1840 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1840 from Ladies' Cabinet (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for January 1840 from Ladies’ Cabinet
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Wednesday 1 January 1840

I bless Almighty God! for having given me as many undeserved comforts during the past year and pray for his merciful protection and guidance through out the one that is commencing, should it be his pleasure to prolong my life to the end of it!

A fine day, without any rain till the evening, when it rained hard between nine and ten o’clock.  We were to have drank tea with Mrs Nicholas, but Emma’s cold was so indifferent I sent a note of excuse in the morning and it was fortunate I did, as we should have had a sad, wet, walk home.  We were agreeably surprised by a visit from Captain Pyne and Mr W Pyne, who sat some time and were very friendly and pleasant.  They came to Bath last night and return home tomorrow.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d, the former looking better.  While they were here Miss Shirley and little Sarah Jane Hale came and staid some time.  After Mrs Chamier went, Miss Shirley told us that Mrs C Penneddocke went to Church on Sunday, the day fortnight her husband died!!! and sent out cards of thanks on Monday, the day fortnight he was buried!!!!!!  I can hardly believe she can be such an unfeeling little wretch, but Miss Shirley says Mrs Ross told her she had sent a card to her, so she knows it to be true.  I am sorry my sympathy and commiseration has been so thrown away!  I had a most kind and droll letter from Miss Chambers in reply to mine, in which she says dear Miss Pyne has fix’d to come to Bath the 9th (next Thursday).  She forgot to seal her letter! and if the Post Master at Somerton read it, which I have no doubt he did, he must think both Miss Chambers and me very odd people.

A Country Post Office by Edward Villiers Rippingille, 1837 (c) The British Postal Museum & Archive; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Country Post Office by Edward Villiers Rippingille, 1837
(c) The British Postal Museum & Archive; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday 2 January 1840

A beautiful clear sunny morning.  Emma did not go out because of her cold, hoping that by taking care it may be well enough for her to go to the Miss Hellican’s tomorrow.  I went to Sims’s to enquire for a “Royal Repository” Almanack, which I could not get this year at Rattle and Brines.  They had not one, but said they would send to London for one and I should have it on Friday.  It began to rain before I got to the bottom of Milsom Street and I returned (as I had not taken my umbrella) till the shower was over and then went to tell Mrs Hibbert that Miss Pyne would be here on the 9th.  It rained slightly as I crossed the North Parade, but before I got to the Abbey Church yard it came on so hard I was obligd to take shelter at Moore’s, where I had left my watch to be regulated!  As soon as the shower was over I came home, as I was afraid to venture to Miss Workman’s, the shower being so frequent, with bright sun at the same time, quite like April.  Miss Hill paid us a long visit.  She ask’d us to go to her on Saturday evening.  She was going to have the little de Visnes and wish’d us to assist in entertaining them.  I said if it did not rain, she might depend on seeing us.  I unpack’d and washed three sets of children’s China tea things, which had belonged to my Aunts when they were children.  One set is imperfect, with the exception of one cup.

Friday 3 January 1840

Wet in the morning, but it held up after breakfast and the streets were tolerably dry for us to walk to the Miss Hellicans’ to dinner at 4 o’clock.  Mrs Simpson call’d.  She said she had been unwell, or she should have call’d before.  There was only ourselves and Miss Workman at dinner at the Miss Hellican’s.  We spent a very pleasant day, as we always do there, they are all so kind and attentive.  Soon after we went up stair from dinner, Mrs Jane, Miss Hare, Miss Workman and I sat down to Quadrille.  When we had play’d one Pool, Mrs Jane and Miss Workman gave place to Mrs Slade and Miss Fanny Hellican.  I won 6d.  When we were putting on our cloaks the servant said it had been raining very hard the whole evening.  Fortunately for us it had subsided into a thick “mizzle” which, tho’ not very pleasant, was better than decided hard rain and only the fronts and bottoms of our cloaks were wet, but the streets were in such a state it was like walking through water.  We had at dinner boild sole, fried whiting and lobster sauce, boil’d leg of house lamb, hashed calves head, a pheasant, sea cale, broccoli, carrots and potatoes, mince pies, sweetmeat tarts and one of the richest and most delicious xmas puddings I ever tasted.  Chestnuts, medlers, apples, almonds and raisins and biscuits.  A Portsmouth News Paper came by the Post, but who from I cannot tell!

Saturday 4 January 1840

A miserable day, thick mizzling rain without any intermission and so dark we could hardly see to work or write.  It was so bad we were obliged to have Chairs to go and return from Miss Hill’s, for it was impossible to walk and I thought she would be disappointed if we did not go when she ask’d us to tea, tho’ I am sure it was not worth the 4/- it cost.  There was only ourselves and the three young de Visnes and a Miss Menet, a very pretty girl who is staying with them.  We play’d at Pope Joan, with which the de Visnes were delighted, never having seen it play’d before.  Jane expressd herself very much obliged to us for coming in such bad weather.  It was just the same kind of rain when we came home at ten o’clock as it had been all day.

Sunday 5 January 1840

A dry  but dull looking morning and the streets not so dirty as I expected to find them.  We went to St. John’s twice, had Mr Audney to read Prayers and Mr Grove to Preach.  While we were at Church the sun came out and it continued beautifully fine the whole day.  When we went to Church in the afternoon the old Clerk told us Mr Audney would read Prayers, which we were very sorry to hear, but he afterwards came to tell us that a stranger, a friend of Mr Audney’s would do the Duty, as the latter was not well.  The gentleman (and elderly man) read extremely well and I sincerely wish he would take Mr Audney’s place during Mr de Visne’s illness.  We sat some time with Miss Workman and call’d on Mrs Chamier, who was up stairs with a bad headache, so we did not see her, and Georgina was not returned from Church, but we met her as we were coming away.  Not any rain the whole day!

Monday 6 January 1840

beautiful day, bright sun and hard frost.  Not a drop of rain the whole day!! We went to Brooks the baker to desire he would send a loaf to Miss Pyne on Thursday next and call for orders every day.  Call’d at Mrs Chamier’s, found her very much better than I have seen her for a long time past and dear Georgina very well.  They ask’d us for tomorrow evening.  Came home and dined and then went out again to Miss Workman’s, where we sat some time and had a bit of cake, which was bought as a twelfth Cake for little Henry, only a bread cake, sugared over and as bad a one as I ever tasted.  In our way we met Mrs Evans twice and had a little friendly chat with her.  We also met the Miss Allens, who said they were coming to us to ask if we would partake of their family dinner on Wednesday.  I bought 3 loaves of sugar at Shepphards, one 19 oz at 9d and two 26 oz at 1/9d, £1.14.6 together.  Call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s. She was not at home.

Tuesday 7 January 1840

A beautiful day, hard frost and bright sun.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d, but scarcely sat down when Major and Mrs Thornton and a lady with them came in and she went away, for which I was sorry, as I wanted to look at a very pretty new bonnet and gown she had on, but had not the opportunity, she was off so quickly.  Major and Mrs Thornton sat some time and were very agreeable and pleasant.  They said the frost was much more severe in Camden Place than down here, as their cistern and pipes were all frozen, while the water here had not even a thin coat of ice!  Freeman went to spend the day with her sister at Carston, I drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s.  Emma did not go, as she thought her cold would be increased by going out at night.  Freeman walk’d up with me and fetched me at night.  I spent a very chearful pleasant evening (tho’ a very cold one).  Mrs Chamier was much better and in very good spirits and very kind.  Somebody sent us the Times News paper, but I cannot tell who!!  The “Times” came from Mr Scott.

Camden Place, Bath 1829 Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Camden Place, Bath 1829
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Wednesday 8 January 1840

Another beautiful day, but a frost with a vengeance, for the ice did not melt from one of the drawing room windows, notwithstanding as large a fire as could be made, with the addition of the heat of the urn and breakfast, till near 12 o’clock!! and it was “bitter” cold in our bed room.  Mrs Slade and Miss Fanny Hellican call’d.  Emma did not go out, but I went to Miss Workman’s.  She was better than yesterday and in very good spirits.  I sat an hour with her and in my way home call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  He was gone out and Miss Shirley was in bed with a very bad cold.  Mrs Davis came to the door to me, looking very well and she said she was a great deal better.  We were to have dined with the kind Miss Allens, but Emma’s cold was not well enough to allow of her going and I sent a note of excuse.  Miss Wilson sent to enquire after us and to hope she should see us soon.  I gave Ann the Portsmouth paper to take to her.  Sims sent me “The Polite Repository” pocket book, in the place of the Royal Repository, which I have had every year for very many years past, but which is this year discontinued.  Freeman paid the young man who brought it 4/-.  It does not appear to me to differ in any respect (except in name) from “The Royal Repository”.

Thursday 9 January 1840

A very cold thaw and so heavy and dark, I could not see to work but at the window and it had all the appearance of snow, but none fell.  We neither of us went out.  Mrs Chamier sent to enquire after Emma and I did the same to Miss Shirley, who was better.  Ann went between five and six o’clock to see if Miss Pyne had arrived.  She brought word back that they came at 3 o’clock, two hours before they were expected, that Miss Pyne was pretty well, but Miss Chambers had a very bad cold.  I “niped” one of the 9d loaves of sugar in the evening that I bought at Sheppard’s.  There was a very thick fog in the evening, but no appearance of frost, before we went to bed.

Friday 10 January 1840

A beautiful day, but very, very cold.  I went out directly after breakfast to Dill’s and brought a small leg of pork and some sausages from them.  I went to Miss Pyne’s, who I found looking very well, but poor Miss Chambers has a very bad cold and cough.  They both received me most kindly.   Mary Ann is very well and delighted to come to Bath again, as is Miss Chambers.  After sitting with them more than an hour, I went to the Miss Hellicans’, saw them all.   Miss Martha was pretty well again. She and Miss Hare were going to the Picture Gallery.  Mrs Jane said she did not feel quite well, but they thought it arose from something having disagreed with her. They were going to have a party to dinner.  From there I went to the Post Office to enquire if it was necessary to have stamps for the letters (the Universal Penny Post coming into operation today).  They told me it was not.  I then went to Mrs Chamier’s.  She was not down stairs, but I sat with dear Georgina till she came down.  She is looking much better and says she feels so.  I sat so long with them that I had not time to go to Miss Workman’s, but call’d at the Miss Allen’s.  Found only Miss Janetta at home and in a few minutes two ladies came in and I came away.  Found on my return home that Miss Allen had calld here in my absence, but did not come up to see Emma, as she was in a hurry.

Royal Mail handbill - Post Office Regulations for the Uniform Penny Post that was introduced on the 10th January 1840
Royal Mail handbill – Post Office Regulations for the Uniform Penny Post which was introduced on the 10th January 1840.

I had a note from Miss Wilson to say she had heard from her sister that Dr Quarnier was gone to Clifton and that he would certainly pass through Bath to see us in his way back and to beg we would entreat of him to go to her, as she very much wishes for his advice, having had a distressing attack of her spasms.  After I came home, Mr Wiltshire call’d and most kindly brought us each a ticket of admission to the Picture Gallery for the season and a catalogue, so we can go whenever we like.  He said he would come tomorrow to sign Emma’s Certificate.  The Eyres let their lodging to a gentleman, two ladies and a man servant.

Saturday 11 January 1840

A very fine day, but expecting Mr Wiltshire, I did not go out.  Miss Hill and Miss Lawrence call’d and Mrs Charles Barwell and three children, a stranger to me She said that having heard from Mrs Mundy (“my mother in law”) that Dr Quarnier was expected some day this week and that he would certainly call here, she had come to request I would give into his charge the little packet she had brought for him to take to Mrs Munday and she left it here in the chance of the Dr calling.  She is a very pleasing lady like woman.  While we were at dinner Miss Drewett call’d, so we did not see her, soon after which Miss Wilson came in and sat till half past 4.  Both she and we had given up all idea of seeing the Dr and concluded he had not been able to visit Bath.  While she was here, Mrs Evans call’d and was very pleasant, as she always is.  When she went away, I persuaded Miss Wilson to stay a little longer and she sat down for a short time.  When she was going there was a knock at the door and I said “Oh! here is Mr Wiltshire at last”,  She replied “Then I’ll stay till he comes up, that I may not meet him on the stairs”, when to our surprise, instead of Mr Wiltshire, in walk’d Dr Quarnier and a gentleman with him, who I think he call’d “Captain Cobb”.  They had been to the College to see Miss Wilson, and it was most fortunate that I persuaded her to stay a little longer, or she would not have seen him, which would have distressed her very much.  The Dr was all life and spirits, said Eliza was very much better, but could not yet use her right hand.  She is staying at Dunannie till he returns and one of the Miss Parkes is staying with her.  He goes to Petersfield by tonight’s Mail at eight o’clock.  I gave him Mrs Barwell’s parcel for Mrs Munday.

Sunday 12 January 1840

A fine day with white frost.  I went to St. John’s in the morning.  A son of Mr Crutwell’s did the Duty, quite a young man, only in Deacon’s Orders.  After Church I sat some time with Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers, the latter’s cold is very bad and her cough very troublesome and Miss Pyne has also a cold.  From them I went to Miss Workman’s, who was complaining, but in good spirits and then came home.  Found Emma in better humor than when I went out, or she has been since Friday.  I did not go to Church in the afternoon, for a thaw having come on, there was so much appearance of snow or rain I was afraid to venture, so we read the Evening Service at home.

When we were going to bed, to my astonishment! Freeman said “She hoped Miss Emma had not encreased her cold by going out”, the first intimation I received that she had been out!  How detestable such mean concealment is, particularly where there is no necessity for it.  Had she told me when I came in that she had been up to Mrs Chamier’s, I should have been delighted to hear it, but no, I was not to know she had been out and would not had not Freeman spoken of it!  I have not yet found out the pleasure derived from mean deceit, but all in good time!

I had a most kind letter from dear Henry.

Monday 13 January 1840

A very fine day.  I wrote Emma’s Certificate and a note to Mr Wiltshire to ask him to call and sign it, which he did late in the day for him, but he had been to the rehearsal of this evening’s concert at the Rooms, at which Miss Hawes and a Miss Cooper (new) were to sing.  Miss Hawes is his favourite singer and he was very much pleased with Miss Cooper.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and sat longer than she usually does.  She was going to take Bridger to see old Mrs Pattern and had bought a pound of tea for her.  I beggd she would add some sugar, which she kindly said she would.  I wrote to Peter Touray with Emma’s Certificate and Ann took the letter and a penny! to the Post.

Tuesday 14 January 1840

Very fine till 4 o’clock, when it rained slightly and continued the rest of the day and evening.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s for two hours.  I did not go out.  Miss Shirley call’d and sat an hour.  I had a kind note of invitation from Miss Allen to dine with them on Thursday.

Mrs Scott sent us The Times News Paper again, having sent it once before and the Cheltenham Paper twice.

Wednesday 15 January 1840

Fine in the morning, but the streets very wet and muddy.  I did not go out, but Emma went to Miss Workman’s.  Mrs Chamier call’d.  She did not look so well today,as the last time I saw her and appeared languid.

I wrote to dear Henry and heard from Peter Touray.  It began to rain between 4 and 5 o’clock and continued all the evening and Freeman, who was out, said she never in her life saw the mud so bad.  It was lucky for us I declined going to Mrs Chamier’s this evening, for we should have had a sad, uncomfortable walk there and home.  She asked us either for tonight, tomorrow or Friday evening.  I said we would go on Friday.  I sent a note to Miss Allen to say we would dine with them tomorrow.

Thursday 16 January 1840

Fine in the morning.  I call’d on Mrs Barwell to tell her I had given the little packet to Dr Quarnier.  She was at dinner, so I did not see her.  As I was knocking at our own door, the Postman came up with a letter from Mr ? with £5 for Harriett, which I took immediately to Mr Butcher’s and gave it to Mr Bradley.  From there I went to Miss Pyne’s.  She was pretty well, but poor Miss Chambers’s cold just the same.  When I came from there it was raining slightly and before I got to Union Passage, where I took shelter, it pourd.  Luckily a man came with a Wheel Chair to the Corridor to see if any person wanted one and I was very glad to take it.  While I was out, the dear Miss Allens sent a most kind and friendly note to beg they might send their chair for us or that we would come in one, at their expense, for they could not bear the idea of our walking in such weather.  It rained so hard we were obliged to have Chairs, which they would pay for, all that we could say to the contrary and I found if I persevered in refusing to accept the 2/- I should wound their kind hearts, which I would not do for worlds, for they are the among the steadiest and kindest of our friends.  No one dined there but ourselves.  They were, as they always are, most kind, chearful and agreeable, but Mr Allen, tho very attentive and obliging, was more than usually taciturn and yawny.  I could not help wishing he had been engaged out.

We had fried soals, shrimp sauce, a delicate boil’d turkey and oyster sauce, a roasted chine, which I never saw before, but it was excellent, some of their delicious greens and potatoes, my favourite boiled millet pudding and mince pies, all good of their kind and beautifully dressd.  After dinner, oranges, apples, biscuits and almond rusks, which they recommended as being very good, but I did not taste them.  Mr Allen eat three or four, so I am sure they were good.

I wrote to Mr Melville.

Friday 17 January 1840

Fine in the morning.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s before twelve o’clock to go with her to take the water for the first time.  She afterwards walkd with her on the South Parade.  It began to rain about two o’clock and continued long enough to make it very muddy.  I did not go out till we went to Mrs Chamier’s to tea, when it was beginning to dry in some parts, but in others the mud was very bad.  We found Mrs Chamier better.  We took the shirt and two chemises that are so beautifully ornamented with curious old point (formerly belonging to Colonel Pyne, an ancestor of Miss Pyne’s) who forfeited very large estates in Somersetshire, by joining the Duke of Monmouth in his Rebellion against Charles 2nd, to shew Mrs Chamier.  Both she and Georgina were delighted with them.  It was much better walking when we came home than when we went to Mrs Chamier’s.  I heard from dear Henry and Peter Touray.  I wrote to the latter, to acknowledge the receipt of £53.18.5, the amount of our half year’s dividends and Emma’s half year’s annuity.

South Parade, Bath by Joseph Sheldon (c) Victoria Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
South Parade, Bath by Joseph Sheldon
(c) Victoria Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday 18 January 1840

A fine looking morning.  We went out directly after breakfast to try to get some crimson watered silk, which Miss Parsons sent to Miss Chambers to buy for her.  We went to Rigby’s, they thought they had got it, but on looking had not.  We then went to Parton and Lanes.  They were very civil.  They said they were certain it was not to be procured in Bath, it was a thing rarely askd for and being very expensive it did not answer to them to keep it.  It might be got in London, but even there it was not always to be had.

We sat some time with Miss Workman, who complained of her head and we persuaded her to let us call at Mr Gore’s and desire him to go to her, which we did.  While we were at his door, it began to rain.  I came home, but Emma went to Miss Pyne’s, where she staid to dine and I sent John Cummins with his Wheel Chair to fetch her home in the evening, for it was improper for her to walk, it raind so very hard.  I heard from Mrs Keen and wrote to her.

Sunday 19 January 1840

A frightful day, pouring rain till 1 o’clock with a wind that shook the house.  It was impossible to go out, so we read the Prayers at home, both morning and evening.  After the rain ceased, the wind soon dried the pavement, which look’d as if it had been rubb’d with a rubbing stone, it was washed so white and clean.  The wind was so violent it was quite alarming and I fear we should hear of great damage on the coast.  It was a beautiful moonlight evening till about eight o’clock, when it began to rain and continued all night, at times pouring torrents and the wind frightful.

Monday 20 January 1840

Heavy rain, but it cleard at ten o’clock and was very fine till four o’clock when it began to rain and did not cease afterwards.  We went to Miss Workman’s and found her much better from Mr Gore’s prescription.  When we left her we attempted to go to Miss Pyne’s, but before we had reached the bottom of Bond Street it began to rain and we turnd back.  It was fortunate we did so, for we should have had a sad, wet, walk home.  We went into Mr Vezey’s shop to ask if they had any crimson watered or corded silk, saw Mr Vezey’s brother, a very young man, who I had never seen before.  He was extremely obliging and said they had both.  They did not sell it, but would spare a small quantity to us, being their tenants.  It was 10/6 a yard, crimson being dearer than any other colour.  I do not suppose Miss Fanny Parsons will like to give that price.   The wind was so alarmingly high all night and the rain pour’d in torrents.  Miss Shirley call’d while we were out.

Tuesday 21 January 1840

Very heavy showers during the day and the wind frightful, almost amounting to a hurricane.  Many stones were blown from the house and the police and people in the street were watching the chimneys, which appeard to rock and the house was in almost a constant state of vibration.  Some of the gusts appeard as if they would rend the house in two.  Mr Keating in Queen Square had six panes of glass blown in, all at the same instant!!  The gale did not abate the whole day and night, lasting more than 36 hours!!  I fear we shall hear of great misfortunes at sea and on the coast.

Wednesday 22 January 1840

Fast rain in the morning, but it cleard up after breakfast and the sun shone bright.  The wind had abated, but was still brisk enough to dry the streets.  We were preparing to to out, a little past two, when it clouded over and there was a violent shower.  It did not last long, but it made the streets most uncomfortably muddy.  We went to Miss Pyne’s and in our way look’d at the Furs that are to be sold by auction tomorrow.  There were a good many muffs, but very few boas.  The man said that they had been disappointed in the arrival of a large quantity from London, the waggon by which they were coming having broken down, they would not be in Bath till 6 o’clock this evening and consequently they could not be on view till tomorrow morning, an hour or two before the sale, not one word of which I believe, as I have no doubt they all belong to some shopkeeper in Bath, who wants to raise a little money and takes this method of doing it, under pretence of their being the property of a Bankrupt sent from London.  We found Miss Pyne very well and Miss Chambers better, tho’ her cold is still bad and she looks very ill.  Mr Kitson sees her every day.  We sat some time with them and soon after we came home I had a note from Miss Wilson to say she had just heard from her sister that Dr and Mrs Quarnier were in Bath! and to beg to know if it was true.  I sent her word I had not heard of their arrival and I thought I should, if they were really here. Poor soul!  She has been,and is still, very unwell. There was a good deal of rain in the course of the evening, but it was delightfully calm.  I sent the News Papers to Mrs Chamier.  We met Mrs Evans in our way home from Miss Pyne’s.  She said she had been very unwell and confined to the house ever since she call’d here a fortnight ago.  Mrs Drummond, who returned from London last night, brought me the Law Papers from Henry that were sent to London to prove my right to the money that came from America.

Thursday 23 January 1840

Wet most part of the day, with heavy showers.  We did not go out all day.  The wind very rough.  I sent the Observer News Paper to Miss Pyne.  The wind very high all night.

Friday 24 January 1840

A very wet stormy day.  The wind at times frightfully high.  About two o’clock it blew a hurricane, with the most tremendous rain I ever saw.  It came down in such floods that the streets were quite under water and the violence of the wind was so great that it drove it about in every direction in the air, as if it was battling with it and trying to prevent its reaching the ground.  It was the most awful storm I ever saw.  When it abated and the water had subsided, there was not a bit of mud remaining in the street.  It was washd clean as if people had been employ’d to do it.  I had a note from a Miss Mitchell (a friend of Miss Wilson) saying poor Miss Wilson was so seriously ill, that if Dr Quarnier was in Bath, she begg’d I would ask him to go to her immediately and, if he was not here, I would send my medical man, as Miss W had been in excrutiating pain all night and tho’ had applied leeches and her usual remedies, it still continued as bad and they were very much alarm’d about her.  I sent the note to Mr Gore immediately, with a request he would go as soon as possible.  The weather was too bad to send Ann to enquire if he had been and how he found poor Miss Wilson.  Miss Workman sent us her Bath Paper.  Mary said her mistress was wonderfully well.

There was a great deal of thunder and lightening during the hurricane this morning, which I was not aware of at the time.

Saturday 25 January 1840

Still wet and showery with high wind in the morning.  It sometimes held up and the sun came out for an hour, but then came rain again!  I sent Ann to Mr Gore before breakfast to ask how he found Miss Wilson yesterday.  She brought word that there was nothing to be alarm’d at.  Mrs and Miss Chamier and Miss Webb call’d.  While they were here, Miss Shirley came in. Miss Webb told us that a stack of chimnies was blown down at “Velone” (General Andrews’s) on Tuesday.  They came thro’ the roof and forced every thing before them to the Drawing Room, where they broke the magnificent chandelier and did other damage to the amount of a thousand pounds!  How dreadfully frightened poor Mrs Andrews must have been.  Mrs Chamier ask’d us to spend the evening with her on Monday, if the rain will permit.  She and Georgina were in mourning for the Margravine of Hamberg.  Miss Shirley staid some time (till nearly five o’clock) after they went away.

I had a note from Miss Chambers to say Mrs Michell died! on Thursday last at half past eight in the morning!  It was an event from her great age.   Long expected.

Sunday 26 January 1840

A very wet morning, the rain too violent to allow of our going to Church and the wind very high.  There was now and then a little cessation of rain and a short gleam of bright sun, but it did not last long and the gusts of wind were really frightful.  We read Prayers both morning and evening at home.

Monday 27 January 1840

A very fine looking morning with bright sun.  We were preparing to go to Miss Pyne’s when it became very dark and a violent shower came on.  In the midst of it a note came from Miss Chambers to Emma to beg she would go to them to walk with Miss Pyne as soon as the rain was over.  She went, I staid till the streets were a little dryer, but before that took place there were two more showers.  At last the sun came out again and I went to Miss Pyne’s.  She was comfortably well and Miss Chambers very much better.  I sat there some time and left Emma there to walk again with Miss Pyne and I call’d on Mrs Evans, the Miss Allens and Miss Workman.  The two former were not at home.  I left the “recipe” for netting mittens for Miss Janetta.  Miss Workman was very well and in good spirits.  The wind was high, but not violent and the streets dry, as we had no more rain till the evening.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and sat some time, as did Mr Wiltshire here at past 5 o’clock.  He came to tell us he had heard a bad account of Dr. Cooper, that he so was seriously ill that he was not expected to recover!  I hope from my heart that the account is exaggerated. Mr Wiltshire promised to let us know as soon as he heard any thing more.  We spent the evening at Mrs Chamier’s and had dry streets!!! and bright stars to go there and tho’ there had been rain in the course of the evening, the streets tho damp, were not muddy when we came home.  Miss Workman sent us some of Mrs Jones Graeme’s ham.  It is not bad, but not like our own.

Tuesday 28 January 1840

Wet morning.  As soon as it held up, Emma went to walk with Miss Pyne.  They returned just in time to escape a hard shower.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d, but was frightened away by the darkness of the clouds and I fear she could hardly have got home before the rain poured.  Emma was fortunate enough to get home before it began. The wind was very high in gusts all day, but more so in the evening, when it was like great guns.  It was so dark for some time about three o’clock, I could scarcely see to write.  Emma got me change for the B P B from London, £53.18.5.

The family went away from Eyres in their own carriage this morning.

Wednesday 29 January 1840

A beautiful day.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s directly after breakfast and  I went up to Mrs Chamier’s with The Observer.  Georgina was gone out and Mrs Chamier had not left her room, so I did not see her.  From there I went to Miss Pyne’s, calling in my way at Dills, to desire they would send for the hams tomorrow to smoke.  Met Miss Hill and Mrs Hudson, the former told me that Miss Martha Hellican had been blown down in the street last Friday and very much hurt!  After sitting a short time with Miss Pyne, we all came out together.  We left her and Miss Chambers at the South Parade and we call’d at the Miss Hellicans to enquire after Miss Martha.  We only saw Miss Fanny.  She told us her sister was very much bruised, but no bones were broken.  Her hip is the part most seriously injured and it will be a long time before she is able to walk about again.  From there we went up to Mrs Simpson’s and Mrs Thornton’s, both out, met Major and Mrs Thornton in the carriage, near their own house, then to Mrs Chamier’s again, Mrs Hardcastle’s, Miss Haugh’s, Mrs Lowry’s, Mrs Jackson, Mrs Pierrepont’s, Mrs Kipling’s, Miss Shirley’s, Mrs Drummond’s and Miss Workman.  They were all out, except Mrs Lowry and Miss Workman.  We pass’d half an hour very pleasantly with the former and sat some time with the latter.  I came home quite tired, but my dinner refreshed me.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  It was very fine and dry to go there, but it rained soon after and the streets were wet to come home, but fortunately it did not rain.  Saw Mrs de Visne at the Post Office, who said Mr de Visne was better.

Thursday 30 January 1840

A very fine day again.  As soon as we had breakfasted, we went with the tickets Mr Wiltshire has so kindly given us for the season, to the Exhibition in Quiet Street.  Going so early we had it all to ourselves for some time and when we came away there were only ten people besides ourselves.  There are a great many beautiful pictures and I was very much amused and gratified.  From there we went to Miss Pyne’s, but did not stay long.  Calld at Miss Hellican’s door, “Miss Martha was better, but not able to move.”  From there to Miss  Drewett, who we found at home, then to Mrs Polwheles.  She was gone out to spend the day at Captain Collins’s in Edgar Buildings.  From there we went to Miss Hill’s and sat some time with her, in the course of which Mr Horton came in, but did not stay long.  When we left her, it look’d so like rain I would not call on Mrs Partis, which I had intended to do, but hurried home, expecting every minute to see it begin, but it did not till about six o’clock, when it made up for its forbearance by pouring all the evening.  In our way home we calld at Miss Pearce’s in Milsom Street, with a message from Miss Chambers about Mrs Stuckey’s bombaszine dress.  Miss Harrison call’d while we were out.  Mary brought Miss Workman’s Bath Paper.  Met Mr Davis by the Institution, who greeted us most kindly.  He is looking remarkably well.

Friday 31 January 1840

A very fine morning.  Emma walk’d with Miss Pyne and brought Miss Chambers back with her.  They went out again together to look at Flaherty’s and Eyres Lodgings, as Mrs Stuckey is soon coming to Bath and wishes to be in Milsom Street.  The former is 4 guineas a week and 19/6 plate and linen.  Eyres 4 and a half guineas a week, without linen and plate, except it was taken for any time when it would be 4 guineas.  Miss Hough and the youngest Miss Philingham call’d, the latter (who I suppose is come to spend the Season with her Aunt), looking very pretty.

Dill forgot to send for the hams yesterday and Emma had the trouble of going there to say so this morning, when they sent immediately.

Fashion plate for February 1840 from Ladies' Cabinet. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for February 1840 from Ladies’ Cabinet.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Saturday 1 February 1840

Heavy rain the whole day, without intermission.  We had a note of invitation from Mrs Polwhele to meet Miss Hill on Monday evening, but I shall send an excuse, for two reasons: first the distance is so great I am sure the amusement will not pay the trouble, and next, I do not wish to increase my tea drinking visits.

Sunday 2 February 1840

A very fine morning.  We went twice to St. John’s.  An old gentleman of the name of Hughes did the Duty in the morning and Mr Awdry in the afternoon.  We calld on Miss Workman and Mrs Chamier between the two Churches.  Miss Workman very comfortable and Mrs Chamier so much better that she lookd quite herself again.  She ask’d us for tomorrow evening, which enabled me when we came home, to write a note to Mrs Polwhele to say we were engaged to her.  After the evening service we call’d on Miss Pyne.  She was not come home from the Abbey.  Mary Ann told us Miss Pyne expected her three nephews, Captain Pyne, William and Colonel Michell tomorrow in their way from Mrs Michell’s funeral at Gloster.  We were surprised to see the water so much out all the fields at the bottom of both Parades, being entirely covered, but we were told that the rain poured in such torrents last night that it was astonishing it was not worse.

South Parade and Abbey Church, Bath by Joseph Sheldon (c) Victoria Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
South Parade and Abbey Church, Bath by Joseph Sheldon
(c) Victoria Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

It began to rain as we went to Church in the afternoon and there was a hard shower, but was fine again till after we got home, when it began again and lasted all the evening and night, at times violent.  Upon the whole it was fortunate Miss Pyne was not at home, for if she had, we should have had a sad, wet, walk.

Monday 3 February 1840

A showery morning, but it cleared up in the middle of the day and the streets dried.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s to walk with her and did not return till near 4 o’clock.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s.  It was quite dry to go, but about 9 o’clock it came on to blow most violently with torrents of rain.  It was quite impossible to walk home and there was great danger in being blown over in a Chair, besides the difficulty of getting one, for the weather was too tempestuous to send any body out to see for one, but luckily a little past 11 we heard men talking and Mrs Chamier, very timely, threw up the window and ask’d if they were engaged.  They had just put down a fare and agreed to take us both, which I was glad of, as I thought our two weights safer than one.  By the mercy of providence we came home safely, but I was dreadfully frightened, as I really thought we should have been blown over in Russell Street, besides which I was almost stifled, for it was a very small Chair and with Emma in my lap, I could hardly breathe.  We left our cloaks and tippets at Mrs Chamier’s that we might have no unnecessary encumbrance in the Chair.

We had the Devizes paper from dear Mr Scott yesterday and I sent it back to him at Cheltenham today.

Milsom Street and Bond Street with pictures of Bath swells, Cruikshank, 1825. A chair of the type used by Fanny and her sister can be seen. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
Milsom Street and Bond Street with pictures of Bath swells, Cruikshank, 1825.
A sedan chair of the type used by Fanny and her sister can be seen.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Tuesday 4 February 1840

A day of hard rain without ceasing.  I had a note, while at breakfast,  from dear Miss Allen to ask us to dine with them tomorrow and soon after one from Mrs Drummond to say she had just heard from Dr Quarnier that he and Eliza would be with her tomorrow evening! and to ask us to meet them at tea.  I wrote her word we were engaged to the Miss Allens, but would call early on Thursday morning.  I wrote immediately to Miss Wilson to tell her of the joyful news and enclosed Mrs Drummond’s note.  Ann took it to the Post office.

Dear Georgina Chamier sent out umbrellas and a note to enquire how we got home.  Mary took back the “Observer” and a piece of green oil cloth for Mrs Chamier, which Mr Stacey was so obliging to get for me and which Mrs Chamier very much wanted for her lace work, but did not know where to get it.  I am always so glad when I can accommodate her in any way, she is so very kind to us.

One of Mrs Jones’s maid servants call’d to enquire how we did.  She came from Oldbury yesterday and is going back this afternoon.  Dear Mrs Jones has got a bad cold, but Maria, Mrs J Graeme and Miss Bowie, who is staying there, are very well.

Wednesday 5 February

A dry day, with the exception of a few drops of rain about 2 o’clock.  Emma had a head ache come on after breakfast and did not go out.  I went to Miss Pyne’s.  She was just returned from her walk and very tired.  Miss Chambers very well again.  I sat some time with them and then went to the Post office with Miss Chambers, who walkd home with me, but was afraid to come in, it lookd so like rain.

Mrs Drummond call’d before I went out and brought Dr Quarnier’s letter.  He is going on to Mrs Tobin in Devonshire and leaves Eliza with Mrs Drummond till he comes back.  The latter askd us to come tomorrow evening.  I afterwards met her in the street.  She said she was going to ask the Miss Allens, but if [I] would give them a message, it would save her the trouble of going, which I agreed to do.  Miss Shirley call’d and sat till it was time to dress.  Mrs and Miss Chamier and the dear Allens calld while I was out, the latter to leave the money for our Chairs to them today, which they insisted on our having.

Emma’s head was so bad after she was dressd that she was unable to dine at the Allens and I was obliged to go without her.  The dear Miss Allens are always agreeable and Mr Allen was in one of his best humours and very pleasant.  At dinner we had a very large hare, a piece of delicious stewd beef, a pheasant, a delicious Cabinet pudding, mince pies, potatoes, greens, Bath and other cheeses and after dinner oranges, apples, figs, damson cheese, almond rusks and biscuits.  Emma was in bed when I came home and her head was better.

Thursday 6 February 1840

A beautiful day throughout.  Emma was better, but not able to go out.  I was preparing to go to Mrs Drummond’s to see Eliza, when they came here.  Eliza was, as usual, all warmth and affection.  She is looking better than I expected to see her, but very pale and thin.  She says she is quite well, except her hand (s) which are still so much  affected she cannot bend her fingers on indeed use them to any extent.  She is going to Bathe and have her hands pumped on and wished me (as Emma was not well enough to go with her and Mrs Drummond) to enquire what time she could have a bath.  Just as we were going, Mrs Pierrepont call’d but would not sit down.  I thought she went away in a little “miff”, but I hope not.  We went first to the Hetling Court Bath, but the woman there was so impertinent and unaccommodating that she would prevent any person going there.  She told Eliza she could not have the woman to rub her there, it was not allowed, “she must have her at home”, “but don’t they allow at the other baths” “No, no, where” “Well I shall go and enquire”.  We then went to the Old Corporation Baths, where they were altogether as civil and obliging as they were otherwise the Hetling Court.  They said it was a common practice to have the Rubber in the Bath Room.  They sent to engage her at the hour Eliza wished and in short did every thing that was kind to accommodate her.  Mrs Drummond left us there and we look’d into the Pump Room to see if Mr Calbeck was there. As he was not, we went to the White Hart, where he is staying.  They shew’d us into a room and Mr Calbeck came to us.  He is very old looking and very deaf and is now suffering from a violent inflammation in one of his eyes, caught in coming from London.  I walk’d to Mrs Drummond’s door with Eliza and then went up to Mrs Chamier’s, where I sat some time.  Mrs Chamier kindly askd us to dine there on Saturday.  I drank tea at Mrs Drummond’s.  There was a group of 13, all strangers to me, except the dear Miss Allens, (who arrived just after me and we came away together) and Miss Caldwell, who was very gracious.  There was Admiral MacKay and two sisters, a Doctor Stamer “DD”, an agreeable man and three other gentlemen whose names I did not hear.  I had a Chair to go and return.  Mrs Drummond had every thing very elegant about her.  Eliza fix’d to call at two o’clock tomorrow to take me to see poor Miss Wilson.  The Miss Allens and Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d on Emma while I was out.

The Grand Pump Room at Bath Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
The Grand Pump Room at Bath
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Friday 7 January 1840

Alternate sunshine and heavy showers.  Just as I had got ready to go with Eliza, Miss Susan Hughes of Devizes was announced.  She called here in her way to Mrs Quarnier, but finding I was expecting her here every minute, she said, if not inconvenient, she would sit with us till she came.  She was very pleasant and agreeable, more so that I ever saw her before and staid an hour and half when, as Eliza did not make her appearance and her patience being exhausted, she took her leave.  As she went out Miss Shirley came in.  she said there was no chance of Mrs Quarnier’s coming for some time, as she had seen Lady Belman’s carriage at Mrs Drummond’s door as she passd in her way home.  When she came, I found she was in the open carriage and the two covered seats were occupied by herself and Mrs Drummond, so I declined going with them to see poor Miss Wilson, as it was beginning to rain and there is no shelter on the front seat.  It was fortunate I did so, for soon afterwards there was a violent shower, in which I must have been wet through.  I went in the evening to Mrs Drummond’s, under the idea there would be no one but myself, as Mrs D said “come in your bonnet and the gown you breakfast in.”  I did not exactly do that, but I did not take a cap and was sitting with Eliza in my bonnet, Mrs Drummond being up stairs dressing, when the door opened and Mrs Pyne Coffin was announced and in she came, very nicely dressd as for a party.  She look’d at Eliza, whom she had never before seen and then at me, who she did not recognise, and then round the room in search of Mrs Drummond and not seeing her was evidently embarrass’d .To obviate, which I, not being able to introduce myself, introduced Mrs Quarnier and we fell into conversation very pleasantly.  Presently, down came Mrs Drummond and with apologies to Mrs Coffin for not being in the room to receive her and to Eliza and me for not having told us Mrs Coffin was coming, our different conjectures on Mrs Coffin’s entrance created much amusement, Eliza fancying she had mistaken the house or the evening for which she was ask’d.  I thought Mrs Drummond had deceived me and expected a party, but it turned out they were both going to a Ball next door and she was ask’d to take her tea with us before she went.  She was extremely agreeable and the evening passd very pleasantly.  I made the tea while Mrs D was dressing and when she came down she look’d very elegant, her gown being black velvet, trimmed with beautiful real old fashioned lace, fastened down the front with diamonds, diamond necklace, earrings and spray and ornament in the front of her black velvet hat and white feather.  I never saw her look so well, tho’ Eliza did nothing but find fault with her hat and insisted on her taking out the flowers which, in truth, was a great improvement.  As soon as they went to the Ball, I went up stairs with Eliza to sit with her while she had her poor hands champood and rubb’d, which occasions her great pain.  Freeman came to fetch me between ten and eleven and Eliza had her up in her room to talk to her and give her a commission to procure her a very fine fowl, a pound of tea, six pounds of sugar and a pint of calves foot jelly, all for poor Miss Wilson and a dozen oranges for herself.  When I left her she said she should call to take me and the good things to Miss Wilson at 2 o’clock tomorrow.

It was dry to go to Mrs Drummond’s and to return (tho’ there had been rain between) and it was fortunate it was so, for the wind was too high to allow of carrying an umbrella.  Mrs Drummond askd me for tomorrow evening, but I told her we were engaged to dine at Mrs Chamier’s.  A gentleman left Mrs Luken’s card, without any address and a most affectionate letter from dear Mrs Vassall.

Saturday 8 February 1840

Occasional showers in the morning, but it cleared up and was dry in the afternoon.  I waited till near 4 o’clock, expecting Eliza, when Sarah came to say her mistress had been persuaded not to go out after her pumping and to beg I would send the things to Miss Wilson by a Chairman, which I did by John Cummings.  Just as we were putting on our cloaks to go to Mrs Chamier’s to dinner, Mrs Drummond came in to our surprise, for it was half past five.  She did not stay more than a quarter of an hour and then we set off.  The streets were quite dry and the moon shone bright.  We always meet with a kind and warm reception and spent a pleasant day.  When we were coming away, we found the rain was pouring in torrents.  I had desird Freeman not to fail to send us Wheel Chairs if it raind at eleven o’clock.  It was more near twelve and no Chairs, so we prepared to walk home and most fortunately the rain had expended itself and it was so slight when we came away it was not of consequence and had ceased before we reached Russell Street.  It had been so violent that the water was rushing down the streets like little rivers and sounded like water falls thro’ the grating of the sewers.  Freeman was so glad when we came in dry, as she said it was impossible to get a Chair.  Ann had been everywhere in search of one and came home so completely wet through Freeman was obliged to undress her and put her to bed and then she went out herself, but could not get one.  We had at dinner fried soals, harrico of mutton, a very fine roasted fowl, potatoes, rice pudding and plum tart.  Oranges (the best I have tasted this year) and biscuits.  We had not been at home half an hour before the rain came down in torrents.  Freeman’s sister Mary came up from Lyme.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Sunday 9 February 1840

A wet morning, but it cleard up before Church time and was fine the rest of the day.  We were at St. John’s twice.  Had a delightful Reader in the morning, a Mr ? who gave us an excellent Sermon beautifully  delivered, quite a young man and Mr Awdry in the afternoon.  After Church we sat some time with Miss Pyne, who has had a cold.  Met Miss Chambers and Mr Randolph at the door as we came out and askd the former to come and see the Procession in honor of the Queen’s marriage tomorrow.  We had intended going to the Miss Hellicans’  to enquire after Miss Martha, but met Miss Fanny and Miss Hare.  Ask’d them come.  We then went to Miss Workman, who was complaining we could not stay long, as we had scarcely time to dine and go to Church again.  As we came to our own door, Miss Drewett was knocking at it.  She came to ask if she might come tomorrow.  She did not stay long, as she knows we dine early.  I did not press her to stay, as we had no time to spare.  To our disappointment we found dear Mrs Lukin’s card again, still no address, so we determined as soon as we came out of church we would make the tour of the hotels in search of her, having before dinner been to the house in Bennet Street, where she was with Mrs Brown when she was here last year, without success.  We ask’d for her at the White Hart, the White Lion, the Grey Hound, the Castle and the York House and found she was at the latter, but was not at home.  I left word with the waiter I would send a note.  We then went to Mrs Drummond’s in the hope of getting off going there this evening, but could not, as neither Mrs Drummond or Eliza would allow it.  We sat there till five o’clock, when Mrs Drummond came out with us to give her little dog a few turns.  When we parted she begg’d we would not be later than half past six o’clock, but by the time I had written my note to Mrs Lukin and made a little alteration in my dress, it was seven and we set out.  It rained a little but did not till after we got there.  After tea, Mrs Drummond went to see her sick old friend, Mrs Boltby and we sat with Eliza, who had not been out all day, not feeling very well and being much disappointed at hearing from the Dr that he would not be able to come till tomorrow evening, instead of this.

We staid till near eleven.  When we came away it was raining, fortunately only slightly, as the wind was so violent we could not hold our umbrellas up without the danger of their being split or our being blown over.   When Ann opened the door she told us we had not been gone five minutes before Mrs Lukin call’d again and left word she was very sorry she could not see us, as she was going into Devonshire tomorrow morning at seven o’clock!  I do not know any thing that has vex’d me more for a long time past.  If she had only put on her card where she was to be found, I should not have been so cruelly disappointed.  Freeman’s sisters, Mary and Martha, came from Lyme last night.  I saw Mary and shook hands with her before I went to Church.  We call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s but did not go in.

Monday 10 February 1840

A beautiful day, which was fortunate for the poor children and indeed all who were to walk in the Procession in honor of the Queen’s wedding.  The show was much better than I expected it would.  There were a great number of gentlemens’ carriages and the dear old Bishop look’d so well in his open carriage and four, the front seat of which was completely fill’d by himself and his beautiful lawn sleeves.  The back was occupied by one of his sons and Mr Brymer.

The Marriage of Queen Victoria, 10th February 1840 Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015
The Marriage of Queen Victoria, 10th February 1840
Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015

We had a good many people to see “the show”.  Miss Hare and a neice of the Miss Hellicans’, Miss Hill, Mrs de Visne, Miss Chambers, Mrs and Miss Chamier, Miss Drewett, Mrs Drummond, Dr and Mrs Quarnier (the Dr having arrived this morning from Devonshire to her great delight), Mr Calbeck and Mr Iveson, who came with Miss Drewett.  Every one appeard very chearful and pleased.  It continued fine till near five o’clock, when there was a very slight shower, but it soon pass’d off and did not return till the evening and then only slightly.  Between 5 and 6 o’clock an immense body of Chartists (who had had a meeting on Beacon Hill) pass’d down the street, with a good band of musick.  They were very numerous, I should think two thousand or upwards, nearly half females and I was sorry to see so many respectable men (in appearance) with them!  There was a good deal of bustle and talking in the street till twelve o’clock, after which it was very quiet.

Tuesday 11 February 1840

A beautiful morning.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s and walk’d with her.  I was prevented going out by Miss Hughes sending me a note yesterday to say she was going home today and would try to call here before she went, so I was obliged to stay at home. Poor Freeman was very unwell with one of her sick headaches, the effect of excitement and over exertion yesterday.

Mrs Osborne call’d to ask us to speak in her favour to the gentlemen of the Monmouth Street Society.  They allowd her mother, old Mrs Pattern, 1/- a week which, of course, ceased when she died and Osborne is very anxious to  obtain it.  I told her we had not interest, but I would speak to Miss Hill and see what I could do for her.  It rained in the afternoon.

Wednesday 12 February 1840

A very wet day.  Sarah came from Mrs Quarnier to beg Freeman would get another fowl, some more jelly, 1/2 pound of butter and a nice twist and send them by a Chairman to Miss Wilson.  Freeman could not get a twist, so sent two Beckford loaves instead.  While I was writing a note to go in the basket, one came to me from Miss Wilson to ask when the Quarniers were going and to entreat I would urge the Dr to see her again before he went, as he had not staid more than ten minutes with her when he went to the College on Monday.  I enclosed a note from him to her, telling her they should go on Friday and that he would certainly see her on Thursday.  The dear Miss Allens call’d and sat some time.  Mrs Drummond askd us for the evening, but I said I was engaged, which was a fib, but I did not want to go.

Thursday 13 February 1840

A beautiful day.  As soon as we had breakfasted we went to Admiral Shirley’s, saw Miss Shirley, but the Admiral was not out of his room.  From there we went to Miss Workman, where we sat some time.  She was pretty well, then to Miss Pyne’s.  She was just come in from her walk and a good deal ?, Miss Chambers a great deal better.  We call’d at the Miss Hellican’s door to enquire after Miss Martha.  The servant said she was better, but not yet able to walk.  It was so beautifully pleasant we went over the bridge and up the Wellington Road to Pulteney Street, where we call’d on Miss Hill and Mrs Partis.  The former was not at home, the latter was, but engaged.  I left a message of thanks for the list of voters to the Deaf and Dumb asylum, which Mrs Partis had lent me for Miss Hughes and which I returned on Monday.  From there we went up to Marlbro’ Street, St. James’s Square and call’d on Miss Harrison, who was not at home, then at Mrs Davis’s, she was engaged, then at Miss Haugh’s.  She and Miss Fillingham were at the door coming out.  She was very pressing that we should go in and rest ourselves, but I declined it and we walk’d together to the Circus, where we parted.  We were going to Mrs Pierrepont’s and overtook her at the top of Gay Street.  I askd her to speak to the gentlemen of the Monmouth Street Society in favor of Mrs Osborne and she very kindly gave me a recommendation in writing for her to take to them.  From her we went to Mrs Drummond’s.  She, the Dr and Eliza were gone to Miss Wilson’s.  Both Emma and I were so tired we could not go to Mrs Chamier’s.  When we came home we found Eliza had calld here soon after we went out and questioned Freeman very closely to know where we were last night.  Mrs Drummond sent to ask us for this evening, but Miss Pyne had done the same in the morning and I had accepted her invitation, besides which Mrs D had a party at dinner and they were all going to the Ball at 1/2 past ten, so I should not have gone there.  Just as we had got on our cloaks, Sarah came to say the Eliza sent her love and entreated we would come between seven and eight and she would receive us in her own room at that time.  I told Sarah it was quite impossible, but we would see her before she went tomorrow morning.  Poor Sarah said “I don’t know what Mrs Quarnier will say, she will be in such a taking.”  It was a beautiful moonlight both to go and return from Miss Pyne’s and we spent a very chearful pleasant evening.  Mrs Kipling call’d after we came home in the morning and sat a long time.  She was very agreeable.  She came to tell us that Mrs Carpenter’s married daughter has just got a “little missey” to the great delight of its Grandmama.  We met the dear Miss Allens near our own door, as we were coming in.

Great Pulteney Street

Friday 14 February 1840

A beautiful morning with bright sun and very white frost and ice, wherever the pavement had been wetted.  We got up early and went up to Mrs Drummond’s before breakfast.  When we got there Mrs D was making the breakfast and very kindly said she hoped we were come to partake of it, but I said we had breakfasted, as I did not like to intrude.  Sarah came to beg we would go up to Eliza.  In my way the Dr, who was writing in the Drawing Room stoppd me to give me one of his friendly kisses.  Eliza was only just out of bed, so we left her to dress and we went down and sat with Mrs Drummond and the Dr, who were beginning their breakfast, when Eliza came down and had finished hers.  She went with us to Finnegan’s, her brother having come in just as we were going out. When we returnd, the Dr was ready to go with her to Mrs Barwell’s.  We accompanied them there and took leave at the door.  Eliza was so strenuous for us staying with them till they got into the carriage, that I was obliged to say we had not breakfasted.  She would kiss us in the street.  It was eleven o’clock before we got home.  I was hungry and relished my breakfast very much.   It continued fine the whole day, but I did not go out again.

Saturday 15 February 1840

A heavy rain the whole day.

Sunday 16 February 1840

A fine day. We went to St. John’s Church.  Mr Awdry read the Prayers and an elderly gentleman preached an excellent Sermon for the united hospital.  Mr Keating held the Plate.  We call’d on Miss Pyne, Miss Workman and Mrs Chamier, the latter was not at home.

Monday 17 February 1840

A fine day. We call’d at Mrs Drummond’s.  She was complaining of a cold.  Met Mr Calbeck there.  Call’d at Mrs Chambers.

Tuesday 18 February 1840

A dry day, but very cold.  We dined at Miss Hill’s, met Miss Coates, (who is staying there), Miss Curtis and her married sister Mrs Collett at dinner and a Mrs Stock came to tea.  Spent a chearful pleasant day.  It was dry to walk home.  We had at dinner Gravy soup, roasted fowls, a ham, veal pie, beef olives, oyster patties, a very nice pudding, mince pies, blancmange jelly, Bath and other cheese and salad, oranges, apples, almond and raisins, biscuits and a nice cake, and cake and wine in the evening.  The dear Miss Allens call’d to ask us for Saturday evening to meet Mrs Cozelet Smith, Miss Burmester, Miss Bowles and a Mrs Smith and her daughters from the neighbourhood of Nottingham.

Wednesday 19 February 1840

Very cold and dry, but threatening snow.  I wrote to Mrs Quarnier and sent the parcel I received from Finegan for her on Saturday, enclosed in a Box of her own to Portsmouth.  Ann took it to the White Hart and had it book’d to go by the Celerity Coach tomorrow morning.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  It was dry to go and come, but piercing cold.  It snow’d a few flakes as we went to Miss Pyne’s, but it did not continue.

Thursday 20 February 1840

A very heavy dark day, extremely cold, with frequent flakes of snow.  I had a parcel from Miss White, Sarah’s Aunt, with some pieces of furniture for Emma’s patchwork and a few bits of silk for mine.  Enclosed was a letter for Sarah and a little packet for Mrs Quarnier, both of which I forwarded by the Post.  Emma took them and paid 4d for the packet and 1d for Sarah’s letter.

We call’d on Mrs Chamier and sat till Georgina’s luncheon was brought in.  We then went to Miss Workman’s.  I wrote to thank Miss White for her kindness in sending the pieces for patchwork.  Mrs Chamier kindly ask’d us for Saturday evening, but we were engaged to the Miss Allens.

Friday 21 February 1840

A fine day, freezing hard and a north east wind that cut one to pieces.  We walk’d to Grosvenor Place to see youg Lukin before I answerd dear Mrs Vassall’s letter.  Bought a dozen oranges at Miss Grabhams (1/6) to take to him.  Found him a sweet boy with very pleasing manners.  We did not stay many minutes, as their dinner was ready. As we came out of the parlor, we met Mrs Groves, who press’d us to return and rest, but we declined it.  We did not find it quite as cold in returning as in going, the wind being behind us.  We went over Bathwick Bridge and call’d on Miss Hill and Miss Coates.  They were out, but we afterwards met them.  We went to Miss Pyne’s.  She told us Miss Chambers was gone to us to ask us to drink tea with them this evening, as we were engaged tomorrow.  In our way home we met Miss Chambers.  We went to Miss Bode’s to order a pound of German wool for Miss Pyne.  Miss Bode shew’d us a most beautiful piece of work she has been doing for a Mrs Dandas “The Goldsmith’s daughter”.   It is much more like painting than work.  We took Miss Hills and Miss Coates in to see it.  We spent a very chearful evening at Miss Pyne’s, as we always do and had some excellent coffee with delicious Devonshire cream, sent her by a friend just arrived from Tiverton.  It was intensely cold, both going and coming home, freezing hard, with a cutting north east wind.  I bought a beautiful small neck of veal at the butcher’s behind the market.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s, but did not sit down.  Met Captain W Lye and had a few words, but it was too cold to stand talking.

The New Bridge at Bathwick, Bath, England. 1830 engraving by FP Hay, hand watercoloured on print
The New Bridge at Bathwick, Bath, England. 1830 engraving by FP Hay, hand watercoloured on print

Saturday 22 February 1840

Hard frost and north east wind.  Emma walkd to Partis College to see poor Miss Wilson, who she found in bed very unwell still.  Miss Harvey walk’d part of the way home with Emma.  I sat more than an hour with Miss Workman and Emma and I met at the door at home.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d to say Miss Burmester and one of the Mrs Smiths were too unwell to go to them this evening, in consequence of which Mrs Corzelet Smith had excused herself and there would be only ourselves and Miss Bowles and begg’d we would bring our work.  She insisted on our coming in Chairs and with her usual kindness left the two shillings to pay for them, making seven shilling they have paid for us in Chair hire!  We spent a very pleasant evening and I was sorry when the Chairs came.  I do not remember every having seen Mr Allen so chearful and agreeable.

Our neck of veal turned out excellent.  Major and Mrs Thornton, Mrs Thackery, Mrs Davis and the Dr call’d in the course of the week but I cannot recollect what days.

Sunday 23 February 1840

Still freezing, but a bright sun, tho’ just as cold as yesterday.  We were at St. John’s twice.  The young man, whose name I have forgotten, read the Prayers and preachd in the morning, Mr Awdry reading the Communion part of the Service.  The Sermon was a very good one.  We had Mr Awdry again in the afternoon.  We call’d and sat some time with Miss Pyne. In our way home we met Miss Hare, Miss Fanny Hellican and her neice and afterwards Miss Chambers.  Call’d on Miss Workman, but did not stay long, as we had very little time for our dinner before going to Church the second time.  I wrote to dear Mrs Vassall in the evening, to go by tomorrow’s Post.

I heard from Miss Armstrong, but with no better account of dear Mr Scott.  They sent us the Devizes News Paper.  Mrs Simpson call’d before we came home from Church.

Monday 24 February 1840

A beautiful bright sunshine day, but not at all warmer than yesterday, the wind being in the same quarter and the frost as severe, but it is delightfully healthy and will do a great deal of good.  We cannot be grateful enough for the change, after such a continuance of wet.  I did not go out all day, but Emma went to Miss Pyne’s and Miss Chambers walk’d with her to Mrs Turner’s.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and sat some time.  They said they were going to the Play tomorrow to hear Mr and Mrs Wood, but I had a note from dear Georgina in the evening to ask us there tomorrow, as Mrs Wood is not well enough to sing.  I had also a note from Miss Hill, enclosing one from Mr Rye, saying he had put Mrs Osborne’s name on the list of Petitioners to the Monmouth Street Society and he did not doubt she would soon be enrolled and receive the Weekly allowance as long as she lives.  I wish with all my heart it may be so!

Mrs and Miss Polwhele call’d and sat half an hour.

Tuesday 25 February 1840

Still very fine and cold.  Mrs Osborne came to say the “Monmouth Street Society” had most kindly put her name as a 1/- weekly pensioner for life, for which she was very grateful not only to them, but to us for having interested ourselves in her behalf.  We call’d on Miss Pyne and at the Miss Hellicans’ door to enquire after Miss Martha, who is better, but not able to move and then went over the North Parade Bridge to Miss Hill.  She was just going to dinner, so we did not sit down, but went directly to Mrs Partis’s, where we staid half an hour.  The old lady was pretty well and Miss Hughes quite so.  We sat a short time with Miss Workman and then call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s, who was not at home.  Miss Pyne ask’d us to tea tomorrow evening.  While we were preparing to go to Mrs Chamier’s a basket came from Mrs Keen containing a fowl and duck and a letter.  It was very kind of her.  We spent a pleasant evening at Mrs Chamiers, but she was poorly part of it.  She ask’d if we would go to her again tomorrow to meet Mrs Bradshaw (a sister of Miss Ash, who lost her husband two or three months ago) and play Quadrille.  I told her we were engaged, but Emma said she was sure Miss Pyne would excuse us and we are to try what we can do tomorrow morning.  I ordered some roasting and boiling beef from Hales.

Wednesday 26 February 1840

A fine cold frosty day.  I had a note from Georgina Chamier to say Mrs Bradshaw was going to them this evening and to hope we would meet her.  We went to Miss Pyne’s directly after breakfast.  She very kindly said it would make no difference to her, provided we came tomorrow evening.  When we came home Emma went to Mrs Chamier’s to say we would go there.  We went at 7 o’clock.  Mrs Bradshaw’s Carriage was just driving from the door.  On going up stairs we were introduced to her.  She was very chearful even to gay, and as unlike a recent widow as possible, much more resembling an emancipated spoilt school girl at home for the holydays.  We sat down to Quadrille almost directly and play’d till the tea was ready, after which we renew’d our pool and continued playing till twelve o’clock, the latter part there were so many beasts, I thought it never would be over, we were obliged to put into the pool so often, to play them out. Mrs Bradshaw’s man waited for her near two hours.  She walk’d home as well as ourselves.  She appears very good natured, but an oddity and had as much the appearance of a widow as I had.  Her hair was parted on her forehead in the present style of wearing it and her cap was quite at the back of her head, shewing the whole division of her hair, with no tie or anything to fasten it on and being in the extreme of the present fashionable shape, it was frequently near falling off and she had three or four most beautiful diamond rings!!  not very widow like!!  We spent a very chearful evening and had sandwiches, cake and hot punch.

Journal des Demoiselles, February 1840, showing the hairstyle (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Journal des Demoiselles, February 1840, showing Mrs Bradshaw’s fashionable hairstyle
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Thursday 27 February 1840

A fine day, but I did not go out till the evening.   Mrs Drummond call’d early.  She was very agreeable, as she always is.  She had heard from Dr Quarnier who said Eliza had derived much benefit from the pumping here and was very busy superintending the planting at Dunannie, so I expect to hear of her being laid up again very soon.  Just after Mrs Drummond went away, Mr Calbeck call’d, but we did not see him, as we were just going to dinner and later in the day Miss Shirley came in and sat some time.  We spent a pleasant evening at Miss Pyne’s.  Mrs Stucky and Miss Michel come on Tuesday next, for which I am very sorry,.  They bring Fanny Parsons with them to stay with Miss Pyne, for which I am more sorry.

Friday 28 February 1840

A dry, but dull looking day, without sun or frost.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s early, by appointment, to go with her and Miss Chambers to see the lodgings that have been taken for Mrs Stucky at No 10 Pulteney Street, which they like very much.  We were agreeably surprised by a visit from Mrs Brymer, who was extremely pleasing and agreeable and look’d very pretty.  While we were at tea Mr Wiltshire very kindly sent us 2 tickets for the Pump Room Concert tomorrow.

Saturday, 29 February

A very fine day, but very cold.  We saw Mr Wiltshire at the Pump Room and thankd him for his kindness.  We also saw Mrs Simpson, the Thorntons and Miss Burmester, but not to speak to them.  Went to Moor’s for my brooch, paid 6d for its being mended.  Sat with Miss Workman some time in our way home.  She ask’d us to drink tea with her on Monday, which we promised to do, provided Miss Pyne did not ask us for that evening.  Call’d at the Miss Allens’.  We were very much gratified with the music at the Pump Room.   Henry Field play’d beautifully and Mr Burnet sang a very pretty ballad of his own composition so sweetly he was encored.  Miss Cooper, Miss Patten, Mrs Penley and Mr Lawler also sang.  The room was very full, upwards of four hundred, but only 260 paid, the rest being friends of the performers, but that was very well at 5/- a ticket.

Fashion plate for March 1840 from Ladies' Cabinet (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for March 1840 from Ladies’ Cabinet
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Sunday March 1 1840

A very fine day, but intensely cold with a rough north east wind.  We went to St. John’s twice.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s to walk with her to St. John, it being Sacrament Sunday.  Mr Awdry read the Prayers and a Mr Bythesea preached a beautiful Sermon, most pleasingly delivered.  We had Mr Awdry again in the afternoon.  Mr de Visne was at Church in the morning, but did not do any part of the Duty.  We call’d on Miss Workman and sat some time with her.  I had intended to go to Mrs Chamier’s after the afternoon Service, but it was so piercing cold and the wind was so high, I would not go.  I heard from Miss Wood with a commission to get her two dozen pocket handkerchiefs at Hornbys.

Mrs Simpson call’d while we were out.

Monday 2 March 1840

A very fine day.  We call’d at Miss Pyne’s who ask’d us to come in the evening.  We then went to Hornbys for Miss Woods cambric handkerchiefs.  I chose two dozen from “seventy dozen”  just brought from London by Mr Tucker, for her at £1.3.6 the dozen and one for ourselves at £1.10.6 the dozen.  I also bought 4 yards of muslin for bed room blinds at 3/- and 24 yds of cap ribbons, pink, blue and lilac at 3d a yard.   Emma went back to walk with Miss Pyne and I went to Miss Workman’s to excuse our going to her this evening and she ask’d us for tomorrow.  From there I went up to Mrs Chamier’s.  Georgina was gone to Mr Penby’s Concert and Mrs Chamier was in her room, having just put leeches on her fingers.  I went up stairs to her and sat more than an hour with her.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  She is expecting Mrs Stukey, Miss Michell and Miss Fanny Parsons tomorrow.  Mr Calbeck call’d and was very agreeable.  Met Major Thornton in the Market while I was buying the salt fish for Wednesday.  He was doing the same and was good humoured and friendly as usual.  The Eyres let their lodging to an old gentleman and lady with a man servant.

Tuesday 3 March 1840

A very fine day.  We went to Hornby’s and got a dozen cambric handkerchiefs for Miss Pyne at £1.2.6 and took them to her.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d, as did Miss Wilson, who is looking very poorly.  The former ask’d us for Friday evening to meet Mrs Bradshaw for Quadrille.  We drank tea with Miss Workman, who had in the morning heard of the death of her old friend Mrs Bilke, which distressd her very much.

Ash Wednesday 4 March 1840

A fine day.  Emma went with Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers to the Abbey.  I went to St. Johns, shook hand with all the de Visnes.  Mr Marshall read the Prayers.  I went to Hornby’s to pay 7/- for cap ribbon that they had forgot to charge yesterday and then sat some time with Miss Workman.  Soon after Emma came home, we call’d on Mrs Brymer, who was not at home.  Met Miss Chambers in Laura Place.  She was going to see if they had made fires at no 10 in Pulteney Street, where she has taken lodgings for Mrs Stuckey, who is coming this evening.  We turnd back with her and look’d at the lodgings, which are very comfortable.  I call’d on Miss Drewett.  Miss Chambers did not like to go in, so Emma walk’d up and down with her.  Of course my visit to Miss Drewett was a short one.  We then went to Hornbys with Miss Chambers to get some handkerchiefs for a Mrs Cridland, a friend of hers and then came home.

Thursday 5 March 1840

A very fine day.  I wrote a long letter to Miss Wood and enclosed one of the Cambric handkerchiefs in it (paid 2d).  We calld on Mrs Thackery and found her at home, but fortunately the Misses were not.  We did not stay long, as Mrs Thackery had her cloak on to go out.   In our way down we calld at Mrs Chamier’s, who was not at home and then in our way to Miss Pyne’s, put my letter to Miss Wood into the Post Office, found Miss Pyne alone, as Miss Chambers was gone out with Miss Parsons, who is a stranger in Bath.  We were just coming away when they return’d, accompanied by Miss Michell, who was looking very pretty.  From there we went to Mrs Stuckey’s, who receiv’d us very kindly.  She likes her lodgings, which appear very comfortable.  Dear Miss Allen call’d while we were out.  Went to Hornby’s to pay for Mrs Criedland’s handkerchiefs and got 37d of nett for caps at 9d a yard.  Miss Shirley call’d.  Met Mrs Simpson, who told us that Dr Cooper thought he had received very great benefit from Mr R Smith’s prescriptions “There’s a feather in Reginald’s cap”.  Also met Mrs Drummond and walk’d up Brock Street with her.  Mrs Harrison’s lodgers went away.

Friday 6 March 1840

A most beautiful day.  Miss Chambers call’d early to walk with Emma to the College, who found Miss Wilson, tho better, still very poorly.  When she came back, we went to Miss Workman’s and by way of a walk for me, went to the end of Green Park Buildings and then to the end of Norfolk Crescent.  In our way there we sat some time with Miss Shirley.  The Admiral was not at home.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She has been confined with a cold and did not look well.  Mrs Uniack is staying with her.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, met Mrs Bradshaw and play’d Quadrille till twelve o’clock!  I won a 1/-, Emma lost 5/-!  Found a note from Miss Haugh on our return home, to ask us to meet “half a dozen friends and play a round game” tomorrow evening.

Saturday 7 March 1840

A beautiful day.  I wrote a note of excuse to Miss Haugh.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s after dinner and then took a long walk thro’ the Park, all over Salter’s new nursery ground and round the Park home.  Saw the Collapsed Head of Jupiter for the first time and do not admire it.  All together the Head is very good, but the stone work on which it stands is (to my taste) very much too high and the rocky stones scattered about the base of it have no meaning and have a very ugly and unfinished appearance.  I came home very tired, having walkd more than two hours.  Miss Workman went out in a Chair and call’d on Mr Templeman and took a long round.  Mr Calbeck call’d while we were out.  He is going to Devizes for a few days, but returns here before going to Salisbury.

Sunday 8 March 1840

A beautiful day.  We were at St. John’s twice.  Emma went to fetch Miss Pyne and we walk’d home with her afterwards and sat with her till Miss Parsons came home.  Met Miss Chambers just as we came out.  We call’d on Miss Workman after the afternoon Church and found her pretty well, not the worse for going out yesterday.  Miss Pyne ask’d us to tea tomorrow.  Met Miss Polwhele in Milsom Street.  She told us Mrs Hudson was very unwell.

Monday 9 March 1840

A very fine day.  I did not go out in the morning, having an uncomfortable cold in my head.  Emma went to Miss Hill’s to enquire after Hudson.  She did not see Miss Hill, as she was engaged (preparing for her card party this evening, I imagine).  Hudson was better.  Miss Pyne! and Miss Chambers call’d.  Miss Pyne did not come up stairs, but I went down to speak to her.  They came to say Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell were to meet us this evening.  Miss Fanny Hellican, Mrs Slade and Miss Hare call’d while we were at dinner, so we did not see them.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d.  They brought Miss Ashe’s card and a note of invitation to meet Mrs Chamier there on Wednesday to play Quadrille.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, met Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell and pass’d a chearful evening, but I like it better when we are there with only Miss Chambers.  We did not come away till eleven o’clock.  My cold but indifferent.

Tuesday 10 March 1840

A beautiful day again, for which we cannot be sufficiently grateful.  We call’d on Miss Ashe to say we would go to her tomorrow evening and were very kindly received by her and her sister, Mrs Bradshaw.  We then went to Mrs Drummond’s and spent half an hour very pleasantly with her. From there we went to Mrs Chamier’s, who was not at home.  Took her the “Observer” and then to Miss Shirley’s, where out visit was short, as Miss Ross came in and we went to Miss Workman’s and then came home.  Found Mrs Stuckey, Miss Michell had call’d while we were absent.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.

Wednesday 11 March 1840

A dull, gloomy looking day, but dry.  Emma went to walk with Miss Pyne directly after breakfast and did not return till after two o’clock.  Old Mr Hughes from Devizes call’d, looking as well and fresh colourd as a young man and said he could outwalk many young men, tho’ he completed his 80th year last November!!  We went out at 7 o’clock to Miss Ashe’s, as she requested, but Mrs Chamier did not arrive till more than half an hour after.  The tea things were brought in before she came and Mrs Bradshaw made the tea immediately after she came in, and as soon as that was finished, Mrs Bradshaw, Mrs Chamier, Emma and I sat down to Quadrille.  Miss Ashe declined playing.  We play’d three 5/- pools.  I held remarkably good cards and won 7/-, Emma lost 4/6d, not from bad cards but bad play.  We had cake and wine and did not come away till half past 11 o’clock, after spending a very pleasant evening.  We went and returned in Chairs.  Being the first visit, we did not know whether we could change our bonnets for caps.  Mrs Bradshaw desired our Chairs not to come till half past eleven.

Mrs Harrison let her lodgings to a gentleman and lady and man and maid servant.  They came in a Handsome open carriage with hack horses.

Thursday 12 March 1840

Just such a day as yesterday, with now and then a faint gleam of sun.  Emma went up to Mrs Turner’s directly after breakfast and Mrs Turner sent word she should keep her to dine.  Miss Hill call’d and sat some time.  Hudson has been dangerously ill, but is better.  Miss Chambers and Miss Parsons call’d and were very agreeable.  I gave Freeman 2/6d for a poor family.  I heard from Miss Wood.  I sent Ann at five o’clock to walk home with Emma but she came home just after Ann went away and brought a little bit of the Queen’s Bride cake from Miss Barry, who had a slice sent her from a gentleman who is attached to the “Board of Green Cloth”.

A cardboard box containing a piece of Queen Victoria's wedding cake. Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015
A cardboard box containing a piece of Queen Victoria’s wedding cake.
Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015

Thursday 13 March 1840

A fine day.  As soon as we had breakfasted, we went to Miss Workman’s and found her a good deal agitated and affected, having just heard that her late kind friend Mrs Bilke had left her a legacy of a thousand pounds!! which we rejoiced to hear.  After sitting some time with her, we call’d at Mirs Kiplin’s.  The old lady received us very kindly and shewd us her birds and her Green House.  From her we went to Mrs Chamier’s and staid a long time and then call’d on Miss Ashe, who was very obliging and lastly on Mrs Pierrepont, where we met Mrs Drummond, who told us she had heard from the Dr (Quarnier) Eliza was progressing and very busy at Dunannie.  They wish’d Mrs Drummond to go to them, to be present at the opening of the floating bridge, which is to take place in a few days.  Mrs Pierrepont has a very bad cold and looks ill.

Miss Hare, Miss F Hellican and a nephew and neice of the latter call’d while we were out.  Freeman shew’d them Miss Pynes old beautiful work’d shifts and shirt.

Mary came from Miss Workman to say she wish’d to see us tomorrow morning.  Miss Janetta Allen call’d while we were out.

Saturday 14 March 1840

A gloomy looking day, but it did not rain.  We went to Miss Workman’s, who only wanted to see us about having her bonnet altered.  From her we went to Miss Pyne’s.  She was gone to take the Water and we followed her to the Pump, but met her in Bath Street and walk’d home with her.  Miss Chambers soon came in and after eating a bun, we went over the Parade Bridge to Miss Hill’s, where we found Miss Polwhele.  There we had a slice of very nice home made cake and heard that Mrs Hudson was very much better.  We calld on the Miss Allens’, found only Miss Allen at home, nursing a cold, to go to Mrs Drummond’s in the evening.  We call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s door to enquire after her.  John said she was very poorly, but not worse.

Sunday 15 March 1840

We went to St. John’s, Emma going first, to walk with Miss Pyne there.  It began to rain between eleven and twelve o’clock and continued the rest of the day.  Mr de Visne did the whole Duty.  Shook hands with Mr and Mrs de Visne.  I was obliged to have a wheel chair home.  Emma staid with Miss Pyne in the old Clerks ? room, till the door of the Hetling pump room was opened for her to take the Water, and then she came home, I having sent Ann with the umbrella down to her.  She, luckily, met a chair in her way and sent it to take Miss Pyne home.  I had a not from Miss Chamier in the evening to ask us to tea tomorrow, as they had prevailed on Miss Workman to come.

Monday 16 March 1840

Cloudy with now and then bright sun, but very cold.  We neither of us went out.  I sent to enquire after Mrs Pierrepont.  She was better.  We had a succession of visiters, first Miss Braband and Mrs Dyke, the latter particularly pleasant, the former not otherwise, then dear Miss Janetta Allen.  While she was here Mrs Slade of Pulteney Street and Miss Hughes of Devizes.  As they were going down stairs, Miss Drewett and her constant attendant Mr Iveson came up.  They had not been gone long before Mrs and Miss Chamier came.  They said Miss Workman had sent to say she did not feel well enough to go to them today, but still they hoped to see us or, if more convenient to us, tomorrow, as Emma’s cold was but indifferent.  I said we would go tomorrow.  Miss Shirley call’d while we were at dinner.  She said she would call again, but did not.  Portbury brought two News Papers from Mrs Chamier and I sent 6 back by her.

Tuesday 17 March 1840

A very fine day, but a very cold cutting easterly wind.  We call’d at Miss Pyne’s for a few minutes and then went to the Miss Hellicans.  Found dear Mrs Jane and Miss Fanny quite well and Miss Martha nearly recovered from her accident.  Mrs Slade and Miss Hare were not at home, but the former came in just as we were coming away.  We walk’d down the Bridge and call’d on Mrs Slade and Miss Hughes, who were not at home and then cross’d Bathwick Bridge and call’d on Mrs Dyke and Miss Brabant in Beaufort Buildings. They were not at home, but Miss Dyke was and was very pleasant.  Mrs Dyke came in soon after we got there and was very friendly and pleasant.

Emma took Miss Pyne’s curious work’d shirt and shifts to shew them, with which they were much pleased.  We call’d on Mrs Fry, who was at dinner, so we were not admitted.  In our way home we met Miss Brabant, who was very gracious and so much obliged by our taking the trouble to walk so far to call on her.   She had a gentleman walking with her.

We spent the evening at Mrs Chamier’s as pleasantly as usual.  Miss Pyne ask’d us for tomorrow evening.  Call’d at Miss Workman’s, found her pretty well.  I heard from Mrs Keen, to get her some more cotton.

Wednesday 18 March 1840

A dry day, but threatening rain.  Miss Shirley call’d and paid a visit.  Miss Drewett also call’d and ask’d us for tomorrow evening.  I said we were engaged, for I did not want to go.  She then said would we come on Friday.  I was obliged to say “yes”. We spent a very chearful evening at Miss Pyne’s, only ourselves.  Fanny Parsons was very pleasant.  She is going with Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell to the Ball tomorrow evening, to the Play, Saturday and to the subscription Ball on Monday.  We call’d on Miss Pyne and in our way got the cotton for Mrs Keen.

Thursday 19 March 1840

A very fine day.  Emma went to walk with Miss Pyne and heard that the party to the Ball was put off, Mrs Stuckey being unwell and Miss Mitchell having a cold and sore throat.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s, at Mrs Pierrepont’s door to enquire after her, (she was much better and had been out in the Carriage) and at Mrs Dorset Fellows’s, where we spent a pleasant half hour.  She ask’d us to tea this evening, but I said we were engaged.  I wrote to Mrs Keen and heard from Mrs Wood, Maria’s mother, with directions how to send the handkerchiefs.

Mrs Harrison’s lodgers went away.

Friday 20 March 1840

A fine day.  I wrote a note to Mrs Wood and did up the handkerchiefs in a small parcel and took them to Mr Tucker, who very civilly said he would forward them to London.  I directed the parcel for Mrs Wood to the care of Mrs Nelson, The Bull Inn, Aldgate, London (for Mr Wood of Blakersham).  From there we went to Mrs Stuckey’s.  She was much better, but Miss Mitchell’s cold still indifferent.  While we were there, Miss Chambers came in and we left her there.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s.  We went to Miss Drewett’s in the evening, met Mr Iveson and play’d Cassino, stupid enough Mr Iveson walkd home with us.  While we were out in the morning Miss Wilson call’d.  She left word she had been to Mrs Drummond, who she found in bed with a cold.  Miss Mitchell gave me a cambric handkerchief to mark for her, with her initials E. D. M.  I saw Sir Thomas Fellowes pass down the street!

Saturday 21 March 1840

A beautiful bright day, but very cold.  We took some News Papers to Mrs Chamier’s, where we staid some time and then Emma went to walk with Miss Pyne and I went to the Exhibition in Quiet Street, where I had engaged to meet Miss Chambers and Miss Parsons, who had, with Miss Maria Hellican, Miss Hare and Mrs Crickland just got up stairs before me.  I staid two hours and a half with them, without sitting down and tho’ I did not feel tired at the time, I felt it in the evening.  Both Miss Chambers and Miss Parsons appeard very much amused and pleased with the pictures.  Emma was not come home when I returned, but came soon after.  I markd Miss Mitchell’s handkerchief.

Met Mrs Evans in the street and had a long conversation with her about Miss Workman and whether she had done anything in her Will for Mary!  The clock stopped almost directly after I wound it up.  Met Mr Thackery, who was very gracious.

Sunday 22 March 1840

Such a gloomy looking morning we took our umbrellas to St. John’s with us.  Emma went to fetch Miss Pyne and I walkd down straight to the Chapel.  Mr de Visne did the Duty to a very full congregation.  We walk’d home with Miss Pyne, but did not see either of her nieces, as they were not come home from Church.  We met Miss Burmester at the afternoon Service, the congregation at which was very small.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s in our way home and sat some time with her.  Mrs and Miss Chamier had been there just before us.  Young Henry kindly sent us the “New Zealand Journal” the 4th time and the 4th number.

St John's Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
St John’s Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Monday 23 March 1840

A wet morning, heavy rain mix’d with snow and a very high wind.  The rain blew off between eleven and twelve and the sun shone very bright, but with occasional very heavy black clouds and now (and) then a few drops of rain.  I sent to Mr Noble to come and see what was the matter with the clock.  A young man came from him, who said it wanted cleaning and took it away for that purpose.  We did not go out all day and no one call’d.  Mary brought a message from Miss Workman to beg if we went out tomorrow we would call on her.  Mr Scott sent us the Devizes Paper.

Tuesday 24 March 1840

A bright sunny morning, but it became very dark between 11 and 12 and there was a very heavy shower of snow, succeeded by bright sun and then another Snow Shower, followed by beautiful sunshine again.  We did not go out till after dinner, when we call’d on Miss Workman and Mrs Drummond.  The latter was too unwell to see any body.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, met Mrs Stuckey, Miss Parsons and a Miss Crickland, a good humourd, agreeable girl.  Spent a chearful pleasant evening.  It was very cold both going and returning. A cutting north east wind all day.

Wednesday 25 March 1840

Much such a day as yesterday.  Snow, showers and sun and very cold.  We did not go out all day.  The dear Miss Allens call’d, as did Miss Shirley.  The latter staid a long time.  I had a note from Miss Ashe to ask us to meet Mrs Chamier and “play low Loo” on Friday, but as we  did not wish to go, I sent word we were engaged.  Had a note in the evening from Miss Shirley to ask us to dine tomorrow!!  “better late than never”.

I paid Mr Vezey a quarters rent £13.2.6 due today.  Sent the “Observer” Paper to dear Miss Pyne and was surprised and concerned to hear on Ann’s return that she was very unwell, having fainted away twice, but Mr Kitson had assured them there was nothing alarming in the attack.  Mary Freeman came in the afternoon to meet little Robert Pyne, who was coming from Pitney to school at the College.  He came here and had some tea with Freeman (which I was not aware of till after he was gone, as I should have had him with us), after which she and Mary walk’d with him to Grosvenor Place.  Mary slept here.

Thursday 26 March 1840

A fine morning, but very cold.  I sent to enquire after Miss Pyne and Mrs Drummond, the former “a great deal better”, the latter “better than yesterday, but still very indifferent”.  We dined at Admiral Shirley’s, only ourselves, very chearful and pleasant, The Admiral went out in the evening and we spent it with Georgina.  At dinner, cod and oyster sauce, beautiful roast fowls, sausages, mashed potatoes, broccoli, custardy pudding and a delicious apple tart.  Oranges, apples, French plumbs and almonds.

Calll’d on Miss Workman and Miss Pyne.  Found Miss Parsons alone in the drawing room, but Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers soon came down, the former much better, the latter but poorly.  Miss Mitchell came in to take Miss Parsons to the Catholic College.  We sat some time.  After they were gone and in our way home, to our astonishment met Dr Cooper in Milsom, looking very ill.  He had been to call on us and I wished him to return, but he excused himself on account of his health.  Mrs Cooper and Miss Yeatman are with him and they are at number three on the South Parade.  He is come to try the Waters.  If they agree with him, he talks of staying three weeks.  We had a long conversation in the street, which might have continued much longer, but Sir John Smith came up and we took our leave.  Miss Yeatman call’d with him, but had left him before we met.

Friday 27 March 1840

A fine day, but extremely cold.  Emma was not very well, so I went by myself to call on Mrs Cooper, who received me very kindly, as did the Dr.  Miss Yeatman was not at home.  I sat a very long time with them, as both they and I had much to say.  I never saw Mrs Cooper looking so well as she does now.  She is grown very fat, which is a great improvement and she really looks better and younger than when she married.  From them I went to Miss Pyne’s and found her better.  I then went up with some News Papers to Mrs Chamier’s, met her just at the rooms in her way to us.  I went on and sat half an hour with dear Georgina.  Mrs Chamier ask’d us to go there this evening (Miss Ashe had put off her Loo party), but as Emma was poorly, I thought we had better not go out at night and she very kindly begg’d, if Emma was well enough, we would drink tea with her tomorrow.

Saturday 28 March 1840

Fine, but still very cold.  We did not go out till the evening.  Dr Cooper call’d and sat an hour and a half and was most friendly and pleasant.  Soon after he was gone, the dear Miss Allens call’d.  We spent the evening very chearfully at Mrs Chamier’s.

Sunday 29 March 1840

A fine morning.  We went to St. John’s twice and call’d on Miss Pyne after the morning Service.  Miss Chambers was not at home.  While we were there, Miss Martha Hellican came in and we left her there.  We went to Church earlier than usual in the afternoon and found only the Miss Allens there, with whom we had a long chat before any other person came in.  Mr de Visne did the Duty, both morning and afternoon.   We walkd with the Miss Alllens to their own house, in our way to Miss Workman’s, where we met Mrs Evans, who was very pleasant and chatty.  I had a letter from Mr Pigou enclosing one to him from Mr Stewardson and two Powers of Attorney for me to sign, empowering Mr Stewardson to receive £790!! and remit it to me.

Monday 30 March 1840

A fine day.  Emma went to Miss Hill’s and took Miss Pyne’s curious shirt and shifts to shew to Mrs Hudson, who was not well enough to come here to see them.  Mr Evans had the kindness to call here relative to the American money.  One of the powers must be altered, as they have designated me “Only child of H Chapman”, and the other I must go to Bristol to have witness’d by the American Consul there.  I wrote to Mr Pigou and returned him, as he desired, Mr Stewardon’s letter.  I also wrote to dear Henry.  Miss Hill ask’d us to tea this evening, but I did not feel inclined to go and was fortunate we did not, as it rained in the evening.  I had a message from Miss Wilson to say she and Miss Harvey would drink tea with us on Wednesday, if we were disengaged.

Eyres lodgers went away.

Tuesday 31 March 1840

A showery day.  We went half way down Milsom Street, intending to call on Mrs Cooper, but were driven back by the rain.  Miss Drewett call’d and while she was here Dr Cooper came.  He sat a very long time.  He thinks himself better and the Water appears to agree with him.  I wrote to Mrs Scott to enquire if Cheltenham was a warm and comfortable situation for an invalid in the winter, at Dr Cooper’s request, as he has some thoughts of wintering there, should he live.

Fashion plate for April 1840 from Godey's Magazine (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for April 1840 from Godey’s Magazine
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Wednesday 1 April 1840

A good deal of rain in the course of the day, so much so we thought it would prevent Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey, but it did not.  The former came early in the day and staid with a friend till near 6 o’clock and then came to us, and the latter join’d her here at the time, it having cleared up sufficiently in the afternoon for her to walk in.  We play’d at Cassino and they were very chearful.

I heard from Mrs Quarnier, her own writing dated “London”!!!

Thursday 2 April 1840

A very fine day.  We went early to Mrs Cooper’s and were very kindly received by them all.  I had not seen Miss Yeatman before.  We sat a long time chatting to the Dr and Miss Yeatman.  A Miss Bowles, who we found there preventing any one but herself from speaking to Mrs Cooper. When she rose to go away, I did the same, but the Dr insisted on our staying for “you have not been able to exchange a word with Mary.”, so we sat down and staid half an hour longer.  The Dr very kindly asked us when we would come and drink tea.  I said any day that they were disengaged and Mrs Cooper said then come this evening.  From there we went to Miss Pyne’s, found her alone, did not stay long with her, as we had to go to Pulteney Street, but first went to Moore’s, to have my watch set and then to get some steel pens for Mrs Keen.  We then call’d at Mrs Partis’s, who has just lost her sister and was too unwell to see any body, and lastly at Miss Hill’s, who was not at home.  Mrs Hudson was better.  In our way home we encountered Mrs and Miss Chamier in New Bond Street and we walk’d together as far as the middle of Milsom Street.  They had call’d on us, as had Miss Hill and Mrs Pierrepont while we were out.  We went to Mrs Cooper at half past six, saw the Dr walking on the Parade and joined him till I was quite tired.  We spent a pleasant evening and walkd home a little after ten.  The Dr was very desirous that his man should come with us, but I declined it.  I heard from Mrs Keen.  Her letter was written on one side of the sheet of paper, on the other half of which was a view of the “Earth slide” at Lyme.  I wrote to her and enclosed her two of the dozen pens I bought for her this morning.  We went to Finegan’s with a message from Mrs Quarnier.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Mitchell call’d so late, they did not go away till a few minutes before 6 o’clock.  Met Miss Grevile, a friend of the Miss Hellicans and Mrs Turner’s.  She askd if it would be agreeable to exchange morning visits.

Lyme Regis Landslip, No.4, the Beach under the Cliff Showing the Mass of Rock in the Sea Forced up by the Landslip by unknown artist c.1840 (c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Lyme Regis Landslip, No.4, the Beach under the Cliff Showing the Mass of Rock in the Sea Forced up by the Landslip, by unknown artist c.1840
(c) Somerset County Museums Service; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday 3 April 1840

A very fine day.  We went to Miss Workman’s soon after breakfast and paid her a long visit.  I have not seen her so well and so chearful for a long time past.  Her kind friend Mrs Bilke’s bequest of £10.0.0 was free of the legacy duty and to be paid immediately.  From her we went to the Miss Allens’.  While we were there Miss Bowes came in, but did not stay many minutes.  Miss Allen ask’d us to spend this evening with them.  From there we went to Mrs Pierrepont’s.  She was out and then to Mrs Chamier’s, where we found Miss Webb.  We staid there a long time and then went to Camden Place and call’d at Mr Thornton and Mrs Simpson’s, both of whom were out.  In our way home, we call’d at Mrs Drummond’s.  She was preparing to go out in a Wheel Chair, so we did not see her.  We met Miss Burmester at the Miss Allens’ in the evening, where she appears a great favourite, which she is not of mine.  There is a manliness about her, which to me is not pleasant and her voice is particularly unpleasant and harsh.  She appears very good temperd.  The dear, kind hearted Miss Allens were quite distressd at our waking and when Prudence was putting our cloaks and opend the door for us she “hoped we would have John to walk home with us.”

Mr Wiltshire call’d while we were out, which vex’d us, as we have not seen him for some time.

Saturday 4 April 1840

A fine day, but every body said very cold.  Neither Emma or I went out.  Miss Barry call’d and while she was here Miss Grevile call’d and was very glad to meet her.  They both sat some time, the latter long after Miss Barry and was extremely agreeable.

I heard from Mrs Scott.

Sunday 5 April 1840

A fine day.  I went straight to St. John’s in the morning.  Emma went to fetch Miss Pyne.  I staid to the Communion, they did not.  Saw Miss Grevile, who also staid.  When we came out, we found Emma and Miss Pyne at the Hetling Pump.  We walkd home with Miss Pyne and found Miss Chambers and William Pyne’s eldest boy Robert there.  Robert appears a nice boy, the image of his father.  We went to Church again in the afternoon.  Mr de Visne did the whole Duty, both morning and afternoon.  The Congregation was crowded in the morning and fuller than usual in the afternoon.  We sat a long time with Miss Workman.  In our way home we call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  They were at dinner, so we did not see them.  We met Mrs Slade and Miss Fanny Hellican as we were going to Church the second time.  They gave a favourable report of all the family.  Miss Workman ask’d us to tea tomorrow.

Monday 6 April 1840

A fine day, but a very high and cold wind.  We went out to call at two or three places, but at the top of Milsom Street we met Dr Cooper coming to us.  He said if we were going to walk  (he) would go with us.  We took a long route up to Marlborough Street and call’d on Miss Grevile, who was not at home.  We returned with the Dr as far as the White Hart, where we left him and went on to Mrs Cooper’s, where we sat half an hour with her and Miss Yeatman.  As we were coming away, Miss Horner (a very pretty girl) came in.  The Horners of Mells park, are staying with the Coopers a few days.  The wind was so cold and rough we could hardly stand in St. James’s Square and made walking very unpleasant.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d while we were out.  We drank tea with Miss Workman, who was in very good spirits and said she felt very comfortable.  There was a shower between five and six o’clock, but did not last long and it was quite dry and fine when we came home.  Had a card from Miss Haugh “Music, the 29th.”  Heard from Mrs Keen to say she did not wish to have such expensive pens and to beg I would send her a card at a shilling, which I got in my way home from Mrs Cooper’s.

Milsom Street Bath c1806, courtesy of the British Library. Charles Jagger (1770-1827) was resident there around 1811 and Fanny was living at the time of her death in 1871
Milsom Street Bath c1806, courtesy of the British Library.
Fanny was living here at the time of her death in 1871.

Tuesday 7 April 1840

A disagreeable cold showery day.  I had a note from dear Georgina Chamier to ask us there this evening.  We were engaged to Miss Pyne, but I knew it would make no difference to her if we went tomorrow instead, so I said we would go to Mrs Chamier’s and Emma went to Miss Pyne’s to put off our visit to her, which she, with her usual kindness, allowd us to do.  Mr Wiltshire call’d.  He was very well and in good spirits.

We met Miss Webb at Mrs Chamier’s and pass’d a very pleasant, chearful evening.  Fortunately it was fine, both going and coming home.  Sent a note of excuse to Miss Haugh for the 29th.

Wednesday 8 April 1840

A cold, showery day.  We did not go out in the morning.  Freeman’s sister Betsey brought her little black Spaniel that Freeman is so fond of to shew us.  It is a good tempered little thing, but not a beauty.  It staid the whole day and ran about the house as if it had been at home.  Dr Cooper call’d (he is very attentive and kind).  Miss Shirley came in and he went away, as it was past his time for taking the Water, which appears to be of great service to him. Georgina sat till Miss Yeatman came in and then she went away.  The latter was very obliging and agreeable, but she really looks like a little old, ranting? nurse.

It rained so fast between six and seven o’clock, I was fearful we should not be able to go to Miss Pyne’s, but it ceased before seven and the streets soon dried.  Miss Pyne was not very well.  She had walk’d too much in the cold wind in the morning and it had made her uncomfortable, but she was much better when we came away, which we did not do till 11 o’clock, I fancying it was only ten!  There was no one there but ourselves, which I was very glad of.  It was dry for us to come home.  I wrote a note to Mr Wiltshire to beg he would call tomorrow to sign my Certificate.  Mrs Harrison let her lodging to an old gentleman and lady with a man and maid servant.

Thursday 9 April 1840

A very fine day all through.  Not one shower, but a very cold wind.  I did not go out, as I expected Mr Wiltshire, who did not come till very late for him, past 3 o’clock.  He wrote a note here, which he had forgotten to write at home and I sent it to his house, as he was not going to return there, the Carriage coming here to take him to Shockerwick.

Miss Hill call’d and paid a long visit.  She gives a very indifferent acount of poor Mrs Hudson!  After tea Emma went to Miss Workman’s and staid till between eight and nine o’clock.  Mary walk’d home with her.  Freeman went up to old Tuggeys to walk back with her sister Mary, who spent the afternoon there.  The dear Miss Allens sent us a nice piece of Griskin.  Mrs Gwyn brought it.  I begg’d her to come up and she sat down and told us all her distresses at the death of poor old James.

Friday 10 April 1840

A beautiful mild day.  I had a letter from Mr Pigou enclosing one from Mr Stewartson to say he had sent a Bill of Exchange for £209.4.6 at 60 day’s sight, for which I am to send my receipt to Mr Pigou.  We went out early and call’d on Mr Evans, but he was not at home.  We then went to Miss Workman, found her pretty well.  From her we went to Mrs Chamier’s, who we heard was not very well yesterday, but she was pretty well again today.  When we came home we heard Dr Cooper had call’d twice, telling Freeman he had had a note he wished to shew us.  Soon after we had dined, Mr Evans very kindly call’d about the American money.  He had scarcely sat down when Dr Cooper came in and gave us a note to read he had received from Lady Cooper, to announce the approaching marriage of Sir George Baker with a Miss Isabella Sutton.  It is to take place in May or June and from Lady Cooper’s manner of speaking of it, the match is a very appropriate and agreeable one to her.  Her Note was written the same as her late letters to me, words left out and others transposed.  She desires Dr Cooper will tell us the news.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld, only the latter came up stairs.  She came to borrow a stool of mine which is lower than a chair.  I went down to speak to Mrs Chamier and she ask’d us to go there tomorrow evening.  They sent James Burke to fetch the stool.  An addition to the lodgers at Mrs Harrisons arrived this afternoon, a gentleman, two ladies, a little child, its doll and a maid servant.

Saturday 11 April 1840

A fine day.  Emma went down to Miss Pyne’s.  I staid at home to write to Mr Pigou.  I sent him my receipt for the £209.4.6 and Mr Stewartson a letter.   Ann put the letter in the Post and paid 2d for it.  I had just finished it when Miss Chambers came to ask me to go with her to get some cambrick handkerchiefs for Mrs Crickland.  While I was putting on my bonnet, Emma returned and we all went together.  I got a dozen at £1.1.6, which Miss Chambers liked very much.  We then went with her to the Pump Room for her Water, where we found Mrs Simpson also taking hers.  She ask’d me to sit down and have a little chat, so Miss Chambers left us there.  Soon after, Mrs Hawksley came, as she is drinking the Water.  She began conversing with Mrs Simpson and I addressed her.  She was very polite.  After talking a few minutes, we took our leave and proceeded to Dr Cooper’s (Mrs Simpson giving me her card to leave there).  In our way we met Mrs Cooper.  She said we should find Miss Yeatman at home, but the Dr, who was very poorly, was out.  We sat some time with Miss Yeatman and then call’d for a few minutes at Miss Pyne’s.  We afterwards met the Dr in the Abbey Church yard, who said he felt very unwell (and in truth he look’d very ill).  Something had disagreed with his stomach.  He felt he wanted the Cheltenham Water and he should be off for Cheltenham as soon as he could.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s. When we got there we found that Georgina had had a ticket given her for Ladies’ Benefit and was gone to the Theatre, but she came home before eleven o’clock.  She said the House was crowded and unpleasantly hot.  Emma call’d with Miss Pyne at Mrs Stuckey, where she met Mr and Mrs Bradney, the latter was very obliging, shook hands and said she was very glad to see her.  Miss Mitchell very kindly lent us the 2 first numbers of “Master Humphrey’s Clock”.

Cheltenham Pump Room
The Pitville Pump Room, Cheltenham

Sunday 12 April 1840

A very wet day.  It did not cease raining once during the day, but it was a soft mild rain that will do a great deal of good and was much wanted.  We did not go out, but read the Prayers twice at home.  I heard from Peter Touray with £15.15.6, my half yearly Annuity and wrote to him to acknowledge the receipt of it.

Monday 13 April 1840

A beautiful day. After the rain of yesterday, quite Summerish.  We call’d at Mrs Stuckey’s to return “Master Humphrey’s clock”.  We did not see Miss Mitchell, she being up stairs preparing to go out.  From her we crossd over to Mrs Bradney’s, who was not at home.  We then went to Dr Cooper’s, met him (still very unwell) in Pierrepont Street.  He said Mrs Cooper and Miss Yeatman were both out, so we walk’d with him as far as the Abbey Church and then returned to Miss Pyne’s, where I heard Miss Pyne had engaged Emma to pass the day with her tomorrow! as Miss Chambers is going with Mrs Stuckey to Clifton to see poor Juliana Pyne who, with her sister Jane and brother John, is staying there.  We call’d at the Miss Allens’, who were not at home and then went to Miss Workman’s, who we found wonderfully well and in very good spirits, tho’ rather tired, having been out a long time in a Wheel Chair, which she enjoy’d very much.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d just as we were going to breakfast!  She ask’d us to tea tomorrow, but we were engaged to Miss Pyne.  She fix’d on Saturday for us to go to her.  Miss Shirley also calld, but did not stay long as our dinner was ready.

Tuesday 14 April 1840

A fine day.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s as soon as we had breakfasted. My head was very uncomfortable and my eyes dazzled so much I could scarcely see to write, which I began to do, to congratulate Lady Cooper on Sir George Baker’s approaching marriage.  It was better after I had dined and I took my letter to her Ladyship to the Post and then went on to Dr Cooper’s, who I again met in my way.  He was a little better.  I told him of my disagreeables, he very kindly enquired into my complaint and laughing said “A dose is the only thing.  Tell Mrs Cooper to give you two of my pills.”, which she did.  I spent half an hour pleasantly with her and Miss Yeatman and then returned home.  I had a note from Mrs Cooper before I went out with a little book call’d “The Happy Mute”, which she had ask’d me before if I had seen.  It is written by a lady who by the methods described in it had taught a Deaf and Dumb child to read and write and comprehend every thing!!  I thought she only intended to lend it to me, but she meant it as a gift.  At half past six I joined Emma at Miss Pyne’s, who I found sleeping after her dinner.  She had taken a long walk in the morning and felt rather tired, but her tea (which I made) refreshed her and she was in good spirits.  We were waited on by her nice, quiet servant Ann, who came from Charlton last night, to the great discomfiture of Mary Ann, who had much rather she had remained at Charlton, that she might have had no one to interfere with her here.  Ann went to fetch Miss Chambers from Mrs Stuckey’s between 9 and 10.  She had had a very pleasant day at Clifton, but brought a very unfavourable report of poor dear Juliana, of whose recovery Dr Simmons says there is not a shadow of hope.  Her brother cannot be persuaded of her danger, nor is she herself aware of it.  We came away about half an hour after Miss Chambers came back and had a beautiful moonlight walk home.

We did not have dear Henry’s “Observer”!!!

I call’d at Miss Workman’s, but did not see her, as she was a dinner.  Mary told me she had taken a walk!!! and a long one for her and that she thought herself the better for it, tho’ she was a good deal tired.

Wednesday 15 April 1840

A beautiful day again.  I sent to enquire after Dr Cooper, who is better, as I know from his prescription.  Neither Emma or I went out.  Miss Wilson call’d.  She came to enquire if we could assist her in getting a poor little child of 6 years old, who has had a parallytic stroke! into the hospital.  I told her I would ask Mr Wiltshire if it could be done and how we were to set about it and let her know.   Miss Workman sent to enquire after me.  Mary said she was pretty well, but felt tired with her walk of yesterday and had not been out today.

Mrs Harrison’s lodgers went away this morning and another set took their place before dinner!!  A lady and three daughters, one of them an invalid and strongly resembles poor Juliana Pyne, as she sits in her Chair at the window, supported by cushions.

Thursday 16 April 1840

A very fine day.  I wrote a note to Mr Wiltshire abut getting the child into the hospital.  Soon after I had sent it to Broad Street, I had one from him from Shockerwick to say he had so bad a cold he could not come into the Concert and sending us his ticket, so my note will not reach him till the servant goes back.

As soon as we had dined, we went out to find some one who was going to the Concert, who would take Emma with them.  We call’d first at the Miss Allens’, they were out, but their housemaid said she did not think they were going, but she would let us know.  We then went to the Miss Hellican’s, saw dear Mrs Jane, Miss Martha and Mrs Slade, all very well, particularly Mrs Jane.  They were none of them going.  After staying some time with them we went to Mrs Cooper’s, saw her and Miss Yeatman.  The Dr was better and gone to to take the Water.  We then call’d at Miss Pyne’s, but did not stay many minutes.  She ask’d us to come and meet Fanny Parsons and her brother William this evening.  We told her Emma was going to the Choral Concert, but I would come.  From her we went to Mrs Chamier’s.  They were out, but Portbury said she knew Miss Chamier was going to the Concert with Mr Mackey, who came unexpectedly last night, but Mrs Chamier had a headache and was not going.  She would give our message to Miss Chamier as soon as she came home.  In our way to the Miss Allens’ (who sent word they were not going to the Concert), we met Mr and Mrs Evans.  They had just seen Miss Workman in her Wheel Chair, so we did not go to her.  Soon after we came home Emma had a very kind note from dear Georgina Chamier to say she should be happy to have Emma with her and to beg she would meet her in the Lobby and I had an equally kind one from Mrs Chamier, begging me to spend the evening with her but, being engaged to Miss Pyne, I could not go.  I went to Miss Pyne’s before the Chair came to take Emma to the Rooms, intending to call first at Mrs Cooper’s to tell her the Service at the Octagon would be at 3 o’clock tomorrow, but I met Dr Cooper at the Corner of the Parade and told him, which saved me going on.  He said he was better, but not so well as before this attack.  There was only Mr W Parsons and his sister at Miss Pyne’s, the former is going to Bristol on Saturday and returns in the evening to his Aunt’s and as I am obliged to see the American Consul there, they persuaded me to go on that day, as we should feel more comfortable than going by ourselves and he was so kind to say he would go to the Consul’s Office with us.

Freeman came to fetch me and Emma came home very soon after me, after spending a very pleasant evening at the Concert with dear Georgina Chamier, Miss Webb and Mr Mackay.

I wrote to Miss Wilson to tell her Mr Wiltshire was not able to leave Shockerwick and therefore I could not gain any intelligence about the child’s admission into the hospital.

Good Friday, 17 April 1840

A very fine day, but a very high cold north east wind.  We went to St. John’s twice.  Emma call’d to take Miss Pyne, but found she was going to the Abbey.  In our way home from Church we call’d at Miss Workman’s, who we found very well and went to Miss Pyne’s before going to Church the second time.  She and Miss Chambers were just coming out to walk, so we all came down stairs together.  To our surprise Mrs Stuckey was at St. John’s alone, so we walkd home with her, the young peaple having gone out to amuse themselves.  Just as we were coming away, Miss Chambers came in and we left her there and came home.

Saturday 18 April 1840

A very fine day.  Mr Parsons and little Robert Pyne came a few minutes before ten to take us to the Coach.  We found a young woman seated in it, who never spoke one word and was not at all accommodating the whole way.  Just before starting, to our great surprise, Mr Mackay made his appearance and accompanied us to Bristol.  When we got there Mr Parsons very kindly went with us to the American Consul (a very queer old man, but very civil in his way) where I signed the Power of Attorney to send to Mr Stewartson and Emma and Mr Parsons witnessed it.  We then went with him to see the ship he is going out in, but when we reached it, he found it was to sail on Monday instead of Tuesday and there was so much bustle and confusion on board it would not have been safe for us to venture.  We left him there and walk’d along the Quay and over the Draw Bridge to the Shoe Shop, where Emma was measured for a pr of Cork shoes and both of us for Gloster Boots.  We then enquired our way to Dowry Square (which was a long walk) and went to the Pyne’s lodgings, where we found Jane and poor dear Juliana! both very much pleased to see us, but the latter quite delighted.  I fear we shall never see her again, for she appears to me to have arrived at the last stage of Consumption!  Captain Pyne very soon came in and was very friendly and obliging.  We had some luncheon, after which Kate (who was out when we arrived) returned.  We sat with them till 9 o’clock (they pressing us to stay and dine, but that I could not do) and then Captain Pyne and Jane would walk down with us to the Coach, for which we were so much too early that we went to three or four shops with them, looked into the Exchange and went back to the College Green to see if we could get into the Cathedral, but it was shut.  We then returned to the Coach Office, where I prevail’d (with great difficulty) on them to leave us till the Coach arrived, when we got in and found Mr Mackie there.  Mr Parsons could not return till the last Coach.  Before we came home, we went to Miss Pyne’s to tell her William could not come back with us.  I was a good deal tired, but not so much as I expected, considering how many miles we walkd’ in the course of the day.

The Floating Harbour, Bristol by Charles Parsons Knight, 1839 (c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Floating Harbour, Bristol by Charles Parsons Knight, 1839
(c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

When we returned we found Dr Cooper, Mr Wiltshire and Mrs Drummond. The former told Freeman he was going to Cheltenham on Monday, Mrs Cooper on Tuesday.  He came up stairs and very kindly wrote a prescription for his pills for me.  Mr Wiltshire also wrote a note here about the admission to the hospital.  I wrote a note to Miss Wilson.  Mrs Bradney call’d.

Easter Sunday, 19 April 1840

A fine day.  We went to St. John’s twice.  Miss Pyne came with Ann.  We all staid to the Communion, which was fully attended.  Emma fetched Miss Pyne to the afternoon Service and we walk’d home with her afterwards.  Miss Chambers was not well and did not go to Church.  Miss Pyne ask’d us to go down after dinner to shake hands with William Parsons and wish him a prosperous voyage, which we did.  We found his brother James there, who came from Langport to see the last of him.  We staid with them half an hour and then went to take leave of the Coopers, where we heard to my great surprise that Morgan Yeatman had arrived the night before to accompany them to Cheltenham.  He and Dr Cooper went out.  We sat with Mrs Cooper and Miss Yeatman till it was quite dusk and were fortunate enough to meet the Dr and Morgan in Pierrepont Street.  Morgan appeard very much pleased to see us and said he would call as soon as he had breakfasted tomorrow.  The Dr also kindly said he would call if he possibly could.  I had a very obliging kind letter from Mr Pigou.

Monday 20 April 1840

A fine day.  Morgan Yeatman call’d early and paid a long visit.  He was very friendly and kind.  He had not been gone many minutes before Dr Cooper kindly came.  He had not been here more than a quarter of an hour when in came Mrs Brabant and her son Herbert, to my great annoyance, not but I was very glad to see Mrs Brabant, but it was unlucky she should just chance to come when Dr Cooper was here, as it prevented my hearing his plans and where he was going from Cheltenham, as he went away when she came in.  They did not stay very long, as a lady call’d for them and she would not come up.  Mrs Chamier call’d and sat some time.  Mr Mackie and Georgina joined her here, the latter all life and spirits and looking very pretty in a becoming new pink bonnet from “Madame Lanouch”.  Mr Wiltshire kindly sent us two tickets for the Horticultural Gardens tomorrow.

I bought two straw bonnets trimmed with white at Miss Smith’s.  the Eyres let their lodging to a gentleman and lady and three young ladies with a handsome Carriage, a Mr and Mrs Purnell.

Tuesday 21 April 1840

A dry day with a very rough cold easterly wind.  We call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, who is looking as well as he did twenty years ago.  Sat some time with Miss Shirley and then went to Miss Workman’s.  We did not stay long there, as we were to dine early to go to the Horticultural Meeting at their new Gardens in the Park.  We did not go till late, in the hope of having less crowd, but there were still an immense number of peaple there and we could not at first get into the flower stands, but when we did, we were repaid for our trouble, for the flowers were beautiful and many of the plants curious and rare, among others a very fine plant of the “Indian Rubber tree”.  There were some beautiful strawberries, a very fine pine apple and a quantity of the finest forced mushrooms I ever saw.  I do not like the situation they have chosen for their garden.  It is very bleak and exposed, without a tree for shade and altogether the reverse of Sidney Gardens, which were  beautiful and exactly calculated for such an Exhibition, with ample room  for the company as well as the plants.  The wind was extremely cold and so rough we were blown about most uncomfortably.  We saw a good many people we knew, Colonel Eyre, Mrs Dorset Fellows, Mrs Simpson, Miss Hare, Miss Grevile, Miss Haugh, Miss Fillingham, Mr Kitson, Miss Crook and Mr and Mrs Evans.  I came home very tired.  I had a note in the evening from Mr Wiltshire to say he was not well enough to go to Miss Richards’s Concert tomorrow and sent us his ticket  I heard from Mrs Barnes with the poor child’s case and took it to the hospital.  The Registrar (Mr Brett) was very kind and said he would do all in his power to forward its admission, but he fear’d it was too young, being only 5 years and 7 months old.  I wrote to Mr Pigou and sent him the Power of Attorney to forward to America.

Wednesday 22 April 1840

A fine day.  Miss Chambers came early for us to go with her to Hornby’s to buy a black satin gown for Miss Pyne.  She got a very nice one for 4/6 a yard.  I bought cambric lining for a gown at 4d a yard, 7 yd, came to 2/4d and a halfpence and 3 gauze handkerchiefs at 9d.  We met Mrs Evans at Hornby’s.  Miss Chambers had a commission to buy a gown for somebody at Charlton and not seeing anything she liked at Hornby’s, ask’d us to go with her to Jolly’s, which we did.  Emma left us there to prepare for going to the Concert.  We found a very pretty thing, which Miss Chambers fix’d on and bought.  While she was paying for it, Mrs Evans came from Hornby’s, not finding what she wanted there.  She look’d at the gown Miss Chambers had bought and admired it so much she said she would have it, not knowing Miss Chambers had just purchased it.  I went to the Pump Room with Miss Chambers and walkd with her to Miss Pyne’s, where I saw Miss Fanny Pyne, who appeard very glad to see me.  From there I went to Mrs Chamier’s, where I sat with her.  Georgina was gone to the Concert till four o’clock.  Emma came home immediately after me and we had our dinner directly.  I had a note in the evening from Mrs Stuckey to ask us to tea tomorrow to meet Mr and Mrs William Pyne, who came to Bath on Monday.  I said we were engaged.  Miss Hill sent to ask us to meet the de Visnes on Friday evening.  I call’d on Mrs Pierrepont, who was not at home.

Miss Randle call’d while we were out.

THE PUMP ROOM, BATH by John Claude Nattes (British Library)
The Pump Room, Bath by John Claude Nattes (British Library).

Thursday 23 April 1840

So gloomy looking we took our umbrellas with us when we went out, but it clear’d off and there was no rain.  We went to Dill’s for some pork and then to Miss Workman’s, who was extremely well, in excellent spirits and looking as well as she did twenty years back.  I ask’d her if she would come some day next week to meet Mrs Chamier  to play at Quadrille.  “With all my heart, any day you like”.  We met Mrs Evans in the street.  I ask’d her if she found any thing she liked at Jolly’s yesterday.  She said “No, your friend bought the only pretty thing in the shop, so I came away dissatisfied.”

After we came home Mr and Mrs W Pyne and little Robert call’d.  Mrs Pyne is so much altered for the better, both in person and manner since I saw her last.  She is now a pretty looking woman and very agreeable and chatty.  They return home tomorrow evening.  I had intended to call on Miss Randle, but met her in the street.  I had a very friendly letter from Mr Pigou to acknowledge the receipt of the Power of Attorney to go to America.  I wrote a note to Mr Wiltshire to thank him for the tickets he had sent us and to tell him what I had done at the hospital.   Just as I was going to send it, I received one from him, asking the questions I had answered in mine, previously written, so I enclosed it in another.  I sent the New Zealand journal to Dr Cooper, “Post Office, Cheltenham.”

Friday 24 April 1840

A very fine day and particularly warm for the time of year.  We call’d on Miss Pyne (met Miss Chambers in our way), saw Miss Pyne and Fanny Pyne.  Miss Chambers came in before we came away.  We then went up to Mrs Chamier, where we sat a long time.  I ask’d Mrs Chamier if she would come and play a Pool of Quadrille with Miss Workman any day next week.  She was engaged every day till Thursday, when she said she would come.  In our way home we call’d on Miss Randle, who was not at home.  In the evening we went to Miss Hill’s, where we met a Miss Smith, Mr and Mrs de Visne and Mr and Mrs Horton.  We all play’d Loo, except Miss Hill.  I lost 6d.  The evening was very warm and there was a large fire!  Everyone complained of the heat and I found it quite uncomfortably warm.  After Mr and Mrs Horton went away, Mr de Visne sat down to the piano and sang three or four songs.  We had cake and wine and jelly.  It was quite a Summer night.  When we came home the stars numerous and very brilliant.  We went to the hospital in the morning to enquire the result of our application for the little child’s admission, but the Board had not made their decision public.  We had two of Lady Cooper’s Papers, after a cessation of ten days.

Saturday 25 April 1840

A beautiful day, quite Summer and every body complaining of the heat.  We did not go out all day.  I set two or three pots of mignionette seed.  Miss Fanny Pyne and Robert call’d.  While they were here Miss Janetta Allen came.  She was in excellent spirits and agreeable and kind, as she always is.  We shewd her Miss Pyne’s  curiously work’d old shirt and shifts, with which she was very much pleased.  Fanny Pyne brought us an invitation from her Aunt for Monday evening.  Miss Pyne sent for the for shirt and shifts in the afternoon to shew somebody.  I returned the three cambric handkerchiefs I had to mark for her, by her Ann.

Sunday 26 April 1840

Very fine and as warm as yesterday.  We went to St. John’s twice.  Emma fetched Miss Pyne and we walkd home with her afterwards.  We came straight home from her.  When we went to Church in the afternoon we found Miss Pyne and Fanny Pyne there before us.  In our way home we went to Miss Workman’s and sat with her till five o’clock.  I heard from Miss Wood.  We left of fires.

Monday 27 April 1840

A beautiful day, but so very warn we did not go out.  In the morning Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d late and staid till six o’clock.  I gave dear Georgina a pretty scarlet and white purse I had netted for her, which she admired very much.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, met a Miss Fieldhouse from Lyme, a very agreeable person,but the facsimile of an old maid in Captain Marriat’s caricatures.  While we were at tea Mrs Stuckey walk’d in by herself.  I had much rather she had staid away.  It was a very warm evening and quite like a Summer night when we walkd home.  Mary Freeman came to stay till Friday, when she is going home to Lyme.

Tuesday 28 April 1840

A fine day and very warm.  Mr Wiltshire call’d.  He lookd ill.  He came to know if the child from Portsmouth had been elected for the next vacancy at the hospital, but it is not yet decided.  We took the Paper to Mrs Chamier and then came home for the rest of the day, till after tea, when we went to Miss Hill’s, who is going to Clevedon tomorrow.  We sat with her till past eight and then came home.  There was a very cold air and I felt quite chill’d, having changed my warm gown for a muslin one and having only a thin silk shawl on.  I took two of Dr Cooper’s pills, which I had made up at Steel’s in New Bond Street, as I do not think ? drugs are so good as Stead’s were.  Mrs Chamier told us that Mrs Drummond’s party last night was so crowded that numbers who could not get into the drawing rooms sat and stood on the stairs and landing places and that the heat was intolerable.  She had music up stairs and cards below. Emma call’d on Miss Workman.  Miss Wilson call’d.  Freeman and Mary spent the day at Carston.  Freeman brought up some green apricots, a nosegay and a pot of flowers.

Wednesday 29 April 1840

A very fine day for the Races, which are today and tomorrow.  Mrs Drummond calld very early, soon after our breakfast.  She told us she was going to Portsmouth to the Quarniers on the 19th of next month and kindly takes Miss Wilson with her, which will be a great accommodation and comfort to Miss Wilson and save her all the expenses of her journey.  While Mrs Drummond was here, Miss Shirley came in and staid some time.  After Mrs D went away, she said the Hales’ were coming to dine with them, as it was Ally’s Birth Day and tomorrow is her own.  I did not go out at all, having such a pain in my back, it was with difficulty I could move.  I took away the yellow bird from Emma’s and put another ? in it’s place.   The family with the poor sick girl went away from Mrs Harrison’s lodging this morning.

Miss Fanny Pyne came to ask us to go to Hornby’s with her to buy some stockings.  I could not go on account of my back, but Emma went with her and she got some she thought very cheap and liked very much.

Thursday 30 April 1840

Another very fine day.  Mr Cooke of Marlbro’ Building call’d and paid a long visit.  He came to enquire what accounts we had of poor dear! Mr Scott.  While he was here, Mrs Kiplin and Mrs Flayer from Stafford came in.  The former ask’d us to go to her on Tuesday evening next.  Soon after they went away, one of the Miss Grevile’s, whom I had never seen before call’d.  She was very agreeable and made a very long visit, staying till long after three o’clock.  I did not go out.  My back (tho’ better) being very painful.  Emma went to walk with Miss Pyne.  Mrs Chamier and Miss Workman drank tea here and play’d Quadrille. Mrs Chamier won 3/6d, I 1/-, Emma lost 4/6d. Mrs Chamier was very poorly, having the tooth ache, but she enjoyd her Pool of Quadrille.  I wrote to Mr Keen and tied up the netting cotton I got some time ago for her, for Mary Freeman to take to Lyme with her tomorrow.

I took two of Dr Cooper’s pills.

Fashion plate for May 1840 from La Mode. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for May 1840 from La Mode.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday 1 May 1840

A very fine day, but not so warm as it has been for some days past.  Emma took two News Papers to Mrs Chamier.  She had a very bad night with the toothache and had the headache this morning.  She was not out of her room, so Emma did not see her.  She also went to Miss Workman’s, who she found quite well.  She then went to the hospital to enquire if the child could be admitted, when to my astonishment they told her they were waiting to hear from Portsmouth, as they concluded I had forwarded the paper with the direction.  How they could suppose I had done so, I cannot conceive, as they told me it was one of the Rules of the hospital that the information must go from them to the Medical man to make out the case.  I immediately wrote to Mrs Barnes, enclosing the Printed Rules.  Miss Chamier call’d and staid some time.  While she was here, Mrs Pierrepont popped in, very kindly to say if we liked to go to Woulds Benefit on Wednesday, she would give us tickets, take us there and bring us back.  She was in such a hurry she could not sit down, as she was going to Miss Bode’s to draw for the beautiful piece of work the Goldsmith Shop which Miss Bode had workd for Mrs Dundas, but which she was disposing of at 5/- tickets to pay herself, as Mrs Dundas did not take it.  Miss Harvey call’d after tea to say Miss Wilson would come to us tomorrow evening.  I ask’d her to be of the party, but she said she was engaged.

Saturday 2 May 1840

A beautiful day.  Mrs Pierrepont came early and brought the tickets for the Play and engaged us to dine with her.  She also gave us a Gallery ticket for Ann, but Freeman did not approve of her going.  Mrs Pierrepont won the beautiful piece of work at Miss Bode’s yesterday.  Just as we were going out, Mrs Earl (who I have not seen for many months) call’d and staid some time.  As soon as she was gone, we went to the Picture Gallery and remained there two hours.  We then left cards at Mrs Kiplin’s (who was not at home) for her and  Mrs Floyer, call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s door and gave John the Gallery ticket she left with us this morning.  We then went up to Mrs Chamier’s, who was gone out and returned home quite tired.  Before Freeman could bring up the dinner, Miss Vassall from Sodbury came in and soon after Mrs Vassall, both looking remarkably well.  They staid till near five o’clock.  We then had our dinner, soon after which Miss Wilson arrived.  While we were at tea Miss Workman unexpectedly made her appearance.  She walk’d here with Mary.  She drank a cup of tea and then went home.  While we were sitting in the dusk, we heard a knock at the door and to our astonishment in walkd Captain Bussell!!!  He, with his wife and three daughters arrived this afternoon and he very kindly said he was determined to find us out immediately.  They are come to stay three or four months for Masters, and have taken lodgings at No. 1 Queen Square.  The Fly came for Miss Wilson very soon after 9 o’clock

Queen's Square, Bath c.1869 Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Queen’s Square, Bath c.1869
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

UNDATED

It is so long since I wrote my journal I have nearly forgotten what has occur’d and therefore cannot set down the events to their proper days.  We were at Church twice Sunday, drank tea at Mrs Kiplin’s Tuesday, where we met Mrs Floyer, Mrs Bruce, Mrs Glover, Miss Churchill and a Miss Creaser.  Wednesday we dined and went to the Play with Mrs Pierrepont and were very much amused.  The House was crammed  for poor Woulds Benefit and his second daughter came out in the Entertainment “Fra Diavolo”.  The Play was “Sweethearts and Wives”.  Thursday we met Miss Drewett at Miss Workman’s.  Friday We were to have gone to Miss Wilson, but it look’d so like rain we were afraid to venture.  Freeman walkd to the College to say so and Miss Wilson ask’d us for Monday next.  Miss Pyne, to our surprise, calld and finding we were not going to Miss Wilson’s, ask’d us to go to her, only ourselves and Fanny Pyne, till after tea, when Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell came in for an hour.  Poor Miss Pyne sadly misses Miss Chambers, who went to London on Monday for a fortnight or three weeks and tho’ Fanny Pyne is staying with her, she is not like Miss Chambers!  We drank tea there again on Saturday, met Mrs Stuckey and Mr Randolph.  There is not the same chearfulness as when Miss Chambers is there.  In the course of the week, we have calld on Miss Pyne, Mrs Stuckey, Miss Workman, Mrs Pierrepont, Captain Bussell, the Miss Allens and Mrs Chamier.  At the latter we met Captain Holmes, a son of Mrs Chamier’s Aunt, Lady Holmes.  He is just arrived from India and is a very agreeable young man.  We have had call here Miss Pyne!!!  Miss Shirley, Mrs Drummond, Miss Wilson, Miss Harvey, Mrs Pierrepont, Captain, Mrs Bussell and their three daughters (as precious stupid pieces of still life as I ever saw), Mrs and Miss Chamier and Captain Holmes.  I received a Box from Eliza Quarnier, Monday May 4, with a number of lace things to be washed, 10 feathers to be dressd and a piece of Dundee cake and sugar plums for us.

Sunday 10 May 1840

A threatening day, but it did not rain.  We went to St. John’s twice.  Emma fetched Miss Pyne both morning and afternoon.  Mr de Visne preach’d for the National School.  We walk’d home both times with Miss Pyne.  Saw Miss F Pyne and Mr Kitson there in the morning, but went no further than the door in the afternoon, it lookd so like rain.  Very cold.

Monday 11 May 1840

A very gloomy day with slight rain now and then.  We set out at half past three to spend the afternoon with Miss Wilson at the College, taking Ann with us and had a very pleasant walk, but rather cold.  Miss Harvey also drank tea with Miss Wilson.  It began to rain soon after we got there, but did not last long!  We took Miss Pyne’s Old Work to shew, with which they were so delighted that Miss Wilson sent to four of her friends in the College to come and look at it, who were equally pleased.  Miss Wilson, Miss Harvey and a Mrs Stubbs walkd part of the way home with us.  We were fortunate enough not to have any rain, tho’ I expected it every minute, it look’d so frightfully black.  Our walk home was very pleasant and I was not at all tired.  Hawkins had brought us a nice nosegay while we were absent and I sent it to Miss Pyne.  We took a piece of the Scotch cake Eliza sent us last week to Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey.  Very cold.

Hawkins brought us a nosegay.

Tuesday 12 May 1840

A cold, gloomy day, but it cleared up in the evening and was bright and fine.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and paid a long visit.  Captain Holmes left them for Cheltenham this morning.  Mrs Chamier ask’d us to go to them tomorrow evening.

After tea we walk’d to Miss Pyne’s and sat an hour with her and Fanny Pyne.  While we were there, the same Miss Fieldhaus, who we met there one evening before, came in and sat a little time.  It was very cold and I should have been very glad of a fire.  Mrs Chamier was quite astonished to find me without one.  There was one at Miss Pyne’s.  Not having any answer to my letter to Mr Melville about Harriett’s money last week, I wrote again today.

Wednesday 13 May 1840

A very wet morning, but it cleared in the middle of the day and Emma went to Mrs Stuckey’s (to enquire after Fanny Parsons, who is confined to her bed with a sore throat, but is better), to Miss Pyne’s and Miss Workman’s.  Miss Shirley call’d while she was out and staid more than an hour.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, only ourselves.  It fortunately was dry both going and returning, tho’ there had been a shower while we were there.  In going, we met Miss Ashe, looking very well.  I did not know she was well enough to go out. I heard from Mr Melville with £5 for old Harriett.  I wrote to him acknowledging the receipt of it.  Old Hawkins brought a beautiful little nosegay, which I took to dear Georgina Chamier, with a slice of Eliza’s “Dundee Cake”.  The Purnell family left Eyre’s lodgings, having been there 3 weeks and 2 days.

Thursday 14 May 1840

Cold and gloomy, with a few showers.  Miss Wilson call’d and sat some time.  While she was here, the dear Miss Allens came.  They very kindly ask’d us to dine with them on Tuesday next.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, only ourselves.  We set out early and spent an hour with Miss Workman in our way, who askd us to go to her tomorrow.  We came home a little after eight.  It was so cold I had the fire lit after breakfast.

Friday 15 May 1840

Cold, high wind, with a few slight showers.  Dechet calld while we were at breakfast to say Mrs Quarnier’s feathers were ready and to ask us to go and see them before he pack’d them up, which we did and they are very nicely done.  We call’d at Mrs Chamier’s and sat there a long time.  We then went to Mrs Pierrepont’s, who was not at home, to Mrs Drummond (who was also out, I believe together), from her to Miss Shirley, who was at home.  When we left her, we intended to call on Mrs Bussell, but we met Captain Bussell in Gay Street, who said they were all out.  He persuaded us not to go further, as the clouds were so black and heavy, there was every appearance of a storm.  He walk’d home with us, but would not come in, on that account.  On our way, we met Mrs Dorset Fellows and (had) a little chat with her.  We drank tea with Miss Workman, only ourselves.  After tea Mrs Chamier and Georgina call’d in , in their way to Colonel Hamilton’s in Green Park Buildings, where they were going to spend the evening.  They staid about half an hour.

It began to rain almost immediately after they went away, but fortunately held up again till after we got home, when it rained again very hard.  I heard from Eliza Quarnier.  Mrs Harrison let her lodgings to a very young looking gentleman and lady, with a man servant.  They have the appearance of having been recently married.  They have got two very pretty little dogs.

Saturday 16 May 1840

A very showery day, quite April weather instead of May.  I heard two claps of thunder at a distance.  Amey brought us a nosegay.  She is looking very well. I have not seen her for a long time, but she is not altered.  I wrote a note to Mrs Drummond and sent three boxes for her to take to Mrs Quarnier, one from Dechet with her feathers, another from Finigan and the third her own with her washed cloak and collar.  I also sent three collars for Mrs Drummond to put with hers.  After tea Emma went to Miss Pyne’s to see how she was and sat with her till past eight o’clock.

Sunday 17 May 1840

A wet morning, which prevents our going to Church and it continued showery during the day and cold.  We did not go out all day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and ask’d us to meet Miss Workman there to tea Wednesday evening.  Little Robert Pyne came after tea to say he would come tomorrow morning to go with Emma to get places at the Play,  Miss Pyne, having kindly given her a ticket to go with him.  I heard from Mrs Scott to say she had been very ill since she last wrote and that Dr Barron insisted on her changing the air for a short time and that as dear Mr Scott was going on comfortably, she had consented and if we would get her an airy bed room near us, she would come for two or three days to us and go back by Devizes, staying there a few days, which would make the change greater.  I wrote by return of Post to say we should be delighted to see her and would see for a bed for her tomorrow and let her know the result.

Monday 18 May 1840

Fine in the morning, but showery afterwards (some hard ones).  Robert Pyne came early and went with Emma to the Theater to take places.  They got those we formerly occupied so often!  When Emma returned, we went to Mrs Pierrepont’s, who we did not see, as she was engaged with her dress maker.  From her we went to Mrs Chamier’s and sat some time.  In our way back we call’d at Mrs Drummond’s.  Her servant said she was gone to us, as she wished particularly to see us.  She had not been gone five minutes.  We hurried home, but were too late, as she had been and was gone, but left word she would, if possible, call again in the evening.  I had intended to go to Miss Pyne’s, Mrs Stuckey’s and Miss Hill’s, but a shower came on, which lasted a long time and prevented me.  As soon as it had ceased and had dried up a little, Emma went to Miss Pyne’s to ask Robert to come here to tea, then they could go together to the Theater.  She only saw Fanny Pyne, her Aunt being out with Mrs Brymer in her Carriage.  Miss Wilson, Miss Harvey and Robert Pyne drank tea here.  The latter and Emma went to the Play and the two former staid till a little past nine, Miss Harvey going home with one of the ladies of the College, who call’d for her in a Fly and Miss Wilson in a Wheel Chair, which Freeman was fortunate enough to stop as it was going up the street, the rain pouring in such a torrent at the time I could not have sent Ann out for one to Mrs Drummond’s to sleep and accompany her to Portsmouth tomorrow.

I heard from Miss Armstrong to say that Mrs Scott had given up all idea of coming, dear Mr Scott having been seized while walking in his garden with a sudden weakness, which had alarmed them very much, but they could not ascertain the extent or nature of the attack, as they were waiting for the Dr!  I greatly fear it is the forerunner of Death!  Miss Hill calld while we were out.

Tuesday 19 May 1840

Quite a wintery day, both in look and feel, with rough north east wind.  We went to Miss Pyne’s, who was not at (home).  We look’d for her on the South Parade and at the Pump Room, but could not find her, so proceeded to Miss Hill’s, where we sat some time.  I do not think she is improved by her trip to Clevedon and Clifton.  She looks old and plain.  She expects her friends, the Miss Robert’s from Yorkshire on Thursday.  We then call’d on Mrs Stuckey and Mrs Parsons.  Found only the former at home,  Mrs Parsons and Miss Michell having gone to call on Miss Pyne.  Fanny Parsons is better, but still confined to her room and almost to her bed.  In our way home, we call’d on Miss Workman, who was pretty well.  We dined at Mr Allen’s and spent a pleasant day, only ourselves.  Mr Allen was in one of his agreeable moods and talkd a great deal.  It was fine for us to walk home.  Indeed it did not rain the whole day.  We had for dinner a very nice Brill and shrimp sauce, hashed calves head, roasted leg of lamb, asparagus, cucumber, greens and potatoes, pickled salmon, millet pudding an ornamented gooseberry tart, stilton and other cheese and salad.  After dinner oranges, French plums, rusks, ginger biscuits and a delicious preserved whole orange in jelly.  I had some of what I have often heard of, but never tasted before, “Clary wine” and think it the nicest made wine I ever tasted.  I wish I had two or three dozen of it.

Mrs Chamier call’d late, to say we must come to dinner tomorrow, instead of the evening.  It is very kind of her.

Not hearing from Miss Armstrong, as I had hoped to do, I wrote to her to beg she would tell me by return of Post how Mr Scott was going on.  Miss Randel sent to say she had been confined to the house with Influenza ever since she was here or she would have call’d again.

Wednesday 20 May 1840

A dry day, but cold and windy.  Miss Pyne had the kindness to call and Emma went home with her and did not return till past 3 o’clock, when we went to call on Miss Randel.  Her dinner was coming on the table, but we went up and shook hands with her, but would not sit down.  We then call’d at Captain Bussell’s.  They were not at home.  We dined at Mrs Chamier’s, met Miss Workman, who play’d two Pools at Quadrille and was very chearful and collected.  We spent a very pleasant day.  I won 5/-, Emma lost (as usual) 2/6d.  The little bird, after dropping 4 eggs, has laid two in her nest and has, I think, been sitting.  The lady and gentleman went away from Mrs Harrison’s lodgings this morning.  We had at dinner very nice fried Soals, a beautiful breast of lamb, veal cutlets, new potatoes, cucumber, greens and old potatoes, gooseberry and rhubarb tart and delicious boil’d custard.

It was fine to come home.  Mrs Chamier ask’d us again for tomorrow evening to meet Miss Ashe and I ask’d her to meet Miss Ashe here on Saturday.

Thursday 21 May 1840

A fine day, but cold.  We did not go out till the evening, when we drank tea with Mrs Chamier.  Met Miss Ashe and play’d Quadrille.  I won 1/6d, spent a pleasant evening.  It was fine to come home.

Georgina gave me some bits of black  and some of crimson velvet for my patchwork.  Heard from Miss Armstrong to say Mr Scott was much in the some state as when she first wrote.

Friday 22 May 1840

A beautiful day, quite warm and Summerish.  Miss Workman and Mary came to say that Mrs Jones and Miss Jones Graeme had arrived to spend the day.  We went to the Picture Gallery for the last time, as it closes tomorrow.  From there we went to Mrs Stuckey’s to enquire after Miss Parsons, saw her looking very ill and still suffering from a sore throat. Mrs Parsons is looking very well, as is Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell.  From there we went to Miss Workman’s, where we found dear Mrs Jones and Mrs J Graeme, both looking very well.  We sat with them till near 4 o’clock and then came home.  Found that Miss Burmester, Miss Ashe and the Jones’s had calld while we were out and also Captain and Mrs Bussell.  We met Miss Hough in the Street and had a long chat with her.  The Miss Fillinghams have left her and returned home.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, only ourselves and Miss Fanny Pyne.  Emma went down before me and I found them walking on the North Parade.  I joined them and we went over the Bridge, at Miss Pyne’s desire, that I might see the progress of the Rail Road across the Wellington Road.  It is quite distressing to see how the country is injured and disfigured wherever the detestable Rail Roads pass thro’ it.  While we were at tea, Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell came in, but did not stay long.  It was fine to come home.  Miss Chambers returns tomorrow evening.

Great Western Railway through Sydney Gardens, Bath Engraving by Charles Davies with St Saviours church in the distance. Published by W Everitt, Bath. Science Museum online collections.
Great Western Railway through Sydney Gardens, Bath
Engraving by Charles Davies with St Saviours church in the distance. Published by W Everitt, Bath.
Science Museum online collections.

Saturday 23 May 1840

A dry day, but gloomy and very cold.  I did not go out all day.  Emma spent the day with Miss Pyne, as Fanny Pyne went with Mrs Stuckey to Clifton to see her poor sister Juliana, who is sinking fast.  Emma returned at six o’clock, as Mrs Chamier and Miss Ashe drank tea here.  Miss Chamier came with her mother, but did not stay to tea, as there was nothing to amuse her.  We play’d Quadrille.  I lost 2/-, which Emma won and Mrs Chamier won 4/-, which Miss Ashe lost.

Sunday 24 May 1840

A very wet morning, which prevented our going to Church.  It cleared up in the middle of the day and Emma went to Church at 3 o’clock, but the rain began again as she was coming home and continued all the evening.  I had a note from Georgina Chamier to say that if it was wet tomorrow morning, they would not send their things here till Tuesday, as they had put off their journey to London till Wednesday.  Heard from dear Henry to say Hal’s wedding day was fix’d for the 6th of June.

Monday 25 May 1840

A very wet morning, in consequence of which the Fete and Fire Works at Sidney Gardens and the morning Promenade at the Victoria Garden in honor of the Queen’s Birthday were putt of.  In addition to the rain, the wind was frightfully high.  The rain ceased between 12 and one o’clock and the wind soon dried the streets.  Emma went to Miss Workman’s and Miss Pyne’s, both of whom she found pretty well.  While she was absent, Miss Shirley call’d and staid till after she returned.

Tuesday 26 May 1840

A very wet morning again, with a very high wind.  It held up in the middle of the day and was fine the rest of it.  Mrs Chamier sent her chest of drawers and boxes, an immense number of them.  She and dear Georgina call’d to wish us “good bye”.  I am very sorry they are going.  We shall miss them very much.  Miss Randall sent to say she was too unwell to call and was going to return to Clifton on Thursday.

Clifton by Charles Branwhite, 1842 (c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Clifton by Charles Branwhite, 1842
(c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

I wrote to dear Henry and sent him part of the correspondence between Mr Pigou and myself, relative to the money coming from America.  I heard from Mrs Jones to beg I would enquire if the lodgings they once occupied the corner of Northumberland Building were vacant.  If they were, they should like to come to Bath the 4th or 5th of June for a fortnight.

Wednesday 27 May 1840

A beautiful Summer day, quite delightful for the Chamiers, who went to London this morning.  We went to enquire about the lodgings for Mrs Jones and fortunately found them vacant.  Mrs Mallet did not like to keep them till the 5th June, but said if they were not let between this and Saturday, she would do so and Mrs Jones should have them for 2 guineas a week.  We call’d at Miss Workman’s, met Mrs Hardcastle at her door, who said her sister was much the same.  Went to Market and chose a piece of roasting beef.  Call’d at Miss Pyne’s, saw her, Miss Chambers and Fanny Pyne.  I bought half a hundred envelopes for 9d.  Call’d at Miss Randall’s.  She has been suffering very much from Influenza and looks ill.  Soon after we came home, Mr Wiltshire call’d and with his usual kindness gave us tickets of admission to the Victoria Horticultural and Botanical Garden for 12 months.  Just as we were going to dinner, the Miss Allens call’d and Freeman said we were out.  They left word they were going to Hampton on Saturday, for which I am very sorry.  I wrote to Mrs Jones to tell her what I had done about the lodgings and again to Henry, enclosing the rest of Mr Pigou’s letters.  While we were out we met Mrs Floyer and her little grandchild and Miss Creaser.  They are going to leave Mrs Kipling today.  We also met the three Miss Grevils.

Thursday 28 May, 1840

A beautiful day for the Horticultural Show at Sidney Gardens.  We call’d at Mrs Kiplin , Miss Haugh’s and Mrs Earl’s, all of whom were out.  We met Mrs Earl in a Wheel Chair, looking very ill.  She wanted us to go back with her, but she look’d so languid we declined it.  They are going to Bognor in a week or ten days.  We then went to the Miss Allens’, saw only Miss Allen, who very much regrets leaving Bath for Hampton, the house there being still in so unfinished a state as to make it a very uncomfortable residence.  From her we went to Miss Workman’s, where we sat some time and then to the Market to dis-order the boiling beef I had bespoke for Saturday.  Before we came home we went to Miss Bode’s to see the beautiful peacock and flowers she has been working on a skreen and which is to be disposed of by 24 tickets at 5/- each, one great prize to 23 blanks. The work is exquisitely beautiful and I should find it difficult to chuse between that and “The Goldsmith’s Shop”.  While we were sitting after tea, Emma saw Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers going by on the other side of the street.  She made a sign to beg them to come in, which they did and sat a little time.  Miss Pyne ask’d us to tea tomorrow evening.  We wet yesterday to a Mrs Millard’s in Hot Bath Street to have Emma’s last year’s straw bonnet altered.  She chose a shape and it is to be brought home on Saturday.  I had a very kind letter from dear Henry, returning Mr Pigou’s letters and a note from Mrs Jones approving what I had done about the lodging.

Sydney Gardens, Bath: the canal bridges Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Sydney Gardens, Bath: the canal bridges
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Friday 29 May 1840

A dry day, but very cloudy at times.  Miss Hill and her friends, the two Miss Roberts’s call’d.  They appeared pleasant as far as I could judge from an introductory visit.  One of them was very dashingly dress’d, but they are both very plain women.  Miss Hill told us that Mrs Hudson is going to London next Tuesday week, for a short time.  I should not be surprised if she did not live to return, for she looks very ill.  While they were here, Miss Fanny Pyne call’d and they all took leave together.  We had just sat down to dinner when Mrs Parsons, her daughter and Mrs Stuckey call’d, also Miss Lowry and Mrs Jackson, so we did not see any of them.  We drank tea at Miss Pyne’s, only ourselves, Miss Chambers and Miss Fanny Pyne, who went home soon after tea.  Miss Pyne was not so well as usual and look’d flushed.  She was going to take some medicine, which I hope will be of service to her.  It was very fine when we came home.  Emma went to see Miss Workman.  Had the Times News Paper from Cheltenham, so I hope Mr Scott is not worse.

Saturday 30 May 1840

A fine day, but a cool wind.  Miss Shirley call’d, but did not stay long, as our dinner was ready.  Miss Harvey very kindly sent us some nice flowers, part of which Emma took to Miss Pyne, who was much better today.  We went with Mr Wiltshire’s tickets to the Promenade in the Victoria Gardens, where we saw some beautiful flowers and heard a good Band.  There was a fair sprinkling of company, but no crowd and we walk’d over the whole of the garden, which is much improved since we were there last.  Saw Mr John Wiltshire, who came to shake hands with us and Dr and Mrs Davis and their 2 nieces, with whom we had a long and pleasant chat.  As we came out of the Park we encountered Captain and Mrs Bussell and their 3 daughters, with whom we had a long conversation and did not get home till past 5 o’clock.  The Bussells had call’d during our absence, as had Mrs Parsons again.  I was very sorry we were not at home to see her, as she leaves Bath on Monday. In our way home we met Admiral Shirley at the top of Milsom Street.  He had been to Bath Easton to a sheep shearing!!  Freeman’s sister Martha brought us a nosegay of beautiful flowers from Betsey at Carston .  I wrote to Mrs Jones to tell her Mrs Mallit’s lodgings were not let, but would be ready for her on Thursday next, the 4th of June.  Martha Freeman slept here.  Met Mrs Bradney in the Park, who stop’d us and was very pleasant.

Sunday 31 May 1840

A fine day and very warm.  We were at St. John’s twice.  Mrs de Visne walk’d to the end of Bath Street after Church in the morning, where we parted and we went to Miss Pyne’s.  Found her better than yesterday.  While we were there Miss Mitchell came in.  We staid till Miss Chambers and little Robert Pyne came from Church.  We call’d after the second Service on Mrs Parsons, but she was not at home.  After tea Emma went to see Miss Workman, but she was gone to dine at Mr Evan’s and she dines on Tuesday at Mrs Nicholas’s.

Fashion plate for June 1840 from Le Follet. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for June 1840 from Le Follet.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Monday 1 June 1840

Quite a Summer day, too warm in the sun to be pleasant.  We went to Mrs Mallet’s to say Mrs Jones would be here on Thursday and then to Miss Workman’s, who was gone to Miss Bush’s about a bonnet.  We went to Market and then to call on Miss Fanny Pyne in Darlington Street, where she is boarding and then went over the Parade Bridge to Miss Pyne’s.  I was quite tired and oppress’d by the heat when I came home.  Miss Hill and one of the Miss Roberts’s call’d, the former ask’d us to “Tea” on Friday, it might just as well have been to dinner.  I wrote a note to Mrs Jones.  It was a beautiful evening for the fire works at Sidney Gardens.  The Miss Hellicans call’d.  I put some mignonette to seed in the flower box at the staircase window.  We call’d on Miss Burmister, but did not see her.

Tuesday 2 June 1840

A very different day from yesterday, showery till after 11 o’clock, but fine the rest of the day.  Miss Hellican call’d again to ask us to go to them tomorrow evening.  Mrs Kiplin call’d and was very pleasant.  While she was here Mrs Simpson came in and staid some time, after which Mrs Kiplin went away.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s.  While she was gone Miss Pierrepont!! call’d.  Unfortunately I was busy and said “not at home”, for which I was very sorry.  She told Freeman she had only just arrived and came to tell us immediately.  She was not to have come till tomorrow, I understand.

Wednesday 3 June 1840

A fine day with high north wind and so cold I should have been glad of a fire.  We call’d on Mrs Pierrepont, who was out and then on Miss Greviles, where we were most kindly received.  They shewd us some beautiful worsted work, both of their own doing and bought.  The eldest sister, who is a great invalid, left us with her sister, as the carriage come to take her daily airing and we sat some time with them after she went out.  From there we went to Captain Bussell’s.  They were out, then to Mrs Gore’s, met the nurse with the baby in the passage going out, as we went in.  We stopped her kiss’d the baby, who is very pretty and a very fine child.  We sat a short time with Mrs Gore and then went to Miss Workman, who we found pretty well.

In our way to the Miss Hellican’s in the evening we call’d at Miss Pyne’s.  A Chair was waiting to take her to Grosvenor Place to see Robert. Miss Chambers and Fanny Pyne were going to walk there, the latter I thought look’d ill.  There was only ourselves, Miss Gibson and Miss Workman at the Miss Hellican’s.  Miss Gibson, Mrs Jane, Miss Fanny, Mrs Slade and I play’d two pooles at Quadrille.  I won 1/6, spent a chearful pleasant evening.  Miss Fanny was so kind to lend me the pattern of a little netted mat for a glass of flowers to stand on and the needle and pins to net it

Thursday, 4 June 1840

A fine day, but the wind still high and cold.  Captain and Mrs Bussell call’d and had a long visit.  They were both very pleasant.  The former told us he had seen the marriage of Sir George Baker to Miss Sutton in the News Paper.  We drank tea with Miss Pyne.  While we were getting ready to go, Freeman came upstairs to tell us that poor Juliana! died at 7 o’clock last night.  Robert Tuggy was just come home from Lyme and heard it on the road.  In our way to Miss Pyne’s we call’d at Mrs Jones’ lodgings to enquire if they were arrived.  They were, but of course we did not go in, as they must have been in a bustle.  We sat a little while with Miss Workman and then went on to Miss Pyne’s.  She was just ready to take her walk and Emma went with her.  I staid with Miss Chambers.  It was dry to come home, but dark and cloudy.  Mary Freeman very kindly sent us a beautiful chicken from Lyme by Robert and her dear old father sent us a nice soal.

Friday 5 June 1840

A complete wet day.  It scarsely ceased raining the whole day and most part of the time very hard.  Miss Shirley call’d and sat some time.  We were to have spent the evening at Miss Hill’s, but the weather was so bad it was quite out of the question and I am sure it was not worth 4 shillings for Chairs.

Saturday 6 June 1840

A very fine day.  Emma call’d on Mrs Jones, but found only Maria at home.  The complaint in my leg, which has been very troublesome for some time, getting worse instead of better.  I begg’d Emma to call at Mrs Gore’s and say I wished to see him, which she did and afterwards went to Miss Workman’s, who was very well.  Miss Shirley call’d, but did not come up and dear Mrs Jones, hearing I was tied by the leg, had the kindness to call for a few minutes.  Emma went after tea to enquire after Miss Pyne and Mrs Hudson, both of whom were out.  We heard that Mrs Hill was not well.  She was taken ill at Church Thursday evening and was obliged to go home.  She did not put off her visitors last evening, but was “very not well”.  Mr Gore came while Emma was out.  He says I need not be alarmed about my leg and advised my putting on leeches, but when I told him they would to a certainty occasion erysipelas, he said he would try other measures and send me a lotion to help it to keep it wetted with and a pill and draught to take.

It began to rain between 7 and 8 o’clock and continued till 10, but was fine afterwards.

This is the day fix’d for dear Henry’s marriage with Miss Brewer.  God grant it may be a happy union and conduce to the comfort and happiness of his father, as well as his own.  We drank their health and enabled Freeman and Ann to do so too.  The family left Eyre’s lodgings this morning.

Sunday 7 June 1840

A fine day.  Emma took Miss Pyne to St. John’s.  After the 3 o’clock Service she went to enquire after Miss Hill, who is much better and after tea she sat a long time with Miss Workman. She saw the three Jones’s at Church in the morning and met Miss Shute and Mrs Jones Graeme walking in the Square in the evening.  I did not go out, as I kept my leg up and wetted with the lotion, as Mr Gore directed, all day.  I read the morning Prayers and we read the evening ones together.

I received “Mr and Mrs H.S. Chapman’s” cards in a beautiful envelope, by the Post, which of course announces that the marriage took place yesterday.  God grant they may be happy.

Monday 8 June 1840

A fine morning, which is fortunate for the Clubs.  Two went by here to Church, looking very gay with their colours and bands and an immense concourse of men, women and children with them.  Emma went at 10 o’clock to Miss Pyne’s to spend the day, as Miss Chambers and Miss Fanny Pyne are going to see the poor! Pynes at Clifton previous to the removal of poor Juliana’s remains to Pitney.  I had a note from Miss Harvey to say she had heard (only a few lines) from poor! Miss Wilson, who has been so ill ever since she went to Portsmouth.  She had not been able to write before.  Mr Gore call’d.  He thought I had better take another pill and draught tomorrow night and he would call again on Wednesday.  Miss Workman call’d and sat some time.  Soon after she was gone, Miss Jones and Mrs Jones Graeme came.  They staid near an hour and were very kind.  Emma did not come home till after 9 o’clock.  I heard from Mr Pigou to say the Bill from America would be due on the 15th and to ask where I wished it to be paid.  I wrote in reply if he would let me know the name of his Bank, my brother Henry would call on him with my receipt and receive the money.

Tuesday 9 June 1840

A dull looking morning.  Emma took Miss Pyne’s shirt and shifts to shew Mrs Jones and afterwards to the Miss Greviles.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  While she was here it began to rain.  She wished to go to a shop and I lent her my umbrella.  Emma came home in the rain, but did not get wet.  It held up between 2 and 3 o’clock and was fine the rest of the day.  Miss Chambers call’d, but could not stay long, as she was going to St. James Sqr.  I expected the pill and draught for me to take tonight and tomorrow morning, but it was not sent!!  Ann took Miss Pyne’s shirt and shifts home and brought me a 2nd bottle of the lotion for my leg from Mr Gore’s.

Wednesday 10 June 1840

A fine day.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s, who I am sorry to say leaves Bath tomorrow and staid with her till near 3 o’clock.  I expected to see Mr Gore, but he did not come, in consequence I suppose of the medicine not being sent last night.  It made its appearance. however, this morning and the boy said it was entirely his fault.  Freeman laughingly told him he deserved to have his head cut off.  The invalid, Miss Grevile and one of her sisters call’d, a great compliment from the sick one, who rarely calls on any one but Mrs Turner and the Miss Hellicans. They sat here an hour and were very agreeable.  After Emma came home, Mrs Bruce call’d and hoped she should see us to tea soon.  In the evening dear Miss Pyne came in a Chair to wish me “good bye”.  She sat here while Miss Chambers went on to Mr Kitson’s in Marlborough Buildings and then returned here to walk home with Miss Pyne, who most kindly said she should expect us at Charlton the 1st of August.  Mrs Jones sent us a beautiful nosegay from Oldbury.  They were deliciously sweet.  I sent them to Mrs Jones, as I know she is very fond of flowers.  Old Hawkins sent us some roses and honeysuckles in the evening.  I took my pill at night.

Thursday, 11 June (A desolating day for me)

A fine morning.  Mr Gore came.  He thought my leg better, but recommending my repeating the medicine on Saturday.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  While she was here, it began to rain, but did not last long. Emma call’d at Mrs Jones’s and Miss Workman’s.  The latter was going to dine at Miss Hay’s and the Jones’s were going there in the evening.  Dear Mrs Jones sent us half of a roasting pig from Oldbury, with a very affectionate note.  We had the piggie dress’d for dinner and it turn’d out delicious.  I have not tasted so nice a one for years.  I had a note from Miss Fanny Pyne to enquire who we employ to cover our bonnets and to beg we would send the person to her at ten o’clock tomorrow morning.  Rather cool I think, particularly as the note did not reach me till past 9 o’clock.  I took my draught this morning.

Friday 12 June 1840

A dull looking morning, but the sun came out in the middle of the day.  Emma call’d at Miss Workman’s and afterwards took the trouble to enquire for a person that covered bonnets and went to Miss Fanny Pyne to tell her.  She had found one, when Miss Fanny very coolly said she had altered her mind and should have a new one at Miss Smith’s.  It was fortunate that Emma did not tell the person to go to her, as she desired in her note last night.  Emma met Miss Hill and the Misses Roberts.  Miss Hill said they were coming here, but as they had seen her, they would defer their visit till another day.  She ask’d us to “Tea “ (again) tomorrow to meet Mrs Portis.  I should not have gone, even if my leg had been well enough to allow of my doing so.  I heard from Mr Pigou and wrote to Mrs Scott and dear Henry with my receipt for £209.4.6, which he is to receive for me of Mr Pigou’s bankers, Messrs. Goslings and Sharpe, Fleet Street.

We had a News Paper from Cheltenham, directed by Mrs Scott.

A very high wind all night.

Saturday 13 June 1840

A slight shower now and then in the course of the day.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Mitchell call’d and were very agreeable, the latter more so than I ever saw her before.  Miss Jones also call’d and sat some time.  I took my pill the 3rd time.

Sunday 14 June 1840

Fine with the exception of a shower between 12 and one o’clock.  Emma went to St. John’s in the morning, but not a second time.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d to see if my leg was well enough for me to go out, but there is no appearance of its being so for some time.  Mr Gore call’d and made quite (for him) a long chat visit.  He enquired about the Darwins.  I had a nice long letter from dear Georgina Chamier, who is as happy as possible in London.  I took my 3rd draught in the morning.

Monday 15 June 1840

A beautiful day.  The Teatotalers held their Annual Meeting.  Their procession was so very numerous and highly respectable.  They had three Bands of music and an immense number of beautiful banners and flags.

Miss Workman and Mrs Jones Graeme came in, just after they had pass’d.  They had encountered the mob and stood up at a shop door to avoid them.  After they left us, Mrs Jones and Maria call’d and while they were here Miss Shirley came in and staid long after them.  Mrs Jones ask’d Emma to meet Miss Workman Wednesday evening, as I am sorry to say they return to Oldbury on Thursday.  I heard from Miss Armstrong a very distressing account of the sudden death of Mr Nugent, poor Mrs Scott’s brother, which has affected her very severely.  I wrote to Lady Cooper to ask where she would have her share of the money, £52.5.0 just received from America paid.  Miss Fanny Pyne call’d after tea and staid till dusk.

Tuesday 16 June 1840

A gloomy (day) but no rain.  Emma call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, Mrs Jones’s and Miss Workman’s.   She bespoke a card and tassells, the same as her bag, for Mrs Jones Graeme.  I heard from dear Henry telling me he had received the money £209.4.6 from Messrs. Gosling’s.  I wrote to Miss Armstrong.  I sent for the 4th bottle of lotion and took my pill the 4th time.  I felt very unwell all day.

Wednesday 17 June 1840

A fine day, but the wind very high.  Emma took the card and tassalls to Mrs Jones Graeme, who was much pleased with it.  She there heard that poor Miss Masters! died this morning, in consequence of which Mrs Jones will not leave Bath till tomorrow week, as she says she cannot leave poor Mrs Hardcastle in her present distress’d state.  Mrs Pierrepont, Miss Haugh, Miss Fanny Pyne, Miss Shirley and Dr Vassall!!!!, the latter I have not seen for fourteen or fifteen years.  He is, of course, much altered and is grown large and like his father.  He came from Bristol to Mrs Jones’s yesterday for a day or two.  Emma drank tea at Mrs Jones’s, only herself, Miss Workman, Dr Vassall and themselves.  She spent a very pleasant evening and the Dr walk’d home with her at ten o’clock.

I took my 4th draught in the morning.  I did not feel well all day.

I heard from Miss Wood, poor thing!  She is in distress, as the Guardians of her pupil have come to the determination of sending her to school.  Consequently Miss Wood has to look out for a situation, as she leaves Thelwauter [Kilwaughter] Castle in September.  I wish I may hear of another situation for her.

A high wind all night and much rain.  Admiral Shirley call’d and sat half an hour with us.  I sent to enquire after Mrs Hardcastle.

The Governess by Richard Redgrave, 1844 (c) Paintings Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Governess by Richard Redgrave, 1844
(c) Paintings Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday 18 June 1840

Waterloo Day.  Slight showers during bright sunshine (quite April) in the early part of the morning but fine after, the wind blowing “a gale” and very cold.  Very unpropitious for the Gala and Fire works at the Gardens this evening.  Miss Hill call’d early.  She was very nervous, poor thing, as she was going to have a tooth out.  We gave her some red Lavender and water, which did her good.  She staid here while Mary went to enquire if Mr Parkinson could see her and, as he could, she went directly in fear her courage should fail.  In their way home Mary call’d at the door with her mistress’s love and she had two teeth out and felt all the better for it.  Miss Shirley and the two little Hales call’d, the Holidays of the two latter commenced today.  They are both very much grown and are pretty children, Sarah Jane decidedly so. They had not been here more than five minutes when Mr Gore came.  Of course they were obliged to go away, saying they would call again today if they could.  Miss Shirley kindly brought me a few pieces of silk for my patchwork.  Mr Gore thought I had a good deal of fever about me and said he would give me some medicine to take night and morning and wished me to walk about in the room.

I have neglected so long entering the occurrence of each day, that I have forgotten what days my friend have been here, but Captain and Mrs Bussell, Mrs Pierrepont, Mrs Evans, the Miss Greviles, Miss Hill and the Miss Roberts’s, Miss Shirley and the Children (Hales) and Miss Yardley, Miss Workman, Mrs Jones and Maria have call’d frequently.  Emma dined at Mrs Jones’s on Saturday the 20th.  I do not think my leg is materially better.  Mr Gore, on Tuesday 23rd, wished me to walk out a little, but as the afternoon was gloomy looking, I did not feel inclined to go out, but on Wednesday, the 24th I walk’d after our tea to Mrs Jones’s and surprised them very much.  We found Miss Workman there, but no one else.  We had second tea with them and staid till ten o’clock, when we walk’d home, having spent three hours very pleasantly.  It was so cold all day, I should have been glad of a fire and Mr and Mrs Evans, who we met in our way to Mrs Jones’s said it had quite a Wintery feel.  Indeed, the wind for this week past has not only been very high, but very cold and we have had frequent showers, some very heavy.  The Jones’s returned to Oldbury on Thursday, 25th.  I paid Mr Vezey a quarter’s rent, £13.2.6 on the 24th.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Michell left Bath on the 24th.  I had a note from the former the evening before to take leave. They have been prevented calling.  Miss Fanny Pyne has call’d frequently.  The Miss Grevile’s most kindly gave Emma a ticket for the Horticultural Show at the Victoria Gardens and took her with them, she,having the day before taken them and Miss Shirley to see Prince Albert’s picture at Salmon’s, for which Miss Shute gave her a ticket of admission.  Miss Drewett call’d Saturday and Tuesday.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d Wednesday.

I had the 6th bottle of lotion for my leg!!

Friday 26 June 1840

A gloomy looking day with a cold wind.  I expected Mr Gore, but he did not come.  Emma went to see the poor old Clerk of St. John’s, who is unwell and took him a slice of cold roast beef and I had some nice beer coudle made and Ann took it to him in the evening.  While Emma was out, one of the Miss Grevile’s call’d.  She sat some time and before she went away Captain and Mrs Bussell came.  In the evening Miss Workman call’d.  She did not stay long, as she was going up to Mrs Hardcastle’s to enquire after her.  She walk’d here and was going to walk there and home!!

I wrote a long letter to Miss Wood.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d at the door to ask if I would like to take a drive in the carriage, but I declined it.  Miss Hill and Miss Lucy Roberts call’d, the former ask’d us to spend the day with her on Wednesday.  They are going soon to Clifton.

Saturday 27th June 1840

Not a pleasant looking day, tho there was some sun, but there was a brisk wind and it was cold in the house.  Mr Gore call’d.  He said it was warm out.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d before I was out of my room to see if I would go out with her today, but I did not feel inclined.  She ask’d us to go to her tomorrow evening, the last time she could receive us before she goes into Devonshire.  I ask’d Mr Gore and he said “by all means, it will do you good.”

Emma call’d on the Miss Hellicans, Mrs Partis.  Miss Fanny Pyne call’d at the door, but did not come up.

Sunday 28 June 1840

Very showery in the morning, but a fine evening.  Emma did not go to Church.  We read morning and evening Service at home.  I did not feel inclined to go out, so sent a note of excuse to Mrs Pierrepont in the evening.

Monday 29 June 1840

Quite a Summer day.  I walkd to Mrs Bruce’s.  She was not at home.  From there we went to Sheppard and got half a pound of 6/- Green Tea to taste (Butcher’s being very bad) and half a pound of 5/- Black for old Hawkens.  We then went to see the old clerk of St. John’s, found him a little better, but as his brother, who was sitting with him said, at 84!  he could not expect to be quite well again.  The good old man relished his Beer Coudle very much and I told him he should have some more.  When I came home, my leg was very much inflamed and swell’d, but it subsided in about an hour and was not worse afterwards.  Emma went to drink tea with Miss Harvey at the college.  She took Ann with her and did not return till half past 9.  It was a beautiful evening for her walk.  She brought a nice nosegay home with her.  Miss Harvey sent word she would spend Thursday afternoon with us, if it did not rain.  Freeman made the clerk a nice jug of Coudle and his niece fetched it in the evening.  Miss Shirley and Sarah Jane Hale call’d in the morning.

Tuesday 30 June 1840

A showery morning, but it held up in the evening.  Admiral and Miss Buckle call’d and were very pleasant.  Miss Buckle told us that Miss Charlotte Boland is certainly going to be married to Lord Keane, but I can hardly believe it.  Miss Workman walk’d here by herself, between dinner and tea, but did not stay long.  After tea Emma and I took a walk.  We went to the South Parade to see the progress the Rail Road is making and walkd up and down the Parade for some time.  It was a chilly evening and I came home after being out an hour, quite cold.  The warmth of the house felt very comfortable.

Miss Ash call’d at the door in the evening to say she had heard from her sister Miss Bradshaw who said the Chamiers were very well and were to dine with her today.  Mrs Hardcastle sent a card of thanks.

Fashion Plate for July 1840 from World of Fashion (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion Plate for July 1840 from World of Fashion
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Wednesday 1 July 1840

A showery morning, so much so I sent to bespeak Wheel Chairs to go to Miss Hill’s, which I was sorry for afterwards, as it was fine enough to have walk’d there.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She told she understood Mrs Drummond was coming home on the 7th, that there had been a great rumpus about the servants at the Quarnier’s, that all the servants had been discharged on account of robbery and great cheating being discovered and that Mrs Drummond was now staying, as one of her servants was required as a witness.  I long to know all about it, which I suppose I shall, when Mrs Drummond or Miss Wilson return.  We went to Miss Hill’s at half past two.  There were only ourselves and Mrs Polwhele and Miss Roberts at dinner,  Miss Harriett Roberts having so bad a headache she could not join us till near teatime. Nothing could exceed Miss Roberts’ kindness and attention to me, she was so anxious that I should rest my leg on the sopha, putting pillows behind me to make me comfortable and in short paying me all the civility in her power.  They were both very pleasant.  Miss Roberts play’d and sung in the evening and they shew’d us some exquisite drawings of flowers they had bought at Mr Empsom’s and a great many other drawings he had lent them to look at  I took my patchwork with me and Miss Roberts very goodnaturedly fetched down some new ribbons and would insist on cutting off some bits of each to add to my patch work.  It turned out very wet in the afternoon and evening, which was unfortunate, as it was the first day of the races and there was to have been a Gala and fireworks at Sidney Gardens, but it was impossible to have them.  Our Chairs fetched us at ten o’clock, when it was very chilly coming home after the warmth of Jane’s drawing room.  I did not think she look’d well or was in her usual spirits.  At dinner we had as a nice piece of salmon as I ever tasted, with lobster sauce, roast fowls and egg sauce, pigion pie, pease, potatoes, cucumber and salad.  Boil’d custard pudding, open raspberry tart and moulds of jelly and blanch mange, the latter delicious, raspberries and Horticultural prize strawberries, which were very fine looking but very acid, tho’ perfectly ripe.

Thursday 2 July 1840

A very showery morning and unfavourable for the second day’s races.  It turned out decidedly wet in the afternoon and evening.  I heard from Miss Wood.  Miss Harvey was to have spent the evening with us, but  the rain prevented her coming.  I sent for the 7th bottle of lotion for my leg.

Friday 3 July 1840

A very rough day.  It blew a perfect gale the whole day.  Miss Fanny Pyne call’d.  She said she had very near been blown down in Green Park Buildings.  She was obliged to hold the rails as she went along to prevent falling and it was a cold wind.  Emma went to Miss Workman.  While she was away, one of the Miss Greviles call’d and staid some time.  I expected Mr Gore all the morning, but he did not come.  Miss Harvey sent to say the rain prevented her coming yesterday, but if we were disengaged and it was the beginning of next week, she would come.  I wrote a long letter to dear Georgina Chamier.

Saturday 4 July 1840

A very fine day, but not like Summer.  Miss Shirley and Sarah Jane Hale call’d.  While they were here Miss Hill and the two Miss Roberts’s came in.  They came to take leave of us, as they go altogether to Clifton next Wednesday for a fortnight, which they divide, the Miss Roberts’s going to Ilfracoomb and Miss Hill undecided where she will go.  The Miss R’s were very obliging and press’d us much to go to see them while they were at Clifton, which was more than Miss Hill did.  Miss Martha Hellican call’d and was very friendly.  After tea we walk’d down to Miss Workman’s, but did not stay long, as it began to rain, but fortunately it was very slight till after we got home.  Mr Gore calld and found my leg much better, but still very far from what it ought to be.

Sunday 5 July 1840

A showery day with a very high wind.  We read prayers in the morning and Emma went to Church in the afternoon.  We read the evening Service at home.

Monday 6 July 1840

A showery morning.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d in the middle of one of the showers and staid till it was over and the street had dried a little, which it did quickly when the sun came out.  She is going into Devonshire on Wednesday.  The rain poured down in torrents in the middle of the day and washed the streets as clean as possible.  It was so violent that it might have been the skirts of a thunder storm.  In the evening it settled into steady, moderate rain, but between ten and eleven at night it again poured.  I wrote to Mrs Keen and made a little parcel of her netting cotton and sent Ann with it to Mr Templeman’s to beg Mrs Hawkins would take it to Lyme with her tomorrow.  While Ann was gone, Mrs Hawkins call’d to wish Freeman good bye and very kindly said she would take it with a great deal of pleasure.

Tuesday 7 July 1840

A very high wind with slight showers occasionally.  Mr Gore call’d and recommended my leaving off the lotion to my leg and try how it will go on without it.  Soon after he was gone Miss Ashe call’d.  She was very chearful and agreeable and made a long visit.  While she was here, Miss Fanny Pyne came in and soon after Miss Ashe went away Miss Shirley and Sarah Jane Hale.  They had not been here long before Captain and and Miss Bussell came, when Miss Shirley and Miss Fanny Pyne took leave.  The Bussells were very chearful and pleasant.  Mrs B and the three “young ladies” are going to Salisbury tomorrow to stay a week or ten days.  Miss Harvey came from the College to tea.  We did not expect her this evening, as the weather look’d very unfavourable.  While we were at tea, Miss Workman came in and little Henry with her.  She did not stay long, as there was a strong appearance of rain, but it did not begin till 8 o’clock, just as Miss Harvey and her maid were going away, when it rain’d so hard she was obliged to have a Fly and it continued the rest of the evening.  A bad prospect for Miss Hill and her friends and Mrs Pierrepont who are leaving Bath tomorrow.  Poor Elizabeth (Miss Harvey’s maid) was so happy and enjoy’d herself with Freeman so much “she wondered what made her mistress go home so early”.  A cold day.

Wednesday 8 July 1840

A very showery day, amounting once or twice to hard rain.  Mrs Drummond (who returnd from Mrs Quarnier’s last night after spending seven weeks at Portsmouth) very kindly calld.  I find from her that there has been a terrible piece of work in Dr Quarnier’s family in consequence of a new butler having been detected in taking some of the Dr’s linen and other things.  When the articles were found in his possession, he said he was “not half so bad as Jane and Mrs Warren”, the housemaid and housekeeper and when further enquiries were made it was discovered that the servants had been carrying on a system of robbery to an amazing extent for years past.  The whole of the servants, coachman, footman, Jane, Mrs Warren and even Sarah!! are sent off.  I do not think that Sarah was implicated in the thieving, but the doctor said “Sarah goes with the rest.”  Certainly she must have been aware of what was going on and ought to have told her master.  I had so high an opinion of her, I did not think it possible she would have done any thing to forfeit her good Character and I am very sorry for her.

Mrs Drummond says she never pass’d her time more delightfully in her life or more sincerely regretted leaving a place than she did Portsmouth.

Miss Drewett call’d and was detained here near two hours by rain.

My leg was not so well today.

Miss Roberts kindly sent to enquire after me before they went to Clifton and sent a strip of blue silk for my patchwork.  We saw Mrs Pierrepont pass at half past three in her way to Devonshire.  It was raining very fast.  Very cold.  I sent a note of enquiry to Mrs Hardcastle.  She  returned for answer she was rather better and was going to Oldbury on Saturday.

Thursday 9 July 1840

A showery morning, but fine in the afternoon. I wrote a  note to request Mr Wiltshire would call to sign Emma’s Certificate, which he did.  He was in very good spirits and made an unusually long visit.  Miss Workman call’d in the evening in her way to take a walk and was pretty well.

I sent Emma’s Certificate to Peter Touray.  My leg was very bad all day, more inflamed that it has been at all.

Still very cold.

Friday 10 July 1840

A dull looking windy day, but dry.  Miss Workman came in a Wheel Chair soon after breakfast, having had a letter from Captain Broughton regretting her inability to pay them her proposed visit and said he would come and see her.  Poor soul!  She still harps on going and ask’d my opinion.  I told her if she felt equal to the journey to go by all means.  She said she felt so well, she was sure she was equal to it and she went away having apparently made up her mind to go, but most probably changed her mind before she got home.  Mr Gore call’d and advised my keeping my leg up entirely on the sopha and reclining as much as I could.  He wished me to continue the lotion again and to take another “dose”, which I did in the evening.

Friday 17 July 1840

I have neglected writing for a week, in which time Miss Workman has call’d almost every day,  Miss Shirley and Miss Pyne twice.  The latter and Mrs Polwhele call’d yesterday.  The Miss Greviles have also been here twice, the last time to take leave, as they are gone today to Lyme and do not return to Bath till November.  They very kindly gave us two tickets for the Victoria Horticultural Shews.  The dear Miss Allens also call’d at the beginning of the week.  They are just returned from a visit in the neighbourhood of Glocester.  Mr Gore has been here twice and I have had 2 black draughts besides the bark and the 8th bottle of lotion but, thank God! my leg is better and Mr Gore assures me I shall be able to go to Miss Pyne’s at the end of the month.  I have heard from Miss Chambers to say Miss Pyne wishes us to be with her as soon as we can after the 27th.  I have also heard from Mr Pigou with the agreeable intelligence that he had received £204.3.6 from America for us.  Blessed be God! for it.  Miss Martha Hellican calld at the beginning of the week, as did Mrs Drummond on Monday.  She left Bath on Tuesday for the remainder of the Summer and Autumn.  I have written to and heard from Henry and Peter Touray, the latter sent us our Dividends and Emma’s Annuity. Emma drank tea with Miss Workman on Wednesday, where she met Miss Drewett and yesterday Miss Drewett and Miss Workman drank tea here.  Miss Shirley call’d yesterday and Mrs Jackson left a TTL at the door.

Bath High Street, mid nineteenth-century Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Bath High Street, mid nineteenth-century
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Saturday 18 July 1840

A showery dull looking day.  Emma saw the Miss Greviles go by a little after 9.  Mr Gore call’d and thought my leg considerably better.  Miss Fanny Hellican call’d.  She is going to Clifton with Mrs Slade, who has been very unwell for some time past.  She has a very bad cough and has fallen away to a shadow.  I fear nothing will be of service to her!  Freeman’s sister Martha came in the afternoon to sleep here.  Betsey was so kind to send us some of the finest red currants by her I ever saw and Freeman brought us up some delicious little rough red gooseberries, as sweet as sugar.

Sunday 19 July 1840

Slight showers in the morning.  Emma went to St. John’s.  It began to rain as she was returning and continued very hard the rest of the day till late in the evening, when it held up and the streets soon dried.  Miss Workman’s Mary came in the evening to say her mistress had heard from Captain Broughton and he is coming tomorrow.  She borrowed a dozen knives and eight silver forks.  Freeman made us a nice little pudding of black currants, sent her from Betsey.  I read the morning and evening Papers.

Monday 20 July 1840

A very showery morning, quite like April.  Emma went to Market and got a nice leg of lamb and some of the largest red currants I ever saw, only 3d a quart!  Fruit is more abundant than for many years past, but the vendors complain that there is little or no sale for it, as sugar is so very dear, no one will preserve it.  Miss Workman call’d to tell us she expected Captain Broughton this evening.  I expected the draught to take tomorrow morning, but it did not come, so I took a pill when I went to bed instead.

Tuesday 21 July 1840

Frequent but slight showers throughout the day.  Mr Gore said he would call today, but he has not.  Captain Broughton kindly call’d and sat more than an hour with us.  He is looking as well as he ever did in his life, indeed, I think better. Not a gray hair, tho’ he must be near 60 and is as agreeable and chearful as when I pass’d so many happy weeks and months in his society and that of those beloved beings who are no more.  Emma call’d on Mrs Wilson Brown, who sent her card of thanks a few days ago, but found she was gone to Dunstable to her family for change of air.  She afterwards call’d on Miss Shirley, who was at home.  Miss Workman sent to borrow a soup ladle and to ask us to tea this evening.  Emma went and it was a disappointment to me not to go, as I should have liked to have pass’d the evening with Captain Broughton, but it was impossible.  They sent the medicine I ought to have taken this morning this afternoon.  It is not the first time it has occurred and it is very careless.  I sent for the 9th bottle of lotion and a bottle of the bark mixture.

Wednesday 22 July 1840

A good day with only a sprinkling of rain.  Mr Gore came and desired me to take the draught on Friday morning and he would come again on Saturday.  Captain Broughton call’d, but did not stay long, as he was going to walk over his old haunts when a boy at Tiverton.   He was to dine at Captain Bussell’s and said if he returned from Tiverton in time before dinner, he would call again, but he did not.  We were agreably surprised in the afternoon by a visit from Miss Wilson, who staid to tea.  She is much pulld down by her severe illness at Portsmouth, but was in good spirits.  She told us a great deal of the iniquity that has been going forward among Dr Quarnier’s servants for years past and to my surprise Sarah, who I had the highest opinion of, is implicated and has turned out very bad.  While we were at tea, Miss Workman call’d.  She said Captain Broughton did not return from Tiverton till just time enough to dress for dinner and very much tired.  Miss Wilson staid till eight o’clock and then went home in a Wheel Chair.  I heard from dear Georgina Chamier and Mrs Keen, the former wished me to send her some ribbon out of a box of hers that is here and a pair of shoes from Phipp’s, by Mr Broughton.

Thursday 23 July 1840

A fine day and very favourable for the Horticultural meeting at Sidney Gardens.  Miss Hill had given us tickets, but as I could not go, gave mine to Miss Shirley and she went with Emma, who was very much gratified.  She saw Mr and Mrs de Visne, who told her the Miss Roberts’s had given up their intention of going to Ilfracomb and that they and Miss Hill were gone down the Wye and afterwards intended going to Malvern.  I did not see Captain Broughton all day, as he went to Clifton.  I heard from Miss Jones and wrote to Miss Wood.

Friday 24 July 1840

Slight showers now and then.  Emma paid 7/6d for Georgina’s shoes and tried to match her ribbon for her, but fail’d.  Captain Broughton paid us a long visit.  He not only went to Clifton yesterday, but also to Oldbury, where he dined and staid till seven o’clock.  He was delighted to see dear Mrs Jones looking so well.  He brought us an invitation from Miss Workman to dine with her tomorrow.  I wished to excuse myself, but he would not hear of it, as he said he had staid till Sunday on purpose to enjoy another day’s chat with me and if I could not come any other way, he would carry me.   He was going to dine at Captain Bussell’s again today.  While we were at dinner the Miss Bussell’s call’d.  Freeman told them we were at dinner and they said they would come again, which they did and staid more than a hour and I was quite surprised to find them so chatty and agreeable.  It was Caroline and Kate, the two youngest.  They brought us an invitation to tea this evening, which I was obliged to decline, against my will, but Emma went and pass’d a very pleasant evening.  The young ladies play’d and sung and were very chearful and pleasant, as were their father and mother and brother and Emma spent a very pleasant evening.

I heard from Miss Wood and she does not leave Kelwaughter Castle till next Spring.  I wrote to Miss Jones.  I took my draught this morning.

The south front of Kilwaughter Castle in the late 19th century. landedfamilies.blogspot.co.uk
The south front of Kilwaughter Castle in the late 19th century.
landedfamilies.blogspot.co.uk

Saturday 25 July 1840

A chearful looking day, but I found it cold.  My leg was more swell’d and painful that it has been for some time past and I begin to fear it will never be otherwise.  I am not usually desponding, but it has now been so long in this state, with only trifling amendment now and then that I think, like my blessed Aunt Neate’s, it may be a prelude to my end!  Mr Gore call’d and desired me by all means to dine at Miss Workman’s.  He was sure a little chearful conversation would do me good and also desired me to drink a glass or two of wine.  He finds the lowering system does not suit my constitution.  He is to come again on Monday.  It turned out wet in the afternoon and we had Chairs to go and return from Miss Workman’s, where we spent a very pleasant evening, Captain Broughton as usual being a host in himself, in chearful and amusing conversation.  Miss Workman was rather tired, they having been to Claverton to renew their acquaintance with Mr Vivian’s house and grounds and she complained of headache after dinner, at which I was not surprised, she having eat of every thing at the table and in no small quantity, to which she added a large portion of raspberries after.  Captain Broughton, I am sorry to say, leaves Bath tomorrow.  I shall miss him very much, for he has been very kind and attentive during the short time he has been here.  We did not come home till 11 o’clock, it was then fine.

We had at dinner green peas soup (Forts), excellent, a boil’d leg of lamb, a beautiful savory goose (which Captain B gave her), peas, turnips, potatoes, apple sauce, currant and raspberry tart and cheesecakes and after dinner very fine raspberries, plums and a cake.  I wrote to Miss Chamier and enclosed my letter in a parcel containing her shoes from Phipp’s and her ribbon from her Box here, which parcel Captain Broughton call’d for, as he went home to dress for dinner, but as we were doing the same, he did not come up stairs.

Mrs Harrison let her lodgings to two ladies, apparently mother and daughter and a maid servant.

Sunday 26 July 1840

A showery day, but Emma got to St. John’s twice without getting wet.  I read the morning Service.  The evening Prayers were read together.  She went to see Miss Workman after Church and found her but poorly, which I was not surprised at after her dinner of yesterday.

Captain Broughton left Bath this morning.

Monday 27th July 1840

A fine day.  Miss Shirley Call’d before I was out of my room.  She sat a little while with Emma and said she would call again.  Miss Workman walk’d here alone and staid some time.  She was looking very well and smart.  While she was here, Miss Shirley came again and when Miss Workman went away Emma and Miss Shirley went to Rigby’s where they are selling off.  The concourse of persons flocking to the shop is so great that they are obliged to shut the doors when the shop is full, to prevent others forcing themselves in and, as one party was served and let out, another was admitted from the throng that surrounded the shop.  Neither Georgina or Emma saw any bargains, consequently were not tempted to buy.  Mr Gore was here and wished me to continue the wine, as it had not made me feverish and also to walk out a little.  Miss Harvey and Miss Wilson drank tea here.  They walkd in and went home in Wheel Chairs.  Poor Miss Wilson was very unwell part of the time she was here and evidently in great pain, but I could not persuade her to take any remedy.  Emma lent Miss Harvey a shawl to go home in.

Tuesday 28 July 1840

A gloomy looking day, but it did not rain, which was fortunate, as it was the Horticultural Meeting at the Park.

Miss Harvey call’d for a few minutes.  She was afraid to stay, it looked so like rain.  She brought Emma’s shawl back.  Miss Fanny Pyne sat here some time.  After she went away Emma went with the ticket the Miss Grevile’s so kindly gave us to the Horticultural Shew and was very much gratified, as both flowers and fruit were beautiful.

Admiral Shirley call’d just after she returned and hearing her speak in rapture of them, regretted very much he had not been there.  He is looking better than he has done for years past.

I walk’d as far as Miss Smith’s twice, to get a cap for each of us.  I bespoke two each and took some silk I had for one, to make us a bonnet each.

Mary came from Miss Workman to enquire how I was.  She said her mistress was so poorly she had begged Mr Gore to see her, which he had, and had prescribed for her.  He said her uncomfortable sensation arose entirely from the state of her stomach.  I wrote to Miss Chambers to say we would go to Charlton Monday or Wednesday next, which would be convenient to Miss Pyne.  I heard from Miss Jones.  We met Mr de Visne in the street.  He shook hands and congratulated me on getting out again.

Wednesday 29 July 1840

A beautiful Summer day.  I began to pack our Box to go to Charlton, which tired me a good deal.  After tea, when it began to be cool, I walk’d gently to Mrs Goodman’s and got two tooth brushes, for which I gave 2/-.  From there I crept to Miss Workman’s.  We found her with her bonnet and shawl on just coming to us.  Mr Gore’s prescription has set her to rights again.  She does not go to Clifton till Friday and said she would come and see us tomorrow.  My leg was very painful while I was sitting with her and I felt very tired.  When I came home Emma went to take places for Charlton, but they would not book them any day for so short a distance, as they might lose passengers the whole way to Lyme, so we must go in a Chaise.

Thursday 30 July 1840

A dull looking day with a very slight shower in the morning.  Miss Drewett call’d and sat some time.  We were busy all day preparing for our journey to Charlton.  I heard from Miss Chambers to say they should expect us on Monday.  I wrote to Mr Alford at the George Hotel at Shepton Mallet to desire he would send a Chaise, as he does for Miss Pyne and have horses ready to go on to Charlton on Monday.  Miss Workman did not call, tho’ she said she would.  Miss Smith sent our bonnets and caps home this afternoon, a day sooner than she promised.

Friday 31 July 1840

A beautiful day.  Miss Shirley call’d and while she was here, Mr Gore came and she went away.  He very kindly said he would send me the bark and the lotion in a small compass for me to take with me and I could put the proper proportions of water to each when I used them.  Captain and Mrs Bussell calld and were very friendly.  Mrs Bussell said they should call again on Sunday to wish us good bye and Captain Bussell said they had hoped to see a good deal of us, but my unfortunate leg had interfered.  It was very obliging in words, but my leg was not bad till they had been in Bath some time.  But it is just as well as it is.  Miss Workman went to Clifton this morning.

I have not had an answer to my letter to Shepton Mallet.

Fashion plate for August 1840 from Godey's Magazine (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for August 1840 from Godey’s Magazine
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Saturday 1 August 1840

A very fine day.  We were very busy the whole of it.  The three Misses Bussells call’d and sat a long time.  They were very agreeable and improve very much on acquaintance.  They told us they were soon to return to Finborough, as a permanent residence, Lady Hotham having given it up to their father.

I wrote to Miss Chambers to say we should be at Charlton on Monday.

No letter from Shepton Mallet!

Sunday 2 August 1840

A very hot day.  I walk’d to St. John’s twice.  My leg was so painful in going in the morning, I thought I should have been obliged to stop.  We staid to the Communion.  Poor Miss Charlotte Liddle came into our Pew and Emma assisted her to the table and back.  Captain and Mrs Bussell call’d and sat some time.  They confirmed the young ladies report that Lady Hotham had given up Finborough to Captain Bussell, he paying all the rates and taxes and keeping the gardens in order and the house in repair.

No letter from Shepton Mallet!!

Monday 3 August 1840

A beautiful day.  Freeman came into our room at 5 o’clock to say she had seen the driver from Shepton Mallet!!!  She was looking out the window and seeing a man looking up at the house, she askd him if he had brought a Chaise from Shepton Mallet to take some ladies to Charlton, and on his saying he had, she came to tell us.  It was curious she should have chanced to have been looking out just as the man was opposite the house.  We got up directly and had our breakfast comfortably and were quite ready without hurrying when the Chaise came to the door at 8 o’clock.  We got into it at 20 minutes past 8 and left Bath for a month, should it please the Almighty! to spare ours and Miss Pyne’s life for that time.  It was a lovely morning, the Chaise a remarkably easy one, having been a private carriage, the horses excellent and the driver extremely careful and civil.  The wind was so brisk and at times so chilly we were frequently, in the early part of the morning, obliged to put up one or other of the glasses.  Fortunately our dust blew from us, so that we were not at all incommoded by that.  Indeed, I do not recollect travelling with less fear or inconvenience.  We changed horses at Shepton, 17 Miles and had another pair as good and as civil a drive on to Charlton, where we arrived at 20 minutes past 1, after a very pleasant ride.  Thank God for it.  We found dear Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers ready to welcome us here, which they did in the kindest manner.  Miss Pyne is looking very well, but more feeble than last year.  Miss Chambers not looking so well.  My leg was sadly swelld and inflamed from the motion of the carriage and hanging down so long, but I hope it will be better tomorrow.  The fare to Shepton Mallet, 17 miles was 1.5.6d, driver 5/- to Charlton, 12 miles, 18/- driver, 3/6d turnpikes, total 2.15.6d.  I went to bed tired and had an excellent night, tho my leg was very painful.

We had at dinner roasted Chicken and pig’s face, beans and rashers of bacon, french beans, potatoes and carrots.  Rice pudding and tart.

I took Miss Pyne two Bath cheeses.

Tuesday 4 August 1840

An intense hot day.  Miss Chambers was so kind as to insist on my breakfasting in bed every morning until my leg is better.

the next passage almost impossible to read, written in faded pencil

Miss Pyne does not come till about 12 o’clock. The inflammation in my leg was a good deal gone down this morning.  I sat with it up the whole day, indeed it was too painful for me to do otherwise and tho there was company in the evening, I lay on the sopha.  Mr and Mrs Williams and Mr Nevison, the gentleman who is doing the Duty of the Church, while Mr Barney is absent, and his sister drank tea here.  The two latter are quite young, Mr Nevison only being in Deacon Orders.  Mrs Williams was very chearful and agreeable and the evening passd off pleasantly.

Roast loin of veal, lamb chops, potatoes, french beans, turnips, apple tart.

Emma walkd to the Post Office before dinner, met Miss Chambers and came back looking quite purple with heat.  I was quite alarmed about her.

Wednesday 5 August 1840

Very hot, but not quite so much as yesterday.  A Mr Wittenbury, being a nephew of Mrs Williams call’d before I came down stairs to apologise for not accompanying Mr and Mrs Williams here yesterday evening, but his health would not allow his being out in the night air.  Emma says he appeared to be in the last stage of Consumption.  Emma walkd with Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers between dinner and tea.  I heard from Freeman, enclosing a letter from Mrs Quarnier.  Mr Wittenbury called Thursday, not this morning.

Thursday 6 August 1840

Still beautifully fine, tho’ very warm.  We dined at two o’clock, as all the party but we were going to take a drive and finish by drinking tea at Mrs Parson’s at Somerton.  The Fly came for them at 4 o’clock.  Between five and six Mrs Williams and her little girl and Miss Bowles calld on us, it being too warm to come in the morning.  Mrs Williams was very agreeable.  Miss Bowles just as odd as last year.  The party did not return from Somerton till near ten o’clock.  Emma said she has pass’d a very pleasant evening.

Friday, 7 August 1840

Still fine and warm.  Mr Nevison and his sister call’d. Miss Chambers, Miss Pyne and Emma walk’d to Betsey Hockey’s to tell her to come for our clothes to wash on Monday, but they found her very ill, having had a strong attack of fever.  She is quite unable to wash at present, but said she hoped to be able to iron next week and she could get a person to wash for her.

Saturday 8 August 1840

A beautiful day.  Captain Pyne and Kate call’d to take leave of Miss Pyne, as Kate and Jane are going to Weymouth on Monday, for the health of the latter, who has not recovered the loss of her sister Juliana  and they fear she will go off in the same way, tho’ at present their medical attendant thinks her mind is more affected than her body, and has ordered her to Weymouth for entire change of scene, as well as air.  Kate appeard very glad to see us and was quite affectionate in her manner.  Both she and Captain Pyne were looking very well.

Sunday 9 August 1840

A very warm day.  Miss Pyne and Emma went to East Charlton Church, Miss Chambers to West Charlton in the morning. I read Prayers at home.  We dined early and both Miss Chambers and Emma went to West Charlton Church in the afternoon.  I read the evening Service and two of Mr Sharpe’s Sermons to Miss Pyne.  I sent word to Hockey, by Ann, not to fetch the clothes till tomorrow week, as we were in no hurry for them.

Charlton Mackrell church via Wikimedia
Charlton Mackrell church via Wikimedia

Monday 10 August 1840

Very warm, but gloomy at intervals and threatening rain.  Mrs Page and two of her children (Miss Blanche, a very pretty girl) and Miss Jane, both very young, call’d on us.  Mrs Page was very agreeable.  She very politely apologised for not having call’d before, but she had been confined to the house with a sore throat.  They had not been gone long when Mrs Dickenson and one of her daughters call’d on Miss Pyne.  I have never seen her since we left Charlton three and twenty years ago and I do not see any alteration in her.  She was very obliging and agreeable.  Miss Dickenson is rather pretty, than otherwise not so tall as her mother, but a very pretty figure with very pleasant mild manners.  There was some rain in the night, enough to lay the dust, but not sufficient to refresh the garden, which is very much burnt.

Tuesday 11 August 1840

The rain of last night has cool’d the air and it is almost chilly today, with a strong appearance of more rain, which fell now and then like a mist, but not really sufficient to wet the ground.  Mr and Mrs William Pyne and their eldest girl call’d (as disagreeable a child as I ever saw).  They were both very pleasant.  After having some luncheon, they went on to King Weston, having said they hoped to see us all to spend a long afternoon with them at Pitney on Thursday.  There were some hard showers late in the evening and during the night, with a good of deal of wind.

Wednesday 12 August 1840

A very windy day and not warm.  Miss Chambers and Emma returned Mrs Page’s visit, who they found with a sore throat and cold.  She was very obliging to Emma and regretted she was not well enough to shew her the alteration making in the house, but hoped before we left Charlton, I should be able to call and see them.  They saw Hockey there, who was still very unwell and hardly able to get so far.  It was cloudy in the evening and the wind very high with showers during the night.  I heard from Miss Wood.

Thursday 13 August, 1840

A very fine day.  I did not get up till late, as we were going to Pitney in the afternoon.  Before I went down stairs, Mrs Brymer and Mrs Williams call’d on us, but I did not see them, which I was very sorry for, as they are both very agreeable. The Fly came at half past three to take us to Pitney (we having dined at two), seven miles.  We arrived there about five and were very kindly received by Mr and Mrs Pyne. We went first into the drawing room where we were introduced to a Miss Richardson, who was on a visit there.  After we had been there a few minutes, Mrs Pyne asked us to go into the dining room to take some fruit and wine.  There we were joined by their seven children, five girls and two boys.  The baby boy, two months old, is a nice little thing, the rest are all very much spoilt, but not disagreeable, except the eldest girl.  She is a very plain girl of twelve years old and the most selfish, pert, destestable child I ever saw.  The fruit;  plumbs, apples, pears, baked apples and cake soon disappeard, for the children eat as much of every thing as they like.  We then returned to the drawing room where Miss Pyne took possession of one of the three sophas and I of another.  We were soon joined by Mr James Parsons, who had been ask’d to meet us and who was very good natured and agreeable.  Just before tea, a Mrs Renolds and her grown up son and daughter came in unexpectedly.  With the tea and coffee, in rushed the three eldest children, the detestable Bessy, little Hannah, (who her sister will soon make as disagreeable as herself), and John, who is a very fine boy with clownish manners.  There was abundance of hot butterd cakes, cold ditto bread and butter, and plum and plain pound cake, every plate of which was emptied.  The three Renolds did not take anything, having drank tea before they came.  I never in my life saw children who eat as they did, quite regardless of whether any other person had a bit.  How they made their stomachs hold the quantity of plums, apples, pears, cake, hot butterd cake, coffee and tea, I cannot conceive.  Soon after tea the Renolds took their leave  and a little before nine the Fly came to bring us home and I was rejoiced when we got back safe.  The house at Pitney is a very good one, nicely furnished with Mr Pyne’s furniture from Lyme, with a great deal of beautiful old china and other ornaments.  The grounds and prospects are very pretty from the window.  My leg was very painful when I came home.

Friday 14 August 1840

A showery  day with a good deal of wind.  Just as we were going to dinner Captain Page call’d. I never saw so much of him before.  He was very agreeable and pleasant in his manner.  There was some rain in the evening, but not much.  We heard a clap of thunder at a great distance.

Saturday 15 August 1840

A fine day, but very high wind.  Mrs and Miss Parsons call’d and sat an hour.  Poor Hockey continues so ill she is not able to take our washing, so I shall give it to the old coachman’s wife on Monday.  Miss Pyne’s face is very much swell’d and perfectly crimson with erisypilas.  This morning Miss Chambers sent to Somerton for Mr Valentine, but for fear he should have left home before her note arrived, Emma went to Hockey’s to beg if he came there she would send him down.  She found Hockey very ill and thinks she will very soon follow her sisters, as  she appears to be in a rapid decline.  Mr Valentine came to Miss Pyne and said there was nothing to be alarmed at, but she must take some medicine and be very cautious not to go into the air.  It was very chilly in the morning.

Sunday 16 August 1840

A showery day.  Miss Pyne was better.  Emma and Miss Chambers went to West Charlton Church and got there just before a shower.  We dined at 2 o’clock and Emma went to East Charlton, as being nearer, at 3 o’clock and Miss Chambers to West again.  Miss Pyne and I read the morning and evening Service at home and I read one of Mr Sharpe’s Sermons to her.  It rained a good deal in the evening and night and was cold.

Monday 17 August 1840

It blew a perfect hurricane from the South West all last night, with torrents of rain.  I thought the window in our room would have been broken, the rain beat against it with such violence and the weather has changed suddenly from extreme heat to quite cold.  Miss Nevison call’d.  The wind was very high all day.  Mr and Mrs Francis Dickenson and Miss Caroline Dickenson call’d.  Mr D is a very handsome, gentlemanly young man and was very agreeable and Miss D looked much prettier than she did the other morning and was very friendly and pleasant.  Mrs D is  rather pretty but very silent, I should say, inclined to be high and consequential.

Thursday 18 August 1840

A cold, windy, disagreeable day with slight showers occasionally.  No one call’d.  I was so cold in the evening that Miss Pyne had a fire at tea time, which was very comfortable.

Wednesday 19 August 1840

A very damp day and much warmer than yesterday.  The banisters felt as if they had been washed and were equally damp at night.  Miss Chambers and Emma went to see Betsey Hockey, who they found better, but still in bed.  I walk’d about the garden two or three times to see what effect it would have on my leg, which has been worse every since I went to Pitney, a little red eruption having come out the day after, in consequence of which I discontinued the lotion on Sunday for fear of driving it in again.  I heard from Freeman, who wrote at the request of Mr Bradley, to say Harriett Melville’s money was expended and he had advanced two week’s payment, 12/- to her and to beg I would write to Mr Melville to that effect, which I did, tho’ there must be some great mistake somewhere, as the money! (I think) ought to have lasted till the 29th of this month.  I also wrote to Freeman to desire she would go to Mr Bradley and make enquiries about it and let me know.  She tells me her “dear old father” has come from Lyme to see his children, who are settled at Bath.  I was very glad to hear it and hope he will not return till we go home.

Thursday 20 August 1840

An intense hot day.  I suffered more inconvenience from the heat today than I did on the 4th and 5th, but I think I must have had a good deal of fever about me, I was so thirsty.  We dined at half past one and at a little after three the Fly came to take us to Somerton.  It had so much the appearance of a thunder storm, that I expected we should have had it on our way, but it went off.  The driver also was so persuaded it would rain, that he thought we had better not have the fly open.  Miss Pyne and I got out at Mrs Parson’s gate and walk’d up to the house and Miss Chambers and Emma went on to spend the afternoon at Huish with Mr Anthony Pyne and Mary.  I was also to have gone, but was afraid it would make my leg worse.  We were very kindly received by Mrs Parsons, Eliza and Fanny, who had not dined and did not till an hour after we got there.

When they went into dinner Miss Pyne and I laid down on the two sophas, I with a book, and an old servant of Miss Pyne’s, who now lives at Somerton came in to see her and tell her all the news of her family.  Eliza Parsons came from the dinner table to beg us to partake of a “nice juicy plum pie and cream”, but we declined it, but went to them afterwards and had some fruit, of which there were plums, pears and baked apples.  I eat two of the latter.  Miss Pyne, Mrs Parsons and Eliza took a walk in the garden before tea, but I was afraid to venture, so staid quietly in the drawing room with Fanny and put my legs up on the sopha.  We had some excellent tea with plenty of tea cakes buttered cold, bread and butter, dry toast and butter and a very nice home made bread cake.  Exactly as the clock struck nine, Miss Chambers and Emma call’d for us, but did not get out of the Fly and we left the Parsons after having spent a very pleasant evening.  Emma was delighted with her trip and said nothing could exceed Mrs A Pyne’s kindness to her.  She took her all over Mr Stuckey’s garden and also over that of a Mr Broadmead, which Emma said was beautiful.  Mary Pyne was equally kind and altogether she enjoyed her excursion very much.  As we were coming home, we met a heavily laden broad wheeld wagon coming up Somerton Hill as we were going down and the driver came so near us that he grazed our wheel, which frightened me dreadfully.  It was very shameful, as there was plenty of room on his side and I am certain he must have done it on purpose and he  had the impudence to called out “All’s right.”

I hardly ever saw so thick a fog as there was the whole way from Somerton to Charlton, so much so that when we got out of the Fly, the driver said to me “How very thick the fog is Ma’am” and he had his great coat on.  I felt so grateful to the Almighty on arriving safe home.

Emma Chapman, Fanny's sister, when elderly and blind.
Emma Chapman, Fanny’s sister, when elderly and blind.

Friday 21 August 1840

A heavy looking morning, but it turned out fine.  Emma and Miss Chambers walk’d to Green Down in the evening and returned so late we were obliged to have candles for tea.

Saturday 22 August 1840

A heavy looking morning with a strong appearance of thunder, which we had about three o’clock. The storm fell at a distance, as the thunder did not quickly follow the lightening.  A torrent of rain fell, accompanied by a violent gust of wind, both of which did not last many minutes, but the cloud from which the rain descended was awfully black and nearly obscured the light.  It was fine in the evening but looked so like rain that Miss Chambers was afraid to take her usual evening walk.

Sunday 23 August 1840

Fine, with the exception of two showers.  Miss Chambers went to West Church, Emma to East in the morning and both went to West Charlton in the afternoon.  I read the morning and evening Service to Miss Pyne and two of Mr Sharp’s Sermons.  I heard from Freeman to say Melville’s money would not be expected till the 29th.  As I thought, I misread her letter.

Monday 24 August 1840

A beautiful day.  Mary Pyne came from Huish to spend the day before I was down stairs.  She is looking better than I ever saw her and was most kind to us.  Mrs Williams, her little girl and Miss Bowles call’d and made a long visit.  As soon as Mary Pyne went away in the evening, Miss Chambers went to a lecture at the Church by Mr Joseph Bradley, who came to Pennard on business and the people here requested him to give them a lecture, which he was but too happy to do.  The Church was crowded.  Emma and Miss Pyne took a walk.  Mr Valentine came to see Miss Pyne while we were at dinner.

Tuesday 25 August 1840

A fine day, with very heavy clouds occasionally, but they did not fall.  Mr and Miss Nevison call’d.  After they went away Miss Chambers and Emma went with the letters to the Post Office.  While they were away the two Mrs Dickensons call’d.  The elder came to tell Miss Pyne that her eldest daughter was going to be married.  She was all delight and happiness on the occasion.  The offer was only made last Friday.  The bridegroom  is Mr Horner, the second son of Colonel Horner of Mells Park and has the living of Mells.  It was quite delightful to see the happiness it was evident Mrs Dickenson felt.  Her daughter in law was quite composed on the occasion, but she appears by nature a cold milk and water character.  In the evening we all went to look at Mrs Gapper’s old house, which Mr Bradney has lately left and which is now undergoing repair (not before it wanted it.  I never saw such a wretched, gloomy old hole in my life.  How they could live in it, I cannot think).  I was very much tired when we came home and my leg was very much swell’d and inflamed.  I put the lotion on when I went to bed.

Wednesday 26 August

A beautiful day.  Mrs Page, Miss Blanche and their little boy call’d.  Mrs Page very kindly ask’d me if I would not like to take a ride with her, as I was not able to walk.  She had sent to ask me before, but I told her I never got into a carriage from choice.  She made a long visit and was extremely agreeable.  Poor Miss Blanche came to take leave of Miss Pyne, as she is going tomorrow to school at Miss Cooke’s at Bath, very much against her inclination, as it is the first time of her leaving home for a school and she appears to be 14 or 15 years of age, too old to go to school.  Miss Chambers was out walking and did not return till they were gone.

Thursday 27 August 1840, Charlton.

A very fine morning.  Miss Chambers and Emma walkd to Keinton to purchase some stocking flannel, tea and sugar for Miss Pyne, at a very good country shop there and between dinner and tea they and Miss Pyne walkd to the other end of the village.  Emma took some baked apples to Betsey Hockey, who she found much better.  It lookd so dark and gloomy when they set out, that Miss Chambers returned for the umbrella, but it did not rain.  They came home very tired.

Friday 28 August 1840

A beautiful day, but very warm.  As soon as we had had our luncheon we all walkd to Captain Pyne’s cottage and went over every part of it.  It is in a sad state, out of repair in every part of it.  He talks of doing a good deal to it, but the best thing he can do would be to pull it down and build a pretty cottage in its place.  It might be made a sweet place, for the pleasure garden about it is beautiful and the kitchen yard very large with abundance of fruit and extensive walls, with good orchards and two paddocks.  It will be a great pity if Captain Pyne does not build there, for it will be throwing money to repair the present house.  In our way home we went into Mrs Durston’s pretty cottage next to Miss Pyne’s.  They are little farmers and have every thing very neat and nice  about them.  Her husband’s daughter, who is a working dress maker in London, was just come home for a short time for a holyday, a plain but very civil girl.  Miss Chambers walkd between dinner and tea and staid so late we were able to have candles at tea.

Saturday 29 August 1840

One of the hottest days we have had this Summer.  The heat was quite oppressive with great appearance of thunder all the morning, but it passd off.  Miss Chambers walk’d between dinner and tea, but Emma did not go with her.  We received a note of invitation from Captain and Mrs Page to dine there on Wednesday next, which I declined.

Sunday 30 August 1840

A fine day with a cool air.  Emma went to East Charlton and Miss Chambers to West Charlton Church in the morning.  Both of which were thinly attended, the labourers being so overcome by the heat yesterday they were glad to lay in bed this morning.  The heat in the middle of the day yesterday  was so intense that the poor people at work in the fields were obliged to desist and lay down in the shade.  Both Emma and Miss Chambers went to West Charlton in the afternoon.  I read both morning and evening Prayers to Miss Pyne and one of Mr Sharp’s Sermons.

Monday 31 August 1840

A fine day, with a very rough wind.  Miss Page and her little brother call’d.  She is just come home after a nine month’s visit at her Uncle’s, Sir Thomas Crawley’s and appears a pleasant girl.  She said her Mama desired her to make apologies for her not having call’d on us so often as she wished, but she had been very much confined from the remains of a violent cold.  Mrs Brymer also call’d and was as agreeable and pleasant as usual, but said she was almost blown away in coming here. Before she went away Captain Pyne came in.  Miss Pyne ask’d him to stay and dine, which he did.  He had seen his sister Jane at Weymouth last week and thought her much better.  Miss Chambers walk’d to Keinton before dinner.  It was my intention to have returned home today, but Miss Pyne pressd us so kindly to stay till next week, we shall remain here till next Tuesday.

Fashion plate for September 1840 from Godey's Magazine (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for September 1840 from Godey’s Magazine
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Tuesday 1st September 1840 Charlton

A very heavy looking morning and so cold that even Miss Pyne could not bear the window open and was obliged to put on her flannel dressing gown while she was getting up, but about eleven o’clock the sun broke thro the clouds and it became very hot.  We dined half an hour earlier than usual to allow of Miss Chamber’s and Emma’s walking  to Lights Carey to see an old family Manse there, which was built and formerly occupied by the Lights, but is now converted into a farm house and is the property (by purchase) of Mr Dickenson.  There are still some fine rooms of the old mansion remaining, with the little Chappel attached to it, but the latter quite a ruin and the cattle walking into it through what were formerly fine Gothic windows to the ground.  Emma came home quite delighted with the old place and the newness of every thing about the farm part of it and particularly with the kind civility of Mrs Dyke, the farmer’s wife, who shew’d them the house.  Just before tea time Miss Sims, the daughter of a farmer near Miss Pyne’s, sent her a brace of beautiful partridges.

I wrote to Freeman to say we should be at home next Tuesday and to Shepton Mallet to desire to have the Chaise on that day sent here to take us back.

Wednesday 2 September 1840

A dull morning with a settled rain in the afternoon for two or three hours and showery in the evening.

Thursday 3 September 1840

Fine, with a brisk wind and the feel of thunder about.  We dined at one o’clock and at two the Fly came to take us to West Pennard to see the famous cheese that was made there last year from the milk of 750 cows as a present from the farmer’s owner of the cows to the Queen.  It is very large, of an octagon shape, with a deep impression of the Royal Arms with a wreath of Oak leaves and Acorns round it, “Victoria Regina” top and bottom.  It is 21 and a half inches high, but we foolishly did not measure across or ask the weight.  Altogether it is very perfect and handsome and well worth going to see, tho quite a journey and Pennard is 7 miles from Charlton and the cheese had been moved 2 miles further on to a beautiful neat farm house and deposited in their best parlour, where a fire was kept night and day during the Winter to ripen it properly.  The farmer, a very intelligent man, and his two nieces, were very obliging and gave us all the information respecting the cheese from its first formation.  He also told us that had some intention to training 8 cows to draw it into London and to the Pallace when it is presented to the Queen, “but that Ma’am, will be a future consideration.”  His nieces most obligingly ask’d me if I would like to see their dairy.  Of course I did.  In it was a quantity of the beautiful Cheddar cheeses ripening for the Bath shops.

Chapman image - cheese
The famous Pennard Cheese made for Queen Victoria.

They had had a very heavy storm of thunder and lightening before we got there, but no rain with it and in our way home from there to Somerton, where we drank tea, we were surrounded with heavy falls of rain at a distance, but only a very slight shower reached us, the sun shining at the time and forming a beautiful rain bow, which lasted a considerable time.

We spent a very chearful pleasant evening at Mrs Parsons’s and had a beautiful fine night to come home.  I did not feel so tired as I expected, tho we had been twenty miles! and I had walkd a good deal for me, but my leg was not painful, tho’ I had not put it up from 1 o’clock till I went to bed.  Mr and Mrs Nevison call’d while we were out.

Friday 4 September 1840

A dull looking morning with rain in the course of the day.  Mr and Mrs Pinney call’d.  He did not get out of the Carriage.  Consequently she made a short visit.  I never saw a person more alterd than she is.  Her face is so bloated, she looks as if she was in a dropsey and her voice is grown harsh and coarse, but her manner just as specious (without meaning any thing) as ever.

I heard from Mrs Quarnier to say she should be in Bath Friday or Saturday next, so we shall have the pleasure of seeing her on our return.

Saturday 5 September 1840

A beautiful day.  Miss Chambers, Emma and I went to pay our “take leave visits”.  We went to Captain Page’s first, met Miss Jane Ann in the road, who returnd with us.  At the door we met Captain Page in his shooting dress.  He was come home for his luncheon, of which his mouth was full.  He came forward to meet us and shook hands and ushered us into Mrs Page, who received us very kindly.  After sitting a short time, she askd of us if we would like to see the improvements Mr Dickenson has been making in the house and most obligingly shewd us every part of the house, up stairs and down. There has been added to it, since we lived there,  a servant’s hall, housekeeper’s room, butler’s pantry, scullery, larders etc, all good and convenient and up stairs a beautiful bed room over the kitchen and a “WC” on the bed room floor.  We did not go into the garden, which I should very much like to have done, but we were so long going over the house and premises we had not time.  Nothing could exceed Mrs Page’s kindness.  From there we went to Mr Williams’s.  They were at dinner and we were just leaving our cards, when Mrs Williams made her appearance and insisted on our coming in.  She was suffering from the prevailing bowel complaint and had fainted at the dinner table, occasiond by the pain and was just recovering when we call’d.  We saw the two nice little children and a Miss Hussey, a relation of Mrs Williams’s from Bath, who is staying with her, a good humourd pleasant person.  Mrs Williams was most friendly and kind and said she should call to see us again before we left Charlton.  We then went to Mr Brymer’s.  The masons were at work in the Church yard, which enabled us to go through it and saved us a long walk round to the house.  The Carriage was at the door to take them out, so we waited till it drove off and then went down to the house, where the servants said “Mr and Mrs Brymer were just gone to Somerton.”  We walk’d into the flower garden, which is beautiful to look at, a new “Oriel” window Mr Brymer is adding at the end of the house.  Altogether it is a lovely place, tho’ in so low a situation.  We came home in very good time for dinner and I did not feel tired, tho’ the walk was long for me.  My leg was very much swell’d in the evening, but not painful, a proof of how much better it is.  Thank God for it.

I wrote to Mrs Quarnier and Freeman.  The Brymers sent Miss Pyne some beautiful grapes from their conservatory.

Sunday 6 September 1840

A very fine day.  Miss Pyne, Emma and I went to East Charlton Church.  Miss Chambers went to West in the morning, Miss Chambers and Emma to West in the afternoon and I read the Prayers to Miss Pyne at home, as she did not feel equal to going twice.

I heard from Shepton Mallet to say the Chaise would be here on Tuesday to take us to Bath.

Monday 7 September 1840

A very wet morning, which I was afraid would continue all day, but the rain ceased between twelve and one and it was beautifully fine the rest of the day.  Mrs Williams and Miss Hussey call’d, the former much better than on Saturday.  She told Miss Pyne (to her surprise) that Captain Pyne had determined to sell his house here, which he had not said a word of to Miss Pyne!!! and that printed papers were distributing to that effect.  After we had had our luncheon, Miss Chambers, Emma and I call’d on Miss Nevison.  She was suffering from a severe cold.  she appears to me quite a “milk and water” person, but I may mistake her.  We took a little road instead of returning straight home and left Miss Chambers to prolong her walk.  We had only just taken off our bonnets when we heard a Carriage and on going down stairs found Mrs Moody and a Mrs Cockram with Miss Pyne.  The former (who I had long wished to see) is not at all what I had pictured the “beautiful Julia Bennet”.  She is what I should call a good looking country person, without a shade of that elegance and fashion about her that I had expected to see.  She was very obliging in her manner, but even that was countryfied.  Just after we had dined, Captain Pyne and Mr and Mrs W Pyne arrived. The two former were going to dine at Captain Page’s.  They staid about half an hour and then went on to Captain Page’s, leaving Mrs Pyne to spend the evening here.  A little before seven, Mrs Parsons (who was to have been here between five and six) and Eliza made their appearance and we pass’d a very pleasant, chearful evening.  At ten o’clock the two gentlemen came from Captain Page’s to take Mrs W Pyne home to Pitney.  They were all very friendly and kind on taking leave and hoped to see us there again next year.

We were up very early this morning and had pack’d every thing but what we were to wear, so that we shall only have to put in our gowns and caps tomorrow.

The Rail Road between Bath and Bristol was opened today.

Twerton, on the Bath to Bristol railway line Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Twerton, on the Bath to Bristol railway line
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Tuesday 8 September 1840

A gloomy looking day with every appearance of rain, but fortunately there was none all day.  We were up early and were quite ready to set out by eleven o’clock, tho’ I had not ordered the Chaise till two.  Miss Pyne most kindly dined at one, to accommodate us.  We also had a large basket of apples, 2 brace of partridges and a small cheese, like one we thought excellent at her table, put into the Chaise and exactly at 2 o’clock with great regret took leave of her and Miss Chambers after spending five weeks with them as happily as the greatest kindness and attention could make them.  We had a safe journey (Thank God for it) and reachd home, where we found Freeman and Ann looking quite well and delighted to see us and every thing clean and comfortable, the carpet and rugs in the drawing room looking like new, Freeman has cleaned it so nicely.  We relished our tea very much.  To my great disappointment I found that Dr and Mrs Quarnier had arrived at the York House late on Saturday evening, that the Dr had attended Mrs Tobin’s funeral to Weston on Monday morning and that they left Bath again in the evening on their way to Devonshire, where business relative to Mrs Tobin’s affairs takes the Dr, who is left her Executor, and it is uncertain if they return to Portsmouth thro’ Bath.

Eliza left a note for me with five pounds to pay me what I had laid out for her, the receipt book she promised me when she was last in Bath, a feather to be cleaned and a great many lace things to be cleaned.  I found a letter from Mr Pigou to say the Bill from America for £209.4.6 would be due on the 14th and to ask if he should desire it paid to his Bankers.  Freeman had a fire in the drawing room for us.

Miss Workman sent Mary to enquire after us.  She told us Miss W had another attack at Clifton but has again recovered!!! and does not remember anything of it.

Both Dr and Mrs Quarnier made particular enquiries of Freeman about my leg and the Dr wish’d me to bathe it 3 times a day with whisky, of which he left a bottle of very old for me to try and Eliza also left with Freeman a bottle of Eau de Cologne for me.  She kept Freeman with her at the York House three hours, besides calling here and talking to her about us for a long time.

Wednesday 9 September 1840

A fine day.  Mr Vezey’s brother came to ask if I had any objection to have the outside of the house painted, as they were going to have the shop painted and he did not think we should be inconvenienced by the smell, as it would soon go off.  I would not object, as it certainly wants it very much, being very dirty and shabby, but it is very provoking that it was not done while we were absent.

Fanny lived on 19 Milsom Street, about Vezey's coach building premises. This advert dates from a later period, but they were still located at Milsom Street.
Fanny lived on 19 Milsom Street, above Vezey’s coach building premises (Milsom Street was their showroom). This advert dates from a later period. (ilovethelondonroad.blogspot.com)

Emma call’d on Miss Workman and thought her looking thin and poorly.  I sent her a partridge and Emma took her some of Miss Pyne’s nice apples in the evening.

I heard from Miss Armstrong, a very indifferent account of both Mr and Mrs Scott, the former she says is kept alive by art and skill and may live in his present state some time, but there is no prospect of his ever being better.  Freeman’s good old father calld to see us.  He is looking better than I ever saw him, tho’ in his 75th year.

I wrote to Mr Pigou.

I began to try the fomentation of hot water to my leg, so strongly recommended by Mr and Mrs Williams at Charlton.

Thursday 10 September 1840

A fine day.  Emma call’d at the Miss Hellicans and found them all pretty well, Mrs Slade very much better for change of air at Clifton.  Miss Workman call’d.  I thought her looking particularly well and she appeard in very good spirits, but did not stay long, as our dinner was ready.  Emma went to the College after dinner to see Miss Wilson and Ann took the parcel that Mrs Quarnier left here for Miss Wilson and walked home with Emma.  They staid there till after tea.  Miss Wilson was pretty well, but poor Miss Harvey very much otherwise.  She has been very ill.

I wrote to Miss Armstrong.

The smell of the paint is very annoying.  Emma met Admiral Shirley, looking remarkably well.  He said he would call tomorrow.

Friday 11 September 1840

A fine day with a brisk wind.  Admiral Shirley call’d, looking twenty years younger than he did last year!  He gave us an account of a tour he had been, which astonished us.  He went to Clifton, got into an Irish Steamer and went to Dublin, where he had never been before.  Saw every thing worth seeing there, then embark’d for Liverpool, where he did the same.  From there to Birmingham by Rail Road, then on to London by the same conveyance and from London home, not having had “ache or pain” the whole time!!!

September 1840

From Lazyness I have neglected to write what has pass’d for a fortnight and have nearly forgotten.  In that time the dear Miss Allens have call’d and they are now gone to stay a month or longer with Mrs Hudson at Wimbledon.  Miss Helen Wiltshire call’d and ask’d us to spend a day and sleep at Shockerwick, but I was obliged to decline it, on account of my leg.  Miss Workman has calld here frequently and drank tea twice.  The Miss Hellicans and Miss Hare have call’d twice, also Mr Wiltshire, Mrs Dorset Fellow, Miss Harrison, the three latter I did not see, as I determined to lay in bed a week to see whether perfect rest would not be of service to my leg and certainly either that or the fomentations, or both together, have done it good.  Mrs Pierrepont returned from Devonshire last week and call’d here immediately.  She is looking very well.  Miss Wilson has calld, but I did not see her.  Emma has call’d on the Hellicans, Mrs Portis and ? on Miss Workman.  She has also been to the Victoria Dahlia Shew with the ticket Miss Grenvile so kindly gave us and to the one at Sidney Gardens, with a ticket Miss Workman gave her.

Freeman has been to Bristol on the Railroad with her good old father, the latter with his daughter Martha have returned home to Lyme.  I wrote to ask dear Henry to come down and see us, but he has declined it on account of the lateness of the season.  Miss Helen Wiltshire sent me a ticket for the Dahlia Shew at the Victoria Garden, with which I sent Freeman.  Miss Fanny Pyne call’d and brought with her her cousin Mr Randolph, who was very agreeable.

“From January 1st to March 31st 1841” frontspiece of journal [inserted]

Sunday 27 September 1840

A fine day.  Emma went to St. John’s in the morning.  I read the Prayers at home in bed.  I heard from Eliza Quarnier telling me that Mr Tobin, their old friend’s son, whose  funeral Dr Quarnier had attended the day before we came home, had been seized with the Brain Fever and died exactly three weeks  after his mother! and that at his own request he was to be buried by her at Weston, that the Dr would attend as before, and that we might expect to see him this evening or tomorrow morning.  I sent Ann off to Miss Wilson with the letter and a note to ask her to come here to tea when she would be sure of seeing him.  To our surprise, just at two o’clock, in came the kind Dr.  As we did not expect him till the evening, I was not up and was obliged to scramble as fast as possible, as he said he could not wait and he had so much to do he could not come again.  I continued to huddle on my clothes, while he took a bit of bread and two glasses of wine.  Nothing could exceed his kindness when I came in.  He look’d at my leg and did not disapprove of the fomentation night and morning, but wished me to substitute his favourite whisky for the water, which I promised to do and desired I would take two glasses of wine instead of one, every day.  He said it would be quite out of his power to go to the College to see Miss Wilson, but appeared very glad when I told him she was coming here to meet him and he promised to be here about 9 o’clock.  He told us how poor Eliza was so overcome by these two melancholy events, particularly the latter, that he was quite alarmed about her first . . . page broken off here

 

GAP IN THE DIARY

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

 

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