1839 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1839 from Godey's Magazine (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for January 1839 from Godey’s Magazine
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Fanny kept two diaries for January and February 1839, this is the first, which lists the people who called at Fanny’s house during January and up to the 26th February 1839, together with other information. The second follows directly after, which lists the same days but gives information on the people Fanny called upon. As Fanny kept the two diaries separate so have we. From the 27th February 1839 there is just one entry for each day.

Calld here

Tuesday, 1 January 1839

Wet day.  I began the year unluckily, for the cat killd my dear little pet birds.  Mrs and Miss Chamier.

Wednesday, 2 January 1839

Mrs Pierrepont, Miss Shirley.  Fine day.

Thursday, 3 January 1839

Miss Martha Hellican, to ask us to dine there tomorrow.  A note from Mrs Longden to ask us to dine with her tomorrow.  Miss Burmester.

Friday, 4 January 1839

A dry sunshine day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier to ask us to drink tea tomorrow.

Saturday, 5 January 1839

A very bad morning with a snowstorm of most extraordinary large flakes.  Mrs Chamier to ask us to dinner, instead of tea.  Dry, both going and coming home.

Monday, 7 January 1839

Such a dreadful wind all night, I expected the Chiminies would be blown down.  We were so frightened we got up at three o’clock and remained up till near seven, when it abated a little, but it has been very high all the morning.  Part of one of Staffords Chimnies next door was blown down in the night.

A Road by a Common, Windy Day by David Cox the elder, painted between 1840 and 1859 TMBC; (c) Tameside Museums and Galleries Service: The Astley Cheetham Art Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Road by a Common, Windy Day by David Cox the elder, painted between 1840 and 1859
TMBC; (c) Tameside Museums and Galleries Service: The Astley Cheetham Art Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Calld here

Thursday, 10 January 1839

A very fine day.  Mrs Longden, Mr Wiltshire.

Friday, 11 January 1839

A warm, disagreeable day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier.

Saturday, 12 January 1839

A dry day.  Miss Shirley, Mrs Thornton, who was very kind and agreable.

Tuesday, 15 January 1839

A very fine day.  Miss Hill, Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey drank tea here and were very chearful.

Wednesday, 16 January 1839

A very fine day.  Miss Janetta Allen.  Mrs Tuttle came to opperate on my corns, which have been very troublesome for a long time.

Thursday, 17 January 1839

A beautiful day.  Miss Polwhele.  Hard frost.

Friday, 18 January, 1839

A most beautiful day, still hard frost.  Mrs Fry, Miss Shirley, Mrs and Miss Chamier.

Saturday, 19 January 1839

A very hard rain in the morning, but fine and dry afterwards.  Miss Shirley, Miss Hellen Wiltshire, Miss Hough, Mrs Wade Brown and her daughter, Mrs Farwell.  Mrs Chamier and Miss Workman drank tea here and playd a Pool of Quadrille.  I won 4/-.

Tuesday, 22 January 1839

A beautiful day.  Miss Drewett call’d to say she would drink tea with us tomorrow.  Mrs Garnett call’d.

Wednesday, 23 January 1839

A very fine day.  Miss Hill, the Miss Allens, to ask us to drink tea, but Miss Drewett and Miss Workman were coming to us.  Mrs Pierrepoint, Miss Drewett was very chearful and pleasant in the evening.

Friday, 25 January 1839

A showery day.  Miss Hill.  We heard of a dreadful occurence in Mr Tugwell’s family.  Mrs G Tugwell, in a fit of insanity, distroyed herself and twin boys with poison.

Monday, 28 January 1839

A dry day.  Miss Allen.  We talkd of little else but the poor Tugwells!  Mrs G T had given poison to her eldest boy, as well as the twins, but fortunately it made him very sick, by which his life was saved.  She had also intended to destroy her husband but putting prusic acid in a decanter of wine!!!

Miss Janetta Allen confined to the house with a cold.  Miss Hough to ask us to drink tea with her this evening.  A  little snow in the evening.

Bristol Mercury, 2nd February 1839
Bristol Mercury, 2nd February 1839

Tuesday, 29 January 1839

Sunshine in the morning, but it turned out wet afterwards.  Miss Polwhele to take leave.  She goes to London on Friday.  In the evening there was a very vivid flash of lightening with distant thunder and violent hail, which turned to small snow.

Wednesday, 30 January 1839

Fine sunshine morning, but snow from the middle of the day.  Miss Shirley.

Thursday, 31 January 1839

Sun in the morning, but it soon turned off and snowed frequently in the course of the day.

Fashion plate for February 1839 from Ladies' Pocket Magazine (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for February 1839 from Ladies’ Pocket Magazine
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday, 1 February 1839

A most beautiful day.  Mr Wiltshire call’d, but we were not at home.

Saturday, 2 February 1839

Sunshine in the morning.  Very cold.  A friendly kind note from Miss Hough to ask us to dine tomorrow.

Sunday, 3 February 1839

A fine day.  Mr and Miss Chamier, but we did not see them, as we were gone to Miss Hough’s.  Miss Workman sent to know why she had not seen us since Friday.

Tuesday, 5 February 1839

A bright morning, but it turned off about 2 o’clock and raind very hard the rest of the day and evening.  Miss Shirley call’d and Miss Chambers from Lyme.

Wednesday, 6 February 1839

A gloomy morning, but very mild.  Mrs Pierrepoint, Miss Hill and Miss Elam, Miss Allen, Mr Wiltshire and Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d, the latter to ask us to tea this evening.  Mr Wiltshire to ask us to go with him to the Pump Room Concert next Saturday and Miss Allen with a ticket for the Master of the Ceremonies Ball tomorrow.

Friday, 8 February 1839

A showery morning, but dry in the evening.  Dear Miss Allen brought us two tickets for the Pump Room Concert tomorrow and would insist on our keeping them, tho’ I told her we were going with Mr Wiltshire.  Miss Allen askd us to drink tea, but we were engaged to Mrs Chamier.

Saturday, 9 February 1839

A beautiful day.  Mr Wiltshire to take us to the Concert and Miss Chamier to go with us.  the musick was very good and we were much amused.  Mr Wiltshire left us before it was over, but we staid till the last.  We walk’d to the top of Milsom Street with Georgina and in returning met Lady James O’Bryan and Miss Otley, who shook hands and were very friendly.  Mr Wiltshire witnessed Emma’s Certificate to send to Mr Touray.

Milsom Street Bath c1806, courtesy of the British Library. Charles Jagger (1770-1827) was resident there around 1811 and Fanny was living at the time of her death in 1871
Milsom Street, Bath c1806, courtesy of the British Library.
Fanny was living there at the time of her death in 1871

Monday, 11 February 1839

A beautiful day, after a dull morning.  Miss Hill calld while we were at breakfast to ask Emma to go with her and Miss Elam to Miss Lawrences and Miss Curtis’s.  Miss Drewett calld while we were out to ask us to drink tea next Wednesday.  I wrote her a note to say we would, if it was fair.

Wednesday, 13 February 1839

Fine the whole day.  Miss Shirley call’d while we were out and brought little Willy Hale with her, who Freeman says is a lovely boy.

Thursday, 14 February 1839

Wet before breakfast, but fine afterwards.  Miss Philpot call’d.  They talk of returning to Lyme next Thursday.

Friday, 15 February 1839

A beautiful sunny morning, but it began to rain between two and three o’clock and continued the rest of the day.  Miss Hill sent to ask us to dine next Tuesday.  Miss Shirley call’d, also Miss Chambers, Miss Hughes from Devizes and a Mrs Slade, with whom she is staying.

Miss Philpot came to borrow an umbrella.  She sat here till the rain abated a little.  Miss Hughes told us that Mr Barnes (Mr Robinson’s cousin) has bought Dr Headly’s house!!  Miss Webb call’d.

Saturday, 16 February 1839

Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d to ask us to tea, but we were engaged to Miss Pyne.  Thunder, lightening and hail last night.

Monday, 18 February 1839

Dry, but gloomy.  Miss Shirley, Mrs Wilson Brown, Captain Eyre, Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey call’d.

Thursday, 21 February 1839

A very fine day, but it snow’d and rained late in the evening.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld while we were out, to ask us to go there to tea tomorrow.

Friday, 22 February 1839

A very wet day.  Miss Shirley calld.  The Admiral was a little better today.  The weather was so bad I was obliged to send an excuse to Mrs Chamier.

Saturday, 23 February 1839

A fine day.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d.  Mr Gore sent his account £2.2.0.

Monday, 25 February 1839

A very fine day, but the wind very high.  Miss Hill and Miss Elam call’d, also Mrs Pierrepont, Miss Shirley and Mrs and Miss Chamier.  Miss Hough calld, but we did not see her.

Tuesday, 26 February 1839

A dry, fine day.  Miss Lawrence and her niece Miss James calld before we went out and afterwards Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey, which was vexatious, as I daresay they came with the intention of staying to tea if we had been at home.  Received a very kind acknowledgement from Mr Gore for the payment of his Bill.

Fashion Plate for January 1839 from World of Fashion. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for January 1839 from World of Fashion.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

This is the second diary, which details the people on whom Fanny called during January and up to the 26th February 1839.

January 1839 Calld on

Wednesday, 2 January 1839

Miss Drewett, Miss Hill, the Miss Allens, Mrs Chamier, Mrs Pierrepont, Miss Workman.  A very fine day with sun and dry streets.

Friday 4 January 1839

Wet morning, but fine afterwards.  The Miss Allens, Miss Shirley.  Took a note from Mrs Jones to Downing at the Hetling Pump, with directions for his boy to go to Oldbury on Tuesday next.  We dined at the Miss Hellicans’, met Miss Workman.  A pleasant visit.  It was fine to walk home.

Saturday, 5 January 1839

 A very wet morning, but it held up after four o’clock.  We dined at Mrs Chamier’s, met Miss Workman and spent a very pleasant day.  It was fine to walk home.  Mrs Chamier and Georgina gave us each a very pretty work’d bag, their joint work.  A snow shower in the morning, the largest flakes I ever saw.

Sunday, 6 January 1839

 The weather was so bad we could not get to Church.  It did not cease raining the whole day and at night the wind was frightful.  It was so bad a three o’clock, we were afraid to remain in bed, so got up and sat in the drawing room till half past six, when it abated a little and we were so cold we went to bed again.

Tuesday, 8 January 1839

 A very wet day.  We drank tea at the dear Miss Allens’, only ourselves.  Mr A dined out, but returned just before we left them.

 Wednesday, 9 January 1839

 A beautiful day.  We call’d on Miss Hill, the Miss Hellicans, Miss Workman, Mrs Gore, Admiral Shirley, Mrs Longden, Mrs Chamier.  We met in the street Mrs Drummond, Mrs Evans, Miss and Miss Polwhele, Mrs Kingdon, Mrs Simpson, Miss Burmester.  We dined with the dear Miss Allens, met a very pleasant, agreeable young man of the name of Richardson and spent a very chearful, pleasant day.  Mr Allen dined from home.

Thursday, 10 January 1839

A very fine day.  Emma walk’d to Partis College to see Miss Wilson, who has been very unwell.  I was not well and did not go out.

 Friday, 11 January 1839

A very warm day with rain in the morning.  Emma call’d at Miss Workman’s, Miss Shirley’s.

 Saturday, 12 January 1839

A dry day.  Emma call’d on Miss Hill.

Sunday, 13 January 1839

At St. John’s in the morning, but it turned out wet (so) we could not go again.  A note from Miss Wilson to say she and Miss Harvey would drink tea with us Tuesday.

Tuesday, 15 January 1839

A beautiful day.  Miss Shirley, Mrs Chamier, Miss Workman.  Mrs Chamier askd us to tea tomorrow.  Met Miss Philpot in the street and Miss Harison.

Wednesday, 16 January 1839

A very fine day.  Emma call’d at Miss Workman’s and Admiral Shirley’s. We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, met Miss Workman.

 Thursday, 17th January 1839

A beautiful day.  Miss Philpot’s, Miss Drewett’s, Miss Workman’s, Admiral Shirley’s.  Saw Mr and Mrs Kingdon in the street.

Friday, 18 January 1839

A most beautiful day.  Emma walkd to Partis College to see Miss Wilson, Miss Harvey.  She afterwards walkd to pay the butcher’s Bill and calld on Miss Workman and Miss Shirley.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Calld on

Saturday, 19 January 1839

A very wet morning.  It rained torrents, but cleared in the middle of the day and was fine and dry afterwards.

Sunday, 20 January 1839

A slight rain till four o’clock, when it became very wet all the evening.  At St. John’s twice.

Monday, 21 January 1839

Very wet morning and so dark we could hardly see to do anything.  Bright sun in the middle of the day and very wet again all the evening.

 Tuesday, 22 January 1839

A bright sunshine day with dry streets.  Miss Hill’s, Mrs Wade Brown’s and Mrs Farwell’s, Mrs Chamier’s, Mrs Hardcastle’s, Miss Shirley’s, Miss Workman’s, the Miss Allens’.  Met Miss Masters in the street and Miss Burmester coming out of Admiral Shirley’s.  We saw the latter, who is much better and looking like himself again.  Drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, only ourselves.  Playd Cassino.

 Wednesday, 23 January, 1839

A fine day.

Thursday, 24 January 1839

A fine morning.  Calld on Mrs Garnett, Mrs Nicholas, Mrs Pierrepont, Mrs Kiplins, met Miss Shirley.   Met Miss Hough in the Circus, who askd us to drink tea with her tomorrow.

Circus with opening into Bennett Street, mid nineteenth-century Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Circus with opening into Bennett Street, Bath, mid nineteenth-century
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Friday, 25 January 1839

Not a fine day and very wet in the evening.  We attempted to go to Miss Hough’s, but were obliged to turn back in George Street, it rained so fast and I sent a note of excuse.

Saturday, 26 January 1839

Not a fine day.  Emma call’d on Miss Workman.

Sunday, 27 January 1839

A beautiful day, but intensely cold and frosty.  At St. John’s twice.  Miss Workman’s, Admiral Shirley’s.

 Monday, 28 January 1839

A dry day.  Emma calld on Miss Hill.  We drank tea at Miss Hough’s, only ourselves.  She was very obliging and kind.  It snow’d a little in the course of the evening and the streets were very wet when we came home, but it was not so very cold as when we went.

Tuesday, 29 January 1839

Sun shine in the morning.  Emma call’d at the Miss Hellicans’, who are all confined with colds.  It turned to heavy rain about three o’clock and continued the rest of the day, and in the evening violent hail with distant thunder and a frightfully vivid flash of lightening.

 Wednesday, 30 January 1839

A fine sunshine morning, but it turned off in the middle of the day and snow’d a good deal.  Very hard frost and intensely cold.   Emma call’d on Miss Workman, the Miss Allens and Admiral Shirley, who was in bed suffering from gout all over him!

Fashion Plate for February 1839 from World of Fashion. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for February 1839 from World of Fashion.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

February 1839

Calld on

Friday, 1 February 1839

A beautiful day.  Hard frost and bright sun.  We went out at half past 12 o’clock and call’d on Miss Hill.  Miss Elam is come from Yorkshire to stay with her.  She arrived last evening.  Miss H askd us to drink tea there tomorrow.  Miss Workman’s, Admiral Shirley’s, Mrs Chamier’s, who askd us to tea this evening, Mrs Hardcastle’s Miss Hough’s (out), Mrs Drummond’s (gone to London), the Miss Philpot’s, met Mr Earl and Miss Allen in the street.  Drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, only ourselves.  Dry to walk home.

Saturday, 2 February 1839

A dry day.  We drank tea at Miss Hill’s, only ourselves and Miss Elam.  Just before we went, Miss Pyne of Charlton’s maid came to say her mistress and Miss Chambers came to Bath last Wednesday for Miss Pyne’s health, who had been dangerously ill.  It was dry overhead for us to walk home, but terribly muddy.

Sunday, 3 February 1839

Fine sunny morning, but it having raind in the night, the mud was so deep it was with difficulty we could get through it in the lower part of the town. At St. John’s twice.  We calld on the Miss Hellican, who are better, did not go in.  Met Miss Hare at the door.  We sat some time with dear Miss Pyne, who is looking much better than I saw her last.  She is coming to try the Bath Water for a weakness in her ancles and legs.

We dined with Miss Hough, only ourselves.  Everything very good and comfortable, with the greatest friendliness.  We were fortunate in having it dry to come home, for it rained before we went to bed.

Monday, 4 February 1839

A wet day, not out the whole day.

 Wednesday, 6 February 1839

A mild but gloomy morning.  Emma call’d on Miss Workman, found her very much out of spirits. We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, only ourselves and she kindly asked us again for Friday.  It continued dry all day and was fine in the evening for us, both going and coming home.

Thursday, 7 February 1839

Neither fine nor otherwise.  A little mistling rain now and then, but not enough to wet the streets and very mild.  Emma call’d on Miss Hill, Miss Drewett, the Miss Hellicans, Miss Pyne, Mrs Hardcastle, gave the latter the ticket for the Master of Ceremonies Ball this evening that Miss Allen kindly gave us yesterday.

Grand Ball Room, Assembly Rooms, Bath c.1840 Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Grand Ball Room, Assembly Rooms, Bath c.1840
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Friday, 8 February 1839

Showery.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, met Miss Workman, play’d Quadrills.  I won 8/6d!!!  Emma lost 1/-.  Gave Georgina one of the tickets for the Pump Room concert, that the dear Miss Allens gave us.  Mrs Chamier did not wish to go.  It was dry in the evening, both going and returning.

Saturday, 9 February 1839

A beautiful day, but dreadfully muddy.  Emma went with the second of Miss Allen’s tickets for the concerts, to the Miss Philpots’, who were not at home, then to Miss Shirley, who did not wish to go.  She then took it to Miss Drewett, who was delighted to have it.  She also took one to Miss Chamier’s, who went with us and Mr Wiltshire to the concert, where we were much amused and gratified.

Sunday10 February 1839

A beautiful day, quite Spring.  At St. John’s twice, shook hands with Mrs and Miss de Visne. Emma assisted one of the Miss Masons for her pew to the Chaple door.  We call’d on Miss Workman and at Admiral Shirley’s door.  He was a little better. Met Mrs Evans at Miss Workman’s and she was very agreeable.

 Monday, 11 February 1839

A damp, disagreeable morning, but it turned out fine and was a beautiful day.  Emma went with Miss Hill to call on Miss Lawrence, Bloomfireld Place and Miss Curtis, Kensington Place.  When she returned we went together to Colling’s to pay a sovereign for Mrs Keen to the Benevolent Society, from there to Mrs Chamier’s, where we sat some time.  As we were coming away, Miss Caldwell and a young lady were going in.  Call’d on the Miss Allens, who were out, then went to Miss Pyne’s, who was at dinner, but the servant said would be ready to see us in a few minutes, so we went on to the Miss Hellicans’, met Mrs Slade at the door, who said they were better, but had not dined down stairs yet.  We took two or three turns on the Parades and then went in to Miss Pyne’s, where we sat some time.  Did not see Miss Chambers.  She was gone to the Post office.  We met Mrs Simpson in the street.  She thinks Mrs Saurin rather better and expects Mrs R Smith on Wednesday.  It was half past 4 when we came home to dinner.  Met Mrs Wilkinson and had a little chat.

Harrison's Gardens and walks, c.1855 Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Harrison’s Gardens and walks, c.1855
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Calld on

Tuesday, 12 February 1839

A fine morning.  We went to Hornby’s to get a lining for Emma’s cloak, some black sewing silk and brown sewing cotton.  Bought a little cork screw at Harrison for Georgian Chamier, for which I  gave 1/-.  After we had dine, Emma went up to Mrs Turner’s, where she saw Miss Barry, Miss Cox, Mrs Noad, a lady and gentleman and two young ladies whose names she did not know.  Soon after she came home it began to rain and was wet all the evening.

Wednesday, 13 February 1839

A very fine day.  We call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, who was a little better, but not out of his room.  Miss S was out.  Then at Miss Workman\s and from her walk’d to Bath Wick Hill to pay the butcher.  It was very pleasant, but very cold.  In our way home, we met Mrs Partis and had a little chat with her.  We drank tea with Miss Drewett, met a Miss Shute, a Miss C? and Miss Workman, all pleasant and chearful.  It was a fine night to come home.

Thursday, 14 February 1839

Wet before breakfast, but dry and fine the whole of the day and evening afterwards, with a high wind.  Emma call’d on Admiral Shirley and Miss Workman, the former was much better and Emma sat some time with him.  Georgina was out walking.  I did not go out at all.

 Friday, 15 February 1839

We had intended to go out after dinner, but the rain came on and prevented us.

 Saturday, 16 February 1839

A very fine day, but very cold.  Went to the grocer for change for a Bank Post Bill for £53, to Hornby’s for two pr of stockings for old Hawkins and a bit of velvet for Emma’s cloak.  Calld on Miss Pyne, who askd us to tea, met Mr Brymer there, than at the Miss Hellicans’ door.  They are all better.  From there we went to Mrs Chamier’s, but did not go in and called at Admiral Shirley’s door.  He was a little better.  We sat some time with Miss Workman and in our way home met Miss Shirley, Mrs Hale and her lovely little boy.  Drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  Just as we were preparing to go, there was a sharp shower of hail.  We set out as soon as it was over, but it made the streets very wet and muddy and they were worse when we came home, but fortunately it did not rain till after we came in, soon after which it poured.  There was thunder, lightning and violent hail last night or, rather, early this morning.

Sunday, 17 February 1839

Snow when we got up, which continued alternately with bright sunshine the whole day.  We did not go out.

Monday, 18 February 1839

A very dull looking day, but dry.  I did not go out.  Emma went up to the butcher’s and to Miss Workman’s and calld at Admiral Shirley’s door, who was very poorly.

Tuesday, 19 February 1839

A dry morning, but gloomy and very cold.  It began to snow about two o’clock, but melted as it fell and turned to rain, which continued the rest of the day.  We were obliged to have Wheel Chairs to go to Miss Hill’s, where we dined, only ourselves and Miss Elam.  Fortunately it was dry overhead when we walkd home, but terribly muddy and so slippery we could scarcely walk.

Wednesday, 20 February 1839

A very gloomy day, but dry.  The wind was frightfully high and prevented our going out.

 Thursday, 21 February 1839

A very fine sunshine, dry day.  We calld at Mrs Slade’s in Pulteney Street, on Miss Hughs from Devizes, found her, Mrs and Miss Slade at home.  Miss H returns to Devizes tomorrow.  We also calld on Mrs Partis.  She and her, Miss Hughes were gone to Clifton.  From there we went to Miss Hill’s, where we sat some time.  Found Miss Elam with a bad cold.  We then went to Miss Workman’s, who was very unwell.  We stopped at Admiral Shirley’s door and heard he was very poorly.  Met Miss Wilson in Milsom Street.

Friday, 22 February 1839

Very HARD rain from morning till night, which prevented our going to Mrs Chamier’s and I was obliged to send a note of excuse.  Towards evening the wind rose and it blew very ROUGHLY, so much so as to make the house vibrate.

Saturday, 23rd February 1839

A fine day.  My head was very giddy and I did not go out.  Emma calld on Miss Pyne, who had sent to enquire after us.  She also calld on Miss Workman, who was better, and at Admiral Shirley’s door.  I took medicine at night.

Sunday, 24 February 1839

A most beautiful day.  I did not go out.  Emma went to St. John’s twice and call’d at Miss Workman’s and the Admiral’s.

Monday, 25 February 1839

A beautiful day.  Emma call’d on Mrs Chamier and Miss Workman.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s.  Dear Georgina went to Loder’s concert and we sat with Mrs Chamier till she returned.  She look’d very smart and pretty.  We had a BEAUTIFUL night to walk home.

Tuesday, 26 February 1839

A fine sunshine morning and was dry and pleasant all day, tho’ rather gloomy looking after the morning.  We call’d on Miss Hough, who was not at home, then went to Mrs Chamier’s, who was also out, but saw Georgina who was not very well, but in good spirits.  Met Mrs Admiral and Miss Western there.  Mrs W very friendly and obliging.  She ask’d where we lived and said she should call.  We sat a long time with Georgina and met Mrs Chamier near her lodgings and had a long chat with her.  We also met Lady James O’Brian and Miss Otley.  We sat some time with Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers, the former is better and press’d us to stay and . . . END OF THIS SECTION

Wednesday, 27 February 1839

Sunshine and showers all day.  Miss Shirley call’d.

Thursday, 28 February 1839

A fine day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld while we were out, to ask us to tea this evening.

Fashion plate for March 1839 from Godey's Magazine (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for March 1839 from Godey’s Magazine
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

March Call’d here

Saturday, 2 March 1839

A very wet, but mild morning.  A note from dear Georgina Chamier to ask us to meet Miss Workman this evening.

Sunday, 3 March 1839

A beautiful day.  Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey sent to say they would drink tea here tomorrow.

Monday, 4 March 1839

A beautiful day.  Miss Hill and Miss Elam came to ask us to meet the de Visnes and three or four others this evening, which we could not do, as Misses Wilson and Harvey were coming to us.  Miss Lawrence, Miss James, Miss Shirley and the Miss Allens, the latter to ask us to tea again, but fortunately we could not go. For the same reason we were obliged to decline Miss Hill’s invitation.  Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey came to tea and were very chearful.  Miss Shirley brought a news paper with the account of the Festival at Goodwood on Lord March’s coming of age.

Tuesday, 5 March 1839

A cold, gloomy, disagreeable day, but dry.  Miss Hill sent to ask us to tea tomorrow.  Miss Chambers came to walk with Emma.  Miss Hough call’d and sat some time.  She ask’d us to tea this evening or tomorrow.  We declined this evening because she had two ladies, strangers to us, and tomorrow we are engaged to Miss Hill.  She told us a great deal about the Darwins.

Thursday, 7 March 1839

A sunshine mornng, but it turned to snow and continued alternate showers of thick snow and sunshine the whole day.  The Miss Allens sent a kind note to ask us to dine tomorrow, instead of going to tea.  No one call’d.

Friday, 8 March 1839

A very cold day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d.  Georgina did not look well and was not in her usual spirits.  They brought an invitation for their party at the Rooms for the 16th of April and askd us to tea this evening.  ….? at Mr Allen’s.

Assembly Rooms, Bath, mid nineteenth-century Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Assembly Rooms, Bath, mid nineteenth-century.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Saturday, 9 March 1839

A fine day but very cold.  Miss Shirley and Mrs and Miss Chaier call’d, the two latter to ask us to tea this evening, but Emma’s cold was not well enough for her to go out.  It was as intensely cold in the evening.  Freeman’s little nephew John came from school to see her.  The poor child had so bad a cold and cough she askd me to let him stay till it was better.

Sunday, 10 March 1839

A fine day but very cold.  Miss Drewett call’d after the morning service and sat some time.

Monday, 11 March 1839

A dull looking day, but dry.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d to enquire after Emma’s cold.  Miss Chambers did the same at 5 o’clock and sat with us till six.  Miss Shirley very kindly sent some worked bags and other things intended for a Bazaar for Emma to see, but she did not chuse to look at them.

We put Emma’s and Freeman’s birds together in one cage.

Tuesday, 12 March 1839

A dull day.  The Miss Allens call’d.  Admiral Shirley sent Emma a cup of Frummity.  It raind at night.  Freeman’s sister to ask little John home who, tho’ better, was not well enough to go to school.

Wednesday, 13 March 1839

A bright looking, mild morning.  Miss Elam calld to enquire after Emma.  Miss Shirley and Mrs Admiral Western also call’d, the latter was very friendly and agreable.  It began to rain about 4 o’clock and continued some time.

Thursday, 14 March 1839

A dull day, but very mild.  Mrs Longden and Mrs Smart, who is staying with Mrs L, also Mrs Pierrepont and Mrs and Miss Chamier, the latter to ask us to tea this evening.

Friday, 15 March 1839

Raind hard the whold day.  No one call’d.  A note from Mrs Hardcastle to ask us to tea on Monday.

Saturday, 16 March 1839

A hard shower in the morning, but sunshine with very slight ones afterwards.  Miss Chambers call’d, but we did not see her, as I was engaged answering a letter from Maria Jones, for which their man was to call.  Mrs Jones sent us a little sea Kale and a few radishes.  Miss Hill and Miss Elam call’d while we were out.

Saturday, 17 March 1839

Wet, cold and disagreable.

Monday, 18 March 1839

A gloomy and very cold day with a little snow in the morning.  Mrs Drummond and the Miss Allens call’d.  Mrs Drummond missd seeing Dr and Mrs Quarrier in London, but has had an invitation from them to a grand Ball given by them at the Marine Barracks tonight, to five hundred of their acquaintance!!

Tuesday, 19 March 1839

A very fine day.  No one calld.

Wednesday, 20 March 1839

A dull day and wet evening.  Miss Shirley call’d and Miss Harvey from the College.  Miss Hill and Miss Elam call’d while we were at breakfast.

Thursday, 21 March 1839

Very fine till the evening, when it rained fast.  Miss Barry and Miss Cox call’d, the latter to take leave, as she leaves Mrs Turner’ in about ten days, after a visit of many months.  I believe she went to Mrs Turner’s in July or August last.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and sat more than an hour.  They did not go away till near six o’clock.  A kind note from Mrs Longden to ask us to dine and go with her to the Play on Saturday.

Friday, 22 March 1839

A fine day, but very high wind.  the Miss Allens call’d.

Saturday, 23 March 1839

A very gloomy day and very cold.  Miss Ellison came to try on my stays.  It began to rain between three and four o’clock and continued the rest of the day and evening.

Monday, 25 March 1839

A disagreable day, with a hard shower in the morning, but dry and cold afterwards.  Miss Hough call’d while we were out and Mrs Chamier after we came home.  She askd us to tea this evening, but I did not feel very well, so she very kindly begg’d us to go tomorrow instead.  Miss Hill sent for the News Papers.  Robert said she was very poorly.  Dear Mrs Quarrier sent us a Portsmouth Paper with an account of the magnificent Ball and supper they gave on Thursday evening last, in compliment to Sir Phillip and Lady Durham and Sir Thomas and Lady McMahon, on the expiration of their time of service at Portsmouth as Naval and Military Commanders there.  It must have been a most elegant and costly entertainment!

Not the Portsmouth paper but the Hampshire Advertiser & Salisbury Guardian dated 23rd March 1839.
Not the Portsmouth paper but the Hampshire Advertiser & Salisbury Guardian dated 23rd March 1839.

Tuesday, 26 March 1839

A very fine day.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d while we were out to ask us to tea tomorrow.  Mrs Lowry call’d. she made a long visit and was very agreable.

Wednesday, 27 March 1839

A very wet day.

Good Friday, 29 March 1839

Dry day.  A note from Miss Harvey.  I sent her the Portsmouth Paper with the account of Dr and Mrs Quarrier’s Ball.

Fashion Plate for April 1839 from Gody's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for April 1839 from Gody’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

April 1839 call’d here

Easter Monday, 1 April 1839

A dismal, wet day.  Mr Wiltshire call’d to give us two tickets for Miss Richardso’s Concert on the 16th or 26th, to hear Miss Hawse, who he thinks the finest singer in the world.  Our little bird, after laying 4 soft eggs, laid a good one in her nest.

Tuesday, 2 April 1839

Dark looking and very cold.  Miss Hough and Miss Shirley call’d, the former told us Mr and Mrs Darwin and Mr Harnison had returned to Elston.  Mrs D very well and in very good spirits.  Mr D and Mr H both very unwell.

It began to rain about 8 o’clock and continued the rest of the evening.  Had another News Paper from Mrs Quarrier.  I sent it to Miss Harvey by her servant, who came to enquire if Mrs Partis had given us tickets for the Anniversary of the Foundation of the College.

Wednesday, 3 April 1839

Very cold and snowey looking.  The hills were white this morning.  Miss Janetta Allen and Miss Drewett call’d while we were out, the former to bring the 13th number of Nicholas Nickleby just published, having kindly lent us the twelve first numbers and the latter to say she was going to Bath Easton for a week and that Mr Cook had been very ill again.

Batheaston Villa c.1825 (Fanny's former home), courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston Villa c.1825 (Fanny’s former home), courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Thursday, 4 April 1839

A cold disagreable day.  the little bird was sitting almost all day on her two eggs.  Miss Shirley calld and very kindly offerd us a breeding cage, if her father had not given it away.  It was a wet evening.

Friday, 5 April 1839

The houses and streets all white with snow this morning, but it soon disappeared, the sun came out and it was very fine, but cold.  Miss Drewett call’d to say she was to drink tea with Miss Workman tomorrow evening and that Miss W hoped we would meet her, which we said we would.  Mrs Pierrepont calld while we were out.  Admiral Shirley sent us a very nice breeding cage complete.

Saturday, 6 April 1839

A fine but cold day.  Miss Wilson and Mr Mackey calld.

Sunday, 7 April 1839

The dear Miss Allens (who told us that Godfrey had given up the idea of going to Service again and had taken a house in Paragon Buildings, intending to let lodgings).  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d before we came home from church, to ask us to tea tomorrow.

Axford and Paragon Buildings, etc., Bath c.1829. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
Axford and Paragon Buildings, etc., Bath c.1829.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Monday, 8 April 1839

A fine morning.  Miss Ellison came about altering my stays.  Miss Hill and Miss Elam call’d.  Freeman gave us some bunches of beautiful primroses and violets that had been given to her.  Miss Shirley calld while we were out.  Spoke to Mrs Tucker to have Emma’s straw bonnet cleaned and altered.

Tuesday, 9 April 1839

A very cold, disagreable day.  Mrs Dorset Fellows and Miss Hough calld, the latter to ask us to dine tomorrow, which we could not do, as we were engaged to Miss Pyne.  She did not know what to say about Thursday, as she thought she must go to the Ball, but would let us know.  Miss E Savage call’d. Had a delightful letter from Miss Wood, saying she was “comfortable and happy”.

Wednesday, 10 April 1839

A very cold, dull looking day. Miss Hough calld to say she should not go to the Ball tomorrow and to beg we would dine with her.  Miss Fanny Hellican and her neice (also a Miss Hellican) call’d.

Thursday, 11 April 1839

A very fine day, but very cold.  Lady Smith and her daughter calld!!! after being four months in Bath without doing so.  We did not see her, as I was writing to Miss Wood and would not be interrupted.

Friday, 12 April 1839

A beautiful day and much milder.  Miss Hellen Wiltshire call’d.  She came to enquire if Miss Wood was engaged, as their Governess, Miss Stiles, is going to be married and they would have been very glad to have had Miss Wood, but she is even better situated than she would have been with them.  Miss Ellison came to alter my stays.

Saturday, 13 April 1839

A dry day with now and then sun.  The Miss Allens call’d.  Miss Hill sent to ask us to tea on Monday.  Janetta Allen, with her usual droligy,? invited us to her “Bazaar” on Monday.  She said she had been looking over her work boxes and routing out all the work she never intended to finish and said if we would call at twelve o’clock on Monday we should have the first choice of any of it that would be useful.

Sunday, 15 April 1839

Very mild and fine in the morning, but cold again in the evening.  I had a note from Janetta Allen to say her “Bazaar” was unavoidably postponed till Tuesday, as she found she could not have the large room on Monday and hoped we would patronise her on that day.

Monday, 16 April 1839

A dismal looking cold day.  Mrs Pierrepont calld just as we had done dinner, but did not stay long, as she had ordered the carriage at half past two and it was near that time when she came in.  she has been confined with a cold.  She told us every body was laughing at Mrs Chamier giving up her party at the Rooms on account of Mrs Lance’s death “A cousin of her late husband’s. They were sure she was very glad of the excuse to save her money”.

Calld here

Tuesday, 16 April 1839

A dry day.  Miss Shirley call’d twice, but we were out both times.

Wednesday, 17 April 1839

A very sunny and showery morning, which turned to a decided rain in the afternoon.  Mr Savage calld about the servant for Mrs Scott, who was gone to Bristol to negotiate about some business which, if he takes, he will not go to Service again.   If I do not hear from him or her tomorrow, I am to conclude he is engaged.

Thursday, 18 April 1839

A steady rain the whole day.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d to bring us the Bath Paper, in which one of the correspondence between the Marquis and Marchioness of Hastings and Lord Melbourn, relative to Lady Flora Hastings and a very strange letter from the Marchioness to the Queen, demanding the dismissal of Sir James Clarke, one of the calumniaters of Lady Flora.  Janetta sat an hour with us and was as chearful and pleasant as she is always is.

lady Flora Hastings from The Fly: A Literary and Pictorial Miscellany for 1839.
Lady Flora Hastings from The Fly: A Literary and Pictorial Miscellany for 1839.

Friday, 19 April 1839

A very fine day and the streets quite dry.  Miss Shirley, Miss F Hellican and Mrs Wilson Browne call’d.  I did not see the two former, the latter came to ask us to tea this evening to a “very small party, not more than twelve”, but I declined it.  Soon after, I had a note from dear Georgina Chamier to ask us there.

Saturday, 20 April 1839

A Spring looking day, but a rough high wind.  Miss Wilson, Miss Harvey and Miss Chambers calld, the two former kindly brought us some sweet Spring flowers, half of which I gave to Miss Chambers.  Miss Workman’s Mary came to enquire after us.

Monday, 22 April 1839

A very warm, pleasant day.  Mr Wiltshire call’d.  Unfortunately we were out.  He very kindly left two tickets for us to hear Miss M B Hawse sing at Miss Richard’s concert next Friday.  The dear Miss Allens call’d, but we did not see them.  It rained late in the evening.

Calld here

Tuesday, 23 April 1839

A fine day.  We were most agreably surprised by a visit from dear Admiral Shirley.  It was very kind of him, as it was only the second time he has been out for nine months.  He was looking very well and in good spirits.  When we came home from Miss Pyne’s in the evening, we found a packet of letters from Oldbury, two for Miss Workman and two from Maria Jones for me.

Wednesday, 24 April 1839

A fine day.  Miss Shirley call’d.  She complained of a cold and cough. Mrs Chamier call’d in her way to the Play.  She askd us to tea tomorrow.  Mr Falconer call’d at the door with a present to us from dearest Henry, a beautiful edition of the Amaranth (Annual) elegantly bound.  The dear Miss Allens sent us a beautiful large Pike.  Miss Workman sent to put off our visit to her tomorrow.

Friday, 26 April 1839

A fine day, a few drops of rain about five o’clock.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d with a ticket for Miss Richard’s concert. I told her we had tickets from Mr Wiltshire, but if she did not wish to give it to any other person, I would retain it for Miss Chamier, as I was sure she would be very much gratified in going.  She very kindly said she had rather we had it than any one else.  Mrs Dr Davis call’d in while we were out.  Miss Hill call’d early.  She is going to Cheltenham next week.

Saturday, 27 April 1839

A fine morning, but a faint sun.  Mr Wiltshire very kindly sent us three beautiful cauliflowers, prizes of yesterday.  Miss Shirley call’d.

Monday, 29 April 1839

A fine day.  Miss Drewett and Miss Iveson call’d, as did Mrs Pierrepont, Mrs and Miss Chamier and the Miss Allens, the four latter we did not see.  Mrs Pierrepont has been confined to the house by a fall, which cut and bruised her face and sprained her wrist.  She has recovered all but her wrist, which is still very painful.  Gregory came to ask me to see a Mrs Mackenzie, who is going to try her as cook and to speak in her favour.

Calld here

Tuesday, 30 April 1839

A Summer day.  Mrs Mackenzie, the Banker’s wife, came to enquire about Gregory.  She fears she is not cook enough, but means to try her.  Miss Hill, Miss Elam and Miss Drewett drank tea here.  The two former go to Cheltenham tomorrow.  Miss Workman said she would come, but sent an excuse.

Fashion plate for May 1839 from World of Fashion. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for May 1839 from World of Fashion.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday, 3 May 1839

Fine all day.  Miss Shirley call’d.  The Admiral was better today.  Miss Drewett calld while we were out to put off our visit to her from Tuesday to Wednesday.  Freeman’s sister Susan came to stay a few days with her.  Left off fires.

Saturday, 4 May 1839

A gloomy day, threatening rain, which came about 6 o’clock and continued all night.

Mrs Nicholas call’d looking very well and as agreable as usual.

Miss Workman sent Mary to enquire after us, as we had not been there for two days!

Monday, 6 May 1839

A fine day, but the wind so high that it must have been very uncomfortable walking.  Mrs Drummond and Miss Wilson call’d together, the latter was spending the day with Mrs Drummond and Miss Shirley call’d.

Tuesday, 7 May 1839

Still a very high Easterly wind.  Lady Gibbes, a niece of Mr Scott’s, call’d with a letter from him to ask for the particulars of Partis College.  She did not come up.  An egg in the nest this morning when we got up and a very small soft one at the bottom of the cage in the middle of the day.

Wednesday, 8 May 1839

Still Easterly wind, and very high.  Mrs and Miss Chamier and Miss Hughes call’d, the latter very kindly to give me the particulars of the College to send to Mr Scott.

Thursday, 9 May 1839

A fine morning, but so cold that I was obliged to have the fire lit.  Mrs Hudson brought the News Papers home.  It began to rain about 2 o’clock.  2nd egg.

Calld here

Friday, 10 May 1839

The wind frightfully high, notwithstanding which Miss Drewett call’d with a note of invitation from Mr and Mrs Crook to dine at Bath Easton on Tuesday, 14th, the old gentleman’s Birth Day, which we accepted.  Miss Wilson sent to enquire after us.  Freeman took her sister Susan to stay a few days with her brother at Lark Hall.  It was very cold and dreary looking in the evening.  Miss J Allen sent us the Bath Paper and the last No of Nicholas Nickelby to read.  A second egg in the nest yesterday and the little bird sitting very close.  Mrs Templeman died this morning.

Batheaston near Bath: a street scene, 1834. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston near Bath: a street scene, 1834.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Saturday, 11 May 1839

A fine day with less wind.

Monday, 13 May 1839

A fine day.  Miss Chambers call’d, and about two o’clock I was agreably surprised by a visit from Ann Vassall, who staid till near four.  While she was here Major and Mrs Thornton, Miss Allen and Miss Drewett call’d.

The Major and Mrs Thornton are going on their annual tour (I think they said) on the first of June to Cheltenham, Liverpool, Belgium, Brighton and London and do not return here till the latter end of November or the beginning of December.  Miss Drewett came to fix three o’clock for our going to Mr Crook’s tomorrow.  It turned out very wet at night.  Mrs Hudson sent to say she is going on Thursday to Miss Hill at Cheltenham and Mary is coming back.

Tuesday, 14 May 1839

A finish day with the exception of two heavy showers of snow!!  Miss Drewett and Mr Iveson calld in a Fly, to take us to Bath Easton to dine at Mr Crook’s, a joint concern for the Fly, which came to, each person consequently cost us.

Wednesday, 15 May 1839

A cold, disagreable day with a great deal of rain and snow.  Mrs Pierrepont calld and Mrs Hudson sent to know if we had any message for Miss Hill tomorrow.

Calld here

Thursday, 16 May 1839

A fine day with one shower.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d while we were out and again after we came home, with the Bath and Standard News Papers.

Friday, 17 May 1839

A fine day, but very cold.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld.  They brought Mr Crawford’s pretty dog Beau with them, who behaved very well.

Saturday, 18 May 1839

A finish morning.  Mr Iveson call’d.  It rain’d hard at night.

Monday, 20 May 1839

A very fine day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d.

Tuesday, 21 May 1839

A fine day.  Miss Wilson call’d to tell us Dr Quarrier was expected to pass through Bath some time today and she came in in the hope of seeing him, as she was sure he would call here, but he did not, so I conclude he did not come.  Miss Wilson is going to her sister at Portsmouth next Friday and was charged by Mrs Quarrier to prevail on us to accompany her, but we could not be ready in so short a time.  Probably we may go in a fornight.  Miss Allen call’d and, to our surprise and pleasure, about six o’clock Miss Pyne came in and sat an hour waiting for Mrs Stuckey, who was shopping and calld for her Aunt and sat some time.  Susan Freeman came from her brother’s.

Wednesday 22 May 1839

A cold Easterly wind and sometimes so dark I could scarcely see to write.  Miss Burmester call’d, as did dear Miss Allen to ask us to dine, but unfortunately we were engaged to drink tea with Miss Pyne.  Dear Georgina Chamier sent her work for us to shew to Miss Pyne.  On our return from whom, we found a packet from Mrs Keen to be forwarded to Mr Howard by the Reading Coach, a parcel for Dr Langworthy, two letters for the Post, one for myself, a pattern to get ten yards of Victoria carpeting at 3/11d, a £5 note to pay for it, the remaining three pounds as a present to us and 2/6 to pay the carriage.

Thursday, 23 May 1839

Cold and very high wind.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld.  They ask’d us to drink tea there tomorrow.

Friday, 24 May 1839

A fine day, but cold.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Chambers call’d twice while we were out.  Mrs Chamier came to beg Emma would teach her to make the Doilys and lend her the frame.  Miss Hare and Miss Granett call’d to see Miss Chamier’s work, the latter sent us the second number of the “Factory Boy” to read.

Saturday, 25 May 1839

A fine day.  Miss Lawrence calld and sat some time.

Monday, 27 May 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Chambers came to ask us to tea, the latter said it was against her inclination, as she was going out.  The Miss Allens and Miss Baker calld.

Tuesday, 28 May 1839

A fine day.  Miss Hough calld to ask us to tea this evening.  I did not see her, as I was busy.  Miss Chamier also call’d.  I did not see her for the same reason.  I sent an excuse to Miss Hough in the evening.

Wednesday, 29 May 1839

A fine day.  Mr William Davis call’d and sat some time.  Mrs Pierrepont also calld, but we had said “not at home”.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld while we were out to ask us there this evening.  Miss Harvey call’d.

Thursday, 30 May 1839

A very fine day.  Miss H Wiltshire brought us two tickets for the Horticultural Meeting, but did not come up.  Mr Davis also calld and, to our surprise, Miss Workman, who partook of our dinner at two o’clock and then went home.  Mrs Nicholas sent to ask us to tea tomorrow, to meet Miss Workman, who dines there.  Miss Chamier calld in a fly to take Emma to the Gardens and Mrs Chamier calld afterwards, but did not come up.

Friday, 31 May 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Chambers call’d with some patterns of collars, but we did not see them.  Miss Hill call’d in the evening.  We did not see her.

Fashion Plate for June 1839 from Ladies' Cabinet. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for June 1839 from Ladies’ Cabinet.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

June 1839

Saturday, 1 June 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Simpson call’d, but we did not see her.  Mrs Pierrepont calld again while we were out.  Miss Chamier sent me the 2/- quire of wapping paper she was to get for me.

Monday, 3 June 1839

A very showery day.  Mrs Drummond calld early to say she was going into Herefordshire tomorrow.  Mr Wiltshire came in the midst of a hard shower, fancying we wishd to see him on business.

Tuesday, 4 June 1839

A fine day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d to ask us to dine with them tomorrow.

Wednesday, 5 June 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Pierrepont calld but we did not see her, as did Mrs Earl also.

Calld here

Thursday, 6 June 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Pierrepont very kindly call’d to give us two tickets for the Play tonight and went down to the house and secured us a snug little private box, which was most comfortable and we were very much amused by the Broken Sword, The Waterman, The Robber’s Wife and Mr Glover in the Venetian Statues, with a variety of singing and little Reves’s dancing.  The Miss Allens call’d.

Saturday, 8 June 1839

A few slight showers in the morning, but fine afterwards.  Mrs Earl call’d and most kindly left a sovereign for old Mrs Pattern, to whom she is very good and, as she is going out of town, she begg’d we would give her part of it now and then.  The Miss Allens call’d to ask us to go there this evening, but I declined it, as we were busy.

Monday, 10 June 1839

Gloomy morning, fine afterwards.  Mrs Dorset Fellowes call’d to ask us to meet the Allens, Mrs Pine Coffin and Miss Monkland at her house on Thursday.  We declined it on account of the two latter, as we did to Mrs Brown.  Mrs Chamier call’d to ask us to dine tomorrow.  She and dear Georgina are so kind and attentive.

Wednesday, 12 June 1839

A Summer day, fortunate for the Races.  Miss Allen calld, almost before we had done breakfast, but Miss Baker was here, so she said she would call again.  Miss Hill sat some time here and Miss Allen came again before she went away, to ask us to go there this evening.  They have a few friends to dine and they wanted me to make up a Cassino Table for Lady Leighton.

Saturday, 15 June 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d, as did Miss Forbes while we were out. Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d.  They ask’d us to tea, but I was not well enough to go.

Sunday, 16 June 1839

A fine day.  Miss Janetta Allen calld to ask if we had a Bed Chair to lend to Mrs Longden.  We had not, but Emma got one at Admiral Shirley’s for her.  Mr and Mrs Evans call’d.  He was quite as obliging as her and settled about the American money by saying he would write to Mr Walker by today’s Post.  Mrs and Miss Chamier sat some time with us and very kindly pressd us to dine with them on Monday, but we declined it and said we would go in the evening.  Miss Janetta Allen also askd us to go to them before we left Bath, but it was not in our power.

Tuesday, 18 June 1839

A fine day.  Dear Mrs Jones and Mrs Jones Graeme call’d, but did not get out of the carriage, as we were to meet them at Miss Workman’s at 6 o’clock.  Mrs Dorset Fellow’s call’d, but we did not see her.  She sent for Admiral Shirley’s breeding cage, which she said Miss Shirley had promised to lend her.

Wednesday, 19 June 1839

A very warm day.  I finished the packing.  Miss Janetta Allen kindly call’d to wish us a pleasant time at Portsmouth.  Mrs Jackson also call’d, but we were denied.  Mr Evans came about the American money, which he is fearful will be a troublesome business.

Fashion plate for January 1839 from Godey's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for July 1839 from Godey’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

FANNY’S JOURNAL FROM JULY 8TH 1839 TO JULY 22 1841

Monday, 8 July 1839

A beautiful morning, but the wind was very rough.  We got up at five o’clock that we might not be hurried and had everything ready and we were at the Dr’s some time before he or Eliza were down stairs, so we took a turn on the Ramparts, but the wind was so high it was  not pleasant and it being high water, and the sea very rough, it beat over the walls so much that we were obliged keep at a distance.  When we returned we found the breakfast ready and Eliza waiting.  The Dr soon made his appearance and was most kind and friendly.  Eliza appeard much distress’d and almost angry at my returning the £10 she had kindly enclosed to us two days ago.  Soon after we had finish’d our breakfast, Miss Wilson and Mrs Barnes came, both much distress’d at parting.  Miss Wilson was to have gone on the outside, but Eliza very kindly paid the difference and she went inside, which I was very glad of, as she was very poorly and there was a little rain in the middle of the day.  The Coach came exactly at 8 o’clock.  We shook hands with Mr Barnes, who was waiting at the door and got in.  We took up the 4th passenger at the end of Portsmouth, a very taciturn gentleman who did not annoy us by his loquacity, as he scarcely spoke the whole way.  We had a safe journey (thank God for it) and arrived at the White Hart at a quarter past six, where we found Freeman, who was delighted to see us waiting.  We took leave of Miss Wilson and came home as fast as we could and found dear Rebecca, who had come to receive us.  She staid and drank tea with us, which Freeman had got ready and everything comfortable and which refreshed us very much.  We went to bed soon after tea, for I was sadly tired and in great pain in my feet and ankles.

We were very sorry to hear of the death of poor Mrs Langden while we were away.

Semaphore at Portsmouth by Edward William Cooke, 1836 (c) National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Semaphore at Portsmouth by Edward William Cooke, 1836
(c) National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 9 July 1839

A fine day.  I did not get up till late and did not go out all day.  Miss Shirley calld in the evening and Miss Hill sent to enquire after us.  The dear Miss Allens call’d to ask if Freeman had heard from us and were astonished to find us returned.  They came up and sat some time and were most kind, as usual.

Wednesday, 10 July 1839

A fine day.  Miss Hill call’d early.  Miss Janetta Allen and Mrs and Miss Chamier also call’d and were very glad to see us.  Miss Workman sent to enquire after us.  Miss Wilson calld.

Thursday, 11 July 1839

A very warm day.  Miss Chamier call’d to ask us to dine tomorrow and Miss Fanny Pyne call’d in the evening, but did not come up, as she had a lady with her.  She left word she would call again tomorrow.  We call’d at the Miss Allens, saw Miss Rainsford there.

Friday ,12 July 1839

A fine day.  Miss Fanny Pyne call’d and was very kind and friendly.  She said she was delighted to hear that we were going to her Aunt’s and was very anxious for us to fix the day for going, that she might tell them, as she will see Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers in her way home tomorrow.  Miss Allen sent us a basket of beautiful strawberries and call’d herself to ask us to dine with them tomorrow.  Nothing can exceed their kindness.

We dined at Mrs Chamiers, only ourselves, and spent a chearful pleasant day, as we always do there.  At dinner we had salmon, stew’d breast of veal and pease, cucumbers, potatoes, currant and raspberry pudding, custards and after dinner strawberries and beautiful raspberries.  It was a beautiful night to walk home.  Miss Wilson call’d to fix Monday for our going to drink tea with Miss Harvey at the College.

Saturday, 13 July 1839

A very hot day.  We went out soon after breakfast to Hornby’s to get a drugget for the stairs, after which we call’d on Mrs Caselet Smith, who was very unwell and going to Clifton, so we did not see her.  We sat some time with Miss Workman and Miss Shirley.  The poor Admiral was suffering very much from his other foot and could not see us.  We call’d on Mrs Pierrepont, who was out, and on Mr and Mrs Evans, who were ditto.  We dined with the dear Miss Allens and were as happy and chearful as the greatest kindness could make us.  At dinner we had salmon, boil’d chickens, bacon, pease, beans, potatoes, cucumber, currant tart, millet pudding and Bath cheese, strawberries, raspberries and excellent port wine.

Sunday, 14th July 1839

So very wet in the morning we could not go to Church and it continued showery all day.  We did not go out, nor did anyone call.

Monday, 15 July 1839

A fine day, but very windy.  Mrs Pierrepont and Miss Shirley call’d.  We did not see the latter.  We call’d on her, but she was out and the Admiral was too unwell to see us.  At 3 o’clock, accompanied by Freeman, we set out to walk to the College to drink tea with Miss Harvey, who was delighted to see us.  She sent directly to Miss Wilson, who soon joined us and we spent a chearful pleasant afternoon.  They were so kind to shew us the Chapel, which is very neat but very damp and gave us a beautiful nosegay to bring home.  I think I like Miss Harvey’s house better than Miss Wilson’s.  We had a very pleasant walk home and I was not so tired as I expected.  In our way home we call’d again on Miss Shirley to wish her goodbye, as she is going to the Isle of Wight tomorrow for two months.  The poor Admiral was on the sopha in great pain, but was amused by hearing what we had been doing at Portsmouth.  We staid there till near ten o’clock.

Tuesday, 16 July 1839

A little rain in the morning early.  Emma went to match some worsted for Miss Wilson, for which her maid call’d in the course of the day.  I wrote all the morning, to Peter Touray with Emma’s and my Certificates and to Mr Wiltshire to beg him to call tomorrow to sign them.  After tea we took some ham to Miss Workman, sat a little time with her. She and Mary were very busy preparing currants and raspberries for preserving.  From her we went to Miss Hill, where we staid till near 9 o’clock.

Wednesday ,17 July 1839

Showery with an easterly wind.  Mr Wiltshire calld and signed our Certificates and I sent them off to Mr Touray.  I also wrote to my brother Henry.  I did not go out all day.  In the evening I bottled the currant vinegar that was made last year and it has turned out very good.

Thursday, 18 July 1839

A very wet morning, with a frightful wind.  At one time it blew quite a hurricane.  I heard from Henry to say he should not come till after our return from Miss Pyne’s, in consequence of which I wrote to Miss Chambers to say we would go to Charlton on the 25th.  Mrs Chamier calld to ask us to dine there tomorrow to meet Miss Workman.

Friday, 19 July 1839

A complete wet day.  It did not cease pouring from morning till night, with as rough a wind as yesterday.  Mr Evans call’d about the American money.  He told me Mr Pigou’s lawyer would give me a great deal of trouble, he requires such security and so much examination of Wills etc, that it will put us to a great expense.  We were obliged to have Wheel Chairs, both to go and return from Mrs Chamier’s, where we spent a very pleasant chearful day.  Miss Workman met us at dinner.  I have not seen her so much herself for a long time past.  She was very chearful, playd two Pools at Quadrille and really enjoy’d herself very much.  I won 2/6.  Mrs Chamier 6d and Emma lost 3/-.

Saturday, 20 July 1839

A showery day.  We did not go out, being very busy putting the border to the new drugget for the stairs.  Mrs Pierrepont calld while we were at dinner, so we did not see her.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d and was kind and agreeable as usual.  Miss Hill sent us her Bath Paper.  The Admiral sent word he was a little better.

Sunday, 21 July 1839

A threatening morning.  It rained slightly as we went to St. John’s, but was quite dry to come back.  We had not been home half an hour before it pour’d.  We had a stranger at St. John’s, a young man who read very well and Mr Awdry preachd a very good Sermon very badly.  The rain prevented our going to Church in the afternoon.

Monday, 22 July 1839

A dry day but gloomy and threatening.  Mr Evans call’d.  Nothing satisfactory yet relative to the American money.  Mrs Kipling call’d after an interval of many months.  She has been confined entirely to the house from her distressing complaint, Tic Dolereux, and was suffering severely from it the whole time she was here.  She is going tomorrow to London.  I told her we had call’d very frequently to enquire after her, which she said she had not heard.  Miss Hill sent to ask us to tea this evening.  We call’d at Mrs Chamier’s, met her and Georgiana near their own house, but would not allow them to turn back.  We went on to leave Nicholas Nickleby that they had kindly lent us.  In our way to Admiral Shirley’s we overtook Mrs Hale and Sarah Jane and walkd with them to the Admiral’s, where we parted, he being too unwell to see us and not out of his room.  We went on to Miss Workman’s, who we found pretty well.  She ask’d us to tea tomorrow.  From her we went to Miss Hill’s to tea, only ourselves and had a very wet walk home.  They lent us umbrellas, but they were very small and did not shelter us much, as they rain was very heavy.  We met Ann in Bridge Street going down with our cloaks and stoped in a door way and put them on and took our large umbrellas, but our petticoats had got very wet.  We met Mrs Evans as we were going down to Miss Workman’s.

Tuesday, 23 July 1839

A very showery day.  As soon as we had breakfasted we went to the York House to take our places to go to Somerton on Thursday, but they could only book one for the short distance, promising to let us have another if it was not taken the whole way to Lyme.  I paid 16/-.  We were caught in a hard shower returning.  I wrote to dear Hal in answer to a very affectionate letter from him written on the 12th, but which did not reach me till this morning, having been detained at Portsmouth.  When the rain held up we went out in search of the Charlton Carrier, first getting change for a Bank Post Bill for £169.13.11 at Butcher the grocer’s.  We went to no 8 North Parade where Miss Pyne lodged.  They knew nothing about the Carrier, but said probably the Miss Heilcans might.  We calld there, they were just going to dinner, but Miss Martha and Miss Fanny came to us at the door.  The recommended our enquiring at the White Hart and we then recollected that one of the waiters there came from Charlton.  He was very civil and told us he thought Edwards the Carrier went from the Saracens Head in Broad Steet, but he was not certain.  Away we went to Broad Street.  There they told us he went from the Catherine Wheel in Walcot Street, where at last we found him, at least found that he would be there tomorrow and take our Boxes to Charlton on Thursday.  I came home quite tired and the evening was so damp and uncomfortable I sent our excuses to Rebecca and intend calling there tomorrow.

York House, early nineteenth-century. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
York House, early nineteenth-century. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Wednesday, 24 July 1839

Alternate sunshine and showers, the latter so violent they had the appearance of water spouts, for the street was literally like a river while they lasted.  We took advantage of a little cessation of rain to call on the Miss Allens.  We found only Miss Allen at home and she was very busy packing to go to Bath Kempton.  From there we went to Miss Workman’s, where we were detained by the rain for some time.  When it ceased we call’d at the Admiral’s.  He was much the same, not up, so we did not see him.  Fortunately we got home without being wet, tho’ it began to rain before we reached our own door.  After tea it was dry enough to go to Mrs Chamier’s, where we sat near two hours.  Miss Webb came for tea while we were there.  Nothing could be more affectionate and kind than Mrs Chamier and dear Georgiana were.  When we came away it was fine for us to come home.

Thursday, 25 July 1839

Fine in the morning, but showery the rest of the day.  The Coach that goes through Somerton call’d for us at 9 o’clock and I came away without kissing Freeman or even wishing her good bye!,  which I have regretted ever since, but in the hurry of the Coach coming I quite forgot   I had not taken leave of her or Ann.  We had two young ladies passengers, one going to Ford Abbey the other to Exeter, the latter quite young and silent, the former chatty and agreeable.  Miss Pyne had been so very kind to send Mary Ann (her servant) to meet us in Somerton and it was quite a relief to me when the Coach stoppd at Somerton to see her good natured face.  We went into the Inn while the Fly was getting ready and, while waiting there, came a most violent shower of rain, which quite flooded the street.  The violence abated in a short time, but it continued to rain fast till after we reached Charlton, where we were received in the kindest manner by Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers, a little past 2 o’clock.  Soon after we arrived Mr and Mrs Brymer calld and sat some time.  The latter was very pleasant and agreeable.  I cannot say I like the former.  We dined at four o’clock (roasted chickens, bacon, beans, potatoes, cauliflower, custard pudding, currant tart, tartlets, lemon and other cheese, gooseberries, currants), drank tea at seven, biscuits, cake and wine between 9 and 10, after which Miss Chambers read Prayers before we went to bed, where I had a refreshing night’s rest, thank God for it.  Our Boxes, which were sent by the Van to save trouble and to keep them dry, were soon after us.

Friday, 26 July 1839

A disagreeable showery morning.  Miss Pyne and Emma took a walk between the showers, but they said it was far from pleasant, it was so muddy. It began to rain just as they reached the house and continued heavy the rest of the day and evening and was very cold, as it was in the morning.  After tea Mr Valentine (the medical man) calld for a few minutes.  Miss Chambers went in the morning to call on Captain Page’s and on her return I heard that Mrs Lawson and her grandson have been staying there some time.  She was not at home when Miss C calld this morning, but I think if she hears from Mrs Page that we are here, we shall see her.  Roast leg of lamb, potatoes, cabbage, carrots, tarts, black currant pudding and cream, toasted and other cheese.

I began netting a purse.

Saturday, 27 July 1839

No amendment of weather. Very cold and wind whistling like Winter and the showers quite as violent as yesterday, with now and then a glimpse of sunshine.  It raind very fast from 12 o’clock without intermission, the rest of the day.  We work’d and Miss Chambers read to us the “March of Intellect”.  Roast beef, Fricasee of Chicken, Rice Pudding, Tart, Toasted Cheese.  We had a fire at tea time.  Rebecca’s Bath Paper came from Mrs Chamier.

Sunday, 28 July 1839

A dull looking morning, but Emma and Miss Chambers ventured to set out for West Charlton Church, Miss Pyne and I intending to go to East Charlton, as being nearer home.  It began to rain in a few minutes after they left the house and they prudently returned, which was fortunate, as they were scarcely within the door before it pourd a perfect torrent.  It was quite awful and we heard several claps of thunder at a great distance.  The rain continued, with short intervals, the whole day.  Miss Chambers endured through it, but we, with Miss Pyne, read both morning and evening service at home.  Cold Beef Pudding and Tart.  We had a nice comfortable fire at dinner time.

Charlton Mackrell church via Wikimedia
Charlton Mackrell church via Wikimedia

Monday, 29 July 1839

It never ceased raining the whole day after twelve o’clock.  A great part of the time very violent.  Miss Chambers read and we workd.  I netted.

Hashed Lamb, Roast Duck, Pease Tart.  Fire at dinner.

Tuesday, 30 July 1839

From 12 o’clock it pourd a torrent the rest of the day, with a high wind at times.  Many parts of the country must be under water and the hay quite spoilt and, what is more distressing, the corn is laid quite flat in many places with no probability of its rising again, the high winds having laid it and the rains beaten it almost into the ground. Miss Chambers read and we workd the whole day, for there has been no possibility of going out since we came.  Fire at dinner time.

Roast Veal, boild Rabbits, French beans, Potatoes, greens, a second tart and a delicious black currant pudding.  Toasted cheese.

Wednesday, 31 July 1839

A frightful high wind with slight showers and now and then a glimpse of the sun, which we have not seen since Friday, but still cold and looking more like November than July.  From  12 o’clock till 3 it raind incessantly and it blew almost a hurricane.  The evening was dry, but the wind continued till about 10 o’clock, when it became calm.  Miss Chambers read, we workd.

Hashed duck, cold veal pudding, Tart.  Henry Observer came from Bath.

Fashion Plate for August 1839 from Ladies' Pocket Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for August 1839 from Ladies’ Pocket Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Thursday, 1 August 1839

A beautiful day with bright sun, but a chilly air.  Captain Pyne call’d.  He had just returned from Clevedon where he had been with two of his sisters and was very much pleased with it.  He was very pleasant and agreeable.  Mrs Stuckey, Miss Mitchel, Miss Fanny Parsons and a Miss Plumtree, the latter a very agreeable woman, dined here.  Mrs Stuckey was very obliging and hoped we would spend two or three days with her before we returned to Bath. Captain Pyne came in the evening and on the whole if was rather a pleasant day than otherwise.  The party returnd to Langport about 10 o’clock.  It was dark and there were a few drops of rain, but only sufficient to say St. Swithin was determined to keep up his reputation of a “weeping Saint”.

Boild chickens, pig’s face, roast loin of lamb, potatoes, carrots, pease, french beans, cucumber, tarts, custards, tartlets, toasted cheese, lemon and gosseberries, almonds and raisins, biscuits and cake.  Emma took a walk with Miss Chambers and got me 37 and a half of pink ribbon to bind a prink ? of Miss Pyne’s to prevent the edges tearing.

Friday, 2 August 1839

A beautiful Summer day.  Mrs and Miss Parsons call’d in the morning and while we were at dinner Captain Page and one of his sons. Soon after him Mrs Lawson and some of the Miss Pages.  I was sorry not to see Mrs Lawson, but she must have known that Miss Pyne’s dinner hour is 4 o’clock, so she could not expect to be admitted at half past 4.  After dinner we took a long walk nearly all round the two villages.  Miss Pyne took us to old Edmund Wills’s, where we saw his daughter, who formerly lived with my beloved Aunt.  She knew me directly and reminded me of our happy tour to the Lakes and spoke of many things I had forgotten.  In returning home we met a Miss Boland, sister of Mrs Bradney, who lives where Mrs Gapper formerly did, who stopd Miss Pyne and had a little conversation.  On going down to tea, I found Mr Barney, the Clergyman of East Charlton, in the Drawing Room.  Miss Pyne had seen him going by and had askd him to come in and take his tea.  He is quite young and appears very shy, but it was impossible to judge whether he is agreeable or not in so short a time.  In our walk, Miss Pyne took us into Mr Williams’s (Farmer Hallet’s when she lived here), which is so alterd I should not have known it.  The garden is really beautiful.  I was so tired that I had a very restless night.

Cold lamb, fricassee’d chicken, pudding, tart and custards.  No rain all day.

Saturday, 3 August 1839

Another Summer day.  Emma walkd with Miss Chambers to Captain Page’s with a book, but they did not go in.  She call’d at Hockey to ask if she would like to take our washing, which she is thankful to do.  Mrs Bradney and her sister, Miss Charlotte Boland call’d, the former tolerably agreeable, but the latter quite the contrary, a mixture of Mrs Sitwell and Miss Susan Hughes and continually introducing “Lady this” and “Sir that” as her most intimate friends.  After dinner we all walk’d to West Charlton to see the alterations in the Church and Churchyard, neither of which I should have recognised, as the unpretending, quiet little place of worship and repository of the bodies of departed spirits I formerly knew!  The Church is now a miniature cathedral with beautiful painted glass windows, pews in imitation of Prickendale? stalls, carved stone pulpit and font, all very beautiful and elegant, but not fitted for the situation it is placed in, a little retired country village.  The Church Yard is equally changed.  It is now surrounded by a handsome wall with entrance gates of iron, good trees and a thick plantation of shrubs.  Many of the bones of the departed villagers have been displaced to level the ground and give it the appearance of a smooth lawn and is kept in beautiful order.  It has altogether an elegant finish, but is so totally altered since we lived here, that I had some difficulty to find poor old Mrs Giles’s grave!  Mr Brymer has made equal alterations about his house and grounds, the latter of which are wonderfully improved by pulling down a great many cottages and out buildings and converting the ground into ornamental plantations and shrubs, but the house lays too low ever, in my opinion, to be pretty, as there is not the slightest view from it.  I gave the woman who shewd us the Church a shilling.  I was tired when we came home, but not so much so as yesterday, as it was a cold evening.

Hashed lamb, cold beef, baked pudding, tart, toasted cheese.

Rebecca’s Bath Paper came from Mrs Chamier.

Captain Pyne drove his sisters Mary, Jane and poor Juliana who is evidently dying of Consumption to see us.  They were all extremely kind and very pressing for us to spend a day with them and it was settled that Miss C and Emma should walk there Tuesday and remain with them, and Captain P drive Miss C to Langport to spend the day and bring her and E back in the evening, but the plan was afterwards altered and Miss Chambers wrote a note to Kingsdon to say she and Emma would not walk there on Tuesday, but only she would go to Longport.

Sunday, 4 August 1839

A very fine day with rather a rough wind.  Miss Chambers and Emma went to West Charlton Church, Miss Pyne and I to East Charlton.  Mr Barney read the Prayers, Mr Bradney the Communion Service, the latter beautifully.  Three of his children and their Governess sat in the Pew with us and two young peaple, a farmer’s daughter’s and there was ample room for six or eight more.  Miss Charlotte Bolard gave me two or three good stares from there, which was rather inconveniently situated for so doing, as she was obliged to turn her head so much round that she ran the risk of twisting her neck.  Emma saw a Mrs Lawson and her grandson, who both received her very kindly and in consequence of her telling Mrs Lawson I should be much disappointed if I did not see her, she came round with three of Captain Page’s children in his little Carriage in her way home from Church.  She was very friendly, but could not stay many minutes, as it was the Coachman’s dinner time.  She is much altered, grown very old in appearance, but her manner chearful and agreeable, as formerly.  I did not see young Lawson, but Emma says he is grown a fine young man.

We dined at two o’clock and all went to West Charlton Church at three, where we had a very good Sermon from Mr Williams.   Luckily for me, Mr Brymer preached in the morning and went somewhere else to preach in the afternoon.  The Church was crowded, tho’ it now acommodated double the number it did when we lived here twenty two years ago!!  Miss Chambers read two Sermons in the evening.

Cold chicken, pig’s face, potatoes, cabbage, rice pudding, tarlets and cheese.

Monday, 5 August 1839

A very fine morning.  Miss Chambers and Emma set out directly after breakfast to walk to Somerton, three miles.  After they went Hockey came for the clothes to wash.  I had not seen her before.  She was much affected, as well as myself, and appeard very glad to see me.  She talked a great deal about her family and the number she had left since I saw her.  She is much altered and looks older than I expected to see her.  A Mr Uttermer, a very agreeable man living at Longport and Mr Bradney call’d.  The former paid a friendly country call, the latter one of etiquette.  We waited dinner for Miss Chambers and Emma till 5 o’clock, but they did not return.  Miss Pyne and I took a walk before dinner.  After tea I began to be uneasy that Miss Chambers and Emma did not return and went out frequently to see if they were coming, till it was too dark to distinguish any thing at a distance.  Miss Parsons (where they had dined) brought them home between 9 and 10 in her little Carriage, driven by a Mr Kitson, a good tempered young man, a friend of Mrs Parsons’s, who had drank tea with them.  It was so late they only came in to shake hands with Miss Pyne and then returned to Somerton.  Mrs Parsons kindly walkd about with Emma and took her to Mr Pinney’s and shewd her the garden and lower part of the house and she spent a very pleasant day.

Fricasee of Chicken, bacon, pease, potatoes, french beans, black currant pudding and cheese.

Tuesday, 6 August 1839

A fine day, but little or no sun.  While we were at breakfast, Mary and Jane Pyne arrived.  The latter spent the day here and Mary took Miss Chambers to spend the day at Longport at Mrs Stuckey’s.  In the course of the morning young Mrs Dickenson call’d with her two children, the eldest a lovely little creature, two year and a half old and the Mama (who is rather pretty, but quite “milk and water” with a sufficient idea of her own consequence), going to produce a third very soon.  When she went away Mr Barney came in, (probably he had heard Miss Jane Pyne was here), and just before dinner Mrs Brymer and Mrs Tugwell calld and were both very agreeable.  Mrs Brymer said her visit was to us and would have been paid much sooner, had not the weather prevented her coming.  We took a walk to  Edy Parsons’s after dinner.  She appeard very glad to see me.  We sat there while Miss Jane very kindly went to Captain Page’s for a sweet little dog to show us, not longer and almost as pretty as dear “Flora”, but black and white and as timid and gentle as she was.  We walkd round the outside of Captain Page’s, which is very much alterd, the trees being very much grown. All the shrubs, which used to conceal the house taken away, so that it is exposed to every one passing in the road, which it was not when we lived there and I do not think it an improvement.  Mr Dickenson has built a very pretty ornamental cottage where Betty Wilmot lived, near the upper entrance to Captain Page’s.  We met James Woods in the road.  He did not know me, but when Miss Pyne said “You remember Miss Chapman, who lived here with Mrs Powell, don’t you?”, “To be sure I do” he replied “Well, this is Miss Chapman” “Is it indeed!” and he immediately held out his hand to shake hands with me, in the same spirit of heartiness he would have done to one of his own companions.  It was characteristic of the honesty and openess of unsophisticated nature!  We had a shower in our way home, but we had had the precaution to take our umbrellas, so did not get wet.  Miss Chambers did not return till after nine.  Mary Pyne did not get out of the Carriage and Jane was soon ready to accompany her home.

Some breast of veal, beans and bacon and potatoes, french beans, tart, pudding, toasted cheese etc.  The Pynes fixed for our spending Thursday or Saturday with them at Kingsdon.

Henry’s Observer came from Bath.

Wednesday, 7 August 1839

A dull morning with rain, but it held up at noon and Miss Pyne, Miss Chambers and Emma took a walk.  I staid at home, for I thought it would rain again before they returned, but it did not.  Miss Chambers and Emma went to Mr J Bradney’s evening Lecture at East Charlton Church at half past 6 o’clock.  Miss Pyne and I had our tea at the usual time and they had theirs after they came home, between 8 and 9.

Sweetbreads in white sauce, cold veal, vegetables, tart, pudding etc.

Emma Chapman, Fanny's sister, when elderly and blind.
Emma Chapman, Fanny’s sister, when elderly and blind.

Thursday, 8 August 1839

A fine day.  Just as we had done breakfast, Mrs Williams’s servant came with their fine little boy to say her mistress meant to call on us, which she did before eleven o’clock and was very agreeable and pleasant.  She staid near an hour.  While she was here Captain Pyne came to drive us to Kingsdon to spend a ? day with his sisters.  As soon as Mrs Williams went away we hurried to change our gowns and, with Miss Chambers, accompanied Captain Pyne to Kingsdon, where we were most kindly received by Mary, Kate, Jane and poor Juliana.  After having some luncheon, we all but Mary took a walk to and through Kingsdon Wood, Juliana going on a donkey.  It was a beautiful walk and I enjoyed it very much.  We had an addition to our party at tea, a Mr Hansell, a young Clergyman and a Mr Pears, who is preparing for Oxford.  We left them them at 9 o’clock, after having pass’d a very chearful, pleasant day and were driven home by the servant, to whom I gave a 1/-.  We found Miss Pyne pretty well and at work.

Boil’d chickens, bacon, roast mutton, pease, potatoes, carrots, french beans, tart (c’s and rasp’s), pudding, cream, cheese etc, currants, gooseberries, dates, raspberries and biscuits.  When we returnd from our walk we found the Bradney’s just coming out of the house to get into their Carriage and before we took our walk Mr and Mrs Valentine of Somerton calld.

Friday 9, August 1839

A fine day.  Mrs Joseph Bradney call’d and appears a good humoured chearful little woman.  Miss Chambers and we call’d on Mrs Brymer, Mrs Williams and Mrs Bradney.  We were most kindly received by the two former, the latter fortunately was not at home, not but she is pleasant enough, but her sister Charlotte is to me disagreeable.  As we came across the field from the Bradney’s, we saw the whole family of the Page’s just coming out of Miss Pyne’s door and that she had, on seeing us, ask’d them to return, and as we did not wish to encounter them, we diverged and walkd on a little way to Mrs J Bradney’s, but did not go in.  When we returnd, they had just taken their leave and were going across the field to the Bradney’s.  Mrs and Miss Parsons drank tea here and were very pleasant.

Leg of mutton, pease, bacon, potatoes, french beans rice pudding etc.

Saturday, 10 August 1839

A cold wind with heavy clouds, but sunshine.  Not Summerish.  Miss Chambers and Emma walked soon after breakfast to Green Down, but returned soon, the wind being so high they could scarcely stand.  I read “Lord Lindsay’s Travels to the Holy Land” aloud all the morning and evening.

Roasted chickens, ham, potatoes, F beans, carrots, cucumber, pudding etc.

Instead of having the Bath Paper an old Sherborne one came from Somerton, directed to me “Miss Charlotte Pyne, Charlton”.  Miss Chambers wrote to the Post Master to desire to have the Bath Paper.

Sunday, 12 August 1839

Slight showers in the morning with very high wind.  Miss Chambers and Emma went to West Charlton Church, Miss Pyne and I to East.  The wind was so rough we could scarcely stand in the Church Yard. Saw and spoke to Mrs J Bradney.  We dined early and went to Church again at three o’clock.  Miss Chambers to West and Emma with us to East Charlton Church, where we had an excellent Sermon from Mr Bradney, Mr Barney reading the Service, as in the morning.  Saw Mrs Joe Bradney again.  After Church Miss Pyne and Emma attempted to take a walk, but the wind was too high to be pleasant and they soon returned.  After tea Mr William Parsons calld (Mrs P’s youngest son) in his way home to Glastonbury, but did not stay many minutes.  A good natured lad, the image of his eldest sister.  In the evening Miss Chambers read a Sermon.

Cold chicken, ham, hot meat pye, potatoes and rice pudding.  Very cold at night.  A note from the Post Master at Somerton to say there was no other Paper directed for me than the one he had sent, which could never have reached me from Bath so directed.  Miss Pyne means to make further enquiries.

Monday, 12 August 1839

A fine morning but the wind cold and high, tho’ not so rough as yesterday.  Hockey came after breakfast to fetch the cloaths to wash.  We dined early, for Miss Chambers and Emma to walk into Somerton, but while we were at dinner Captain Pyne, Kate and poor Juliana call’d and Captain Pyne kindly offered to drive them to Somerton, which he did, his two sisters staying here till he returned to take them home, after they, us, Miss Pyne and I took a very pleasant walk to Primrose Hill, where Mr Bryman has fitted up the former Poor House as three very pretty and most comfortable cottages, in a lovely situation.  We sat there some time and reached home just before Miss Chambers returned from Somerton.

Fricaseed chicken, hashed mutton, pudding, tart, vegatables, cheese etc.

Tuesday, 13 August 1839

A fine day.  Miss Boland call’d.  More agreeable than her sister Charlotte.  Miss Chambers, Emma and I call’d at Mrs Page’s.  Found Mrs Page at home, who was very agreeable.  Saw only her, a little girl and boy.  The place is much alterd since my beloved Aunts lived there, but it recall’d many scenes of happy former days and the visit was any thing but pleasant to me.  We had intended on calling on Mrs Joe Bradney, but we met her, Miss Boland, Mr Bradney’s three little girls and their Governess at the gate as we came from Captain Page’s, so we came straight home, where we found Captain Pyne. His sisters Mary and Jane arrived to spend the day.  Miss Pyne, Emma, Miss Chambers and Jane took a walk before dinner.  Mr Barney and a Mr Tyler (a very agreeable lad from Bath, a nephew of Lady Winn’s and a pupil of Mr Williams’s here) drank tea here and altogether it was a pleasant, chearful day.

Boil’d beef, ducks, veal cutlet, potatoes, fr. beans, carrots, pease, plum tart, currant tart, custards, toasted cheese etc.  Currants, gooseberries, almonds, raisins, cake and biscuits.

Henry’s Observer came from Bath.

Wednesday, 14 August 1839

A gloomy day, but not unpleasant.  at 11 o’clock we all got into a nice Fly from Somerton to go to Langport to dine at Mrs Stuckey’s.  We went a roundabout way, that we might see a very find column erected by subscription of his brother Officers to the memory of Sir Samuel Hoad (who died in the East Indies in 1814) at Polden Hill, near Compton Dundon.  From there we drove to Mrs Parsons’s at Somerton, where we staid more than an hour and had some luncheon.  We walk’d round her garden, which is very pretty.  We saw her eldest son Edward and Miss Parsons and while we were at luncheon, her second son James came in from Langport and with him Mr Kitson.  Edward Parsons is a very handsome fine young man, on rather too large a scale and very loud and boisterous in his manner.  No “mauvaise honte”  about him.  It began to rain soon after we left Somerton and continued till after we reached Langport (3 o’clock), which prevented our getting out and walking thro’ Mrs Mitchell’s plantations at Huish, which Miss Pyne wished to do.  Mrs Stuckey and her niece were not at home when we arrived, having been detained out by the rain, but we were received by her mother, Mrs Mitchell (Miss Pyne’s sister) and Fanny Parsons, her grand daughter.  The former is a delightful old lady of 82, as chearful and pleasant as a girl and more upright than either of her grand daughters.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Mitchell soon came in and received us very kindly.  Before we left the dinner table, Mr Edward Parsons arrived and Mr Kitson came in unexpectedly and, as the rain had ceased, after sitting some time Mr Parsons proposed going out on the water, as he said he came on purpose to give his cousin and sister a row.  While they got ready, Mrs S, Miss Chambers and we put on our shawls and walkd in the garden, which is very pretty.  When they joind, Mrs Stuckey said we might as well see them into the boat, so we went just as we were, without our bonnets to the river side and saw them off, Misses Mitchell and Parsons and the two young men, Mr Parsons rowing.  We walkd along the bank of the river a little way to see them turn round the point.  In returning Mr Stuckey very kindly took us into the Iron Foundry, where we saw them pour the red hot iron like liquid into the moulds.  From there we went into the Gasometre and had all that explained to us and then returned thro’ the garden, look’d at the profusion of grapes (not yet ripe) in the Green House and found the two old ladies in the Drawing Room, ready to receive us, where we were joind by the water party.  The tea table was so noisy that dear old Mrs Mitchell said she would move to the coffee table, where Miss Parsons was presiding and quietly talking to her “Beau” Mr Kitson.  After tea we had some music, the two girls playing and Mr Parsons making discord with the tamborine.  When they had had music enough we “Play’d at Proverbs” till the Fly came to take us home, about half past ten.  It was a very light night and we reached Charlton 8 miles from Langport, a few minutes before twelve, after spending a pleasanter day than I expected.

Monument to Vice-Admiral Sir Samuel Hood
Monument to Vice-Admiral Sir Samuel Hood

Soup, soals, veal patties, leg of lamb, turkey poult, stew’d cucumber, potatoes, F beans, delicious pease, the best I have tasted this year, apple tart, little bread puddings (not good), French pastry and cheese cakes, currants white and red, gooseberries, almonds raisins, cake and Rout cakes.  Henry’s Observer came.

Thursday, 15 August 1839

A great deal of quiet, steady rain.  We did not go out all day, except for a few minutes in the garden between showers.  Captain Pyne call’d and sat an hour.  He is going to take his sisters Jane and Juliana to Tenby on Monday to try if the latter will benefit by being on the sea, but I fear she is too far gone to be saved and is rapidly following her poor sister Anna Maria.  Miss Pyne was very unwell all day.  She did too much yesterday.  I read almost all the morning and the whole of the evening, till I was nearly blind (“Lord Lindsay’s Travels to the Holy Land”).

Leg of lamb, potatoes, F beans, carrots, turnips, pudding plum tart, cheese.

Friday, 16 August 1839

Sunshine and slight showers now and then.  Miss Pyne much better this morning.  She and Emma took a walk before dinner.  Miss Chambers walkd to Kingsdon.  She wished Emma to go with her, but Miss Pyne rather objected, we thought because Miss C was going with a present from Miss P to Juliana for her private use, she having yesterday sent her wherewithall to pay for a Chaise from here to Bristol, where she is to embark in a steamer for Tenby.  I did not go out all day, except in the garden.  Ann went to Kingsdon to walk home with Miss Chambers, but she came back in the Pynes’s open Carriage.  Miss Pyne and Emma took a walk again after dinner.

Hashd duck, hashed lamb, potatoes, pease and bacon, french beans, black currant pudding.

Saturday, 17 August 1839

A fine day.  Miss Chambers and we call’d on Mrs Joe Bradney, who was not at home and then went with my letter to Freeman to say we should be at home next Saturday to the Post Office.  Had a little conversation with Edy and James Parsons and then walk’d round by West Charlton Church to see if our watches agreed with the Church clock.  Mr Bradney call’d and was very pleasant.  Just before dinner Captain Pye and Mrs Page, her youngest girl and a Mrs Woodford (a friend of Miss Pyne’s, who is staying the the Page’s) also call’d.

Boild fowl, pig’s face, potatoes, F beans, apple tart.

Sunday, 18 August 1839

A very gloomy looking morning, but very pleasant out.  Miss Pyne and I set out for West Charlton Church early, that we might walk as slow as we liked.  Miss Chambers followd us.  Emma went to East Charlton.  We had no Sermon on account of it being Sacrement Sunday.  Mr Williams performed the whole duty with great devotion, particularly the Sacramental part.  I was introduced to Miss Page (a pretty girl) and her Aunt, Miss Bowles, in the church yard.  We had not got far from the Church when it began to rain and in a short time it literally pourd.  Fortunately I had my large umbrella and therefore did not get so wet as Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers, the latter of whom ran home, but got wet through.  The rain continued the rest of the day, violent at times, like thunder showers.  We could not go to Church in the afternoon, so I read Prayer and Miss C the Lessons.

Cold roast fowl, pig’s face, potatoes, apple tart, rice pudding.

Monday, 19 August 1839

A fine sunshine morning, but a cold easterly wind.  Rebecca’s Bath paper came.  She did not have one last week.  Hockey came for the clothes.  Mary Pyne drove here early, that Miss Chambers and Emma might go in their Carriage to Somerton to enquire if we could secure places in the Coach to return to Bath on Saturday.  She found it was not possible to secure them, but she saw the Coachman, who drove us here, who said he would do all in his power to take us, if we would go on Friday, but he did not drive the Coach on Saturday.  I wrote to Freeman and we all walkd to the Post Office after dinner and went to see old Joan Isaacs.  She is looking miserably and is nearly blind, but her husband very well.  I gave her 2/6d.  Mary Pyne went home when we took our walk, as Kate was not well and alone, Captain Pyne, Jane and poor Juliana having set off this morning for Tenby to try the effect of sea air and sailing for the latter.

Roast beef, fricassed chicken, potatoes, french beans, carrots, pudding.

Tuesday, 20 August 1839

A fine morning.  Mary Pyne drove over to spend the day at Captain Page’s.  She call’d for Emma and me and took us to Mrs Williams’s (T T L) who was not at home.  We parted there and Emma and I walkd on to Mrs Brymer’s, where we sat some time and found her very pleasant.  When we came out, the sky lookd so frightfully black and there was so much appearance of storm that we hurried home as fast as possible and it was fortunately we did, for we had not been in the house more than ten minutes when it began to rain heavily, but did not last more than an quarter of an hour.  After dinner Miss Chambers and Emma drove to kingsdon to spend the evening with Kate Pyne and did not return till nine o’clock.  Just as Miss Pyne and I were going to tea the two youngest Miss Pages and their eldest brother Robert came in, but did not stay long.

Boild rabbit, cold beef, potatoes, F beans, carrots, cucumber, apple pye, macaroni etc.

Wednesday, 21 August 1839

A very fine morning, but cold.  Kate Pyne drove over early and spent the morning here.  Miss Chambers returnd to Kingsdon in the Carriage.  She and Mary came back together.  The latter and Kate went back to dinner.  Mrs Brymer, Mr and Mrs Williams, their little girl and Miss Bowles calld.  After dinner Mr  William Parsons came to tea and took a walk with Miss Pyne and Emma.  His mother and sister came from Somerton to Mr Joe Bradney’s “Lecture” at the Church, which was not over till past nine, when they came here to tea and staid till past eleven and were very chearful and agreeable.  I pack’d the chief of our things in the course of the morning and before I went to bed.

Roast breast of lamb, hashd beef, potatoes, F beans, cucumber, pudding, plum tart etc.

Thursday, 22 August 1839

A very gloomy cold day with all the appearance of rain, which I fear will fall tomorrow, which will be very unlucky.  Miss Pyne, Emma and I went up to the Vicarage at the end of the garden, very different to Vicarages of modern days.  Mrs Joe Bradney calld and sat an hour.  We finished our packing and while Emma and Miss Pyne took a walk I taught Miss Chambers how to net the painted purses.  Just as the cloth was taken from the dinner table, Mrs Bradney call’d, having heard we were going tomorrow.  She could not allow us to leave Charlton without wishing us a pleasant journey.  She was very agreeable, but I thought she would never take her leave, as I wanted to go back to the dinner room where Miss Chambers remained and have my glass of wine, which I had not drunk before Mrs Stuckey and Miss Mitchell drove up.  Miss Chambers went to receive them while I finished my biscuit and wine.  We had hardly shaken hands and sat down when Mr Richard Batiscombe, his wife and children calld in their way thro’ Charlton to London.  He did not sit down, as Mrs Batiscombe would not get out of the Carriage on account of her baby.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Mitchell went away at 9 o’clock, the former kissing and taking a most friendly leave of us.

Boil’d rabbit, roast loin of veal, potatoes, F beans, cucumber, carrots, baked and boil’d apple dumplings.

It rain’d a good deal in the afternoon.  William Hockey took our trunks to the Carriage, for which I gave him a shilling.

Friday, 23 August 1839

A very warm day with great appearance of storm, but it passd off.  Wilts brought us a nosegay to take to Bath, so did Hockey.  I gave the latter a shilling,  Miss Pyne also gathered one for us.  Mary and Kate Pyne came from Kingsdon to take leave of us and to accomodate us with the Carriage to Somerton.  Miss Pyne most kindly would have a dinner for us at one o’clock and at 2, after taking leave of her and her two nieces we, accompanied by Miss Chambers, got into Captain Pyne’s little Carriage and quitted Charlton (after having pass’d a month there) with great regret.  We drove to Mrs Parsons’s, staid a quarter of an hour with her and her daughter and then went down to the Inn to wait for the Coach.  When we got there Giles told us Miss Fanny Pyne was there with a lady who wished to go in the same Coach.  Fanny joined us in the street, where we stood to secure two places if they were vacant.  Fortunately the Coach was empty and the Coachman as he drove up call’d out “I have places for you Ma’am!”.  Giles put our bundle and umbrellas in and we follow’d them as quick as we could, after which a pleasing elderly lady got in who Fanny Pyne introduced to us as Mrs Dalzell and we found her very agreeable and strongly reminding me of Mrs Graeme and Betsey Blenman, very like Betsey, and a handsome likeness of Mrs Graeme.  At Wells we took up a vulgar woman who fortunately fell asleep and did not wake till we reachd Farrington, where she and Mrs Dalzell got into another Coach to go to Bristol and we proceeded very comfortably by ourselves to Bath where we arrived safe (thank God for it) at 1/4 past seven and found Freeman and Ann very well.  We had our tea, which we relished very much, having found it very warm the whole day and went to bed early.

Cold and minced veal, cold lamb, potatoes, rice pudding, plumb tarts.

The Coachman very civilly put us down at our own door.

Milsom Street, Bath in 1828. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Milsom Street, Bath in 1828 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Saturday, 24 August 1839

A gloomy morning with great appearance of rain.  We went out soon after breakfast to execute Miss Pyne’s and Miss Chamber’s commission, having sent Ann with Mr Brymer’s, Mrs Williams’s, Mr Tyler’s and Kate Pyne’s letters to their respective destinations.  We first went to Brahams and got the spectacles for Miss Pyne, for which I gave 2/-, from there to Miss Bode’s for Miss Chamber’s worsted (where I bought a beautiful bag to send her as a present).  I could only match the green there and tried to match the brown at Hatches, Germaines and Marish’s without success.  Neither could I get so large an umbrella at Hornby’s as mine.  We then went up to Mrs Chamier’s, where we met a most warm reception from her and dear Georgiana, who are going to Clifton on Tuesday for a month.  They are both looking remarkably well and kindly ask’d us to dine with them tomorrow.  After sitting some time with them, we came home to dinner and went out again after in search of Miss Chamber’s umbrella, first going to Sims’s at the Western Exchange and then to Scovells in New Bond Street, where I found a very nice one, as large as mine at 17/6, which I bought.  I had intended to call at Admiral Shirley’s, but it began to rain a little, so I came home and sent to enquire how he was.  He sent word in reply he was very pooly.  It raind fast enough to wet the streets from six to seven o’clock, but dried up afterwards.  Our Boxes arrived by the carrier from Charlton.  We saw  Mrs Tugwell in her Carriage in Milsom Street, who bow’d very kindly to us and we afterwards met her as we were coming out of Sims’s.  She shook hands and was very friendly, said she was going to send to Charlton on Thursday and would convey either letters or a parcel, as there would be plenty of room in the basket she was going to send.  I bought a Blind for the staircase at Hornby’s, for which I gave 2/7d.

Sunday, 25 August 1839

A fine and warm day.  At St. John’s twice.  Mr Audry read the Prayers and a Mr Hethcot preached in the morning.  Mr de Visne did the duty in the afternoon.  Spoke to Mrs and miss de Visne in the morning and Mr de Visne stoped at our Pew to say he was glad to see us in the afternoon.  In our way home we call’d at Admiral Shirley’s and sat some time with him.  He is much alterd since I saw him last, looks very pale and thin, but says he is better.  We dined at Mrs Chamier’s and spent a very pleasant day.  Beautiful moonlight when we came home.  They go to Clifton on Wednesday.

Roast chickens currie, rice, bacon, pease, potatoes, plum pudding, green gages, plums.

Monday 26, August 1839

A fine morning.  Emma took Ann Holland’s letter to her brother, who was a policeman, but has been dismissed for stealing strawberries.  I wrote to Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers, sent the former the spectacles for the poor woman and two Bath cheeses for herself and the latter the pretty bag I bought for her, the umbrella and green and brown German wools.

It raind two or three times in the evening, but did not last.  Ann took Miss Chamber’s umbrella and Miss Pyne’s basket to the Charlton carrier to go tomorrow morning.

Tuesday, 27 August 1839

A fine morning.  Emma and I were hard at work on the stair carpet all day and did not go out.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and sat some time.  It rained twice in the afternoon, but only slightly.  Miss Wilson calld between dinner and tea, but could not stay, as one of the ladies was waiting to return to the College with her.

Wednesday, 28 August 1839

A fine day with only a few drops of rain.  We did not go out all day, as we wished to finish the stair carpet, which we did and it will be put down tomorrow.

Thursday, 29 August 1839

Slight showers frequently in the course of the day.  Emma went to Market in the morning and did not go out after.  I was not out at all.  Freeman put down the stair carpet and it looks very nice and clean.  After dinner we assisted in taking up a great many of the things from the store room into the garrets, that we might be able to move about and get at the Boxes.  Miss Workman’s Mary called, to our great surprise.  She came from Clifton to get some additional cloaths for her mistress, as she is going Tuesday week to Oldburn to stay a month.  Mary thinks she is better for the change of air.  I heard by the Evening Post from Mrs Scott, to beg I would enquire about a school for two little girls, great nieces of Mr Scott’s, who their mother wishes to send from Ireland to school in Bath!

Friday, 30 August 1839

A wet morning, with now and then sunshine.  It held up after tea, when Emma and I took a walk round the Parades.  In our way home we calld on Admiral Shirley and found him uncommonly well and in good spirits. We did not stay long, as a lady and gentleman came in to drink tea and play cards with him.  I ordered a brush and mop from Handcock’s and paid Mrs Moone for mending my diamond star ring.

Saturday, 31 August 1839

It rained heavily without intermission the whole day and we could not go out.  Grace Gregory’s brother brought me a very kind and chearful letter from Miss Chambers, with a good account of Miss Pyne.

Fashion Plate for September 1839 from Ladies' Cabinet. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for September 1839 from Ladies’ Cabinet.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Sunday, 1 September 1839

Quite an April day, bright sunshine and excessive heavy showers.  We could not go to Church, either in the morning or afternoon, but read the Prayers at home.  I wrote a long letter to Mrs Keen.

Monday, 2 September 1839

A beautiful morning till eleven o’clock when it began to rain and continued the rest of the day, but with short intervals.

We were agreably surprised by a visit from Mrs Leonard Vassall.  She was in very deep mourning for her sister, Miss Fitch, but was looking very well.  Ann Vassall is at Cheltenham, but she expects her back on Saturday next.  It was very kind of her to call.  Miss Wilson sent to say if we were disengaged tomorrow, they and Miss Harvey would come and drink tea with us.  I replied we should be most happy to see them.  Mrs Chamier sent us Miss Workman’s Bath Paper from Clifton.  Very cold, particularly in the night.

Tuesday, 3 September 1839

Heavy showers with short intervals the whole day.  It held up about 5 o’clock and the streets soon dried, the wind being very high and cold the whole day.  I should have been very glad of a fire.  Mrs Pierrepont calld to tell us her friend at Blackheath (Mrs Mason) was dead and had only left her a very small remembrance, at which she was more hurt than disappointed.  Miss Wilson sent me a note to say the weather was so bad she hoped I would excuse her and Miss Harvey this evening, but they would come tomorrow, if agreeable.  I sent word either tomorrow or the first fine day, as we had no engagement this week.  I wrote a long letter to Mrs Scott.  Very cold in the night.

Wednesday, 4 September 1839

A very fine day, but the wind very high and cold.  We calld at Admiral Shirley’s, who we found in excellent spirits and better than I have seen him for a long time past.  From him we went to Miss Errington, 22 Green Park Place, to enquire the terms of her school for Mrs Scott.  The wind was so violent, it was with difficulty we could stand and could not possibly carry our parasols.  Went to Miss Bode’s to match some German wool for Miss Chambers.  Could only get one shade exact there, then tried at the shop in the Corridor, but did not succeed.  Met Miss Helen Wiltshire and Miss Hane, both very kind.  the former said she would call soon, the latter is staying with the Crooks, but came in today to see the poor Hellicans, who are in a sad state of illness and anxiety, Mrs Jane and Miss Martha being both in bed and their nephew, the Clergyman who has been staying with them for change of air these six weeks past, so weak and reduced that he cannot sit up in bed and they say he is going into a rapid decline!  Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey drank tea here and were very chearful.  We play’d a merry rubber at Cassino.  It began to rain again while we were at tea and continued all the evening.  Miss Masters call’d while we were out.  She and Mrs Hardcastle are only just returnd from London and going to Western Super Mare in a few days.  A lady left a letter for me from Miss Hill, who says she does not like Weymouth at all and is going through Bridport and Lyme to Sidmouth, intending to remain there three weeks if she likes it and can get comfortable lodgings and to return to Bath the 15th October, where she has taken lodgings at 39 Pulteney Street (the last house, I believe), an immense distance from here.

Pulteney Street, Bath, early nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Pulteney Street, Bath, early nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Thursday, 5 September 1839

A very gloomy morning, which turned to rain in the afternoon and continued heavily all the evening.  I heard from dear Henry to say he was ready to pay us his promised visit and I wrote to fix Monday for his coming.  We were to have walkd to the College to drink with Miss Wilson, but the rain prevented our going.

Friday, 6 September 1839

A fine day, but the clouds at times very heavy.  Miss Drewett call’d and sat some time and was very pleasant.  I had a note from Miss Wilson to beg we would not walk to the College this afternoon, as both she and Miss Harvey were engaged, but to ask us to come on Sunday to hear Mr Pinder at 3 o’clock and take an early tea with her, or if that was not agreeable, to come to her on Monday.  I sent her word Emma would go on Sunday, if the weather permitted, but we could not on Monday, as my brother was coming to us from London on that day.  After dinner we went to Miss Cookes (a stately dame) in Queen Square to enquire her terms, which are hight than Miss Errington’s.  From her we went to Mrs Drought’s at 11 Laura Place and got hers, which are rather lower than Miss E.  We then walkd as far as Christ Church in our way to Camden Place, to enquire there, when we found it began to rain and we turnd back, but it was only a few drops. We should not have known it rained had we not seen it on the pavement, so we once again pursued our way upwards, but the clouds lookd so black and heavy, we took fright and thought we had better come home.  Emma went to enquire after the Hellicans.  The ladies are better but their nephew much the same.  She afterwards met Miss Fanny (looking very ill) who said they had given up all hope of their nephew’s recovery!

Saturday, 7 September 1839

A very wet day and a frightful high wind, which we thought owing to the eclipse of the sun, tho’ invisible in England and we did not go out all day.  I wrote a long letter to Miss Hill at Sidmouth.  Freeman heard of the death of poor Mr Pyne at Lyme.  He will be a sad loss, not only to his servants, but to the poor, to whom he was unbounded in his goodness.

Sunday, 8 September 1839

A fine day, tho’ part of it was very cloudy.  We went to St. John’s in the morning.  A Mr Groves performd the Service.  He read the Prayers remarkably well, but I did not like his preaching. Neither Mr or Mrs de Visne were at Church.  Emma walkd to the College in the afternoon to drink tea and go to their Chapel with Miss Wilson.  It lookd so dark and gloomy when she set out, I was very fearful she would have been wet, but there was no rain till she was coming home and then so trifling it was not of consequence.  Miss Wilson, Miss Harvey and Mrs Stubbs walkd part of the way home with her.  We read the Evening Service before we went to bed.  I wrote a long letter to Mrs Quanier, Freeman having had one yesterday to say her mistress was confined to her bed with Rheumatic gout in both hands and could not assist herself in any way!

Monday, 9 September 1839

A very fine day, but a brisk chilly wind.  We took my letters to Mrs Quarnier and Mr Melville to the Post Office and then went with Miss Chamber’s little parcel of wool to Mr Brymer’s to go in any parcel of theirs to Charlton.  Went to the Grocer’s for some cheese and then to Miss Aldredges in Camden Place to enquire the terms of their School.  They were not at home, but I saw a sister (a visiter there) who knew nothing of the terms, but said she would inform her sisters on their return home and they would send me the particulars.  From there we mounted to Landown Crescent a weary way.  Miss Hughes, who formerly kept a School there has left it, so we enquired at Miss Fournier’s.  The two elder were out walking with the pupils, but I saw the youngest, a very pleasing, pretty girl, who was very polite, and said their terms should be sent down in the evening, which they were.  I came home so tired and in such pain in my feet I could hardly stand.  We were busy the early part of the day preparing our bed room to receive dear Henry.  We are going up stairs to sleep in Freeman’s room, she and Ann sleeping on the floor in the back room, but he did not arrive.  We waited tea till 9 o’clock.  Met Miss Savage in the street.  I have not seen her for a long time,stopped and had a little chat. We also met Mr Charles Pennuddocke, who was very friendly.  He told us they had lost their youngest child, three months old, which I had not heard.

Tuesday, 10 September 1839

A fine day.  I did not go out.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and brought her work and sat an hour with us.  I wrote to Mrs Scott to send with the Prospectuses of Schools.  Dear Henry arrived a little past 5, instead of half past seven, having come by the Railway Coach.  He is looking very well.  He went to take a little walk after tea to refresh himself after his journey.  Emma walkd to Grosvenor Place to enquire about two Schools there and got their terms.  I heard from Miss Chambers from Lyme to announce the death of poor Mr Pyne.  She and her Aunt were in time to see him before he died and mean to stay there instead of going to Weston.

Wednesday, 11 September 1839

A fine morning.   Henry walkd out alone and afterwards with Emma who call’d at the Miss Hellicans to enquire for them and their nephew, the former better, the latter worse.  It turned out wet in the evening.  I sent the little parcel for Mrs Scott  to go by the Cheltenham Mail, but it was too late, so it must go tomorrow.  Miss Aldridge sent her terms in the evening and I opened the parcel for Mrs Scott and put them in.

Soles 2/0, shoulder of lamb, rice pudding, F beans Potatoes.

I wrote to Miss Chambers and enclosed my note in the little parcel of wool that was to have gone to her at Charlton, but is now sent to Lyme thro’ the medium of Mrs Tucker the Milliner.

Thursday 12 September 1839

A fine day.  Henry went to the Bath before breakfast and found himself very comfortable after it.  We calld on Admiral Shirley and sat a long time with him.  While we were out Miss Harvey call’d and just as we were going to dinner 4 o’clock.  Mr Wiltshire calld, so we did not see him.  He left word he would call again tomorrow if he could.  Before we went out Mr Evans calld to say he hoped every thing was in a fair way now for obtaining the American £103.  Henry took a walk alone before dinner.  I sent the little parcel containing 7!! prospectus’s of Schools to Mrs Scott by the Cheltenham Mail.  There was some rain after dinner.  In the evening Miss Margaret Philpott, who was just arrived from Lyme, sent her card and a letter from Mrs Keen.

Boild chicken, Oyster sauce, blade bone of lamb and pickled mushrooms, potatoes, F beans, apple tart, puffs.

Friday 13, September 1839

A fine morning.  Henry went again to the Bath before breakfast and took a walk immediately after breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire call’d and sat some time.  He was in very good spirits and had a great deal of chat with Henry about music and musical performances.  I did not go out all day.  We drank tea a little past six that Henry might walk afterwards, which he did and fortunately returnd before it began to rain for the evening and night very hard.

Stewd sole, boild neck of lamb, capers, turnips, potatoes, apple tart, puffs.

Saturday 14 September 1839

Dry in the morning, but began to rain between 1 and 2 o’clock and continued the rest of the day.  Henry went to the Bath again before breakfast, but found it was too much for him, which I was sure he would, tho’ he would not be persuaded to think so till he had tried.  Emma went up to the butcher’s.  While she and Henry were out, Miss Harvey call’d, but could not sit down.  I gave her the letter I received from Mrs Cole this morning, relative to poor Mrs Quarnier, who is suffering dreadfully from Rheumatic fever, to take to Miss Wilson.  I did not go out all day.

Roasted loin of veal, cold ham, yorkshire pudding, F beans, potatoes, apple pudding, blackberry tart.

Sunday 15 September 1839

A very fine morning, but showery afterwards.  Emma and Henry went to the Abbey, I to St. John’s.  Mr Groves did the whole Duty again.  Saw Miss Janetta Allen.  We shook hands as she pass’d, for she went out before me, but overtook me in Bond Street and we walk’d together as far as their house.  Miss Allen and a cousin who is staying with them went to the Octagon, which obliged Miss Janetta to seek another seat.  I did not go out after the morning Church.  Miss Wilson sent back Mrs Coles’s letter in the evening.

Stew’d lamb and rice (very good), minced veal, potatoes, turnips, custard pudding, blackberry tart.

Pump Room and Abbey Church, Bath c.1842 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Pump Room and Abbey Church, Bath c.1842 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Monday, 16 September 1839

A very showery morning which turnd to a wet afternoon and evening.  I wishd to have taken Henry to see the Rooms, but the day was too bad to go out.

A beautiful lobster stewd, boil’d beef, rich plum pudding, blackberry tart, potatoes and carrots.

Tuesday, 17 September 1839

A very gloomy looking morning with an exceeding cold wind.  As soon as we had done breakfast Henry went and took a place in the Beaufort Coach for tomorrow.  When he returned we all went up to the Rooms, where we found Marchant the waiter, who shewd them the Gentleman’s Club Rooms and the two Cloak Rooms were new to me.  From there we walkd through the Circus, Brock street and Catherine Place to the beginning of the Park, intending to go round it, but it was so cold we would not go and it was fortunate we did not, as it began to rain before we got home and we must have got wet if we had had far to walk.  Emma and Henry were to have gone to the College to see it and calld on Miss Wilson and a Miss Dale, who Henry knew formerly, but the weather was even too wet and bad to go in a Fly.  Miss Wilson call’d and was very desirous that they should go after dinner if the weather improved, but it did not, so they gave it up.

A very fine Salisbury Eel, cold beef, potatoes, custard pudding and puffs.

Wednesday, 18 September 1839

A beautiful morning.  We were up at 6 o’clock, that Henry might have his breakfast comfortably before he went, which he had in good time and took a quantity of nice ham sandwiches with him.  He would be at home to dinner.

Mrs Pierrepont call’d and askd us to dine today, which we did, only ourselves, very chearful and pleasant.  There were some very hard showers in the course of the day, but fortunately it was dry, both to go out and return from Mrs Pierrepont’s.

Skate, partridges, broild and pull’d chicken (bad), potatoes, F beans, boil’d bread pudding.

Thursday, 19 September 1839

Fine till about 11 o’clock, after which it raind torrents.  A melancholy day for the Dhalia Show.  Mr Wiltshire call’d and very kindly brought us three tickets, not knowing that Henry left us yesterday.  He said he was afraid we should not be able to make use of them, the weather was so bad and that it would occasion a loss of forty pounds to the Horticultural Society.  He call’d again in an hour to ask for one of the tickets.  I wished him to take them all, but he said he wanted only one, so I sent Ann and Freeman with the other two and they were both much pleased, notwithstanding the rain and mud in the gardens.

Mr Evans call’d about the American money and said he hoped it would now be shortly settled.  I was busy all the morning looking over papers to see if I had got the Probit of my Grandfather’s Will, but could not find it, nor do I think that my mother or Aunts ever had it.

I wrote again to Mr Melville, not having had any answer to my letter of the 9th.

Friday, 20 September 1839

Fine as yesterday till 11 o’clock, when the rain began, but was not so incessant as yesterday, having some bright sun between the heavy showers.  Quite an April day.  We did not go out, nor did any one call.  Freeman unwell with a bad cold and sore throat.

Saturday, 21 September 1839

A beautiful day, without a drop of rain.  I hard from Mr Melville with £5 for Harriett’s use, which I took to Mr Bradly.  Fortunately Melville had not been there for her money till after it arrived.  We call’d on Miss Margaret Philpot, having been prevented doing so before by the badness of the weather.  Found her more agreeable than she usually is.  Calld at Admiral Shirley’s, just saw him in his chair going out.  He expects Georgina home this evening.  From him we went to Palmer’s to order some coals, which are to come on Tuesday and then to Miss Drewett’s, who was not at home.  We did not return to dinner till near 4 o’clock, having first call’d at Mrs Chamier’s to ask when she was coming home.  Mrs Taylor said she expected her on Tuesday, indeed she was sure she woud return on that day, as they intended to go to Thalberg’s Concert on Wednesday.  I wrote after dinner to Mr Melville with Butcher’s receipt for the £5 I received this morning for Harriett Melville, and Emma took the letter to the Post and afterwards went to enquire after the Miss Hellicans, where she heard their nephew died at their house last Wednesday!  Emma also went to see old Mrs Pattern, who was delighted to see her.  She took her some tea and sugar, arrow root, sago and half a crown.  We met Mrs Lowry in Milsom Street.  She told us that poor Mrs Saunen died last week!  We had a long conversation with her and would have heard a great deal relative to Ms Saunen, but Miss Helen Wiltshire and Miss Cocknan stopped to speak to us and she walk’d on.  We afterwards met Mr Wiltshire with a very sick looking lady leaning on his arm.  He stop’d and shook hands, as did Miss Allen in her usual friendly, kind manner, who we also met in the street.  They day was so fine, everybody was out and enjoying it.

Freeman better.

Sunday, 22 September 1839

A beautiful morning.  We went to St. John’s.  Mr Groves did the Duty for Mr de Visne, who is at the sea.  There had been a shower just before we came out of Church, but it was nearly over and ceased entirely before we got home.  It began again between one and two o’clock and last two hours, very hard, which prevented our going to Church again.  When we came home, to our surprise, we found a nice fire, Freeman thinking it was cold and that we should like it, and we found it very comfortable, but the worst of beginning so early, we should not like to leave off again, even should the weather become warmer, which is not very likely.  It was a fine evening with a beautiful bright moon.  Freeman pretty well again.

Monday, 23 September 1839

A very fine morning.  Soon after breakfast Miss Shirley (who returned from the Isle of Wight on Saturday) call’d.  She had not been here many minutes before Miss Lawrence came in.  Georgina did not stay long, but Miss Lawrence did, and was very pleasant.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d and was, as she always is, affectionately kind.  She said the day was so beautifully pleasant we ought not to stay at home, so between 3 and 4 o’clock Emma and I went up to the butcher’s by way of a walk and paid his bill.  We then extended our walk higher up Bathwick Hill, along Cleveland Terrace (where I had never been before, a lovely walk and view) and came out into the Lane behind “Velore” (General Andrews’s), round the back of Sidney Gardens, down Sidney Place and Pulteney Street, home.  I was not so much tired as I expected.  The weather continued very fine the whole day, bright sun, without a drop of rain!

Bathwick Bridge, 1830 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Bathwick Bridge, 1830 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Tuesday, 24 September 1839

A gloomy, dull looking morning.  I heard from Kate Pyne to beg I would procure an “Orinasol Resperator” for poor Juliana, who is not at all better for her sea voyage to Tenby.  They talk of going to Lyme, where I hope they will continue the Winter.  We went to Terry and Duttons, the only agent in Bath for the Resperators, but they had only the Oral ones and the others not answering so well and being a greater incumbrance than the orals.  We call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  Miss Shirley was gone to Bath Easton. The Admiral was pretty well, but I did not ask to see him, because it was beginning to rain slightly and I was afraid it would encrease, which it did soon after we came home and continued till five o’clock.

We met Mrs Captain Jones (nee Morgan) and stopp’d to speak to her in George Street.  I wrote to Kate Pyne.  I had a note from Miss Wilson.  She had heard from Mrs Barnes that poor Mrs Quarrier was still suffering severely and the Dr also confined to his bed with Gout!

Wednesday, 25 September 1839

A fine morning till between 11 and 12 o’clock, when it rained very fast for about half an hour, but was fine after the rest of the day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d after the Concert (Thalberg’s Farewell).  They returnd from Clifton last night, both looking very well and very kind.  We did not go out all day.  I wrote to Mrs Cole.

Thursday, 26 September 1839

A beautiful morning.  Freeman ask’d leave to go to her sister’s at Carston.  There was a heavy shower about an hour after she went, but it did not last long and was fine the rest of the day.  After dinner we call’d at Mrs Pierrpont’s, who was not at home.  We then call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, but he and Georgina were out.  From there we went to Hydes to enquire if they had heard from Miss Workman.  They expect her home tomorrow.  We walkd to the end of Norfolk Crescent, from there to the end of Norfolk Buildings, down James Street, home.  In the Square we met Dr Davis, who joined us and was extremely friendly and kind.  Coming up Gay Street Georgina Shirley overtook us.  She was coming with my little gold pin that I left at Portsmouth, which she kindly brought from thence for me.  While we were talking to her, Mr Evans came up.  He kindly said he hoped soon to get our business settled and would call tomorrow.  In consequence of another letter from Kate Pyne, we went to Terry and Duttons and bought one of the oral respirators for poor Juliana, for which I gave £1.10.0.  Freeman brought us a beautiful nosegay from Carston, but came home very much out of spirits, having heard that her sister Mary was very seriously ill.  She askd my leave to go to Lyme on Saturday to see her and I could not deny her request.  She went to bed with a bad head ache.

Norfolk Crescent, Bath c.1828 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Norfolk Crescent, Bath c.1828 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Friday, 27 September 1839

A beautiful looking morning, but there was a slight shower after breakfast, but it did not last many minutes.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d while we were at breakfast.  She came very kindly to ask us to partake of her goose on Sunday, for which we were very much obliged or we should not other wise had had any goose on Michaelmas Day.  Mr Evans call’d to say that tomorrow or Monday he would bring Mr East to witness my affidavit to enable me to receive the money from Mr Pigou.  I wrote to Kate Pyne, pack’d up the Respirator and Ann took it to the Catherine Wheel in Walcot Street to go by the Charlton Carrier tomorrow morning.  I ask’d Freeman how long she thought she should be absent.  She replied by asking me how long I could spare her, would I allow her to stay a fortnight or three weeks?  She thought a little change of air would be of great service to her, which I hope it will, as she is certainly not so well as I wish her.  Old Hawkins is to be here while she is away.  She wish’d us good night in very low spirits.

It began to rain about 7 o’clock and I believe continued all the evening.  Mrs Pierrepont told us that Mrs Stafford Smith died on Tuesday.  She will be a dreadful loss to the Poor.

Saturday, 28 September 1839

Very wet till nine o’clock, when it cleared up and was fine the rest of the day.  Freeman came into our room before we were up to wish us good bye.  Mr Vezey came and received his quarter’s rent due tomorrow, £13.2.6.  We went out before dinner, call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  He was delightfully well and going out.  Georgina poorly, a little bilious.  From there we went to Miss Workman’s, who we found much better for her excursion to Clifton and Oldbury.  She was in good spirits and appeared to me altogether very well.  We sat a long time with her and then went to the Grocer’s and ordered 6 pound of moist sugar and a quarter of a pound of tea for Hawkins.  We afterwards call’d at Mrs Chamier’s, where we staid half an hour and she very kindly askd us to dine with her on Monday on a goose, so we shall have two Michaelmas Days.  The last two years we had not one, as far as goose was concerned.

Sunday, 29 September 1839

Very fine all day.  We went to St. John’s twice, had an excellent Sermon from Mr de Visne.  As he came down from the Desk in the afternoon, he stopp’d to speak to us and was very obliging.  We call’d to ask after Miss Shirley and found her pretty well again and the Admiral quite gay.  They ask’d us to dine tomorrow, but we were engaged to Mrs Chamier.  We dined at Mrs Pierrepont’s, only ourselves and spent a pleasant day.  It was fine to come home.

Monday, 30 September 1839

A dry morning, but threatening and went directly after breakfast to Hornby’s to see for a scarf shawl for Mrs Pierrepont, which she requested us to do yesterday.  They had got an immense number down today.   I pick’d out six or eight for her to chuse from.  They sent them up and she came here to chuse one.  She fix’d on one at £1.9.6 and beg’d I would pay for it and let it remain here till she fetches it.  She walkd down with us to the shop, where I left £2 with Mr Thomas and he was to send me the change with the shawl.  We calld at Miss Workman’s, who we found in good spirits and very well.  She is to meet us at Mrs Chamier’s.  When we came home, Ann told me that they had sent the shawl with a message that they had made a mistake in the price.  It was £1.19.6 instead of £1.9.6.  Emma went to Mrs Pierrepont’s to tell her and she declined taking it.  We spent a very pleasant day at Mrs Chamier’s.  Play’d Quadrille.  I lost 1/-, Emma 6d, Mrs Chamier won the 1/6.  We had a fine night to come home.  Indeed it did not rain the whole day, tho’ it threatened so much between 4 and 5 o’clock that I expected it would before we could get to Mrs Chamier’s.  Ann told us at night that she had taken the shawl to Hornby’s and that Mr Thomas had given her the two pounds back.  At dinner we had very bad cod, but excellent oyster sauce, a very fine goose, minced beef, potatoes, brocoli, apple sauce, apple tart and ground rice pudding.  Bottled porter (very good), pears and walnuts.

Fashion Plate for October 1839 from Ladies' Pocket Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for October 1839 from Ladies’ Pocket Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Tuesday, 1 October 1839

A beautiful day.  We did not go out in the morning, expecting Mr Evans, but he did not come.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.

After dinner we took a walk to see where they are altering the canal to make room for the railroad and were shockd to see what devastation they are making in the beautiful meadows between Bath and Bathampton.  I wish there were no railroads in England.  We had rather a long but very pleasant walk.  It was a delightful evening and there were a great number of people looking at the men at work.  The iron boat going to Bradford pass’d us on the canal, very rapidly.  Miss Wilson sent to know if we had hear from Portsmouth.  She has been too unwell to come to Bath for this week past.  The Miss Hellicans sent their card of thanks.  Mr Thomas came from Hornby’s while we were out to say they had had more shawls come in this morning and he hoped the lady would come and look at them and that he was extremely sorry that he had made the mistake about the price.  A beautiful starlight evening.

Wednesday, 2 October 1839

A very dark, dull morning.  It began to rain about one o’clock and continued without interruption till 5.  Mr Evans call’d to say he would bring Mr East to administer the Affidavit to me tomorrow at one o’clock. I wrote a note to Georgina Shirley to beg her to meet him to sign the Bond for Mr Walker’s indemnification, which she very kindly sent word she would.  I wrote to lady Cooper to tell her there was a chance of my receiving the money and to know whether the fourth part should be sent to Brook Street, or to her bankers.  Fine starlight and sharp frost.

Thursday, 3 October 1839

A sunshine morning, but very cold.  If it continues so cold I shall be obliged to begin the fire again.  Mr Evans brought Mr East to administer the Oath to me (for which I gave the latter a Sovereign!) and Miss Shirley came to put her name to the Bond of Indemnity for Mr Walker.  After dinner we call’d on the Miss Hellicans, where we sat more than an hour.  They were all pretty well and Miss Hane quite so and as canny as ever.  In our way home we call’d on Miss Workman who, as well as the Hellicans, has a fire.  She was very well.  We did not stay long, fearing it would rain, it lookd so heavy, but it did not till 9 o’clock, when it began and continued (I believe) the whole night.  I know that from twelve to one o’clock it pourd.  Mr Evans told us that Mrs Stafford Smith died worth £114,000!!  The Shirley’s expect Mrs Hayter this evening,  to spend a fortnight or three weeks.

Friday, 4 October 1839

A little sun when we were getting up, but it soon disappeared and began to rain again and continued without intermission the whole day, great part of the time pouring.  No one, except from absolute necessity, could go out.  I had a very kind letter from Lady Cooper  saying “No No!  I shall not share the remittance from America with you”.  She sent us the paper again, the “Morning Post”.

Saturday, 5 October 1839

A very fine day, but with a very cold easterly wind.  While we were at breakfast, Mrs Pierrpont calld and brought us a partridge. Emma walkd to the college to enquire after Miss Wilson, who has been unwell but is not pretty well again.  I calld at Mrs Chamier’s, found two Miss Broadhursts there, one of them from London.  They were very pleasant. Mrs Chamier had had a sore throat, but was better and intended to go out, which she did and she and Georgina calld here to borrow one of Emma’s kettle holder’s as a pattern.  I took Rebecca’s Bath paper and the Morning Post, also Nicholas Nickelby, to Mrs Chamier and they lent me the last numbers of Nickelby.  From there I calld on Mrs Hayter.  She and Miss Shirley were out, but I sat some time with the Admiral.  I then went to Miss Workman’s, who I found very well and staid some time with her.  Emma had returned from the college before I got home.  I had intended to take the partridge to Mrs Chamier, but I feard it was rather stale, so we had it for dinner and it turnd out delicious and dressd it beautifully and made some excellent gravy and bread sauce.  It proved so good, I regretted I had not taken it to Mrs Chamier.  I heard from Freeman.

Sunday 6 October 1839

Emma went to the Abbey in the morning, I to St. John’s.  I staid to the Sacrament,  We both went to St. Johns at three o’clock and had a “How do you do” from Mr de Visne as he pass’d.  Emma went to Miss Workman’s.  I came straight home and did not go out afterwards.  Had two papers from Lady C.

Monday, 7 October 1839

A very fine day.  Mrs Simpson call’d.  She had hardly sat down before Miss Drewett and Mr Tueson came in.  As soon as they went away we prepared to go out, but before we were quite ready, Miss Hough came and sat some time and ask’d us to tea this evening.  When she went away we walk’d over Bathwick Bridge and calld on Mrs Polwhele in Daniel Street (14), but it was so late she was at dinner.  In our way there we met Mrs Dorset Fellows and Mrs C Pennudlock, with both of whom we had a long conversation.  In our way home we came down the Henrietta Road, where they are building two neat little villas and will soon, I have no doubt, fill all those pretty gardens with houses.  Walk’d to look at the Infant School houses at the garden end of Grove Street.  In our way home we met Miss Shirley, Mrs Hale and Mrs Hayter in Milsom Street, the latter so altered I should not have known her.  Betsey West brought us a beautiful nosegay, the best part of which Emma took to Mrs Chamier, who is confined with a bad cold.  We drank tea at Miss Haigh’s, only ourselves.  Very pleasant.  I wrote to Freeman. No rain all day!!!

Tuesday, 8 October 1839

A very dull looking day, but it did not rain till the evening.  As soon as we had dined, we went up to Mrs Chamier’s, who we found better.  We just saw dear Georgina, who was going out when we went in.  We sat with Mrs Chamier two hours and then calld to enquire after Miss Masters, who has been unwell.  She was better, but they were just going to dinner, so we did not see them.  We went thro’ the Gravel Walk to Miss Workman’s, who we found very well and then came home, soon after which a person brought me a letter from Miss Armstrong with the distressing intelligence of dear Mr Scott’s having had an Apopletic fit and being in great danger!

Mrs Chamier kindly ask’d us to dine there tomorrow on hare.  I took dear Georgina a few pickled mushrooms, she never having tasted any.  Two papers from Lady Cooper.

Wednesday, 9 October 1839

A wet, disagreeable day.  I wrote to Miss Armstrong in the morning.  We dined at Mrs Chamier’s, only ourselves.  Fortunately it did not rain (tho’ very muddy) when we went.  A Miss Ashe came to play Quadrille in the evening and play’d very genteely.  I lost 2/-, Emma won!!! 6d.  When we were coming away it pour’d torrents and Mrs Chamier insisted on our staying till the shower was over.  It was so violent she was sure it could not last.  In about ten minutes Portbary came in to say the rain had ceased and we got home without any, but in less than half an hour it pour’d again.  We spent a very pleasant day.

Carrot soup, minced veal, hare, roll pudding, carrots, turnips and potatoes.

Thursday, 10 October 1839

A fine morning.  Miss Shirley and Mrs Hayter call’d, as did Miss Wilson, to ask Emma to go with her to Jolly’s to chuse a Boar.  There was a very hard shower while she sat here, but it did not last long.  Emma went with her and they soon returned with the Boar, for which she gave £1.15.0.  I could not prevail on her to stay to tea.

Friday, 11 October 1839

Quite a Summer day, so very warm we were obliged to let the fire out and have the window open the whole morning.  Miss Allen and Miss Baker call’d, the latter is staying at Bathampton, which I did not know.  She was very friendly and agreable and told us a great deal about Lady Cooper, who I was very sorry to hear is much altered by the stroke she had some time ago and has difficulty at times of expressing what she wishes to say and making herself understood!  I am sincerely sorry for her.  After they were gone we went to Miss Workmans’ and had scarcely sat down when it began to rain and continued more than an hour, part of the time pouring.  As soon as it ceased, we came home, fortunately without any more rain, but it was very sloppy and disagreeable.  There was a great deal of heat lightening in the evening and much rain in the night.

Saturday, 12 October 1839

Wet in the morning early, but fine sunshine afterwards and much colder than yesterday.  Emma went to Market for a shoulder of lamb.  She got a beauty, tho’ Haward’s man said that “Lamb was mutton now” and “that they had none”, which I do not believe. The Miss Allens call’d while we were getting ready to go out.  They did not stay long and then we went up to Mrs Chamier’s, who was not at home, but return’d as we were standing at the door.  She, having found it was an Easterly wind, only went to the bottom of Russell Street.  After we had been there a little while, it began to rain very hard, but fortunately it was only a shower and when it held up we came.  Miss Shirley overtook us in Milsom Street, but could not come in, as she was going to do some some commissions for Mrs Hale, added to which her feet were wet.

Mrs Lowry call’d while we were out, for which I was very sorry.

The Guildhall and Market Place, Bath c.1850. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
The Guildhall and Market Place, Bath c.1850.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Sunday, 13 October 1839

A fine morning with threatening clouds.  we went to St. John’s in the morning, but it look’d so like rain we were afraid to venture in the afternoon, so read the Service at home.

Monday, 14 October 1839

A thorough wet day, dark and gloomy.  I wrote to Freeman to desire her not to come home till next Monday.  Had a nice long letter from Dear Miss Wood.  The rain did not cease the whole day.

Tuesday, 15 October 1839

A very fine morning.  As soon as we had dined, we prepared to go out, when just as we were ready, Miss Workman, to our surprise, came in.  As soon as she went away we went to call on Mrs Hardcastle, who was not at home.  There was great appearance of storm the Crescent way and I do not think I ever saw the sky so black by daylight.  It was quite awful and attracted the observation of every body in the street.  We took two News papers to Miss Chamier and to our surprise heard that Dr Crawford was with her mother, who had caught cold on Saturday and that it had fallen on her chest. Portbury wish’d us to go up to Miss Chamier, as Miss Webb was with her, but I was fearful of the storm, so declined and it was fortunate I did, for we had scarsely got home before it began to rain and pour’d for some time, after which there was sunshine and a magnificent rainbow.  The rain commenced again about six o’clock and continued all the evening, but when we went to bed it was bright starlight.  I had a communication from Mr Evans to say Mr Pigou’s lawyer was out of town and therefore the money could not be paid till his return, in about a fortnight.  I hope his affairs were not in as bad a state as Mr Hales and that we shall be cheated out of the money, but it looks very suspicious.

Wednesday, 16 October 1839

A fine looking morning, but threatening.  Miss Shirley call’d to ask us to dine!!!!!  We calld at Mrs Chamier’s.  She was very poorly but saw us.  Dear Georgina’s rheumatism better.  In our way home met Miss Hill and Miss Allen and Miss Baker.  The former was just arrived from Clifton and was on her way to us, but was going first to Mr Marriott’s.  We told her we were going to get some cheese and begged her to go to our house and wait till we returned.  She is looking thin and far from well.  We found her here when we came back.  She had not been here long when Mrs Admiral Westerne came in, and she went away.  Mrs Westerne was very agreeable and paid a long visit.  We were very lucky in getting to the Admiral’s without rain.  We had not been there more than five minutes before it began and was showery all the evening, but luckily was quite dry both above and below when we came home.  There was only Mrs Hayter who is staying there, her neice Miss Hayter of Tiverton, a very pleasant girl and ourselves.  The Admiral was very well and went out in the evening.  Spent a very pleasant day.  Miss Hayter returned to Tiverton a little before ten o’clock and we came home soon afterward.  Giblet soup (very good), beautiful boild and fried soals! boild turkey and tongue patties, leg of lamb, whole and mashed potatoes, brocoli, apple tart and a delicious custard pudding.  Apples, pears, walnuts and almonds.

Thursday, 17 October 1839

A fine morning till about twelve o’clock when it began to rain and continued the rest of the day.  Betsey West brought the beautiful little black, tan and white spaniel puppy she is going to send to her sister Mary to shew us before we were up.  Ann brought it to us in bed.  It is very handsome.  Betsey sent it to Lyme by the Coach this morning.  A family came to Mrs Harneson’s lodgings this morning.  Mr Norman paid a very long visit there.  The gentleman appears an invalid.

A Spaniel with Two Puppies by Filippo Palizzi, 1849 (c) The Bowes Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Spaniel with Two Puppies by Filippo Palizzi, 1849
(c) The Bowes Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 18 October 1839

An incessant day’s rain.  I do not think it ceased half an hour the whole day.  Miss Workman kindly sent us her Bath Paper.

Saturday, 19 October 1839

A most lovely day, quite Summer.  We went up to Mrs Chamier’s early, saw dear Georgina.  Mrs Chamier is better again, but has been very unwell since we saw her three days ago.  From there we went to Miss Hough’s, who we met just by her own door.  She insisted on our returning with her.  We sat a short time and then came out all together.  We stopped at Mrs Lawry, who was not at home, then call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s, “not at home”.  Went to Miss Workman.  She was just going to enquire after Mrs Chamier, so we did not stay many minutes with her but proceeded on to Miss Drewett’s, where we sat a short time and then walk’d along the Henrietta Road to Daniel Street and call’d on Mrs Powhele who was out.  We then call’d on Miss Hill, who was also out.  Indeed, few people would stay at home such a lovely day.  We have not had such a one for these two months past. We cannot be too grateful for it and God grant it may continue.  As we pass’d Mr Templeman’s, I thought I would ask how poor Mrs Hawkins, his housekeeper who has undergone an operation for cancer, was going on, when to my surprise she came to the door herself, said she was quite well and was going to Lyme next Tuesday.  She was looking very pretty and it is certainly a wonderful quick recovery.  Mr George was the medical man employ’d.  In our way to Mrs Chamier’s we encountered Mr Gore looking remarkably well and very friendly.  When we came home we found Mrs Powhele had call’d in our absence and Miss Webb and Miss Chamier call’d after our return, the latter to ask us as and act of charity to drink tea with them tomorrow.  Our walk today was rather a long one and I was a good deal tired, but it was beautifully pleasant and the only inconvenience was that I had put on too thick a shawl and was incommoded by the warmth of it.  Not a drop of rain the whole day!!  and a lovely moonlight night.  I heard from Miss Armstrong this morning with a very favourable account of dear Mrs Scott.

Sunday, 20 October 1839

A fine day, but cold.  We went to St. John’s twice.  We drank tea with Mrs Chamier, who was better, tho’ languid from the effects of bleeding and medicine.  It was much warmer both in going and returning from Mrs Chamier’s than in the morning and Ann said there had been two or three slight showers in the course of the evening, but the streets were quite dry when we came home.

Monday, 21 October 1839

A very dull looking day but pleasanter out than it appeared to be.  Miss Burnmister call’d, as did Mrs Pierrepont and askd us to tea this evening.  We call’d on Miss Shirley and Mrs Hayter.  They had had a bad account of Mrs Shirley and said it depended on the account they received tomorrow whether Mrs Haytor went to London on Wednesday or to her mother, in the latter case Georgina would accompany her.  Mrs Lutwich came in while we were there and we went to Miss Workman’s, who we found very well.  After sitting there some time we went to the grocer’s to order some rush lights (6) and two dozen pounds of kitchen candles and on our return home found that Mrs Wilson had call’d in our absence, for which we were sorry.

Freeman arrived from Lyme at half past six.  We spent a chearful evening at Mrs Pierrepont’s and found when we came home that poor Freeman had been very sick and was gone to bed with a bad head ache.  She said it was bile, occasioned by the journey and thought she should be very well again tomorrow.

Tuesday, 22 October 1839

A very gloomy morning.  A lad came for the tax for poor dear Flora! which has been paid twelve months since she died.  I was plagued very much about it last year and thought it was then settled.  The young man was very civil and took the receipt with him to shew.  Emma afterwards took another receipt to Mr Quarry the grocer, who is the present collector.  He was very obliging and said he would try all in his power to get it remitted, but he feared I should be obliged to pay it, because I had not sent a Notice that the dog was dead.  Emma call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  The account of Mrs Shirley was better this morning, but Mrs Hayter talks of going to her tomorrow, if she does not hear any thing from her daughter to make it necessary for her to return.  However, Mrs Hardcastle and Miss Masters call’d, the latter who has been ill, looking pale and languid.  Old Hawkens sent us a nice little nosegay, which I sent up to Mrs Chamier by Ann, who brought Miss Chamier’s thanks and that she did not think Mrs Chamier at all better.  Miss Workman’s Mary came to tell us that Lord Brougham had been thrown out of a carriage and kicked on the head by a horse and killd instantly!  Mrs Harcastle had told us he was dead, but she did not know he had been kill’d.  Freeman bought us a bunch of Dahlias and some delicious mignionette from Lyme and letters from Miss Chambers and Mr Keen.

Wednesday, 23 October 1839

A dull looking day with now and then little flits of rain, but not sufficient to wet.  Miss Shirley call’d.  She told us they had no letters from the Isle of Wight, but Mrs Hayter was gone to their mother.  Miss Allen and Miss Baker call’d, but unfortunately we were at dinner, so we did not see them.  After dinner we went up to Mrs Chamier’s, who we found very poorly and languid.  Just saw dear Georgina and Miss Webb, who were going out to walk.  We sat with Mrs Chamier till past 4 o’clock, when it looked so black and dank I thought we should get wet before we reached home, but luckily it did not rain till late in the evening, when it continued all night.  Miss Shirley brought the pattern of the copper tea kettle for Emma to copy.  A family came to Coe’s.

Thursday, 24 October 1839

A complete day’s rain.  It did not cease till late in the evening, about the time it began yesterday and continuing 24 hours!  The dear Miss Allens with their usual kindness and consideration sent us a nice basket of apples.  I wrote a long letter to Miss Wood.

Friday, 25 October 1839

A dull looking day with cold easterly wind.  Miss Workman call’d and brought her Bath Paper which, as soon as she was gone, we took up to Mrs Chamier, who still continues very unwell.  Portburys had order not to admit any body but us.  We sat two hours with her and dear Georgina.  It rained slightly in the evening, but soon went off.

Saturday, 26 October 1839

A beautiful morning, bright sunshine after a white frost.  Miss Shirley call’d early to say she was going this evening by the Mail to Portsmouth, as they have had worse accounts of her mother from Miss Justice this morning. We intended as soon as we had dinner to walk to Bathampton to call on the Miss Allens and Miss Baker, but just as we were going Mrs Dorset Fellows, Miss Hellican, Miss Hare and Mrs Kiplin, one after another call’d, so we could not get out till 20 minutes past three, when we set out for Bathampton.  The lateness of the time obliged me to walk too fast to be agreeable.  When we got there, they were gone out to walk!  John was very desirous that we should go in and rest, as he was sure they would not be long before they returnd and “they would be so disappointed if they did not see us”, but as it was late, I would not go in.  Returning, we met them and Miss Baker.  They were very sorry they chanced to be out and begg’d we would come again soon and earlier.  We found from John that it was Mr Allen had sent us the apples, at his suggestion.  I heard from Dr Quarnier and Mrs Cole saying Eliza was better.  The latter kindly sent me a bottle of Eau de Cologne that she brought home with her.  No rain.

Sunday, 27 October 1839

A very fine day.  Emma went to the College early enough for the morning Church and took two letter to Miss Wilson that came in the Packet from Portsmouth, brought by Mrs Hawksley last night.  I went to St. John’s and afterwards to Miss Workman’s and Admiral Shirley’s.  Sat a long time with Miss W, who was in very good spirits.  The Admiral was also pretty well.  Found Emma at home when I returned and as soon as we had dined, we went together to St. John’s and afterwards to Mrs Chamier’s, who was a little better.  We staid there till her dinner was ready.  It was very cold all day. No rain.

Mrs Pierrepont call’d yesterday  to ask us to dine with her on Tuesday next.

Monday, 28 October 1839

A beautiful morning, but very cold.  Miss Workman call’d.  While she was here Mrs Fry also call’d.  Emma was gone to see Mr Allen’s house in Laura Place, as all the things are to be sold and the house given up, but she came home before Mrs Fry went away.  Rebecca came a second time to shew us some spectacles Mr Braham had allowed her to take home to try and with which she was much pleased.  We got ready to go out, but when Freeman opened the door for us, she persuaded us to wait a little, for the wind, which had been fresh all the morning had risen to quite a breeze and the dust was flying in such clouds that the people in the street were obliged to turn their backs to it.  In less than half an hour the wind abated and we went up to Camden Place, calling in our way at Miss Philpot’s, who is still at Admiral Bullen’s, but returns to her lodgings on Wednesday.  Mrs Simpson was not at home.  We hurried from her house, expecting it to rain, the clouds opposite Camden Place being tremendously black and heavy, with the rain pouring from them at a distance, but it overtook us before we reached Mrs Chamier’s and by the time we got there the streets were quite wet.  We found Mrs Chamier better, but still very languid.  Georgina was gone out.  Miss Webb came in while we were there.  We waited till the rain ceased, which was some time and then came home, the streets not being at all muddy and not inconveniently wet, tho’ it would have been more agreeable if it had not rained.  We left the Palace Martyr (lent us by Rebecca) and two news papers.  When we came home Freeman told us Miss Wilson had not been gone ten minutes, having been here nearly all the time we were out, but could not stay any longer.

Tuesday, 29 October 1839

A dry day with very high north east wind and very cold.  We did not go out till half past five, when we went to dine with Mrs Pierrepont, only ourselves, and spent a chearful evening.  It was warmer when we came home at ten o’clock and rained in the course of the night.  I wrote to Dr Quarnier and Mrs Cole to go to Portsmouth in a Parcel Miss Wilson is going to send on Friday.

At dinner we had boil’d leg of pork, minced veal, turnips, potatoes and bread and butter pudding.

The man came to put up the oven and grate in the kitchen, which Mr Vezey has let us have, for which I am to pay for putting up at £1.10.0.

Wednesday, 30 October 1839

A dry day, but gloomy looking with cold high north east wind.  Very disagreeable to be out in.  Miss Workman call’d early and sat here an hour.  She was very well and chearful.  Miss Hill also call’d.  She has a bad cold and cough.  She staid some time and told us her old suitor, Mr Westwood is married!!!  She ask’d us to “tea” tomorrow.  Considering the distance to her lodgings, she might as well have ask’d us to dinner, for it is a very long way to walk to tea and back these cold evenings. We call’d at Mrs Kiplins, who was out, at Mrs Drummond’s, who received us very kindly.  She told us she had written to Dr Quarnier pressing as strongly as she could their coming to her as soon as Eliza is able to travel and that she would put up a bed in the back drawing room for her.  We went to enquire after Mrs Chamier, but had not time to go up stairs.  She is better.  We then call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  Mrs Shirley (Georgina writes him) is just in the same state as when she went to her.  From him we went to Moore’s to have my watch put to rights.  I bought a pr of purse sliders and tassells, for which I gave 2/-.

Miss Chaier sent home the News Papers I lent her.  The man finished putting up the oven and grate in the kitchen, but not till 11 o’clock at night.  He has done it very nicely.

Thursday, 31 October 1839

A dismal day, raining a nasty drizzling rain the whole day.  Mrs Drummond sent me her letter to Dr Quarnier to go with mine to Miss Wilson.  Ann took them to the College with a note from me to Miss Wilson, with a purse for Mrs Barnes from me and a worked kettle holder from Emma.  Miss Hill sent to know if she was to expect us to tea.  She must have been crazy to suppose we should walk to the bottom of Pulteney Street to drink tea in such weather.  “If we could not come, she hoped to see us tomorrow, as it made no difference to her.”  I sent word “If it did not rain we would go.”

Fashion plate for November 1839 from Godey's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for November 1839 from Godey’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday, 1 November 1839

A complete November day, incessant hard rain and so dark we could scarcely see, but by the windows.  Going to Miss Hill’s was of course quite out of the question.

The man came for his money for putting up the grate and oven.  I paid him £1.10.0.

Saturday, 2 November 1839

As bad a day as yesterday.  We could not get out, even to enquire after Mrs Chamier.  Miss Workman kindly sent us her Bath Paper.  Freeman brought us up some grapes and a large piece of nice bread cake that her sister Betsey had made for her boys.

Sunday, 3 November 1839

A very wet morning, but it held up at Church time and Emma went to St. John’s.  I read Prayers at home.  Emma went again at three o’clock and soon after she returned it began to rain again and continued the rest of the day and evening.  It pourd between 9 and 10.  Ann took the Bath Paper to Mrs Chamier in the afternoon and brought word back the “Mrs C was not so well today”.  We read the Prayers before we went to bed.

Monday, 4 November 1839

A beautiful sunshine morning.  We call’d at Admiral Shirley’s and found the house quite shut up, so concluded poor Mrs Shirley was dead, which James confirmed.  I ask’d if his master was to be seen.  He said he was not out of his room yet, but Mrs Davis came forward and begg’d we would come in, as the Admiral would be in the parlor in a few minutes and she knew he would be glad to see us.  He came in immediately and was very kind.  He said he was pretty well, except being very nervous.  Mrs Shirley died on Saturday.  On being ask’d if she wished to see her husband and brother, she replied “she did not want to see either of them.”  Her death will make a considerable difference in the Admiral’s income.

We call’d on Miss Workman, who we found looking very well and in good spirits, but beginning with her “I have got a cold and cough”, so she had not been out in one of the pleasantest mornings we have had for a very long time.  Miss Hill had been with her and had foolishly persuaded her she had better not go out.  From her we went to Mrs Pierrepont’s.  She was not at home.  I left the “Palace Martyr” for her to read.  At her door we encountered Miss Wilson and a lady with her.  Miss W said she meant to call on us, but not before three o’clock, so we went up to Mrs Chamier’s who, I was glad to find, was gone out in a Wheel Chair for the first time.  It look’d so black all round that we hurried home and I had only just knock’d at the door when it began to rain.  Had Mrs Chamier been at home we should have had a sad, wet walk home.  We had just taken off our bonnets when Mrs Pierrepont call’d and staid till the shower (which was a very heavy one) was over.  Soon after she went away Miss Wilson came and staid till her friend call’d for her in a Fly.  Miss Wilson had had a letter from her sister, who appeard to consider Dr Quarnier’s and Eliza’s coming to Bath as a settled thing.  While we were out, Miss Hill call’d to ask us to tea this evening and I had to send Ann in the rain with a note of excuse, to the bottom of Pulteney Street!

I received a little parcel from Kate Pyne with a note for her nephew (William’s son) who is at Grosvenor College and one for myself dated Kingsdon, October the 7th!!! enclosing £1.10.0 which I had paid for Juliana’s “Respirator”.  I sent the note for Robert to the Post Office immediately by Ann.

Tuesday, 5 November 1839

A fine day without rain!!! tho’ it threatened three or four times and was so dark at those times I could hardly see.  Emma took a note for me to Mr Wiltshire, who was not come into Bath, but was expected.  I did not go out all day, as I thought Mr Wiltshire might call, but he did not.

Osborne call’d to say her old mother was very poorly, but that she always says when she wants money.  I gave her two shillings of Mrs Earl’s money, of which I am sorry to say there is only 1/3d remaining.

Wednesday, 6 November 1839

A very dull looking day, but mild and only one very light shower of rain.  Miss Drewett call’d and was very chearful.  Soon after she went away, Miss Workman’s Mary came to say she was alarmed about her mistress, fearing she was going to have the jandice, her skin had become so yellow within a day or two and that it had very much increased this morning.  I advised her to go immediately to Mr Gore and tell him I was not able to go and see her, expecting Mr Wiltshire, who after all did not come, but Emma went.  She found her complaining a little, but not feeling sufficiently unwell to prevent her going to Mrs Evans’s this evening, so I hope it is nothing serious.  In her way home Emma call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, who was pretty well, but a good deal annoy’d at not hearing any thing from Georgina of how her mother had left her property.  It is inexcusable of Georgina not writing to her father, for she must be aware he would be anxious to know what was going on.

While Emma was out, Mrs Gore calld and sat some time.  I wrote to Kate Pyne to acknowledge the receipt of the £1.10.0 for Juliana’s Respirators and paid the postage of the letter.

I had a note from Georgina Chamier to ask us to spend the evening with her mother (who was not so well today) tomorrow, as she was going to Mrs Taylor’s in Marlborough Buildings.

Thursday, 7 November 1839

A wretchedly wet, dismal looking day.  To my surprise Mr Wiltshire came and kindly witnessd my Certificate, which  I sent to Peter Touray by this day’s Post.  I askd Mr Wiltshire to give me some good mould for my plants and with his usual kindness he said he would send me in a bushell on Saturday.  We spent the evening at Mrs Chamier’s, who was a little better, having been bled in the morning, which she though had been of service to her.  We met Miss Ash there, which I did not expect, so we did not send our caps.  I made the tea for Mrs Chamier and we had two pleasant Pools of Quadrille.  I won 1/6d, Mrs Chamier 4/6d, Emma lost 2/- and Miss Ask 4/-.  We staid till near twelve o’clock, but as Georgina did not come home and it did not rain, we thought we had better not stay till she did.  It was a particularly mild night and tho’ terribly muddy both in going and returning, we were fortunate not to have any hard rain.  As we went it was a thick mist, that obliged us to use our umbrellas the whole way home.  In coming home we did not put them up.  Mary brought us Miss Workman’s Bath paper,just as we were going to Mrs Chamier’s and we took it up with us.

Friday, 8 November 1839

A showery disagreeable day.  The streets did not begin to dry till between 4 and 5 o’clock, too late for us to go and enquire after Mrs Chamier, who dear Georgina sent word this morning, was very poorly and she certainly looks very ill.  Mrs Pierrepont came in to avoid a hard shower of rain.  She ask’d us to tea on Monday and said she would ask Mrs Drummond to meet us.  It did not rain late in the evening.

Saturday, 9 November 1839

A very fine morning.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s, found her very well.  From her we went to Admiral Shirley’s.  He was pretty well and expecting Georgina home tomorrow by the Mail.  When we went up to Mrs Chamier’s we found her in bed, but she would have us up and we sat some time with her.  I did not think it rained the whole day!  We call’d on Miss Hill, who was out and when we came home we found she had been here.  She call’d again in the afternoon to ask us to dine on Wednesday and sat an hour and a half.  Met Miss Hough, who walk’d with us to the bottom of Millsom Street.

Sunday, 10 November 1839

The rain pour’d in torrents the whole day, without any interruption.  We read both morning and evening Prayers at home, for it was impossible to go out.  I had a note from Miss Philpot to say she was going to Lyme on Tuesday, if I had any thing to send.

Monday, 11 November 1839

A very fine day.  We calld on Miss Shirley, who I did not think lookd well, but it might be her black dress.  We did not see the Admiral.  We then went to Miss Workman’s, who we found quite well and much pleased by an invitation she had just had from Miss Hill to meet us on Wednesday at dinner.  From her we went up to Mrs Chamier’s, where we found Miss Ellen Crawford.  Mrs Chamier had been out in a Wheel Chair and felt better for it.  We sat some time before Miss Crawford (who was very agreeable) went away, soon after which Dr Crawford made his appearance.  When we came away I exchanged a slight bow with the Dr in passing.  Mrs C begg’d us to come up tomorrow morning in a whisper, as we shook hands.  Georgina was not at home.  It was so pleasant that when we came home, Emma did not come in with me, but extended her walk.  Mr Evans call’d with a letter he had had from Mr Creetwell saying there had been another remittance from America to the amount of £198.1.10, which would make the sum we are to receive £205.17.1!!! and that Mr Lake said there would be still more, but they could not tell when it would arrive.

I wrote to Mrs Keen.  We dined at Mrs Pierrepont’s, only ourselves at dinner.  Miss Drummond came to tea, a chearful, pleasant day.  Fish (very good), roast chicken, egg sauce, potatoes, brocoli and preserved apples.  Cake, pears and apple.

Tuesday, 12 November 1839

A fine day.  We went up to Mrs Chamier’s, who was gone out in her Chair, but we sat a long time with Georgina.  When we were coming away, I said “Mrs Chamier askd me to come up this morning, do you know what she wanted?”  Georgina exclaimed “It was not this morning, but this evening she ask’d you to come.  I hope you are not engaged.”  It was very fortunate for us that we call’d as we did, for otherwise we should not have pass’d the evening pleasantly with them.  It was fine to come home, but we had not been in the house half an hour before it pour’d!  I had a most kind letter from dear Peter Touray enclosing my half year’s annuity £15.15.6 and I wrote to him to acknowledge the receipt of it.

Wednesday, 13 November 1839

A wet morning, but it held up (fortunately for us) about two o’clock and did not rain afterwards.  I wrote a very long letter to Henry and copied those from Mr Lake, relative to the remittance from America.  We went to Miss Hill’s at three o’clock and did not find it half so muddy as I expected.  There was only ourselves and Miss Workman at dinner, but Mr, Mrs and Miss de Visne, Mrs Polwhele and her niece and Miss Emma Wilson came in the evening and it passd chearfully.  Mr de Visne playing and singing as usual.  It was dry to come home, but a thick fog and we found the walk very long.

Soup, roasted chickens, part of a ham, pigeon pie, brocoli, potatoes and rice, plum pudding.  Apples, pears and biscuits. Plenty of hot cakes  etc at tea and sandwiches, cakes, wine and milk punch in the evening.

Thursday, 14 November 1839

A very wet day and so dark I could hardly see to write.  No one call’d and we could not get out.

Friday, 15 November 1839

A wet morning, but it cleard up for a short time and began to dry and we were in hopes it would be fine for us to walk to Mrs Hardcastle’s to dinner, but the rain came on again so violently it was impossible and we were obliged to go and come back in Wheel Chairs.  We met Miss Workman and Miss Renshaw at dinner and played Quadrille in the evening.  I won 6d,Miss Workman won 1/6d.  Miss Masters was very unwell and has been so for some time past and looks very ill.  We spent a chearful day.  Nothing can be more hospitable than Mrs Hardcastle.  She thinks you can never have enough of any thing.

Fried Soals, roasted fowls (immense ones and very good), part of a ham, potatoes, brocoli, mince pies and excellent baked custard pudding.  Appels, pears and cakes, delicious Port wine, sherry and Porter.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d to ask us to tea tomorrow.  They did not come in.  I heard from Mrs Scott a very bad account of dear Mr Scott!

Saturday, 16 November 1839

Tolerably fine with one or two slight showers.  We call’d on Miss Workman, found her quite well.  On our way we met Miss Shirley, who does not look well in her mourning.

Mr Evans call’d with the Papers from London for me to sign.  Mr East and Miss Shirley are to meet him here on Monday.  We went up to Mrs Chamier’s to tea, found her very languid and poorly.  She had seen Dr Parry by Dr Crawford’s desire, who says if what she is now taking does not prevent the return of the fever, she  must change the air, which Dr Crawford had before wished her to do, as he had tried all he could think of for her without effect.  She is very much fallen away and looks very ill.  We were fortunate in having it dry to come home.

Sunday, 17 November 1839

It was dry to go to St. John’s in the morning, but rained a little when we came out and encreased as we came home, but not enough to make us more than damp.  But we had not been many minutes in the house before it began to pour and continued the rest of the day and evening, without intermission.

St John's Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
St John’s Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Monday, 18 November 1839

Dry over head in the morning, but very wet streets.  Miss Shirley, Mr Evans and Mr East came at one o’clock, the latter to adminester another Affidavit and the former as a witness.  It began to rain about three o’clock and pourd till five.  I had a note from Georgina Chamier before breakfast to ask us to tea and, soon after one, from Miss Hough with an invitation to dinner, which was unlucky, as we were obliged to decline it.  We had moonlight without rain to go to Mrs Chamier’s, who we found very poorly, she having had a bad night.  She was very nervous after tea and we persuaded her to have some camphor julep, which was of service to her and she and I playd at Cribbage, which amused her and took off her attention from her self more than her work did.  We came home without rain, tho’ it had been very violent in the course of the evening, as the streets were very wet.  I heard from Mrs Keen with £1.5.0 to pay for her News Paper at xmas.

Tuesday, 19 November 1839

A fine morning.  We went before twelve o’clock to Miss Hill’s.  She was gone out.  We met Mrs Hadson in Pulteney Street who was hurrying home, thinking it was going to rain it lookd so black and heavy.  We calld on Miss Workman, but did not stay long.  It rained slightly when we came from her and continued some time, or we should have gone up to Mrs Chamier’s before we came in.  Georgina sent word in the morning that her mother was a little better, having had a good night.  The rain continued till 5 o’clock, after which it cleard off and was a fine moonlight night.

Wednesday, 20 November 1839

A beautiful sunshine day with a healthy cold, dry wind.  We went up to Mrs Chamier’s before one o’clock, thinking she would scarcely be out of her room but, to our surprise, she was gone out in a Wheel Chair.  Portberry said she was better and had gone out early, because Mrs Garrett was to take her out in the Carriage at two o’clock, “So she will have plenty of air today, Ma’am.”  We then call’d at Mrs Hardcastle’s.  She was not at home, but we sat some time with Miss Masters, who was very poorly.  From her we went to Miss Hough’s and sat a little time, then to Mrs Lowry’s, who was out, then again to Mrs Chamier’s, who was gone with Mrs Garrett and then to Mrs Earl’s, who was not at home.  In our way we met Mr Wiltshire, who said he was very well and look’d so.  We also met Mrs Evans.  Kissd hands to Mrs Turner in her Carriage as she pass’d and Emma saw Miss Hellican and Miss Hare.  We call’d at Mrs Wilson Brown’s door to enquire how she was.  The servant said better, but she had been very ill, confined to her bed for three weeks!!  Met poor! Mr Iveson, who enquired after my Aunt!!

Mrs Lawry calld here but we did not see her.  She left Mrs Jackson’s card.  I new potted some of my plants.

Thursday, 21 November 1839

Dry in the morning with a hard shower in the middle of the day and wet in the evening.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She had had a cold and had not been out for two or three days.  I potted some more of my plants with the mould Mr Wiltshire was so kind to send me.  We did not go out all day.  I netted all the evening.

Friday, 22 November 1839

Fine, bright sun till ten o’clock, when it clouded over and became so dark we could hardly see at breakfast.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s, found her very well, then went to Mrs Chamier’s, who was but very poorly.  Georgina wished to go to some shops, but did not like to go by herself, so Emma offered to go with her.  We came home and hurried over our dinner and then Emma went up again to Mrs Chamier’s and went shopping with Georgina.  Mrs Chamier ask’d us for tomorrow evening and said she would ask Miss Workman to meet us.  In our way home we met Mrs Nicholas, who was very friendly and press’d us to call  on her.  Emma did not come home till quite dusk.

Saturday, 23 November 1839

A beautiful day.  We walk’d over Bathwick Bridge to Hampton to call on the Miss Allens, who were come into Bath.  Old Thomas very kindly would have us go in to rest, and sent Mrs Gwin to us, who was very anxious, as was Thomas, to persuade us to have some luncheon, but we declined it.  In our way back we met John, who told us house was vacant and he should be very much obliged if we would speak to recommend it to any of our friends.  Soon after we met the Miss Allens and Miss Emma Green, who I have not seen for some years and who is so much altered I should not have known her.  She is grown quite the old woman and has nothing remaining of what she was, but her smile.  We had a beautiful walk and I enjoyed it very much and did not feel much tired.  The Allens have taken No 7 in the Square, for 6 months.  Before we came home we call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.   Miss Shirley was out and the Admiral was engaged with General Loveday.

The New Bridge at Bathwick, Bath, England. 1830 engraving by FP Hay, hand watercoloured on print
The New Bridge at Bathwick, Bath, England. 1830 engraving by FP Hay, hand watercoloured on print

We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, met Miss Workman, who was in very good spirits.  We play’d Quadrille.  I won 5/6d!!!  Emma lost 1/-, Rebecca 1/6d and Mrs Chamier 3/-.  It was dry to go and return.

Sunday, 24 November 1839

A very threatening, gloomy morning and very cold when we went to St. John’s, where the congregation was very thin, an unusual circumstance there.  Mr and Mrs Evans call’d.  The former had just received the receipt for me to sign to empower my brother Henry to receive the American money and was so anxious to have the business finished that he would not wait till tomorrow, so I put my signature and sent the letter enclosing the receipt to the Post by Ann.  As soon as the Evans’s were gone we hurried to Church and were just in time to sit down in the Pew before Mr de Visne came in.  There was a little mist falling when we came out of Church, which encreased to small rain as we went to Mrs Chamier’s, but we went on, fearing tomorrow might be wet and prevent our seeing her.  She was a little better.  We would not sit down, as we were very damp and it appeared as if the rain was encreasing, which it did, and the wind was so violent we could not put up our umbrellas.  When Ann opened the door we were shockd to hear that Mary had sent to beg we would go to Miss Workman’s directly, as she thought “she was seized for death”!  We hurried there as fast as possible and met Mr Gore coming out.  He said she had had a fit and had been insensible for some time, but was now better and knew him.  He was going to send some leeches to be applied to her head and a draught and when that opperated he thought she would be relieved.  I askd if he thought it would be advisable to write to Captain Broughton.  He said he thought it was a pity to alarm the family unnecessarily.  He should see her again by and bye and expected to find her better.  We found poor Mary greatly distress’d and Mrs Hyde and Mrs Tod with poor dear Rebecca, who did not take any notice or appear to know anyone was near her when I spoke to her, she just unclosed her eyes, but shut them again immediately and became apparently insensible.  As we could be of no use, only filling up the room, we came away, Mrs Hyde kindly promising to send us word how she was after Mr Gore had seen her the second time.

About 9 o’clock Mr Hyde came to say that they had had great difficulty to get  the draught down and could only do it by a tea spoonful at a time, that she was quite insensible while the leeches were putting on and had remained so ever since; and that Mr Gore was astonished to find her in that state and said that all had been done that could and he feard she would not survive the night, that Mrs Todd was gone home under the impression she was then in a dying state.  This account was so distressing I determined to go and sit up with Mary, so at ten o’clock Freeman walk’d down with us, when to our great delight, we found she was beginning to recover her recollection.  The medicine had had a very powerful effect, which with the loss of blood from the leeches, had taken off the stupor and by the time we had been there half an hour, she was quite herself, but was not at all aware that she had had the leeches or the medicine!!  As she was so much better, we sent Freeman home and desired her to fetch us at 11 o’clock, which she did and we left dear Rebecca saying “She felt very comfortable”.  It blew most violently and we waded through a sea of mud, both in going and returning.

Monday, 25 November 1839

Quite a November day, dark and dismal.  Mary sent word that Miss Workman had had a very good night and was still better, to the astonishment of Mr Gore. Poor Emma was very unwell all day.  I think she caught cold yesterday, for we got very wet.  She lay on the sopha all day and could not do anything to amuse herself.  I wrote most part of the morning.  To our great surprise Miss Randle call’d.  I was very glad to see her.  She sat here a long time, talking over Lambridge happy days!  She is looking very well and is living at present at Clifton, where she means to stay till May.  I did not go out all day, but sent Freeman in the evening to see how Miss Workman was going on.  She brought a favourable report and said Miss Workman was very much pleased to see her, shook hands with her and said “She thought she should not see us today, as it rained.”  When we went to bed the rain was pouring in torrents!

Tuesday, 26 November 1839

A beautiful, bright morning.  We went out directly after breakfast, took the bottle to Stacey’s to be filld with Magnesia and salts.  Went over Coe’s house, which is to be let, then went to Miss Workman, who we found wonderfully better and quite collected.  Call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, who was quite well, but Mrs Davis is laid up with the gout!  Sat some time with him and then went up stairs to Georgina.  After sitting with her a short time, we call’d at Mrs Wilson Brown’s door.  She was better.  Went to Mrs Pierrepont’s.  She was out.  In our way to Mrs Chamier’s, we met Miss Hill and Miss Polwhele in the Circus.  They had been to call on us, found Mrs Chamier poorly, but she was going out in a Wheel Chair and dear Georgina was all bustle to get her luncheon to go with her mother, so I cut her some cold roast to eat with her bread and butter.  Both she and Mrs Chamier askd us to go up in the evening, as she was going to Thalberg’s Concert.  From there we call’d at Dr Davis’s’.  They were not at home, then at Mrs Nicholas’s, where we spent a pleasant half hour.  She was very much affected at hearing of poor Rebecca’s serious attack.  Met Mr Kitson, who gave us a friendly shake of the hand.  On coming home we found that Dr and Mrs Davis and Mrs Turner had call’d in our absence, as well as Miss Hill and Miss Polwhele.  I regretted very much not seeing Mrs Turner, as it is the first time she has call’d.  We had only been in the house a few minutes when it began to rain and continued half an hour, very fast, and we were afraid we should have had a very muddy, uncomfortable walk to Mrs Chamier’s and back, but it dried up and the pavement was quite clean, both going and coming back, when the moon and the stars shone beautifully bright and it was a sharp, white frost.  Georgina came home before we left Mrs Chamier and was delighted with the concert.  Georgina wrote to Captain Broughton to say how ill Miss Workman had been.  The Eyres let their lodgings this afternoon.

Wednesday, 27 November 1839

A sharp, white frost with a heavy snowy looking sky.  We went (much against my inclination, for it was very cold) soon after breakfast to Miss Workman’s, who is going on very well, being still better than yesterday.  Mr Gore told her she might get up if she wished, but I persuaded her , as it was so cold, to remain in bed till tomorrow.  After sitting some time with her, Emma said “I told you it would snow, it is beginning now”, so we hurried home as fast as we could, snowing all the way, but luckily not very fast till after we got in, when it came on very thick and lasted between two and three hours.  It did not lay on the street, but the tops of the Carriages and houses were quite white.  Miss Chamier sent word that her mother was not so well today, having had a bad night.  I wrote a note of thanks to Mrs Evans for Mr Evans’s kindness in transacting our business, which has given him a great deal of trouble and for which he would take no renumeration, enclosed two Sovereigns to pay for stamps and postage.

Thursday, 28 November 1839

Dry in the morning, but it did not last.  Miss Hill call’d before the rain began and sat some time.  Soon after she was gone, Mrs Evans and her pretty dog came.  She brought one of the Sovereigns back that I sent to Mr Evans yesterday, with a very kind message from him to beg we would always employ him whenever he could be of any service to us and saying that one Sovereign amply covered all the expenses he had been at for stamps and postage.  It turned out very wet in the afternoon and we did not go out at all the whole day.  I was engaged all the morning unpacking and packing again linen trunks to find a quilt for Freeman’s bed.

Friday, 29 November 1839

It did no rain in the morning, but it began soon after breakfast and prevented our going to Miss Workman, who sent us the Bath Paper and begg’d we would not come out on purpose to see her, as she felt very comfortable and she was afraid we might catch cold, the weather was so bad.  To our surprise Mrs Chamier paid us a visit.  She very kindly came to tell us that Georgina had heard from Captain Broughton who said, as Miss Workman was so much better, he should not come till he heard again from her.  Mrs Chamier was looking a little better.  I heard from dear Henry saying he had received £178.9.6 of the £205.17.1, the rest £27.7.7. being expended in Law Charges which with £3 here makes the expenses £30.77!!!

Saturday, 30 November 1839

A fine sunshine morning.  As soon as we had breakfasted we went to the grocer’s to order 2 doz mould candles etc and then to Miss Workman’s.  We found her in bed, by Mr Gore’s desires, as she had taken the medicine, but wonderfully well.  She was up nearly the whole of yesterday and did not feel fatigued or uncomfortable.  After sitting more than an hour with her we went to Mrs Chamier’s, found her and dear Georgina at their luncheon, waiting for Mrs Cameron’s open Carriage, which she had kindly lent to to Mrs Chamier to take her on an airing.  I thought it was very cold, too much so for Mrs Chamier to go out in an open Carriage, but she did not think so and she had been out in a Wheel Chair. As soon as the Carriage arrived we came away and returned home.  After we had dined, Miss Wilson call’d and sat more than an hour.  She had a glass of wine and some bread and butter.  She has been very unwell, poor soul! since we saw her with her painful and destructive spasms, but it is for the present better.  We call’d at Mr Evans’s to shew him my brother’s letter, but they were not at home.  I left a card for Mrs Evans.

We had one shower in going to Miss Workman’s, pretty hard, but it did not last long.  It was dry afterwards till about six o’clock, after which it rained fast.

The wind was very high last night and the rain pourd in such torrents that it was more like pouring water out of pails than rain!!

Saw Admiral Shirley at his own door getting into his Chair.  He was comfortably well, but poor Mrs Davis is in her bed with the gout!!! and Miss Shirley has a bad cold.

Fashion Plate for December 1839 from World of Fashion. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for December 1839 from World of Fashion.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Sunday, 1 December 1839

A sunshine morning, but it rained while we were at breakfast.  It held up, however, for us to go to St. John’s, but we had scarsely got there before it pourd.  It was fine again when we came out of Church and continued so the rest of the day.  We went to St. John’s again in the afternoon, but did not go any where else, it was so uncomfortably muddy and wet.  I sent to enquire after Miss Workman, Miss Shirley and Mrs Chamier, all better, the latter out in her chair.  It was very cold all day.

Monday, 2 December 1839

A very gloomy day, but dry and very cold.  I did not go out.  Emma went to Miss Workman’s and Miss Shirley’s.  Rebecca was not down stairs, but only prevented by want of inclination, and the coldness of the day.  Miss Shirley was better.  I wrote to Lady Cooper in the evening to go by tomorrow’s Post.

Tuesday, 3 December 1839

A very dark gloomy morning and very cold, looking very much like snow.  Mrs Coates from Clifton and Miss Hill (with whom she is staying) call’d.  We went to Miss Workman’s, who was pretty well.  Met Mrs Chamier there, who is much better.  I heard from Maria Jones to enquire after Miss Workman.

Wednesday, 4 December 1839

A very beautiful day.   I did not go out, as I was busy writing, but Emma went to see old Mrs Pattern and took her some tea and sugar.  She afterwards went to Miss Workman’s.  Miss Shirley, Mrs Slade and Miss Fanny Hellican call’d.  Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey drank tea here.  We play’d two Rubbers of Cassino and they were very chearful and appeard very comfortable.  I had a note from dear Georgina Chamier to ask us to go there this evening, but we could not on account of Miss Wilson coming here.  Mrs Chamier and she calld to ask us for tomorrow.  Only Georgina came up.  I wrote to Mr Evans (and sent him Henry’s letter) and to Maria Jones.

Thursday, 5 December 1839

A fine morning.  We went soon after breakfast to call on Miss Hill and Mrs Coates.  They were going out, so we did not stay long.  Jane askd us to tea! either this evening or tomorrow. As we were engaged to Mrs Chamier this evening, we said we would go tomorrow. We call’d on Mrs Partis, who received us very kindly, but I think something had occur’d to disturb her, for she was very much excited.  A friend was sitting with her, who tried to soothe and calm her.  We had been there but a short time when the servant said a lady was in the drawing room who wished to speak to her, so we took our leave.  The old lady hope’d she should see us again soon and that we would come and drink tea with her.  We call’d on Miss Workman.  While with her it began to rain, but fortunately was slight, till after we got home, when it encreased and lasted some time, very hard.  It held up for us to go to Mrs Chamier’s, who is much better, only ourselves.  We work’d and play’d Cribbage and had no rain to come home, tho’ it must have rained very hard in the course of the evening, as the streets were very wet.  The frost was so severe last night that they were carrying the ice about in carts to the pastry cooks.  It was near an inch thick.  Mr Evans call’d while we were out.

Friday, 6 December 1839

A very cold, dull looking day.  We did not go out till the evening, when we went to Miss Hill’s to tea and a horrid, disagreeable walk we had.  The mud was so slippery, we had great difficulty in walking and it was so “bitter” cold my hands were quite painful.  There was only ourselves and Mrs Coates.  We play’d Quadrille, which I did not know Jane knew any thing about, but Mrs Coates said she was in the habit of playing when she was a girl.  It was so very cold while we were at cards, that Jane proposed our having some hot Elder wine to warm us, to which we all readily agreed and it had in some measure the desired effect.  When they brought up the sandwhiches they were accompanied by some more Elder wine, as hot as we could drink it, which warm’d me comfortably.  We spent a chearful, pleasant evening, but the distance to walk there and back in such mud and cold was a great drawback.

Saturday,  7 December 1839

A very, cold, heavy, dark day, looking as it it would snow any minute.  Mr Evans call’d to return Henry’s letter which I had sent him and to say he approved of my writing to Mr Stewardson in Philadelphia, instead of Mr Pigou.  He was so kind to say he would “word” a letter to him for me to copy.  As soon as he left us we took the Bath Paper to Mrs Chamier.  She was out in her Chair, but we saw dear Georgina and after sitting with her a short time, we went to Miss Workman’s.  We found her sitting in her bed room, Mr Gore not thinking her head so well, as it should be, had desired her to take some medicine and remain upstairs.  We did not stay long, fearing the snow would come, but it did not.

Sunday, 8 December 1839

Still looking like snow and very cold.  We went to St. John’s, both morning and afternoon.  Mr de Visne was unwell and a stranger read the Prayers (not well) and Mr Audrey preached, most horridly.  In our way home we call’d on Miss Workman, the weather looking as if we should be prevented doing so in the afternoon.  We found her much better than yesterday and down in the drawing room.  After staying a short time with her we came home to dinner and then went to Church again.  When we got there the door was not open and we went round to the other door, which also was locked.  As it was near 3 o’clock, we concluded that as Mr de Visne could not attend, there would be no service.  We went to the Clerk’s Room, that was lock’d, then to Mann’s “ditto repeated” and at last knocked at a door on the female side, when two very civil old women came out, who told us there would be Prayers, that the Clerk was gone out to spend the day, but where “Mr” Mann was, they could not tell, except in the Vestry and one of them very obligingly went and found him there.  While we were waiting, another lady and Mr Orchard came, the latter “so polite all the while” would insist on our going into the Vestry, till they found the keys, which were not forthcoming, as he was sure we should catch cold standing in the open air.  After a short delay we were let in, Mr Orchard remarking that the “Air of the Chapel felt quite genial, after standing in the cold.”  Mr Audrey read the Prayers worse than he preach’d in the morning, if that was possible and old Mann acted as Clerk.  It is really very improper in Mr de Visne to employ Mr Audrey to do the Duty, when he is unwell and if he continues to do so Mr Audrey will very soon have the Chapel to himself.  There were not more than eighteen or twenty people there this afternoon!

Monday, 9 December 1839

A very cold, bleak day, the ice carrying about in quantities.  We went to look at Mrs Pond’s house in Camden Place which, in consequence of her death, is to be sold.  It is a very large, comfortable and most convenient house, but wanting a great deal done to it.  From there we went to Mrs Chamier’s.  She is better and dear Georgina quite well.  Mrs Chamier ask’d us to go there tomorrow evening.  We afterwards call’d on Miss Workman and found her much better for her medicine of yesterday.  While we were at dinner Miss Wilson’s little maid came with a note from Miss Wilson and 5/- which she had kindly procured from Mr Pinder for old Mrs Pattern.  Freeman gave little Ann some of our hashed mutton and she had a glass of Ginger wine, which she was highly pleased.  Mr Evans was so kind to leave the letter for me to copy to Mr Stewartson, at the door.

Camden Place, Bath 1829 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Camden Place, Bath 1829 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Tuesday, 10 December 1839

A cold, very dark, disagreeable day.  Emma went to see Miss Workman, who was much better.  I did not go out at all, as I was busy writing to Henry and Mr Stewartson.  The letter to the latter I enclosed to the former and begg’d of him to direct and forward it.  Mrs Drummond call’d to say she was going to town unexpectedly for a month.  She was agreeable, as usual.  Mrs Evans call’d at the door with Henry’s letter, which I had written a note to Mr Evans to request to have, but he was out and as soon as he returned he sent it by her, but she did not come up.  It began to rain between 5 and 6 o’clock and continued very hard all the evening, which prevented our going to Mrs Chamier’s.  Tonight is the Ball for the Victoria Park and it is unfortunate that it should have turned out so wet, as it may prevent many people going.  I wrote to dear Henry and enclosed a letter to Mr Stewartson in America and begg’d him to forward it by the first conveyance he heard of.

Wednesday, 11 December 1839

A very disagreeable morning.  Emma went to the Town Hall to see the vegetables raised by labourers and others on the “Alotment System” and to hear the speeches and see the prizes distributed.  She met Miss Hill, Miss Hare and the Hellicans there.  After she returnd Mrs Pierrepont call’d and sat some time.  She had her great party last night.  It began to rain just as she went away and continued the rest of the day and evening and, I believe, all night.

I heard from Miss Wood, who said she was impatient to send me a “four penny”! letter, instead of a 16 penny one, which hers from Ireland have hitherto been.  The family went from Eyres, after staying only a fortnight.

Thursday, 12 December 1839

A more chearful looking morning than we have had for some time, with bright sunshine, tho’ raining at the same time.  The sun, however, soon disappeared, but the rain continued the whole day and it was sometimes so dark I could scarcely see to work.  I had a note from Mrs Drewett to ask us for tomorrow evening, but I said we were engaged, for the weather is too bad to go any where but to intimate friends, where I am sure it will be agreeable.

The family at Harrison left this morning, having been there two months.

Friday, 14 December 1839

A fine day with some sunshine, but sadly muddy.  Emma went to see Miss Workman, who was pretty well.  While she was gone I had a note from dear Georgina Chamier to ask us to dine on Christmas Day and to go there to tea this evening.  It is very kind of Mrs Chamier and her.  Miss Shirley call’d.  She confirmed what I had before heard, that her mother did not mention her’s or Mrs Hale’s name in her Will!!!,  a cruel act on the part of Mrs Shirley, as they were equally her children, with Mrs Comyn and Mrs Hayter, tho’ not the same father and if the two latter had any generosity or feeling they would divide the property with their sisters.  It was a fine evening for us to go to Mrs Chamier’s, tho’ very muddy.  It rained very hard while we were there, but fortunately was fine again for us to come home.  Only ourselves there and Mrs Chamier much better.

Saturday, 14 December 1839

A fine day with some sunshine, but more clouds.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d.  They have taken Mr Kitson’s house in Queen Square for six months and are go into it.  Miss Allen has a bad cold and could not come out.  I wish they had continued in Nelson Street.  We calld on Mrs Dorset Fellows, having heard she had had a fall.  The servant said she was a good deal hurt, particularly her nose, having fallen on her face, but she was a great deal better and was gone out.  We sat some time with Miss Workman, who was in very good spirits, but was sitting in her room, for why I do not know.  From her, we went to the grocer’s and got some cheese and the currants and raisins for the Christmas pudding.  Met Mrs Western in Queen Square and had a little chat with her.  She complained, as well she might, of the terrible mud in the streets, which made it anything but pleasant walking.  I got 3 skeins of pink and 3 skeins of blue netting silk at Miss Germain’s for which I gave 2/6d.

Queen's Square, Bath c.1869 Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Queen’s Square, Bath c.1869
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Sunday, 15 December 1839

A tolerably fine morning.  We went to St. John’s.  A stranger did the Duty, a very old gentleman who would have read very well, but for the loss of his teeth.  He gave us a most beautiful sermon.  It began to rain slightly as we came home, which prevented our going to Miss Workman’s and it was fortunate we did not, as it encreased and continued the rest of the day, so as to prevent our going to Church the second time and we read Prayers at home.

Monday, 16 December 1839

A fine day with some sunshine.  Emma went to Miss Workman’s, found Mrs and Miss Chamier and Miss Crawford there.  Rebecca was pretty well.  Just as we sat down to dinner, Miss Barry call’d.  It was very unlucky, as we could not see her.  I did not go out all day and busy part of it, looking for something to make me a bonnet.

Mrs Harrison let her lodgings again today!  to an elderly gentleman and a lady and a maid servant.  They came in a Fly.

Tuesday, 17 December 1839

A dark, disagreeable day with slight rain about 12 o’clock, but it did not last.  Miss Shirley call’d.  She shew’d us some very nice things that were her mother’s, particularly one set with very large pearls, which is very handsome, a very good pearl hoop, a torque ditto and amethist ditto and one , if real diamonds,  a very beautiful one, also a pearl locket and a handsome bracelet of Ally’s hair.  She told us what we were very mucyh distress’d to hear.  The death of poor Mr Charles Penruddocke! who died last Sunday morning of inflammation of the lungs, after only two or three days illness!  Poor Mrs Charles is left with seven children and very near her confinement again.  How much she is to be pitied, poor soul!

We call’d at Mrs Chamier’s.  She was out, but we sat some time with dear Georgina and then went to Miss Workman’s, where we did not stay long, as it was late.  She was pretty well.  We met Mr Wilson (Dr Davis’s nephew) coming out of her house as we went in and shook hands with him.  It was very cold and the wind rather high.  Mrs Harrison’s lodgers, who came yesterday, went away this morning!!!

Wednesday, 18 December 1839

A dry morning and the streets quite clean and dry.  Emma went to Miss Bodes for some German wool, pinks, greens, blues, buffs and lilacs and from there to the butcher’s to pay for the leg of mutton 4/2d.  It began to rain soon after she came home, about 12 o’clock and continued the rest of the day, evening and night.

Miss Chamier call’d in a Chair to ask us to go to them this evening, which we promised to do, provided the rain ceased, instead of which it rather encreased and it was impossible to go.  The Kind Miss Allens sent us a nice piece of London cod, enough for our dinner, today and tomorrow.  I wrote to Mrs Scott.

Thursday, 19 December 1839

A thorough wet day, slight rain in the morning, but very heavy in the evening.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d, but did not stay long.  Mr Wiltshire also call’d, but would not sit down, because he came in the Carriage and did not like to keep the horses and coachman in the wet.  He very kindly came to give us tickets for the concert on Christmas Eve.  I heard from dear Henry with a Bank Post Bill for £58.9.6.  I wrote him to acknowledge the receipt of the money.

Friday, 20 December 1839

A beautiful sunny morning with dry streets, but there was a hard shower soon after breakfast!  As soon as we had dined, we went out,  met Mrs Chamier in her Chair, turning into George Street, Miss Crawford and Georgina with her.  She lookd very ill and languid, but ask’d us to go there there this evening, as the sun was then shining very bright.  At the other end of George Street we met Mrs Evans, with whom we had a very long chat.  While we were talking to her, Mrs Nicholas came up in her Wheel Chair and call’d Stop, Stop, to the man.  She said she was going to us and was quite ashamed of not having call’d before.  While we were all standing together, Miss Lucretia Otley came up.  She shook hands and ask’d and answered a few questions.  After we separated we went to the Miss Allens in Queen Square, found only Miss Janetta at home.  She had a bad cold, but was as chearful as usual and laughd at being so surrounded by medical men.  Their house is very comfortable and they like it very much.  It rained very hard while we were there, but had ceased before we came away.  We went to Moore’s for some purse tassalls and sliders and to have my watch set.  I bought two pair of tassalls and sliders, for which I gave 4/-.  It rained slightly when we came out of the shop, but by the time we reached Union Passage it poured and we were glad (tho’ we had umbrellas) to take shelter in the corridor till it was over.  When we got home without any more wet, it held up both to go and return from Mrs Chamier’s, where we passd a chearful evening, tho’ Mrs Chamier was very languid, but she was not out of spirits and dearest Georgina as gay as a lark and look’d very pretty.  I took Mrs Chamier a card purse I had netted for her, with which both she and Georgina were much pleased and she very kindly gave me a very pretty blue “comforter” that she had knitted for me.

Saturday, 21 December 1839

A very lovely looking morning, with bright sun.  Emma went to Miss Workman’s, who she found pretty well.  While she was gone Colonel Cockran’s eldest son came with the tickets for the concert on Xmas Eve from Mr Wiltshire.  He is the image of his sister, but very shy and awkward in his manner.  He staid till after Emma came home.  She went to Market before breakfast and got a nice piece of pork.  It began to rain between one and two o’clock and continued very hard the rest of the day.  Mr Butcher brought me change for the Note Henry sent me from London, £50 in quite new notes of Tugwell’s Bank, 8 Sovereigns in gold and 9/6 in silver.  He was so tipsy that he was talkative and facetious, which I never knew him before, for he is generally very taciturn.

I had a most kind letter from Mrs Scott in answer to mine, written at the express desire of dear Mr Scott by return of the Post.  She says he is just the same as when she wrote last, nor is there any chance of amendment till the Spring. Should it please God, he lives till then!

The Eyres let their lodgings this evening.  A man servant came with the luggage from their York House, but the family did not go in till after dark, so I do not know whether there are gentlemen or only ladies.  I hope only the latter.

Sunday, 22 December 1839

Fine for us to go to St. John’s, tho very muddy.  We had that horrid Mr Audley to read the Prayers and Mr de Visne, who appeard very languid and look’d ill, preached a Sermons for the benefit of the Hospital.  There was a thin congregation.  When we came out, we found it pouring with rain.  Luckily there were plenty of Wheel Chairs and we got two, or we must have been wet through, tho’ we had our umbrellas.  The rain continued the rest of the day and prevented our going to Church in the afternoon, so we read Prayers at home.

Monday, 23 December 1839

A beautiful morning, with bright sun and dry streets!!!  but it began to rain about 11 o’clock and continued the rest of the day, so pelting as to wash the streets quite clean.  Miss Workman sent us a bit of Stilton cheese by Mary, who said her mistress did not feel very well today, but she thought it was owing to the closeness and warmth of the weather, for it was more like May than December.  I sent the News Papers to Mrs Chamier.  Ann brought word back that Mrs Chamier felt very weak and languid, owing to the incessant rain and warmth of the weather.

Sunday, 24 December 1839

A dry morning!!  Mr Wiltshire kindly sent us a book of the songs for the concert in the evening,  We went to order some mince pies for tomorrow and to the grocers.  Call’d at Mrs Chamier’s, saw only dear Georgina, went from there to Admiral Shirley’s.  He was out, but we sat some time with Miss Shirley and then went to Miss Workman’s, where we met Mrs Evans, who was exceedingly friendly and pleasant, as she always is.  I persuaded Rebecca to accept her invitation to dine tomorrow, instead of going to Mrs Chamier’s and told her we would make her excuses to Mrs Chamier, who I really thought was not well enough to encounter all three of us, which she did and we went up to Mrs Chamier’s to tell her.  She was at the door, just getting into her Chair and very poorly.  She was delighted at the arrangement, not but she would have been happy to have Miss Workman there, but she is now so weak and languid she is not equal to the exertion of talking loud enough to make her hear.  Miss Hill and Mrs Hudson calll’d.  Jane ask’d us to dine on Thursday.  She had had a quarter of house lamb sent her and wished us to partake of it.

We went with Mr Wiltshire’s tickets to the concert, part of The Messiah and part of The Creation and were delighted.  Old Braham sang beautifully and tho’ his voice may not be so clear as when he was young, he has lost none of his energy and exquisite expression.  He sang a great deal, join’d in the choruses, which were beautifully performed.  The singers, in addition to Braham, were Miss Woodyatt, Miss Hobbs, Mr B Taylor, Mr Comer (not good) and a Mr Lawler, decidedly bad.  The room was crowded in every part and opressively hot, but as we went early enought to get seats in the front row, we were not incommoded either by crowd or heat, got out (tho’ we staid till the last) without inconvenience and luckily got Chairs, tho’ they were scarse.  Miss Burmester came twice and had a little chat and I saw Miss Shute as I was coming out.

The notorious Chartist leader Roberts and his bride sat next to us the whole evening and he had the audacity to sit down during the Hallilujah Chorus.

William Prowting Roberts by Unknown artist, stipple engraving, 1843 or after (National Portrait Gallery).
William Prowting Roberts by unknown artist, stipple engraving, 1843 or after (National Portrait Gallery).

It began to rain about 3 o’clock and continued very hard the rest of the day and evening.  We shook hands with Admiral Shirley in his Wheel Chair in Milsom Street.  Dear Henry sent us 2 barrels of oysters, one for Mr Evans, which I sent to them, accompanied by a very large and fine looking cod, which I bought of Cole for 12/-.

Wednesday, 25 December 1839, Christmas Day

A very fine day throughout.  We went to St. John’s twice.  Mr Marshall read Prayers and gave us a most beautiful Sermon.  Mr de Visne assisted at the Sacrament, but look’d very ill.  We went to Miss Workman’s in our way home and sat with her till it was nearly time to go to Church again.  We dined with Mrs Chamier, only ourselves.  She was very languid and look’d wretchedly. I sent Mrs Chamier 3 dozen of Henry’s oysters and a dozen and a half to Miss Workman.  We playd at Cassino and she appeared better before we came away.  At dinner we had carrot soup, roasted turkey, a ham, plumb pudding and mince pies and jelly.  Grapes, bananas, French plums and biscuits.  I askd Lady Cooper’s old coachman and old Hawkins to dine with Freeman.  They had a beautifully fine piece of roast beef, a delicious plum pudding, much better than Mrs Chamier’s, and a mince pye each and strong beer.  Miss Harvey sent to enquire after us.  I gave her a little mince pye and sent one by her to Miss Wilson’s maid.

Thursday, 26 December 1839

A very wet day, but fortunately it rain’d so slightly when we walkd to Miss Hill’s to dinner that we did not get wet, and the streets, tho’ very wet were, from the violence of the rain, washd clean.  There was only ourselves and Mrs Polwhele, who was very agreeable.  We play’d at Quadrille in the evening.  I lost 0/6d.  It was fair to come home, but it appear’d to me that the street was endless.  At dinner we had excellent stewd eels, boild leg of house lamb and the loin fried, spinach, potatoes, mince pies (not baked enough) and a very nice bread pudding, oranges, pears, delicious figs and biscuits.  Spent a pleasant, chearful day.  Met Miss Wilson’s maid coming to us to say Miss Wilson (was) going to send a Parcel to Portsmouth and would enclose a letter to Mrs Quarnier, if I wished to write.  Jane gave Emma 5/- for Mrs Pattern.

Friday, 27 December 1839

A dry day.  We went up to Mrs Chamier’s, saw only Georgina.  Mrs Chamier a little better, but not down stairs and we could not wait, as we wanted to enquire about the lodgings on the North Parade for Miss Pyne.  When we got to Mrs Hibbert’s we found she had heard from Miss Chambers twice lately and  they had fixd to come the second week in January, but she said if I was going to write, she would be obliged to me to say it would be a very great accomodation to her if Miss Pyne could make it convenient to come the latter end of the first week, instead of the second.  We call’d on the Miss Hellicans, found them all at home, but Miss Martha and all as kind as usual, Mrs Jane looking delightfully well, Miss Hare hard at work on a beautiful square for her carpet.  There was the old gentleman sitting with them, who we used to see every Sunday at St. John’s, but who has not been there for many months past and who, I think, is now blind, as a female attendant was with him.  We had only just time to have a few of dear Henry’s oysters, which are delicious and change our dress before we went to Miss Workman’s to dinner.   Found her very comfortable and in good spirits.  Only ourselves.  We had for dinner roasted turkey, sent her from London by Captain Broughton, a chine from Mrs Jones Graeme, mince pies and Stilton cheese from Mrs Bilke, oranges and biscuits.

North Parade, Bath, 1804. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
North Parade, Bath, 1804. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

It was dry when we came home at ten o’clock, but began to rain soon after.

Mr Wiltshire call’d, unfortunately a few minutes after we went to Miss Workman’s.

Saturday, 28 December 1839

A fine day with white frost.  Emma walk’d up to Mrs Turner’s and staid till near 4 o’clock.  I wrote to Mrs Quarnier and a note to Miss Wilson.  Mrs Nicholas call’d and sat some time.  She was extremely agreeable.  She was going to Miss Workman’s to ask her to dine on New Year’s Day and ask’d us to meet her in the “evening”.  It would have been more agreeable if she had said “at dinner” and could have made no difference to her, for the dinner for four would equally have done for six.  Miss Shirley call’d and sat till it was so dusk we were obliged to have candles to dine.  I daresay she thought we had had our dinner at our usual time.  I wrote to Miss Chambers in the evening.  Mrs Turner was so kind to send me a slice of bride cake by Emma.

Sunday, 29 December 1839

A beautiful day, bright sun and hard frost.  We went to St. John’s twice, had Mr Marshall in the morning and one of his beautiful Sermons and that terrible Mr Audney in the afternoon.  We call’d on Miss Workman, who was pretty well.  From her we went to Mrs Chamier’s, who we found at luncheon, on apple tart, and much better. She was going out in her Chair.  We did not stay long, for fear of being too late for Church.  It continued fine the whole day!! and did not thaw in the shade.  Ann took my letter to Mrs Quarnier and note to Miss Wilson to the College before Church time.

Monday, 30 December 1839

Hard frost in the morning, but it soon began to thaw, tho’ there was no sun, but it was very pleasant out.  I went directly after breakfast (Emma having a cold in her head, did not go with me) to Dill’s to enquire about some hams to pickle.  He thought he should have some would suit on Friday. In coming back I met Mrs Pierrepont at the bottom of Milsom Street, who returned with me as far as Orchard’s to look at a beautiful “pic nic” carpet that was displayd in his window and had been sent there to be joined.  It was so beautiful I persuaded Emma to go with me to look at it.  While we were admiring it, Miss Hare came by with two young ladies, her nieces, and they came in.  As soon as they were gone, Miss Hughes of Pulteney Street seeing us, also came in to ask how we were.  It was so pleasant out Emma said she would go and see old Mrs Pattern and I went up to Mrs Chamier’s.  She was better, but not down stairs, so I only saw dear Georgina.  I begg’d she and her mother would go to look at the carpet at Orchard’s.  From her I went to Miss Workman, who was in very good spirits and appear’d very well, but very angry with Mrs Nicholas for not asking us to dinner, instead of tea.  I sat some time with her and in my way home met Major Thornton in George Street and a lady with him.  He said they intended to call soon, but had been very busy ever since they came home.  Emma found old Mrs Pattern up and sitting by the fire and much better than when she saw her last.  In her way home she call’d on Mrs Fry and found her at home.  We were surprised at near 4 o’clock by a visit from Mrs Kipling, who was very good humourd and friendly and said she was quite well.  She did not stay long, as she ought not have been out so late, but she was determined to call today.  She said Mrs Carpenter gave a very bad account of Lady Cooper, who she thought was “going fast”.  This does not agree with Captain Broughton’s report to Miss Workman, so I hope Mrs Carpenter’s fears have magnified the danger.  Freeman spent the afternoon and evening with her friends at Lark Hall.

It rained a little in the evening.

The Miss Hellicans call’d before we began our breakfast.  Luckily they were in a hurry and could not come up, but came most kindly to ask us to meet Miss Workman at dinner on Friday next.

Tuesday, 31 December 1839

A bright looking day, but the frost quite gone.  Emma’s cold so indifferent she could not go out, nor did I, as the streets continued wet the whole day and look’d any thing but inviting.  Mr Wiltshire call’d and paid us a long and pleasant visit.  He was looking very well and in good spirits.  He told us Loder’s Subscription Concert last night was so badly attended (only 2 hundred tickets paid for) that it would be impossible for him to continue them, if he was not better supported.  Mr Wiltshire said the music last night was beautifully performed.

Freeman went to her Chapel to end the old year and begin the new one in Prayer.  She came home about half past twelve.

 

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

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