began to whine and then skream and howl in the most dreadful manner I ever heard.  We have given him a long dose of castor oil and shut him up in hopes that (it) may carry it thro him.  I shall be seriously sorry if it kills him, as he is the finest good temperd and most affectionate creature I ever saw.  I wrote all the evening.

Monday, 23 March, 1812

A very gloomy looking morning.  Miss Strangways came while we were at breakfast, by appointment, as my Aunt has lent her the poney to go to Ashhill.  She is to return in the evening.  Poor Pedro appears very well today, but unluckily the oil made him sick instead of going thro him.  I gave him some salts, but had not enough to be of service.  It began to rain about one o’clock and continued pouring the rest of the day and evening.  The field in front of the house was quite under water.  Miss Strangways returnd about five, thro the rain, but was so wrapd up she was not wet any where, but just on the side, near where she sat on the saddle.  She took off all her clothes (and I lent her some of mine), had some hot brandy and water and laid down on the sopha.  My Aunt would not allow her to go home, but sent Ephraim to say she would sleep here.  We chatted in the evening and did not sit up late.

Tuesday, 24 March, 1812

A gloomy looking morning.  Miss Strangways went home directly after breakfast.  It was fortunate she did so early, for it began to rain about an hour afterwards and did not cease the whole day.  George went to Taunton and got some Ethiops mineral.  I gave Pedro a dose, which he took very well, poor fellow.  I vancouvered all the morning, broke some sugar and mended two dusters for my Aunt in the evening.  George took my letter to my mother to the Post.

It snowd when we went to bed.

Wednesday, 25 March, 1812

The ground was covered with snow when we got up, but it was a very fine day and the sun had such power that it was all melted by the afternoon.  I vancouverd in the morning and netted in the afternoon.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper, which I read to my Aunts.

Thursday, 26 March, 1812

A beautiful day.  I vancouverd all the morning and netted in the afternoon.  My Aunt P calld at Mr Grosett’s and Mr Ball’s.  She saw all Mr G’s family.  The Captain and Mrs G were friendly and glad to see her, the latter looking lovely.  Mr and Mrs Strangways came at Mr Ball’s, Miss Anna not yet come home.  I mended some towels for my Aunt in the evening.  Mrs W Williams sent me a pressing invitation to go and stay some time with her at Weymouth for the benefit of the warm bath, which I would not do if I was in health, much less in the state I am in at present.

Good Friday, 27th March, 1812

A dull looking day with very little sun.  I vancouverd all the morning.  My Aunt P was up stairs packing.  Farmer Furber came to speak to my Aunt Neate.  Mrs Giles made us some excellent hot cross buns.  I workd a little in the evening, mending some towels for my Aunt.

Saturday, 28 March, 1812

It did not cease raining the whole day.  I vancouverd all the morning.  My Aunt packd.  Miss K Grosett was so kind to get some muscles at Taunton for us, some of which we had for supper.  They were very fine ones.  I workd in the evening.

George got the change for the Draft Mr Touray sent me £8.1.10.

Easter Sunday, 29 March, 1812

A very dull looking morning, but warm out.  We read Prayers soon after breakfast.  George and Pocock went to Ruishton Church.  It began to rain between twelve and one and continued the rest of the day and evening.  I read all the evening.

Monday, 30 March, 1812

A tolerable day and so warm out, it was like going into a hot house.  I dried a good many books and mended a cloth to cover them and put them on the floor behind the sopha.  Mrs Strangways sent for an emetic for Miss S, who is very unwell.  I netted all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Tuesday, 31 March, 1812

A wet day.  Mr W Williams’ servant brought a note from Mr W to say it would not be in his power to call here, in his way to Weymouth, but sent his man to take Pedro to Cooper.  I could not help shedding some tears at parting with poor, dear Pedro.  He was so affectionate and so very fond of me.  The man appeard very good temperd and was very kind to him and Pedro went very willingly with him.  I wrote all the morning and playd at Gosch with my Aunts in the evening.  My Aunt Powell was very unwell from tea time.

Fashion plate for April 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for April 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Wednesday, 1 April, 1812

A gloomy looking morning, but warm out.  My Aunt Powell was very unwell with a complaint in her bowels and was very sick after breakfast, which relieved her greatly.  I netted all day and playd Gosch with my Aunt Powell in the evening.

We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.  I wrote to my mother.  It was very wet from twelve o’clock.  My Aunt sent Miss Strangways a rabbit for her dinner.

Thursday, 2 April, 1812

Warm out, but raind the whole day.  Mr Philip and Miss Miriam Ball calld and sat some time.  My Aunt gave Miriam a pot of veal and ham to take home with her.  Mr Ball told us a good deal of news.  My Aunt Powell suffered very much from a pain in her face and teeth the whole day and evening.  I netted in the morning and a little in the evening.  I had the happiness of hearing from my beloved William.  His letter is dated September, 1810.  I had also a nice long letter from Harry.  I wrote to my mother.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

William Neate Chapman, Fanny's brother.
William Neate Chapman, Fanny’s brother.

Friday, 3 April, 1812

A very wet day.  George went to the Assizes very early and came home before dinner.  The servants took down the furniture of the bed in the Oak Room.  My Aunt P still not at all better today.  I lookd over letters and papers all the morning and workd in the evening.  Played at Gosch after supper.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  Mrs Strangways sent my Aunt some grafts of the Sack Apple and French pears.

Saturday, 4 April, 1812

A most beautiful day, quite like May.  The Wall trees are coverd with blossom.  We were all very busy the whole morning, drying and wiping the furniture of the Oak Room and I scarcely sat down from breakfast till dinner time.  My feet ached very much and I sat with them up the whole evening and workd till after supper, when I played Gosch with my Aunt P, whose face is very bad.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 5 April, 1812

A beautiful day.   We read Prayers at home.  My Aunt sent Pocock and George to Thorn Church, but there was no Service in the morning, so they went again at one o’clock.  My Aunt and I walkd a little while in front of the house and I put both the birds out.  Captain Grosett and Miss Kitty calld and sat some time, both very friendly and sociable.  I read all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 6 April, 1812

A dull looking morning, with a hard shower early, but a beautiful day afterwards.  My Aunt P and I went to Taunton early.  We stopd at White’s, the brokers, and saw a great many chairs etc.  We then went on to Incell’s to Mrs Speediman’s sale.  My Aunt bought a very nice mahogany table, for which she gave £3.12.0, but the chairs which she wanted went extravagantly high.  We staid there till three o’clock and then returnd to Taunton.  I bought some muslin handkerchiefs, four at 3/6d and two at 3/3d.  I also bought a silk handkerchief to give to George at 3/6d and a pair of stockings at 3/3d for Mrs Giles, in the place of those that Pedro tore.

I got at Bailys a toothbrush 1/-, a nail brush 6d and a pair of purse tassalls for Cooper’s purse, 4/- and at Alexander’s a pr of scissors, 2/6d.  I went to Miss Miles’s for some green chenille and two pr of garters, but could not get either.  I bespoke a pair of lasts, right and left.  We went to Mr Coxes, Mr Townsend’s, Bales, Jacob’s the Cogg makers for my Aunt Neate and to try to get a plaid for her, but could not.  We stopd in our way home at White’s again and my Aunt fixd on some chairs for the bed rooms and dining room and two bedsteads and a flock bed.  We did not get home to dinner till seven o’clock.  I sat with my feet up all the evening and did not eat any supper, but was not near so much tired as I expected.

Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835 (c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Castle Bow, Taunton by Sargeant, c.1835
(c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 7 April, 1812

A dull looking day, but pleasant out.  Miss Ball and Miss Anna calld.  They brought us a beautiful bunch of hyacinths and some double violet roots.  While they were here, their brother and Captain and Mrs Grosett came in.  She lookd very pretty and was very pleasant.  My Aunt lent them the “Spirit of the Book”.  My Aunt Powell suffered very much all day.  She put on a blister behind her ear at night.  We were very busy all day.  George took up the carpets and beat them and then went to the sale, where he bought the meat skewer my Aunt wanted.

Wednesday, 8 April, 1812

A dry day, but dull looking and cold.  Mr Ball calld to ask after my Aunt, but she was not well enough to see him. We paperd a good many of the drawing room chairs and workd at it till quite dusk.  I workd a little after tea. We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper, George and little Boait brought home the meat skewer and table from Incell.  My rabbit produced six young ones.

Thursday, 9 April, 1812

A dull day and very cold.  Mr P Ball calld, but only I saw him.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld and sat some time.  They had some luncheon.  Miss S looks unwell and languid.  After they were gone, we workd hard at the packing till after seven o’clock.

Friday, 10 April, 1812

A dry day, but extremely cold.  Miss Ball and Miss Anna calld, but did not stay long.  When they spoke of our going so soon, poor Anna could not help shedding tears.  I packd a good many of the tables, ready for George to put the Hay band on.  My Aunt’s face was very bad.  I hemd one side of a handkerchief between tea and supper and playd Gosch with my Aunt P after.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Saturday, 11 April, 1812

A very fine day.  Mrs Strangways sent to enquire after my Aunt, who is in great pain to day.  I don’t think the blister has done her any good.  My Aunt sent Mrs S a rabbit to keep.  We were busy all day packing.  I playd cards with my Aunt P after tea and sat with my feet up all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  I wrote to my mother.

Sunday, 12 April, 1812

A beautiful day.  I read the Prayers, as my Aunt P’s face was too bad for her to do it.  George, Pocock and Hannah went to Ruishton Church.  My Aunt P and I walkd round the garden and lookd at the Wall trees, which are beautiful.  Pocock’s sisters came to see her.  She and Hannah walkd part of the way home with them after tea.  Miss Strangways calld to ask my Aunt how she did at eight o’clock, but did not sit down five minutes.

The Church of St George, Ruishton (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)
The Church of St George, Ruishton (www.westcountrychurches.co.uk)

Monday, 13 April, 1812

A fine day, but a very cold wind.  Mr P Ball calld but I did not see him.  Mrs and Miss Charlotte Comber calld and were very chatty and agreeable.  They had some luncheon.  I netted all day. My Aunt’s face was very bad. Mrs and Miss Strangways, Mr P Ball and this three sisters drank tea and suppd here.  Miss Anna looks ill and was out of spirits.  Miss S very well.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost six shilling, but my Aunt gave me 2/6d of it again.  They went away a little after twelve.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Miss S brought us each a present of a very pretty red leather pin cushion.

Tuesday, 14 April, 1812

A fine day.  My poor Aunt P was in such agony all the morning it was quite distressing to see her sufferings.  I persuaded her to try a mustard poultice, which in an hour or two, by the blessing of God, relieved her and tho very languid the rest of the day, yet her face was easy.  I netted a little and playd Gosch in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Wednesday, 15 April, 1812

A very fine day.  My Aunt P better.  Mrs Strangways, Miss Ball and Miss Anne calld, the two latter sat a long time.  They brought some stockings for us to see that they had been so kind to bring from Taunton.  I aird a great quantity of prints and laid them proper for packing.  I was very much tired and sat with my feet up all the evening.  I playd Gosch with my Aunt P.  Mrs S took the Paper home with her.

Thursday, 16 April, 1812

A fine day.  I finished the prints.  We had a visit from Mr and Mrs Strangways at Hatch, the first time he has calld since we have been here, a prelude I rather think to their visiting us at Charlton, where he has a living, tho no house, and where it may be very convenient to them.  He is going to Charlton on Monday and calld on pretense of asking if he could any thing there for my Aunt and to put her in the way of getting coals, etc.  Mr P Ball, Miss Anna, Miss Miriam and their little girl came with them.  They staid about an hour.  Miss Anna brought a small loaf she had been so kind to make from a receipt somebody gave my Aunt (barley meal and oat meal) which they had from here yesterday.  It was very eatable, tho not very palatable.  I dried a good many books in the afternoon, sat with my feet up and playd part of a game of Gosch with my Aunt P.  We had Cooper’s Paper and I heard from my mother.

My Aunt P sent Mr  Kimberly notice that when she quits this house, which will be, she thinks, in a fortnight or three weeks, it will be shut up, consequently not liable to more than the quarter’s taxes.

Friday, 17 April, 1812

A fine day.  A man came to mend the table and different things that want glueing.  We were very busy packing and carrying books all the morning.  I wrote after dinner.  Miss Ball and Miss Miriam calld and sat an hour before tea.  Miss M is going to Taunton tomorrow and kindly came for our commissions.  We had Cooper’s Papers.  I wrote to my mother and my Aunt, to Messrs Clements, enclosing a draft for £51.13.0 for Mr E Clark.

Saturday, 18 April, 1812

A very fine day.  My Aunt assisted in packing the books all day.  I dried a great many of them.  Miss Strangways calld, but did not stay long.  Just as I had made the tea, Miss Anna and Miss Miriam Ball calld to bring me some velvet for my head that they had been so kind to get for me and for which I paid Miss M 3/6d.  My Aunt prevaild on them to stay and sup with us.  They lookd over a great many of our patterns for work and took some home to copy.  The shoemaker woman from Stoke came and took my lasts to make me a pair of soles and says she will let me have them Monday evening.  We playd Pope Joan.  I neither lost or won.  The Balls did not go away till near twelve.  It was a beautiful night, but a very hard frost.

At the Shoemaker's Shop by British School, 1825 (c) National Trust, Wimpole Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
At the Shoemaker’s Shop by British School, 1825
(c) National Trust, Wimpole Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Sunday, 19 April, 1812

A beautiful day.  I read the Prayers directly after breakfast.  My Aunt P was very unwell all day.  The two Miss Grosetts calld.  Mr P Ball calld while they were here to take my Aunts enquiries to Charlton, where he is going with Mr Strangways tomorrow.  My Aunt had not got them ready and he was so kind to say he would call this evening for them.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld just before tea.  My Aunt askd them to stay.  Mrs S said they came on purpose.  Mr Philip Ball came after tea, staid to supper and walkd home with the Strangways afterwards.  They went away about eleven.

Monday, 20 April, 1812

A very fine day.  My neck was so painful I put on two leeches, which fixd the moment their heads touchd the skin.  In the evening my throat and neck sweld and inflamed so much it was frightful to see, independent of the pain, which was very great.  I wrote all the morning and afternoon and sat with my feet up all the evening.  I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 21 April, 1812

A very fine day.  My neck as much swelld and inflamed as yesterday, even more so, as it is as red as if I had the Scarlet Fever quite to my bosom.  Captain, Mrs and Miss Grosett calld, but did I not see them.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld after dinner, in their way to Mr Grosett’s, where they were going to drink tea.  I was in a good deal of pain all day.  I fell asleep after Mrs S went away and it refreshd me very much.  I sat on the sopha all the evening.  George took my letter to my mother to the Post.

Wednesday, 22 April, 1812

Rather a cloudy looking morning, but very pleasant out.  When I went to feed the poultry after breakfast, the nightingales were singing enchantingly, the first time I have heard them this year.  Miss Strangways calld in her way to Taunton for our commissions.  My throat very little better today, indeed I felt very unwell all over.  Mrs and Miss Strangways came at half past eight, in their home from Taunton and suppd here.  Miss S brought two pair of stockings for me to look at.  They are very good ones indeed, but 8/- a pair.  They went away about eleven and my Aunt sent George home with them, as their maid did not come to fetch them.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper.

Thursday, 23 April, 1812

A very fine day.  My throat felt very painful and I had the tooth ache very much in the morning, and so bad in the night I got out of bed and put some Odantalgic to it, which relieved it a little.  Mr Fickers sent home the picture frames he had to new gild.  I wrote part of the morning and afterwards, put the pictures in the frames.  My Aunt Powell began to pack some of the china.  My teeth were very bad all the evening.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 24 April, 1812

A very fine day.  Miss Strangways and Mr Phillip Ball calld, the latter to bring an account of Charlton, which he say will not be ready or fit to inhabit these six weeks or two months.  While they were here, Mrs Ball and Miss B came.  They brought part of a brown loaf to my Aunt.  George got me some very mice mould and new potted the orange tree and put the Bergemotte tree in a tub, iron bound, that had a rhododendron of Mr Anderdon’s in, which died last year.  Miss S waited and took a letter for my Aunt, as she is going to Taunton this afternoon to stay till tomorrow.  I had the tooth ache very bad all the evening.

Saturday, 25 April, 1812

A gloomy morning with very hard showers.  My teeth were very grumbling all day.  A man came from Charlton to offer himself as gardener and my Aunt has agreed to take him.  Pocock very foolishly lockd the Stone Room door after my Aunt and turnd the key twice, so that it could not be undone.  We sent to Pope to pick the lock, which he could not do and was obliged to force the door.  I playd at Gosch after supper with my Aunt P.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.  Berry came to say his wife was very ill.  My Aunt had some broth made and sent her.  Old Harry? Wilmot came to ask for some embrocation  My Aunt gave her some and 2/- .

Sunday, 26 April, 1812

A fine day.  We read Prayers soon after breakfast.  My teeth were very bad the whole time.  My Aunt went to see Berry’s wife and sent her some mutton and pudding from our dinner.  Mrs Giles and Hannah went to see Ephraim, who is still very ill and then went on to Stoke to Mary Furness.  George askd leave to go with Farmer Furber to spend the afternoon at Pocock’s father’s. He did not come home till eleven o’clock.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld after dinner and drank tea here.  They went away at eight o’clock.  My Aunt P read aloud part of the evening.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers, done up in one cover.  One was ten, the other eleven day’s old.

The nasty old dark cat killd and eat one of the wild rabbits in the morning and when my Aunt Neate went out after supper to feed her larks, she found six of the others dead.  They had got out and the cat had killd them, every one.

Monday,  27 April, 1812

A beautiful day, till about four o’clock, when it began to rain and continued all the evening and night.  My teeth were very troublesome at times all day.  George went to Taunton to take some potatoes, which I packd up to go by the Coach to Charlton.  I found the sweet peas and shelled them.

I heard from my mother.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Tuesday, 28 April, 1812

It rained very hard till three o’clock, but was fine afterwards.  I put the last picture in the frame and was so unlucky as to break the looking glass as I was putting that in the the frame.  I wrote part of the morning.  My teeth were very painful at times.  I workd a little after dinner.  My Aunt was busy all day putting the feathers in the bed. I wrote a long letter to my mother.

Wednesday, 29 April, 1812

A gloomy morning.  Mr Ball, Miss Anna and Miss Miriam calld.  My Aunt shewd them a great many of the old things from Italy.  I workd part of the morning.  There was a tremendous storm of thunder and lightening came on at three o’clock and lasted more than an hour.  The thunder rolled incessantly and the rain pourd in torrents.  George went to Taunton in the evening and took my letter to the Post.  Mr Guppy, the Inn keeper at Langport, came to speak about taking the sheep for the night, when they go to Charlton.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 30 April, 1812

It raind very hard till about five o’clock, when it cleard up and was very fine.  I did a great many little odd things, such as packing six dozen of eggs in bran (which bran my Aunt sent to Mrs Furber’s for), varnishing the bed board and waiter etc. etc.  My Aunt P was very much tired.  I playd Gosch with her and my Aunt Neate in the evening.

Fashion plate for May 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for May 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 1 May, 1812

A beautiful morning.  My Aunt P went to call on the Balls and Grosetts.  While she was gone I put one leech on my neck, which suckd very well and the place did not swell and inflame afterwards, as it did last week.  My Aunt did not come home till near four o’clock.  I was very quiet all the evening and workd a little. I sent Anna Ball some sweet peas and a few convolvulus majors and they sent us a sweet pot of Indian pinks in bloom.

Saturday, 2 May, 1812

A very fine day.  Miss Strangways calld and sat a long time.  We were eating some Frummity when she came and she had some.  She walkd round the garden with us and lookd at the Marvel of Peru seeds, which are coming up in the hot bed.  I gave her some sweet pea seeds, a few convolvulus majors and some very fine roots of fennel.  She was not in good spirits, but did not complain of being ill.  My Aunt walkd and I rode the poney to see Ephraim.  I was very much frightened at first, but enjoyd it very much afterwards and rode on, while my Aunt went in to see Ephraim, who is a little better.  I boild and clarified some honey in the evening.  Miss Anna and Miss Miriam Ball came up after tea on their return from Taunton to bring a bottle of Vancouver that they got for my Aunt.  She wished them to stay, but they could not, as Mr and Mrs Strangways had been making a great deal mischief at their house about Miss Strangways, and both their father and mother were unwell and very low spirited.  We had a Paper of Cooper’s.   My Aunt sent the Balls a large tureen of Frummity.

Sunday, 3 May, 1812

A gloomy looking morning and very cold.  My Aunt P and I walkd to Thorn Church.  It raind a little all the way there.  We sat more than an hour at Mrs Strangway’s before we saw Mr S go by and then went on directly and they said they would overtake us.  Mr S joind us, but the moment they came up, and he heard them speak, he walkd on without taking any notice of them at all.  It raind fast when we came out of Church.  We sat till near three o’clock at Mrs Strangways and had some cake.  They told their grievances and how cruelly Mr S has used them, ever since his brother’s death and they have been unprotected.  They and Anne, Miriam and Phillip Ball drank tea and suppd here.  Both Anna and Miss S had bad headaches and were out of spirits till after supper, when the conversation turnd on Mr and Mrs S’s bad conduct, they they recovered and were very chearful.  They did not go away till twelve o’clock and we did not go to bed till past one.  I heard from my mother. Captain Tolson and his little girl calld, while we were at Church.

Monday, 4 May, 1812

A heavenly day, as warm as Summer.  Soon after breakfast my Aunt P and I went to Mr Ball’s to take the old gentleman some rhubarb and Miss Anna some cuttings of geraniums, verbena and evergreen honeysuckles.  We met Miss B and Miriam in the Lane.  They would go back with us.  While we were there, Captain and Mrs Bullen calld, both so much altered I should not have known them, nor did they recollect us till my Aunt explaind that we had seen them at Swanage.  We only just saw Mr and Mrs Ball and did not stay there more than ten minutes.  From there we walkd nearly as far as Farmer Boistes, along the Canal in Neme and to the plantation at the head of it and then home.  I was out most part of the day and felt a little tired at night.

Tuesday, 5 May, 1812

A very fine day.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Perry at Farmer Furber’s and found her very pleasant.  From there we went to Mrs Strangways and sat half an hour with them.  As we came away, we saw Phillip Ball going there.  We met Captain and Mrs Grosett coming to call on us.  They walkd across the fields with us.  My Aunt packd all the afternoon.  I heard from my mother.

Wednesday, 6 May, 1812

A fine day.  I vancouverd some things.  While I was about it, Captain and Mrs Grosett calld.  They did not stay long.  I workd a little.  My Aunts playd Gosch in the evening.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Paper.

Thursday, 7 May, 1812

A very fine day.  I wrote part of the morning and afterwards fixd the glass that I broke the other day, in the frame.  Mr Ashe, the Assessor, calld after dinner and was extremely obliging.  He told my Aunt if at any time she wanted information about the taxes and would write to him, he would give it her.  As soon as he was gone, we went down to Mr Ball’s, where we staid a long time.  Poor Mrs Ball has got a very bad cold.  The old man was in very good spirits and very droll.  The three girls walkd back with us just as they were and my Aunt prevaild on them to come in and spend the evening, which they did, Anna going back to fetch their bonnets.  We played Pope Joan.  Miss Strangways came in while we were at tea and stayd to supper.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 8 May, 1812

A beautiful day, but extremely hot.  We went to the Balls directly after breakfast to ask the old gentleman to spend the evening here tomorrow, to meet the Strangways, between whom there is a misunderstanding, owing to Mr Strangways having told Mr Ball that Miss S had spoken very disrespectfully of him and which she says is not true.  He agreed to come.  We sat there an hour and then went to Thorn to ask the Strangways.  There we found Captain, Mrs and Miss Grosett, Mrs and Miss Case, Mrs Land, Mrs C ’s daughter and Mr P Ball.  They were going to Thorn Hill.  They left Mrs G at Mrs Strangways till they returned.  We staid there about half an hour and then came home.  I packd a drawer before dinner and was out in the garden afterwards till tea time.  Miss Strangways came for some lettice plants, which she took up herself and carried home.  I was a good deal tired in the evening, but did a little work.

Saturday, 9 May, 1812

A dull looking morning.  My Aunt P and I went to Taunton.  We calld at Mr Standents to ask how my Aunt was to proceed to get advice from the Hospital for Sarah Major and her husband, who are both very ill.  He very obligingly put her in the way and askd us to go and see the Hospital, which we did.  I never saw any thing more comfortable.  We did a great many things, but unfortunately it raind a good deal, which detained us much longer in Taunton, as we were obliged to stand up frequently.  I bought a straw bonnet, for which I gave £1.3.0 and a bit of edging to trim my cap for 3/-.  We saw Captain Tolson in the Market, who stopd us and had a little chat.  We also had the pleasure of seeing (very unexpectedly) Mr Scot, who was as friendly and pleasant as when we saw him at Weymouth.  It really gave me pleasure to see him.  My Aunt saw the Combers in a shop, but I did not go in.  Henry overtook and joind us for a little while.  It was very late when we got home and I forgot my bonnet and left it behind me.

Mr and Mrs Ball sent an excuse and only three girls and Phillip came and Mrs and Miss Strangways.  The latter brought us a beautiful nosegay.  We playd Pope Joan.  I neither won or lost.  They did not go home till past twelve o’clock.  I was extremely tired when we went to bed.

Sunday, 10 May, 1812

A wet morning.  We read Prayers at home.  The rain continued almost all day.  Mrs Ball very kindly sent us the Sherbourne Newspaper.  I read after dinner and tea.

Monday, 11 May, 1812.

A few showers early in the morning, but fine afterwards.  I workd all day, turning my Aunt P’s green silk pelisse.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld after tea and staid till it was quite dusk.  I playd Gosch with my Aunt Neate after supper.

Tuesday, 12 May, 1812

A fine day with the exception of two or three showers and one very hard one.  George mowd the grass in the front of the house.  I workd all day on my Aunt’s pelisse.  Mr West, the Wine Merchant, brought his bill after dinner, but my Aunt did not see him.  I put one of the Macobea lilies in a pot in the hot bed.  It has got a bud and I hope will flower.  I continued, with a great deal of piecing and patching, to make two pillow cases out of some rose colour silk that had been the lining of a coat of my poor Uncle Meniconi’s, to put some down in for our feet in the Winter.  It took a long time to continue and will take longer to put together.  George went to Taunton and brought back the shocking intelligence that Mr Perceval had been murdered, going into the House of Commons by some wretch who shot him in the heart.  I sincerely hope it is not true.  We had kind Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper, who never forgets us.

Wednesday, 13 May, 1812

A very showery morning, but fine afterwards.  I workd till dinner time on my Aunt’s pelisse, which I very nearly finishd.  When I went to feed the poultry after dinner, I found the poor little Bengaleni’s cage on the ground.  The nail had come out of the wall.  He was so much frightend I though he would have died, and was a long time before he recoverd himself.  He has lost all the feathers from one of his wings, so that he must have been a good deal hurt, as well as frightend.

Sarah Major went to the Hospital today and was so civil to bring my new straw bonnet from Taunton with her.  I workd after dinner a little and then my Aunt P and I cut all the asparagus we could find and took up to Mr Maine’s for one of his daughters who is very ill.  We saw her, her eldest sister, brother and Mr P Ball.  We sat there about half an hour.  Mr B walkd across the field with us, because there were some oxen in it and we were afraid.  My Aunt sent Miss Maine some veal broth.

Thursday, 14 May, 1812

A fine day.  I workd a little and wrote the rest of the morning.  We had very near lost our dear little Bengalini.  I put it in the sun in the anti room and the nasty cat threw the cage down.  Luckily my Aunt P heard it fall and ran to see what was the matter, which saved its life, as the the door of the cage was open and the cat would very soon have killd it.  She had torn one of its wings shockingly.  I put some laudanum to it twice, which did it good, but I was very much afraid it would have died.  While we were at tea, Miss Strangways calld to ask for some coffee for the sick Miss Maine.  She did not stay long.  My Aunt askd her and her mother to come here tomorrow evening.  My Aunt sent Mrs Perry a few asparagus.  I wrote a long letter to my mother, which Mrs Perry is so obliging to take to Bath with her tomorrow.  My Aunt sent to Mr Ball’s to borrow the Paper that has the account of poor Mr Perceval’s death in it, which they lent us.

Friday, 15 May, 1812

A very showery morning.  At one time it pourd.  Mr P Ball calld while we were at breakfast.  He did not stay long.  Mrs and Miss Strangway drank tea and suppd here.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 1/6d, but my Aunt P gave it me again.  They went away about twelve.  It raind a little.

Saturday, 16 May, 1812

A cold, damp day with slight rain almost all the morning.  I workd in the front of the house weeding, nailing and other things till past twelve o’clock, when I began to make wafers.  Pocock and I were about them till dinner time, and afterwards till seven o’clock.  I did not do a stitch of work the whole day.  George askd leave to go and see his mother at Wincanton tomorrow, promising to be back Monday night.   He said he should go the Bath.  I wrote a note to my mother for him to take.  The cats killd four of my gray rabbits last night.

Whitsunday, 17 May, 1812

A very wet day, cold and gloomy.  We read Prayers at home.  I wrote a good deal in the morning and read the rest of the day.  My Aunt P read aloud in the evening.  Mr Grosett sent up one of his Papers.

Monday, 18 May, 1812

Not a fine day, but dry.  Benjamin and Ephraim workd all day weeding and making the front of the house look decent for the Clubs coming tomorrow.  Betty and Pocock were out after dinner to assist them.  I began to alter the cushion that were at Lambridge for the chairs in the dining room at Charlton.  My Aunt askd the Strangways and Grosetts to come tomorrow evening to see the Club.  We sat up till near one for George, but he did not come home.

Tuesday, 19 May, 1812

A dismal, wet day.  It did not cease pouring five minutes.  George came home before we were up and brought a bad account of the house at Charlton.  It is not a bit forwarder than it was when Mr Ball was there a month ago.  George did not go to Bath, so put my letter to my mother in the Post.  Notwithstanding the weather was so bad, Miss Strangways and the two Miss Grosetts spent the evening here.  We playd Pope Joan.  I lost 1/-.  They went home about twelve.

Wednesday, 20 May, 1812

A tolerable fine morning.  My Aunt P and I went to ask the Balls to come here tomorrow evening.  While we were there, a most tremendous storm of rain fell, accompanied by thunder and lightening I never saw.  We were detained there an hour or two and should not have been able to get home till evening, if Mr Ball had not had the kindness to have planks put down for us to walk on across his Barton?, for we could not come out of his front gate, the water ran so rapidly down the Lane. It was quite a river from his house to beyond Farmer Bartlett’s.  The water ran thro Mr Ball’s house and when we came home we found it worse here.  It even ran into the parlor and Stone Room.  I never saw such rain before.  It was not bad walking home, as the torrent had washd the mud away.  I workd on the cushions after dinner and my Aunt went to see Miss Maine, who is ill.  She also sent her some raspberry jam and wafers.

Thursday, 21 May, 1812

A very fine morning, but a violent storm in the middle of the day, with thunder at a great distance.  The rain lasted some hours, but it was very fine in the evening.  Mr Phillip Ball calld in the morning to say he could not accompany his family here in the evening, as he was engaged at Mr B Collins’s at Hatch.  I workd in the morning.  We dined early to be ready to receive Mr Ball, who is an early man.  Mrs and Miss Strangways met them here.  Mr Ball, my Aunt P and my Aunt N and Miss S playd Whist.  Mrs Ball, Mrs Strangways, Miriam, Sally and I playd Pope Joan.  I lost a shilling.  We had a very nice supper and Mr Ball smoked some of the little cheroots after supper.  They went away about eleven.  Just as they were going, Mr Maine sent to beg Miss Strangways would come up, as his daughter was very bad and wishd to see her.  She left her mother here till she came back.  In about half an hour she sent to beg her mother would not wait, as Miss M wishd her to sit up with her, so Mrs S went home.  Mr Ball was very pleasant and appeard much pleased with the attention showd him.

Friday, 22 May, 1812

A tolerably fine day.  I workd all the morning.  Miss Strangways calld.  She did not stay long and appeard out of spirits.  After tea my Aunt and I walkd to Thorn.  They were not at home, but Molly fetchd Mrs Strangways.  We sat about an hour with her.  She walkd to the bottom of the Lane with us.  We calld at Farmer Furber’s in our way back and had so long a chat with Mrs F at the gate that it was quite dusk when we got home and we had not been in the house half an hour when it began to rain a torrent and continued most part of the night.  George, who was gone to Taunton, came home wet thro.  He brought me a basket from my mother with the sweetmeat pots she had from my Aunt, some biscuits and ginger bread from Emma to my Aunts and a rose tree and three other plants to me.  The Jacobean Lily I put in the hot bed has blown beautifully.  I heard from my mother.

Watercolour on vellum by James Bolton. Bolton was born in West Yorkshire, England and was the son of a weaver. He was a self- taught botanist, artist and engraver. His brother Thomas Bolton (1722-1778) was also a naturalist. James Bolton was highly successful as a mycologist and author of several botanical books including the first British book on fungi. James and Thomas Bolton were both sponsored by the art and natural history collector Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715-1785). Painting date c.1790s.
Jacobean Lily Watercolour on vellum by James Bolton. Bolton was born in West Yorkshire, England and was the son of a weaver. He was a self- taught botanist, artist and engraver. Painting date c.1790s.

Saturday, 23 May, 1812

A fine day.  I put the plants in pots, packd three dozen eggs and then set down to work on the cushions, which I continued to work on morning, afternoon and evening.

Sunday, 24 May, 1812

A gloomy looking morning.  We had intended going to Church at Thorn, but it lookd so like rain, my Aunt thought we had better not.  We read Prayers at home.  Miss Strangways and Mr P Ball calld, but I did not see them.  We walkd down to Mr Grosett’s and sat there a long time.  The old man is very much alterd for the worse since I saw him last, which is near three months, I believe.  Mrs G lookd very ill, but very pretty.  The Captain, Shaw and Kitty very well.  The old gentleman lent us a News Paper.  I wrote a good deal after dinner.

Monday, 25 May, 1812

I had such a distressing giddiness in my head that I could not look at any thing, or scarcely open my eyes and did not get up till after dinner.  I took some magnesia, which relieved me and I was better in the evening.  It was very hot, but raind very hard, almost all the morning, but was fine after dinner.  I wrote (after I got up) a long letter to my mother.

Tuesday, 26 May, 1812

We got up very early, as my Aunts were going to Charlton.  It was a beautiful morning, but clouded over about twelve o’clock and we had a slight shower.  I workd very hard on the cushions all day.  My Aunts did not return till near ten o’clock.  I began to be uneasy.  They brought word that the house would would be ready the end of this week.  They had some supper as soon as they returnd and went to bed early, as they were both very much tired.

Wednesday, 27 May, 1812

A gloomy looking day, but very hot.  I felt uncomfortable and my spirits so depressd I could scarcely bear to speak.  I workd all day and in the evening.  We did not sup till very late and did not go to bed till after one o’clock.

Thursday, 28 May, 1812

A fine day.  Miss Strangways calld soon after breakfast.  She had not been gone long when the two Miss Balls came to ask us to spend the evening there.  I workd all the morning.  We all drank tea and suppd at Mr Ball’s, where we met the Strangways, a Mrs and Miss Summers of Ashill and Mrs Betty Ball.  We had Whist and Pope Joan.  I playd at the latter and I neither lost or won.  Mr Ball behaved with great politeness to every body and was very pleasant.  It proved a very wet evening, which was unfortunate.  It raind extremely fast when we came home at twelve o’clock, but the Miss Balls lent us old bonnets and we had our thick cloaks and plaids, so that we did not get wet.  We did not go to bed till past two o’clock.  My Aunt sent the Balls some asparagus and gave Miss Strangways some potted veal and ham to take home with her.  George rackd the elder and black currant wine.

Friday, 29 May, 1812

A fine day, with the exception of a shower.  I packd the whole day and was so tired I could hardly move at night.  Miss Strangways calld after dinner to ask how we got home last night.  We went to the gate with her and walkd backwards and forwards with her three or four times.  While we were out, Captain and Mrs Grosett and Miss Shaw came into the field.  Mrs G was on an Ass and would not get off, but had a very long chat.  I sat with my feet up in the evening.  I heard from my mother and we had two of Cooper’s Papers!!!

Saturday, 30 May, 1812

A fine day.  I cut all the asparagus I could find and my Aunt sent it to Mrs Strangways.  I packd the rest of the day and was very much tired.  We all went to bed very early.

Sunday, 31 May, 1812

Quite an April morning, bright sunshine and showers.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast and, as it was fine, at one o’clock my Aunt P and I went to Thorn Church.  We were in very good time, saw Miss Strangways and Mrs and Miss Summer there.  It raind when we came out of Church.  We went to Mrs Strangway and staid two hours in hopes the rain would cease, but it continued pouring.  Mrs S pressd us very much to stay and dine, but my Aunt thought it would be worse in the evening and they were so kind to lend us bonnets and habits.  My Aunt put on Mrs Summer’s and I Miss Strangway’s.  They were all excessively kind and obliging in equipping us.  The fields were quite under water as we came home, but we did not get wet any where, except our feet and legs.  It did not cease raining the whole afternoon and night.

Fashion plate for June 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for June 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Monday, 1 June, 1812

A very wet morning, but it cleard up at twelve o’clock and was very fine the rest of the day.  My Aunt sent home Mrs Strangway’s things and with them a pint of currant brandy and some wafers.  My Aunt packd all day and I assisted her in many little things.  My Aunt bespoke an X bedstead of Hallend, the carpenter, who is to make it compleat for  £1.4.0.  I fancy I caught cold yesterday, for I had the tooth ache very bad all the evening.  I wrote to Mr Touray.

Tuesday, 2 June, 1812

A very fine day.  We got up very early.  I was down stairs at half past seven o’clock.  The man came with his waggon from Charlton to take a load of goods there.  Mr Maine’s waggon went also.  They did not set off till after six o’clock.  George went on the poney and is to return tomorrow.  I had no fatigue today, as I sat down all the morning writing the inventory of the things then in the two waggons.  The bees swarmed. Fortunately I went into the garden at the time and Betty thumpd the bees till they settled and Ephraim put them in a hive where they staid very quiet.  Mrs and Miss Strangways calld while we were at tea and sat an hour with us.  My Aunt gave them a dozen eggs to take home with them.

We had Cooper’s Paper.

Wednesday, 3 June, 1812

A very fine day, but very hot.  I new potted all the plants, assisted by Ephraim and took up the gum cistus and put it in a pot.  George came home just before dinner.  He and Benjamin packd and tied down the hampers made for the waggon tomorrow.  I was in the cellar with them till tea time.  Mr P Ball and Miss Miriam calld in the morning, but I did not see them.  While we were at tea, Mrs Strangways and Miriam came in.  They had some tea with us, but went away directly after.  I had the tooth ache very bad all the evening. We had Mrs Phillip’s Paper and one of Cooper’s.  My Aunt sent the Balls some apples.

Thursday, 4 June, 1812

A very fine day.  We were up early.  As soon as we had breakfasted I went with George and Benjamin into the cellar to collect all the empty bottles.  I was seized with a very uncomfortable giddiness in my head, which continued almost all the morning. I took Magnesia twice, which was of some service to me.  We dined early on two very fine Whitings which Mrs Strangeways sent.  I packd every thing of mine that remained.  Hockey came from Charlton before dinner and with the assistance of George and Benjamin packd Mrs Manns Waggon ready to go tomorrow.  His own waggon comes early tomorrow morning to be packd.  Miss Strangeways calld while we were at tea and brought us some Hyacinth roots.  She did not stay long.  We suppd very late. Consequently it was very late before we went to bed.  I wrote to my mother.

Thursday, 5 June, 1812

A beautiful day, but very hot.  Hockey’s waggon came at six o’clock to be packd to go with Mr Maine’s, but they did not set out till past two.  Mr Phillip Ball calld.  While he was here Colonel Binney and Mr Standert calld, but my aunt said “not at home”, as every thing was in too much confusion to admit them.  He asked for a glass of water.  My head was better than yesterday and I assisted in packing a good many things.  Two of the four wild rabbits that my Aunt had of George, got out and I do not suppose we shall ever see them again.  George went to Charlton on the pony in the afternoon and took old Dragon and the colt with him.  I hope they will go safe.  A man brought one of the finest Whitings to the door I ever saw.  My Aunt brought three at 1/- each.  We did not go to bed till very late.  Fauncat ? and Stevens came to look at the furniture, for the latter to take the catalogue for the sale.  He appraised some things which my Aunt means to take.  They had some wine.

Saturday, 6 June, 1812

A beautiful day, but intensely hot.  Mr P B and Farmer Smith came to value the hay.  They estimated it at seven tons at £4 a ton and the manure at 6 pounds and the ashes at ?.  Mr P B calld again before dinner with some bills he was so kind to get at Taunton for my Aunt. His mother and sisters also came and brought us some brown bread and a chearful nosegay.  Miss Strangways calld after tea and with her Mr P B again.  My Aunt gave her some Raspberry vinegar to take home with her.  George came back before dinner.  The horses went tolerably well.  Hallet brought the new bedstead.  I never saw any thing so neatly made.  He put the old up in its place in my Aunt’s room.  We all workd very hard all day and were very much tired at night.  I lined my Aunt P’s straw bonnet before supper and bathed my feet when we went to bed, which was very late.

Sunday, 7 June, 1812

A beautiful day and as hot as yesterday.  We read prayers soon after breakfast, which was late, as we did not come down till past ten.  The two Miss Grosett’s calld before dinner, both very unhappy at the bad conduct of their brother, who grows more brutish every day.  They both cried very much, but particularly poor Kitty.  She was extremely affected.  We dined very early that we might call on our friends in the afternoon to take leave.  We all three went to Mr Grosett’s, where we sat an hour.  We did not see Mrs Grosett, as she had been very much affected by the old man’s bad conduct and was gone to lay down.  From there my Aunt Neate went into Mr Ball’s, my Aunt Powell and I on to Creech.  Charlotte Comber met us in the kindest manner at the door, as did Miss Comber in the passage.  Mr and Mrs C were equally friendly.  They were just making tea and pressd us to partake it with them, but we had drank tea before we set out.  There was a Mrs Beadon with them.  We staid till after nine o’clock.  Indeed they would not let us come away before, for whenever we got up they pressd us so much to say a little longer, that we could not, without being guilty of great rudeness, have come away.  They gave us some very good cake and wine and walkd with us as far as Mr Ball’s in our way home.  I have not spent a pleasanter evening for a long time, as nothing could be kinder or more friendly than our reception.  It was so late when we reachd Mr Ball’s house that we would not go in, concluding my Aunt Neate was gone home, but on Pocock’s coming to the door, we found she was not returnd, so we walkd back to Mr Ball’s.  We found him, Mrs B, Miss B, Miriam and my Aunt Neate at supper and we sat down and had some with them.  In the middle of it Mr P B came in.  We left them about eleven and had some more supper (as it was on the table) when we came home.  I was a good deal tird when we went to bed, but not so much so as I expected.

Monday, 8 June, 1812

A beautiful day, but extremely hot.  Hockey came with his wagon which was to go to Charlton very early tomorrow morning.  Captain and Mrs Grosett and Mr P Ball calld.  They staid about half an hour.  I found six strawberrys ripe for Mrs G.  Miss Ball and Miriam calld.  They brought me a little hare that Mr P B caught in his father’s field and a cream cheese to my Aunt.  She told them is was impossible to sit down with them and begd they would come up in the evening.  Miriam took the little hare back with her, but brought it again in the evening.  Mrs and Miss Strangways came also about seven o’clock.  Mrs S made herself very useful and packd a good many things.  We all drank tea together which Miss S made about ten o’clock, soon after which they took leave.  We did not go to bed till very late, extremely tired.

Tuesday, 9 June, 1812

A beautiful day, but as hot as yesterday.  Miss Strangways and Mr B came soon after breakfast, the latter brought me another little hare.  They both made themselves very useful.  The Chaise came about eight o’clock from Langport to take us to Charlton.  George got a cart at Farmer Sammers’s at Stoke to take the plants and the odd things the wagons could not take.  When it was mainly filld they found there were a great many more things than it could possibly hold and young Sammers went home and brought a waggon.  Daniel Turner assisted in packing.  Miss Strangways and Mr Ball went away about two o’clock.  She was a good deal affected at parting, as was Sally Ball last night.  By the time the waggon was packd the rose trees taken up and every thing done, it was so late my Aunt thought it better that we should have something to eat before we set out, so they undid the basket of provisions that had been done up to go with us and we all had some cold roast mutton which Mrs Furber (who came in the morning with the Farmer to see if she could be of any use to us) was so kind to do up again.  We got into the Chaise about five o’clock, my two Aunts, the two birds and myself in one.  Mrs Giles, Pocock, Hannah, Betty and Gheta in the other and George on the pony.  When we got out of the gate Rover was not to be found any where, tho I had calld him out of George’s pantry when we got into the Chaise.  We stopd in the Lane at least a quarter of an hour while George was looking for him and he at last found him under the bed in my Aunt’s room.  One of the horses in our chaise would not go on again and very nearly backd us into the ditch, but the other driver came and led him on and we had no reason to complain of him the whole way afterwards, but we got out at all the hills and stopd at a shop in Lamerton and my Aunt desird the man to send her some blankets tomorrow.  We reachd Charlton between nine and ten (after having passd Sammers’s waggon on the road) and found Hockey and the old man, my Aunt Neate sent from Ruishton, in the house.  They made us a fire in the kitchen, which was almost the only room we could get into for packages.  They soon made a small space in the breakfast room for us to sit down and as soon as they could make the water boil we borrowd some tea of Hannah (which was very bad) and had some tea.  We then all set to work to unpack the beds.  George had put up my Aunt P’s bedstead when he came over before and my Aunt Neate and I had a X bedstead each. The servants sleept on the floor.  Somers’s waggon came about one o’clock.  It was unpackd, the horses put in the field and young Farmer Somers came and slept on the floor with George.  We did not go to bed till three o’clock and of course were not very comfortable.

Fashion plate for July 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for July 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Thursday, 2nd July, 1812

Have been so much engaged since we came, it has been impossible for me to find time to insert what has passd every day.  The weather has been so very bad every since we came, we have been hardly able to go out at all.  Such torrents of rain have fallen that the country all round has been inundated.  My Aunts have been very unfortunate since we left poor old Henlade.  My Aunt Neate has lost an ewe and pure Spanish ram lamb and my Aunt Powell her finest cow.  A bad beginning.  Mr Ford the Clergyman sent to enquire how we did after our journey and calld a few days after, but did not come in.  The house and premises are in such an unfinished state that we are surrounded by masons, carpenters and painters.  No one but my Aunt, I am sure, would have come to a house in such a situation and very few besides herself would have taken such a detestable place.

We could not go to Church till last Sunday and then in the afternoon.  The Church is nearly as far as Thorn was from Henlade.  Mr Ford reads in the most ridiculously pompose manner I ever heard;  to me very unpleasant, but I hope I shall get accustomd to it in time.  My Aunt and I took a little walk after dinner, but it was as cold as Christmas.  I have had quite a correspondence with Cooper since I came here, relative to my mother’s annuity, which she was most anxious to have the 1st of July, the day it is due and which he promised, but like most of  his promises, he did not perform it.  I wrote him three letters and have had two from him, filld with professions, but last night’s Post brought me a Draft from Mr Bower of Weymouth, not payable till ten days after sight.  Of course my mother cannot receive it till the 14th and probably not so soon, except any one at Bath will cash it for her.  I sent it to her by the Morning’s Post.  Cooper sent me a present of five pounds.  I had rather he had kept it and let my mother have had hers at the time it was due.  I have written to and heard from Mr Touray and frequently to my mother.  Tuesday Mr Phillip Ball rode here before we were up and spent the day here.  He brought a letter from Miss Strangways and the scarlet and black bell ropes she has made for my Aunt and put them up.  We went into my Aunt Neate’s hay field after dinner and walkd thro part of the village with him.  He told us which were Mrs Gapper’s, Farmer Pits and Lady Burnaby’s houses.  Mrs Gapper and her sister Miss Barnard calld on us Tuesday and sat an hour.  They are neither pleasant or unpleasant.  Mr Bryer, the Apothecary of Taunton? also calld, a very gentlemanly, pleasant man apparently.  Yesterday a Mr and Mrs Ford and a Miss Murray calld, the latter, I imagine, lives with the Fords.  Mrs B? did not speak a word, indeed it was hardly possible she should, for her husband talks so incessantly and so loud, it is impossible to hear what any body else says.  Luckily, they made a very short visit.  I have been obliged to let my poor dear rabbits loose, since we came to this horrid place, from not having any place to put them in.  It grieved me very much, after having had them for so long.  The poor hens too, have roosted in a tree all thro the shocking weather and have laid their eggs all over the premises, so that we have lost a great many. There have been excessive hard showers all the day, with bright sunshine between.  I wrote most part of the morning.  It was fine in the evening and my Aunt P and I went to the shops and bespoke some dough to make a bread cake tomorrow.  We walkd round the outside of the plantation to look at the stream that runs round it, which was so much swelld by the torrents of rain that have fallen, that it had overflowd its banks.  I gatherd a nosegay and workd a little before supper.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 3 July, 1812

A fine day, with two or three very heavy storms of rain.  We calld on Mrs Gapper, saw her, Miss Barnett and a Miss Sapper, sister in law to the former, a very good humoured, agreeable woman.  Miss Barnett  shewd us her green house.  She has got some beautiful plants.  We also went round their kitchen garden, which is in excellent order.  We spent an hour there very pleasantly.  In our way home we calld at Farmer Thouights???!  to desire he would send here for any thing his wife might fancy she should like.  She is dying, poor thing, of a cancer.  I was a good deal tired, but workd a little in the evening.

Saturday, 4 July, 1812

A beautiful day.  My Aunt P and I walkd to return Mrs Ford’s visit.  We saw Mrs F and her sister Miss Munday.  Their house is almost in as much confusion as this, as they have been painting and papering.  Miss Munday walkd back with us, very nearly home.  I painted the little work stand and began the one my Aunt bought at Henlade.  I gatherd a great many flowers, but did not do any work in the evening, as I felt very unwell all day and had the tooth ache very much.  I had two letters from my mother, one short one to acknowledge the receipt of the Draft, the other a very long one, in a parcel of paper from Rebecca Workman to my Aunt.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 5 July, 1812

A very dull looking day with a good deal of rain in the morning, which prevented our going to Church, but George and Pocock and Hannah went.  We read Prayers  at home and Mrs Giles and Betty came in.  My spirits were extremely depressd all day, probably owing to a bad cold I have got in my head and on my chest.  It cleard up a little after dinner and my Aunt P went out.

Monday, 6 July, 1812

A fine day.  I painted a little in the morning and afterwards Mr Ford calld and sat an hour.  He came to ask if either of us would like to go an Airing? with Mrs Ford and Miss Munday in the evening, but we declind it.  I painted from dinner till tea time and workd in the evening.  I had a long letter from Cooper and we had his Paper.

Tuesday, 7 July, 1812

A fine morning, but dull the rest of the day with one or two very slight showers.  I painted a little after breakfast.  We were very agreeably surprised by an unexpected visit from Sir John and Major Durbin in their way from Bridgewater to Bath.  They did not stay more than an hour.

The old gentleman was looking as well as I ever saw him and the Major also and were both very friendly and obliging.  I painted in the afternoon and after tea walkd with my Aunt P to the shop and old Caswell’s Cottage.  We went into his garden, which is an excellent one.  I playd at Gosch with my Aunt P after supper.

Wednesday, 8 July, 1812

A fine day, but heavy looking at times.  I workd in the morning and went with my Aunt P into Pines, where they are making hay and afterwards to Sommers’s to desire he would take the cart into the field and then to Wood’s shop to pay the bill.  It was very hot.  We had about a pint of peas and the same quantity of beans at dinner for the first time.  I painted in the afternoon.  I heard from my mother enclosing the change of Mr Bowen’s Draft in two half notes for thirty pounds.  Had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 9 July, 1812

A very fine day and intensely hot.  I put out the bird to enjoy the sun a little.   Mr Bond calld, but did not stay long.  He brought a Paper for my Aunt to sign, agreeing with the rest of the neighbourhood to prosecute any one who commits depredations.  He says there is a gang of ten thieves who steal every thing they can lay their hands on. I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 10 July, 1812

An intense hot day.  I painted all the morning.  Mr and Mrs Dickenson and their son, a very fine little boy, calld.  Mr D was friendly and pleasant, more so than her, I think.  They came on horseback.  As soon as they were gone I went to painting again.  I gatherd a great many flowers.  Poor Betty was taken very ill in the hay field.  George and Hannah brought her in quite insensible and when she recoverd a little she was very hysterical and wandering.  My Aunt P and I led her up stairs and she laid down on the mattresses in the little room, where she fell asleep and slept till eleven o’clock but very disturbd and agitated.  At that time my Aunt persuaded her to try to get up to her own bed, which she did with the assistance of Hannah and Pocock.  My Aunt gave her an emetic, which after some time operated and we left her better at one o’clock, but a little before two my Aunt heard her vomit and I got up and went to her.  She was very much relieved, but was sick again after I left her.

We had Cooper’s Paper.

Saturday, 11 July, 1812

As hot as yesterday.  Betty better today, but very weak and languid.  Mrs Giles also unwell, but not ill.  Some ladies calld, but my Aunt said “not at home”.  They left a card, “Miss Pyne”.  I painted all day and in the evening waterd the plants.  I gatherd a quantity of full blown roses, which are here in great profusion.

I had a long letter from my mother with the second halves of the notes.  We had Coopers Paper.

Sunday, 12 July, 1812

A very fine day, tho it had the appearance of rain in the morning.  We all went to Church and were there some time before the Service began.  As soon as it was over Mr Ford begd we would go thro his garden, as being our nearest way, we overtook Mrs Ford, Miss Munday, Miss Gapper, Miss Barnett and three other ladies, strangers to us.  They took their leave before we reachd the house, where we did not sit down, but proceeded altogether up to Mr Ford’s Summer House, which he has built lately in a field a short distance from his house and which commands a beautiful view.  It is surrounded with very  nice trees and beautiful flowers in great perfection.  We staid there about half an hour and then came home, Mr and Mrs F accompanying us across a field.  My Aunt P and I walkd about the garden a little after tea.

Monday, 13 July, 1812

A very hot day.  I painted all day.  The white hen brought out seven nice strong chickens from nine eggs.  I put them under a basket in the orchard.  After tea I assisted my Aunt P in covering a currant bush.  My Aunt P very kindly wrote to my mother to ask her and Emma to come here for change of air for the latter.  I wrote to Cooper.

Tuesday, 14 July, 1812

A very fine day.  I painted in the morning.  Mrs Gapper and Miss Barnett calld, but we were denied to them.  They left a message to beg we would drink tea with them this evening, which we all did.  We were introduced to an elder sister who is calld Mrs Barnett and Mrs Gapper’s two daughters, who returnd from Mr Whitelock’s yesterday.  The eldest is a lovely girl.  I hardly ever saw a more beautiful face.  She appears to be about eighteen.  She was very indecently dressed, or rather undressd, as she had no covering half way down her back and her shoulders and bosom were quite bare.  The youngest is a fine girl, but very plain. She may be as handsome as her sister by and by, as she is not yet fourteen.  We had tea and coffee and afterwards they brought in some strawberries and cherries.  We had intended coming away at nine o’clock but George did not come for us till past ten.  It was a very fine moonlight night.  The paperhanger from Bath came and began papering the drawing room.

1812 Costume Parisien fashion plate
1812 Costume Parisien fashion plate

Wednesday, 15th July, 1812

A fine day.  The painted hen hatchd nine of the eleven eggs she has been sitting on.  I took the two eggs and put them under another hen.  My Aunt P and I walkd to King Weston to return Mrs Dickenson’s visit.  She was not at home, luckily.  It appears to be a beautiful place.  The drive from the gate to the house is really beautiful.  We went to Thomas Pike’s house to speak to him, but he was at Mr Dickenson’s.  I was so tired when we came home I could hardly move, but painted a little in the afternoon.  The man finished the drawing room.  We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper, three of Cooper’s and one from Kent, which was not intended for us, but sent from the Post Office at Lamerton.

Thursday, 16 July, 1812

A fine morning, but it began to rain about two o’clock and continued till the evening.  I painted all day.  The man paperd the bed room that was left undone.  I painted till quite dusk.  My Aunt heard from my mother to say she should be here next Thursday, if dear Emma was equal to the journey here.  We had four of Cooper’s Papers.

Friday, 17 July, 1812

A very gloomy looking morning and intensely hot.  I gatherd a great many flowers and then wrote till one o’clock.  When we were to return Miss Pynes visit, we saw two Miss Pynes, not young, but sensible, agreeable women.  They live in a very pretty cottage and their garden, which they shewd us, is in the nicest order I ever saw. We sat near an hour and in our way back encountered Mrs Barnet, just at Lady Burnaby’s gate, who came out while we were standing there.  She curtseyd to my Aunt as she passd.  Mrs B walkd as far as her own gate with us and wanted us to go in, but my Aunt excused herself for fear of the rain, which appeard to be coming on and which began to fall soon after dinner and put an end to the carrying of hay.  I wrote after dinner and painted a little in the evening.  George, William, Hannah and Pocock put up the large bed in the spare room.  I wrote to my mother.

Saturday, 18 July, 1812

A fine morning, tho very threatening and gloomy looking.  The hay was finishd before dinner.  I painted all day.  It began to rain about seven o’clock and continued all the evening. Mr Hosey, who has been employd painting and papering here, calld about nine o’clock for our letters, which he is so civil to take to Bath for us.  I compleated my thirty – year and never passd a birth day in so detestable  a place as this is to me.

Sunday, 19 July, 1812

So wet a morning we could not go to Church, but Pocock, George and Hannah chose to go.  We read Prayers at home.  It continued raining till after dinner.  I read the Bible all the morning.  After tea my Aunt P and I took a walk, but it was too wet to go without Pattens.

Monday, 20 July, 1812

A heavy looking morning.  It began to rain, heavy showers about twelve o’clock, soon after which we had a tremendous thunder storm.  The lightening was very vivid and the rain came down in torrents.  My Aunt Neate came in wet thro.  The storm lasted more than an hour and we heard it at a great distance more than two hours afterwards.  A Mr, Mrs and Miss Moody calld, but my Aunt could not admit them, as she was in such confusion.  They saw my Aunts in the breakfast room.  They live two miles off and my Aunt sent George with a note of apology to them in the evening and had a very polite reply.  I had a very kind letter from Cooper and we had four of his papers.

Tuesday, 21 July, 1812

We had some rain, but fine between.  I was very busy about the house and painted a good deal.  I also began to do something to the carpet in the Drawing Room.

Wednesday, 22 July, 1812

A fine day.  I worked very hard on the carpet all the morning and after dinner put up the drapery of the curtain of the room my mother and dear Emma are to sleep in.  We all three, with Hannah and Pocock workd on the carpet till eleven o’clock.  At night we had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper.

Thursday, 23 July, 1812

A fine day and very hot in the sun.  My Aunt P, I, Hannah and Pocock workd very hard on the carpet and finishd it about two o’clock.  The Miss Pynes calld, but I did not see them.  As soon as we had finishd the carpet I changed my gown.  While I was about it, Mrs Barnett, Mrs Gapper and her little boy calld.  While they were here my mother and dear Emma arrivd (between two and three o’clock), the former looking very well but the latter wretchedly.  She relishd her dinner very much and seemd refreshd by it and did not go to bed till after ten o’clock.

Friday, 24 July, 1812

A tolerable fine morning, but there were two or three showers.  Dear Emma had a delightful, comfortable night’s rest and got up very much refreshd, but suffered a good deal in the course of the day from the pain in her heart.  She walkd as far as the flower garden and sat down there for a little while.  I gathered a great many flowers and assisted my mother in taking out her things.  She has executed all my commissions very nicely.  It began to rain while we were at dinner and continued all the evening.  We had an invitation from Mr Ford to dine there next Friday.

Saturday, 25 July, 1812

A very heavy looking morning, but very hot.  Poor Emma very unwell today.  My Aunt P and I went to call on Mrs Ford to say we would dine with them next Friday.  We met Mrs and Miss Barnet at the gate and had a long conversation with them.  At Mrs Ford’s we were shewn into the Drawing Room and after waiting some time Mr Ford came in.  He had hardly began to speak when the maid came to say George wanted to speak to my Aunt.  It was to tell her Mr Woolen was waiting at home to see her.  We took leave of Mr F as soon as we possibly could, which was a difficulty and almost ran home.  My Aunt shewd him all she wanted done, which he has promised shall be compleated by the first of September

We had four of Cooper’s Papers.  Mr Pinney calld and sat half an hour and we found him delightfully pleasant and friendly in his manners.

Sunday, 26 July, 1812

A fine day.  My two Aunts and myself went to Church in the morning.  Dear Emma was too unwell to go and my mother staid at home with her.  We saw the Fords, Barnetts and Pynes.  We went into Mr Ford’s after the Service was over for a few minutes and then all went with them to look at the Church, after which we walkd home.  We sat down about half an hour and then went into the garden with the intention of gathering some raspberrys, but George came to tell us it was time to go to Church if my Aunt intended, so she and I went.  We had singers for the first time.  Dear Emma walkd as far as the Walnut trees.  It raind fast in the evening.

Monday, 27 July, 1812

A tolerable morning, but it began to rain about the middle of the day and continued with out intermission till the afternoon.  We were to have drank tea with the Miss Pynes, but my Aunt was obliged to send an excuse.  I began to make up the drapery of the curtain for the Drawing Room and workd on it all day.

Tuesday, 28 July, 1812

Still showery.  The Miss Pynes sent a very polite note to beg we would not think of going there till the weather was more settld.  I workd on the curtain all day.  Dear Emma was very poorly.

Wednesday, 29 July, 1812

A tolerable fine day.  I workd on the curtain most part of it.  My Aunt P and I went as far as Mr Knight’s after dining to try to get some barley for the poultry.  He was not at home, but we saw his late wife’s sister.  She askd us to walk round the garden, which we did and said she was sure if Mr K had any barley, he would let my Aunt have some.

Thursday, 30 July, 1812

A fine day.  Poor Emma very ill all day with the oppression and pain in her heart and my mother not in a very good humour.  Mrs Gapper and Miss Barnet calld and sat some time.  I finishd the curtain and George put it up.  My mother and dear Emma had the happiness of hearing from our beloved William, who says he was in perfect health the second of March and that he was going in a few days with a gentleman (who name he does not mention) to settle at Java as agents, with every prospect of success.  God grant he may be fortunate.  My Aunt P and I drank tea at the Miss Pynes.  We met Miss Lucy Gapper and Miss Gaul and an elderly lady who resides with the Miss Pynes and spent two hours very pleasantly.  We came home at six o’clock and found the supper ready on the table.

Friday, 31 July, 1812

A fine day, but a very threatening sky.  Emma was to have had a ride on the pony, but she was so unwell she was afraid to venture and I fear she will never be better while she is with my mother, whose temper and disposition is so unfortunately bad, that it worries poor Emma to death.  I gatherd a great many flowers and made the nosegays and then went with my Aunt to Wood’s to look at some  pork he has to sell and of which she she bought a great deal.  After we came back I altered a gown for my Aunt to put on at Mr Ford’s, where she and I dined and met a large party, all strangers to us; a Mr and Mrs Armstrong (friends of Admiral Phillip), Mrs Upham (Miss C’s aunt), Miss Woodyear of Lymington, who is on a visit with Mrs Armstrong, Mrs Bayer of Somerton, a Mr Tuson, a very pleasant young man and a Miss Willoughby from Bath, who is on a visit at Mr Ford’s.  We had a very handsome dinner of two courses, with every thing conducted with the greatest ease and quietness, but I never passd so stupid a day.  No one was inclined to talk and we were some times two or three minutes without a word being utterd.  They all went away before nine o’clock.  We waited some time for George, but as he did not come and it was raining very fast, we borrowd a plaid, shawl, thick shoes, bonnets and umbrellas and set out, for fear it should be quite dark and get very muddy.  We met George about half way, when I put on a plaid and my own thick shoes, as Miss Mundy’s were so big I could scarcely keep them on.  We got home very dry, though it pourd, and found Emma looking very ill and my mother very much out of humour and complaining she was very ill, which is generally the case when she is out of temper.  She required a great deal of persuasion to eat a very good supper, which she evidently wished to do, but which I should not have pressed but on dear Emma’s account, and took some laudanum when she went to bed.

Fashion plate for August 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for August 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Saturday, 1 August, 1812

A cold, dull looking morning.  Emma looking very ill, my mother in a very bad humour.  She would hardly answer me, when I went to ask her how she did.  She did not have any breakfast with us and poor Emma was obliged to sit in her room the whole morning, while she slept, instead of breathing the fresh air which is so essentially necessary for her recovery.  It is more than a pity she should be so sacrificed.  When my mother woke she was in better humour, eat a very good dinner and allowd Emma to come down stairs.  My Aunt very kindly had the poney saddled and we put Emma on it and George led it about for half an hour.  The air and exercise did her a great deal of good.  When we came in my mother was up and coming down stairs.  My Aunt P and I both had letters from our dear William, thro Mr Porcher, but did not tell my mother of them, as he writes to us what he would not to her.

Sunday, 2 August, 1812

A fine day, but gloomy looking and intensely hot.  My two Aunts, Emma and I went to Church in the morning.  Emma rode the poney.  We sat a little while at Mr Ford’s, but saw only their family and Miss Willoughby at Church.  We had some luncheon when we came home and then went to Church again, my mother taking my Aunt Neate’s place.  Emma rode again and thought it was of service to her.

Sunday, 9 August, 1812

A very fine and hot day.  My Aunt, my mother, Emma and I went to Church in the morning.  Emma rode the Poney.  She lookd very pale and wan and I believe was very unwell all day.  We saw Mr and Mrs Ford, Miss Munday, Miss Willoughby, the Miss Pynes and Miss Gould.  We went into Mr Ford’s, but did not sit down.  We had some luncheon when we came home and then all (but my Aunt Neate) went to Church again.  I was very much tired when I came home.

I have not had time to write since last Sunday.  The week has passd much as usual, a good deal of rain the beginning of the week, and very fine the latter end.  The Miss Pynes drank tea here Monday.  Tuesday my Aunt and I calld on Mrs Gapper to ask them to come here in the evening.  We met Lady Burnaby there.  Miss Gapper, Miss Lucy and Miss Barnett drank tea here Wednesday.  Colonel Pinney and two fine boys, his nephews, calld.  Thursday we were surprised by a visit from Lady Burnaby and Dr and Mrs Colston.  They askd us to go to King Weston with them, but we declind it.  Saturday my Aunt and I returnd Lady B’s visit.  We sat there a long time, walkd round her garden with her and she came nearly to the gate with us.  We have had four of Cooper’s Papers in the course of the week.  George made some very nice Hassocks, which Emma helpd cover with green baize.  William took them to the Church yesterday.  My Aunt P, my mother and I walkd there, Emma rode.  We found a very beautiful bird in the Church which William caught for me and I brought it home to shew my Aunt Neate.  George said it was a young cuckoo. I let it fly in our way to Church today.

Monday, 10 August, 1812

A fine day.  I workd all day new bodying a gown.  My Aunt had some of the pictures put up in the Breakfast Room.  Mr and Mrs Ford, Miss Munday and Miss Willoughby drank tea here.  They went away at nine o’clock.  I workd a little before supper.  Mrs Pinney calld, but it was just as we were going to dinner, so my Aunt said “not at home”.  She left the books Cooper had the kindness to send me, by her.

Tuesday,11 August, 1812

A fine day.  I workd hard on my gown the whole of it and finishd it before tea, after which I put up the remaining pictures in the Breakfast Room, which took me up til after the supper was on the table.

Wednesday, 12 August, 1812

A fine and very hot day.  I trimmd my gown in the morning to wear at Mr Dickenson’s at dinner.  George went with my Aunt Neate’s rams to Lydford Fair, but did not sell them.  We had some dinner and my Aunt Neate, Emma and my mother and then my Aunt P and I dressd ourselves to go to Mr Dickenson’s.  We found assembled there Mr and Mrs D, their sweet little boy, a Mr and Mrs Taylor, Mr Stucky of ? port, a Mr Daw from Castle Cary and a Mr Parsons and Mr Byer from Somerton.  Just as we sat down to dinner, Mr, Mrs and Miss Moody arrived.  The dinner was the most superb and elegant I ever saw, all served on magnificent plate and the desert equally grand.  One man out and three in livery waited.  When we went into the Drawing Room after dinner, the dear little boy askd Miss Moody and me to go and see his  ponys.  We walkd all down the plantation, got over a dreadful stile into a cottage garden and went thro that into the orchard, where they were.  Coming back, the old woman at the cottage was so civil to let us thro a ? by which we avoided the stile.  Before we went into the house William took us to see where he is going to have a swing put up.  I found Miss Moody very pleasant and chatty.  Every lady went away a quarter of an hour before us.  We got home about half past nine.  The visit went off better than I expected, but I can never find pleasure or amusement in the society of strangers and those so infinitely above me. My Aunt P and I did not go to bed till twelve o’clock.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

The Swing by Arthur William Devis (c) Museums Sheffield; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Swing by Arthur William Devis
(c) Museums Sheffield; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday, 13 August, 1812

A very fine day and very hot.  We were all very much disconcerted after breakfast by George’s telling my Aunt P that he had sold the grey poney at the fair yesterday and bought another in its place without having askd her permission or given the least hint of his intention.  She was very much displeased, as she would not have parted with it on any account and it certainly was a most impudent thing in him to do.  My Aunt P, Emma and I went to return Miss Moody’s and Mrs Colton’s visits. At Mr Moody’s we saw him, Mrs M, their daughter and two sons, fine young men.  Their house is new built and the Drawing Room magnificently furnishd.  I walkd around the garden with Miss Moody.  We found Dr and Mrs Colston at home and very friendly.  They wanted us to have some cold beef, which we declined, but they brought in sandwiches, cake, apple and and wine.  They took us to see the Church yard and a beautiful water fall, after which the Dr, my Aunt and I went across two fields to see another water fall, but it was not running.  We did not get home till late to dinner and met little Dickenson on horseback near home.

Friday, 14 August, 1812

A fine and very hot day.  My Aunt P, Emma and I went to Somerton, where we went to two or three shops, bought what he wanted and then calld on the Mrs Pinny’s.  We found old Mrs P, the Colonel and his wife at home.  The brought in cake and wine and Mrs P desired to have some Raspberry vinegar, which the Colonel persuaded my Aunt and me to have some of and which, mixd for us, it was the best I ever tasted.  Their place is the prettiest I have yet seen and the room they were sitting in magnificent, with quantities of exquisite flowers.  We came home the short way, thro the village, which is much pleasanter than the other.  I gathered a nosegay after dinner.  Mrs Pinney sent my Aunt a very fine melon in the evening.  We had one of Cooper’s Papers and one intended for a Mr Wickham, which was sent here also.

Saturday, 15 August, 1812

A fine day, but a cold high wind.  My mother in a very ill humour, consequently poor Emma suffering and unwell.  I wrote most of the morning and workd a little in the afternoon.  I wrote a long letter to Harry.

Sunday, 16 August, 1812

A chilly morning with showers, which prevented our going to Church.  We all read Prayers at home.  Poor Emma very unwell.  My Aunt P, my mother and I went to Church in the afternoon, saw Mr and Mrs Ford, Miss Willance, Miss Gould, Miss Barnett, Miss Pyne and Lady Burnaby.  We walkd home on the road way to accompany the four latter part of the way.  Miss Pyne askd us to drink tea with them in a sociable way, but my Aunt declined it saying we would walk down after tea, which she, my mother and I did (after my Aunt, Emma and I had been to see Benjamin Summers, who was not well).  We found Lady Burnaby and the Mr Parsons, whom we met at Mr Dickenson’s there. He was very sociable and pleasant.  We staid till about nine o’clock and had a beautiful walk home.

Monday, 17 August, 1812

An intense hot day.  Poor Emma very ill and my mother in very bad humour.  I workd all day making a tippit, which my Aunt P was so kind to give me of a Patent net.  Mr Ford calld and staid more than an hour.  After tea my Aunt P and I took a little walk, in which Emma was very desirous of joining, but my mother insisted on her staying within and she was obliged to comply.  I workd in the evening.  My Aunts, I and Emma and my mother played Cassino.

Tuesday ,18 August, 1812

The hottest day we have had this year.  I trimmd my new tippet to wear at Mr Moody’s today.  Emma was invited to go with us, but was too unwell to venture.  We met Mr and Mrs F and Miss Munday, Miss Willoughby, Mr Bryer and a Mrs Brock and spent the pleasantest day I have passd since we came to Charlton.  Nothing could be more friendly than the whole family were to us. After dinner we all walkd to a shop in the village where my Aunt bought a good deal of glass and earthen ware.  We afterward walkd about the garden.  We came  away about about nine.  My Aunt offered to bring Miss Munday with us, that Mr Ford might not be obliged to walk, but she begd we would allow Mr F to go with us, which he did and we put him down at a gate, where he crossd one field to his own house.  In the middle of supper my mother fancied she was very ill and went to bed before we had done.  We had Cooper’s Papers.  I heard from Harry.

There is a small piece of paper pasted on this page saying “Holly Bank July ?, 1839”

Wednesday, 19 August, 1812

I workd all day.  We had a shower but it did not last many minutes and was evidently the skirts of a thunder storm. Emma was very unwell and my mother consented to her getting on the new horse for a little exercise.  My Aunt and I went with her to Mrs Gapper’s where we saw Mrs G, Miss G  and Mary, Miss Davis and Lady Burnaby.  We sat there an hour and then Emma extended her ride and we our walk, to the end of East Charlton village.  The ride appears to be of service to her.  We did not come home till half past three and found a card “Mr Rocke, Chelsea”.  He had lived in this house and sold it to Mr Whitelock.  I gatherd a great many nasturtiums to pickle.  My mother was in an extreme ill humour all the afternoon, but recoverd herself after supper.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Thursday, 20 August, 1812

A fine day.  I workd a little and wrote the rest of the morning. I have been so little inclined to write and have so very little of any thing pleasant to commit to paper, that I have neglected my journal upwards of a month, during which we have dined at Mr Pinney’s and Dr Coltson’s, drank tea at Lady Burnaby’s twice. at Miss Pyne’s and at Mrs Gapper’s.  Dear Emma is certainly better than she was considerably and would, I think, very soon be perfectly restord to health if she was away from my mother, who unfortunate temper is enough to worry any one to death and who makes a perfect slave of poor Emma.  My Aunt P, Emma and I dined at Mr Pinney’s, where we met an immense party, all strangers to us;  Lord Glastonbury, General Grenville, Mr and Miss Gould, Mr and Mrs Arnes, Mr and Mrs Thring, Mrs Bayley, Mr Dickenson, Colonel and Mrs Pinney, Mr C Pinney, Mr and Mrs P and ourselves.  It was a magnificent Turtle dinner and every thing in as high a stile as possible.  I should have been much happier at home.  We spent a very pleasant chearful day at Dr Cathesans.  Our party there consisted of a Dr, Mrs and Miss Shipton, Miss Pearson (all staying in the house), Lady Burnaby, Miss Barnett, Mr Ford, Mr Bayer, my Aunt P, Emma and myself.  We had a beautiful moonlight night to come home.  Mrs Pinney and Mrs F P have calld on us again.  Mrs P had the kindness to bring us one of the finest Pine Apple I ever tasted.  I have heard from Harry and wrote a long letter to Cooper.  Dr Coltson has had the kindness to lend my Aunt some Cyder Hogsheads and sent her a hare.

Fashion plate for September 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for September 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Friday, 25 September, 1812

A fine day, tho gloomy looking.  We were very busy all the morning preparing for the company we expected at dinner.  Mr, Mrs and Miss Moody, Dr and Mrs Coltson, Miss Pearson and Mr Bayer dined here and were all very pleasant and chearful.  Mr Bayer was sent for to some sick person before the gentlemen joind us in the Drawing Room.  Mr Moody, Mrs Colton and my two Aunts playd Whist, the rest of us Commerce.  Dr C won the Pool, after which he shewd us a game I never heard of before called the The Recruiting Officer, the Pool of which he won also.  While their horses were putting too, we playd a game of La Peur, which Emma won.  Neither lost or won.  They all went away between ten and eleven.

Saturday, 26 September, 1812

A fine day.  My Aunt Powell, Emma and I were out all the morning.  Emma rode about while we calld at the Ford’s, Pynes and Lady Burnaby’s.  We saw only Mrs Ford at their house, where we staid a very short time.  We found Miss Pyne and Miss Coddington just coming to call on us.  We sat there a short time and then went to Lady B, who was out.  We overtook Misses P and C in our way home.  They walkd as far as the gate with us, where they took leave.  My Aunt askd them to come and play a Pool of Quadrille this evening, which they did.  My two Aunts, Miss Coddington and my mother playd.  Miss Pyne, Emma and I lookd on.  They did not go home till after ten.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Sunday, 27 September, 1812

A tolerable fine morning, tho gloomy looking.  My two Aunts, Emma and I went to Church.  My mother fancied she was not well enough.  We saw Mr and Mrs Ford and Miss Munday, but did not call there.  We were caught in the rain coming home, but it was slight.  It raind frequently in the course of the day and we did not go to Church again in the afternoon it was so cold.  My Aunt had the fire lit after dinner.

Monday, 28 September, 1812

A very wet day.  I workd the whole of it.  My mother did not get up till near dinner time.  We were to have drank tea at the Miss Pynes, but the rain prevented us.  My Aunts, Emma and my mother playd Cassino in the evening.  I playd one game.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Tuesday, 29 September, 1812

A tolerable day.  I painted my drawers and part of a chest of my Aunt Powell’s.  My Aunt, Emma and my mother pickd Elder Berries for the wine.  Miss Pyne and Miss Coddington calld, but we did not admit them.  We all, except my Aunt Neate and my mother, picked Elder till supper time.

Wednesday, 30 September, 1812

A gloomy looking morning, but pleasant out.  We all pickd Elder till about two o’clock, when my Aunt P and I dressd ourselves, expecting Mrs Dickenson and Mr and Mrs Goodford.  They came between two and three and little William with them.  Mrs and Miss G as friendly and good humourd as ever and Mrs D very pleasant.  There was a violent shower while they were here, which lasted an hour, but it was fine afterwards.  Mrs Dickenson sent a hare, with an invitation to my Aunt, Emma and me to dine there next Saturday, which my Aunt accepted.  We pickd berries till tea time, after which my two Aunts, my mother and I playd Cassino.  Emma workd.

Fashion plate for October 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for October 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

October 1812

My time passes so disagreeably that I have no inclination to set down events as they pass. We dined on Saturday at Mr Dickenson’s and passd a tolerably pleasant day.  Met the Goodfords, Mrs F Pinney, Mr Bryer and the two Miss Moodys.  We have calld on the Fords, Pynes and Lady Burnaby, who have all calld here, as did Mrs and Miss Gapper.  Colonel Pinney calld Saturday and was as pleasant as usual.  He is just come from London and brought a tolerable account of dear Cooper.

Sunday, 11 October, 1812

A very thick fog.  My Aunts and I went to Church and staid to the Communion Service, after which we sat half an hour at Mr Ford’s and then went as far as Lady Burnaby’s with my Aunt Neate.  Left her there and we went on to Mrs Gapper’s, where we saw Mrs G, her two daughters and her second son (who is just come from Sea, a very fine lad), Mrs Barnett, Miss B, Miss Gapper and Mrs Davis.  While we were there Mr Colston came in.  He is very like his brothers in face, but a complete clown in manner.  Miss Barnett was extremely rude in her manner to us, so much so that if I had been my Aunt I should have come away, instead of which we staid till it was time to go to Church again.  Mrs Barnett and Miss Gapper walkd with us, the latter sat in our Pew.  Emma was there just before us.  We walkd the road way home and accompanied Miss Pyne, Miss Gould, Miss Gapper, Mrs Barnett and Mrs and Miss Chamber part of the way.  When we returnd, we found Dr and Mrs Colston and Lady Burnaby had calld.  We had not been in the house more than ten minutes when it began to rain very fast and continued about an hour.

Monday, 12 October, 1812

A fine morning.  I workd a little after breakfast and made wafers the rest of the day.  Mrs Pinney and Mrs Ames calld.  I did not see them.  They brought the work boxes that Cooper had the kindness to order when he was last at Henlade, of the French prisoners at Norman Cross.  It is impossible for words to describe their exquisite beauty.  It raind very hard while Mrs P was here and was wet in the evening.  I finishd the wafers at tea time and workd all the evening.  My Aunt Neate and my mother played at Piquet.  Mrs Pinney very kindly brought my Aunt some fine pears.

French Plait Merchants Trading with French Prisoners of War at Norman Cross or Yaxley Camp, Cambridgeshire, 1806–1815 by Arthur Claude Cooke (c) Luton Culture; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
French Plait Merchants Trading with French Prisoners of War at Norman Cross or Yaxley Camp, Cambridgeshire, 1806–1815 by Arthur Claude Cooke
(c) Luton Culture; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 13 October, 1812

A beautiful morning.   I workd a little after breakfast and then went out with my Aunt P.  We went to Farmer Hallet’s about some pears, and then to Ann Page’s to enquire about having some wool carded for quilts.  In our way home we met Miss Julia Pine and had a little chat with her. It was delightfully pleasant, while we were out. We had not been home half an hour when it began to rain and continued with little interruption the rest of the day and night.  Mr and Mrs Ford, Miss Munday and Mr Boyer dined here, the latter was sent far away at tea time, as he was the last time we had the pleasure of seeing him.  We did not play cards and the Fords went away about half past nine.  I workd a little afterwards and we did not go to bed till one o’clock.  Poor Betty took an Emetic which operated almost all night.

We had Cooper’s Paper.

Wednesday, 14 October, 1812

A very wet morning, which was a disappointment to us, as we expected the Miss Pynes, Mrs Chambers and her daughters to see Mr Dickenson go by to be elected for the County at Chester.  We had fancied there would have been a grand procession, instead of which there was only Mr D’s coach and four and a few peaple on horseback.  Miss Julia Pyne and Miss Chambers calld as soon as the rain was over and sat an hour.  Mr Dickenson returnd about two o’clock. It continued fine the rest of the day and evening.  We were to have drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, but my Aunt excused herself on account of the number of drunken peaple that would be returning from the feasting at Mr D’s.  I workd on Emma’s gown all day and in the evening too.  It was so cold a day we dined in the Breakfast Room. We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 15 October, 1812

A very showery and sunshine day.  I painted a little after breakfast.  While I was up stairs Mr and Miss Gould condescended to honor my Aunt with a visit.  Their civilities came rather too late, in my opinion.  I workd all day, at least till dinner time.  Mrs Gapper and Miss Gapper, Miss Lucy, Miss Whitelocke and Miss Barnett drank tea here.  My poor Aunt Neate was so unwell she was obliged to stay up stairs till after tea and dear Emma had so bad a head ache she went to bed before they went away.  Mrs and Miss Gapper, my mother and I playd a Poole at Quadrille after which my Aunt Neate took my place.  I cannot say I like Miss Whitelocke very much.  Her manner is loud and second rate.  They did not go away till near eleven and we did not go to bed till one o’clock.

Friday, 16 October, 1812

A fine morning.  My Aunt Neate and Emma both better.  Poor Betty was taken very ill while she was making the beds.  My Aunt and I went to her and found her on the bed insensible.  We soon recovered her by Hartshorn and in about half an hour she was a little better.  We gave her an emetic at night, which affected her the whole night.  It continued fine the whole day.  My Aunt P and I went as far as Farmer Hallet’s about the pears, which my Aunt bought and also five hundred of walnuts.  Just as dinner was putting on the table, Mrs Gapper, her son and Miss Gapper calld.  Of course we said “not at home”.   George went early in the morning to Stourton, to return at night, but did not.  I workd at little on Emma’s gown.  We playd Quadrille in the evening and did not go to bed till one o’clock.

Saturday, 17 October, 1812

A very wet day.  George returned before our breakfast.  Betty very unwell in the morning, but so much worse in the middle of the day that my Aunt sent for Mr Bryer , who came about five.  George went over to Somerton again in the evening for the medicines, which relieved her very soon.  I finishd Emma’s gown. We playd Quadrille in the evening, but did not sit up late.  We had three of Cooper’s Papers.

Sunday, 18 October, 1812

A very wet day.  We could not go to Church, but read Prayers at home.  Betty was better to day.  Mr Binger? calld before dinner to see her and George went to Somerton to fetch medicine.  We had Cooper’s Papers.

Monday, 19 October, 1812

Violent showers and sunshine, with the most frightful wind I ever heard.  It was so bad last night I expected the windows would have been blown in.  Betty not quite so well to day.  Dr and Mrs Colton calld in the evening, at my Aunt’s request, in their way home from Mr Ford’s, where they had dined.  They sat about half an hour.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.

Tuesday, 20 October, 1812

A showery day with a good deal of wind, but not so high as yesterday.  Betty better to day.  I workd on Emma’s gown and finishd it.  I wrote to Mr Touray to beg he would sell a hundred pounds of my stock, for my Aunt Neate. We playd Quadrille in the evening .

Wednesday, 21 October, 1812

A beautiful day, quite Summer.  Mrs Pinney and Mrs Ames calld. The former pressd us very kindly to dine there next Wednesday and go to the Ball at Somerton, which her son gives as Colonel of the Local Militia, but neither Emma or I wishd it, so my Aunt declind it.  When they were gone my Aunt, Emma and I took a walk as far as the shop at East Charlton.  In our way back we calld on Miss Whitelock at Mrs Gappers, but she was gone out.  We saw only Mrs and Miss Gapper.  We met Miss Julia Pyne and one of her nieces, Miss Fanny Pyne, with her and as we came home we encountered Mrs and Miss Barnett.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.

We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Papers.

Thursday, 22 October, 1812

A showery day.  I was busy pickling mushrooms.  Mr Binger? calld to see Betty, who is now quite well.  I began to make another gown for Emma.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.  We had four of Cooper’s Papers.  Miss Julia Pyne and Miss Gould calld, but I did not see them.

Friday, 23 October, 1812

A beautiful day, but a good deal of wind.  I workd all the morning on Emma’s gown.  After dinner my Aunt P and I walkd to Farmer Hugh Penney’s.  My Aunt calld at Mrs Ford’s door to ask how she did, but did not go in.  It was very muddy and we were but just in time to see our way home.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.

Saturday, 24 October, 1812

A very fine day.  I workd part of the morning and painted the rest.  After dinner my Aunt P and I went to Hockey’s Shop where I bought a yard of white ribbon for strings to my bonnet, for which I gave 9d.  From there we went to Benjamin Summer’s new cottage and saw the baby.  It is the smallest I ever saw.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.  I heard from Mr Touray with the money for my Aunt Neate and my dividend.  We had Cooper’s Papers.

Sunday, 25 October, 1812

A very wet day.  We could not go to Church, but read Prayers at home.  Pocock went in the afternoon and George, for there was service only once, Mr Ford being at Bristol and Mr Gould performd it for him.  Mrs Coltson very kindly sent me a pattern of work, a needle and some cotton to do it with.

Monday, 26 October, 1812

A showery day.  I painted part of the morning and workd the rest of the day.  We playd Quadrille in the evening and had Cooper’s Paper.  Mr Brodnip? (Mr Dickenson’s agent) calld, but the room smoked so dreadfully he could not stay to talk on business, for he literally could not see across it.

Tuesday, 27 October, 1812

A tolerable fine day.  Mr Bryer calld to ask if my Aunt had any thing to send to Dorchester, as his brother was going there.  While he was here, Miss Whitelock, Miss Lucy, Miss Mary, Mr Southly and Master A Gapper calld.  I workd all day on Emma’s gown.  We played Quadrille in the evening.

Wednesday, 28 October, 1812

A fine day upon the whole.  I was busy most part of the morning getting things ready for the Company tomorrow.  Mrs Coltson kindly sent my Aunt a fine pheasant, saying in her note “she hoped the dear invalid would relish it”, meaning Emma.  I made jelly and blancmange in the evening and we playd Quadrille. We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and two of Cooper’s.

Lady Burnaby calld and sat an hour.  My Aunt lent her some News Papers.

Thursday, 29 October, 1812

A very fine day.  I did not sit down from breakfast time till dinner.  I had so much to do to get every thing in order against dinner time.  Mrs Pinney, Mrs Ames, Mrs Goodford, Colonel Pinney and Mr and Mrs Dickenson dined here.  The day went off very pleasant and chearfully.  Mrs Goodford, Colonel P, Mrs Ames and my Aunt Neate played a very merry Rubber of Whist, my Aunt hired Mr Ford’s coachman’s wife to assist in dressing the dinner, which was very nicely done.  Cooper sent my Aunt one of the finest Cods and oysters I ever saw and a Stilton cheese, but they did not arrive in time for dinner, which was very provoking.  We had his Paper.

Friday, 30 October, 1812

A very wet day.  I workd the whole of it.  It was so dark and dismal it look just like a November day in London.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.

Saturday, 31 October, 1812

A beautiful day.  I workd a little in the morning and about one o’clock went with my Aunt and Emma (the latter on horseback) to call on Mrs Gapper, Lady Burnaby and the Miss Pynes.  We met Lady B at the latter, so did not go on to her house.  Saw Miss Julia and Miss Fanny Pyne.  Just as we were taking leave Mrs Ford and Miss Munday came in.   At Mrs Gappers we saw Mrs G. Miss Whitelock, Miss Lucy and Miss Mary.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Fashion plate for November 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics
Fashion plate for November 1812 from Ackermann’s Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions, and politics

Sunday, 1 November, 1812

A very bad day.  It rained so fast we could not go to Church, but read Prayers at home.  The rain did not cease the whole day.

Monday, 2 November, 1812

A beautiful day.  Emma rode and my Aunt P and I walkd to Mr Ford’s, where we sat two hours.  From there we went to Farmer Lane’s and then came home, where we heard Mrs Gapper had calld while we were out, knowing my mother was at home, but she had been denied to her, owing to a mistake of Pocock’s.  My mother wishd Emma to go there and make an apology for her and we accompanied her.  We found only Miss Barnett at home, but Mr Gapper and Miss G came in before we left her house.  On our return home we found Mr Dickenson with my mother and my Aunt Neate.  I partly cut Emma’s hair before dinner and collected a good many things together after dinner to go with them to Bath tomorrow and began to pack a basket in which I put a good many sweet apples, some pears, some meddlars, a bottle of Port wine, a little jar of pickles, a larger of Raspberry jam, a nice piece of the cheese Cooper sent my Aunt, some pearl barley, some groats, a couple of chickens and some parsley and a loaf.  We playd Quadrille in the evening and had a French Paper from Cooper.

Tuesday, 3 November, 1812

A fine day.  I got up early and finishd cutting dear Emma’s hair before I was dressd.  The Chaise to carry them to Bath came at eight o’clock.  Dear Emma made the breakfast while I finishd their baskets and boxd some apples and Mrs Phillip’s News Papers in another, to go to them.  We could not any of us eat any breakfast.  They left us (with heavy hearts) about half past nine and I am sure mine was very heavy all the rest of the day.  The house appeard quite deserted and as deplorable as when we first came to it.  I workd the whole day getting one of my new gowns ready for the wash.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers and I heard from Henry.

A general view of Bath, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).
A general view of Bath, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Wednesday, 4 November, 1812

A very fine day.  I moved the drawers and press into my room and put the things a little to rights.  I divided two slips of the Citridona Geranium that Dear Emma gave me into five and potted them.  I hope they will grow.  We expected Mrs and Miss Strangways to dine and stay a fortnight here, but they did not come.  I read all the evening. We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper and one of Cooper’s.

Thursday, 5 November, 1812

A most beautiful day.  I did a good many little odd jobs and then dressd myself and sat down to work.  Mr Ford calld, but did not stay long.  I workd in the afternoon.  Mrs Strangways did not come, nor have we heard from her.  I workd all the evening.  We had Cooper’s Papers.  My Aunt P heard from my mother.  They got to Bath very well at half past 4.

Friday, 6 November, 1812

A beautiful day with a very white frost.  I was out in the garden a long time after breakfast and gatherd an immense quantity of Mignonette and three beautiful cabbage roses, which is extraordinary at this time of the year.  Miss Julia Pyne calld and was pleasant and chatty as usual.  I assisted my Aunt in quilting all the morning and with my Aunt Neate’s assistance, we finishd it before supper but workd very hard to accomplish it.  We have not heard any thing of the Strangways.  We had Cooper’s papers.

Saturday, 7 November, 1812

A beautiful day, but so hard a white frost that the windows in our bed rooms were coverd with ice inside.  My Aunt went George to get some pans for the flower pots.  He bought all he could get, but not enough.  I put the pots into them and then picked the buff and green curtain (that was left of the two drawing room ones) to pieces, that it may go to Bath to be dyed.  After that I workd till dinner time and then in the evening undid some more of the curtains.  I wrote to Harry.  We had Cooper’s paper.

Sunday, 8 November, 1812

A white frost and fine sunshine in the morning, when we all went to Church.  Saw only Mr and Mrs Ford and Miss Munday.  When we came home my Aunt sent George to Thorn with a letter to Miss Strangways.  He is to return tomorrow.  When we went to Church in the afternoon the frost was quite gone and it was very muddy.  We saw the Fords, Mrs and Miss Mary Gapper, Mrs Barnett, Miss Julia Pyne and Miss Gould, the two latter were going to dine at Mr Ford’s.  I wrote a very long letter to my mother.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Monday, 9 November, 1812

A very wet day.  I workd the whole of it, preparing the calico to go to Bath.  George returned about three o’clock.  He told us Miss Strangways is very shortly to be married to Mr Phillip Bally.  He heard it at Henlade, but I suppose we shall hear more of the matter when Miss Strangways and Miss M Bally come next Monday.  I workd on the curtain all the evening.

Tuesday, 10 November, 1812

A very fine day.  I workd all day getting the curtain ready to go to Bath by Molly Giles tomorrow.  My Aunt went to call on Lady Burnaby (who goes to London tomorrow).  She was denied.  I finishd the curtains in the evening.  We had Cooper’s Paper.  Pocock went away after dinner with a heavy heart, tho it was her own wish.  I am sorry she is gone, as she was extremely good temperd and obliging.

Wednesday, 11 November, 1812

A miserable wet day.  I caught a chicken to be killd and roasted for Mrs Giles to take with her after breakfast.  I measured and packed up the calico and wrote a note to my mother, enclosing a one pound note and a Tambour needle to be mended.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Rutleigh to return Miss Gould’s visit.  Fortunately she was not at home.  Mrs Giles and George went in the Chaise (when it returnd to Somerton?) as far as the Turnpike, where the caravan was to take her up.  She was very much affected when she went away and I was very sorry to part with her.  It was like losing an old friend.  Just after she was gone William came back with the baskets that came from my mother by the Coach, with a great many patterns of stuffs and calicos, my stockings, six pair at 5/9d and two pair at 4/9d, my netting needles, a pair of gloves for my Aunt Neate, my Aunt Powell’s green workd gown, scissors and knives, that went to be ground and shifts, petticoats and stockings for Hannah.  Poor little Gheta was terribly distressed at the loss of Mrs Giles and when George returnd he said Mrs G was as much distressed at parting with Gheta and made him promise to get a pretty six pence and hang it around her neck for her sake.  I markd my eight pair of stockings and three pair for Hannah and then cut out a cap of the yellow chambray my mother gave me and made it.

Thursday, 12 November, 1812

A very wet day.  I workd the whole of it, beginning to alter a gown of my Aunt Powell’s to make it fit Hannah.  Mr Bond calld but did not stay long.  I workd all the evening.  It was so extraordinarily hot out of doors in the evening as to steam all the windows on the outside and really felt like going into a hot house.

Friday, 13 November, 1812

A dismal dark day with heavy rain most part of it.  My Aunt Neate received the intelligence of poor Mrs Beck’s death.  She died last Sunday the eighth.  I workd all day and in the evening too, on Hannah’s gown.

We had Mrs Phillip’s Bath Paper, two of Cooper’s and one belonging to a Mr Wickham, sent by mistake.

Saturday, 14 November, 1812

A very dull looking morning, but tolerably fine in the afternoon.  I wrote in the morning and workd all the rest of the day, and very hard too, but finishd Hannah’s gown before twelve o’clock.  The new servant came in Mrs Gile’s place, but we shall never have such a one as she was again.  I wrote to Cooper about Mr T’s Bill.  We had Cooper’s Paper.

Sunday, 15 November, 1812

A cold, foggy morning, with a slight white frost.  We all three went to Church, the mud so deep we could hardly get along.  Saw Mr and Mrs Ford, Mrs Munday, Miss Julia Pyne and Miss Gould. The two latter walkd part of the way home with us.  My Aunt Neate went to Lady Burnaby’s to look at her sheep and we came home, had some soup and then went to Church again.  In our way we met Mr Dickinson just coming out of Mrs Ford’s.  He stoppd and had a little chat.  We went thro Mrs F’s garden and they begd us to go in till they went to Church, which we did.  We went thro their garden again on our return.  We stopd to ask Mary Cary how she did, in our way.  The weather changed very much while we were at Church and it proved a fine, mild day.  In the evening my Aunt sent Mary Cary some medicine by William, and George took a letter to Mary Dickinson to be frankd for my Aunt Powell.  I wrote all the evening.

Monday, 16 November, 1812

A very wet day.  William went to the Firs to meet Miss Strangways and Miss Miriam Ball, whom we expected by the Coach, but they sent a note to say they could not come till next Friday.  William fetchd the blankets and grocerys from the Turnpike, that came from Bath by Dingen on Saturday.  I covered my garden bonnet in the evening.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Tuesday, 17 November, 1812

A wet day, with a tremendous wind.  I wrote most part of the morning and bind some of the blankets that came from Bath. In the evening.  I glued my Aunt P’s blue work box and finishd making a morning cap.  I wrote a long letter to my mother and had a very nice long one from her in which she says he has heard from our dear William.  We had two of Cooper’s Papers.

Wednesday, 18 November, 1812

A dry day, but gloomy looking and excessively hot, with a very high wind.  I sewd all the fringe that was left of the drawing room curtains together to go to Bath by ? to be dyed puce color and went on airing the remainder of the blankets.

Drawing room window - Ackermann's Repository, September 1812
Drawing room window – Ackermann’s Repository, 1812

Friday, 27 November, 1812

A fine day, quite warm out, tho damp.  I have been so much taken up ever since Miss Strangways and Miss Miriam Ball came, which they did on Friday the 20th, that I have not had time to write, except letters.  Miss is looking remarkably well and grown quite fat, Miriam not so well.  My Aunt Powell has had a very bad stiff neck, but it is now gone.  Saturday the Miss Pynes calld, as did Mr Ford and Friday, Mr Moody. Sunday my Aunt Neate and the two Misses went to Church in the morning.  My Aunt P was not well enough to go out and I went with them in the afternoon.  Monday, Miss Gapper, Miss Lucy and Miss Mary calld.  They and Mrs Gapper drank tea here.  Miss Lucy taught us a new namd game calld “the red nines”, a good deal like Pope Joan but more amusing.  Mr Ford calld, also on Monday.  The frost has been very hard from Thursday 19th till Wednesday 25th.  My Aunt Powell and Miss Strangways not being well, we did not go out till yesterday, when we calld on the Gappers and Pynes and went to the shop at East Charlton.  I caught cold I believe, for I have a bad headache today.  I have heard from my mother once and written two very long letters to her.  I have also had a very kind letter from Cooper, saying he would send £20 to pay poor Emma’s bill to Mr Turner.

Miss Miriam Ball has been very unwell ever since she came here.  Both she and Miss Strangways have been constantly at work making caps for Hannah.  We have had Cooper’s Papers regularly, as well as Mrs Phillip’s.

Saturday, 28 November, 1812

A dry day, but not pleasant looking.  Mr and Mrs Ford and Miss Mundy calld to ask us all to dine there next Wednesday, which my Aunt agreed to do.  I finishd a purse of Miss Strangways and began one for Cooper.  A parcel arrived from my mother with a great many things;  the muslin  my Aunt sent to be dyed to make her and me a gown, my old scarlet cloak, which is so beautifully done, and so pretty and warm, Miss Strangeways advises me to make a gown of it.  My mother also sent me a present of four very nice leather boot laces and dear Emma sent my Aunt six lemons.  We playd Red Nines in the evening, which we have done every night since Miss Strangways and Miss M Ball have been here.  I had a long letter from my mother and had the pleasure of William’s letter to her, which she sent in the parcel.

 

HERE THIS JOURNAL ENDS.

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

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