1807 Diary

The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman

18 July 1807

Compleated my thirty second year. Gather’d a beautiful nosegay to send down to to my mother.  Lady Dunbar called to bring a box of papers to remain here till they return from the country where they are going for a month  I taught her how to plait the shavings and my Aunt P gave her enough to make a Bonnet, with which the old Lady was highly delighted.  Mr Tudor very kindly calld to tell my Aunt how he found poor Mrs Edwards at the Hospital.  He gave a very indifferent account of her and appears to think she will never be much better.  Mr T was very chatty and pleasant.  We had a good deal of laughing about teaching him to plait the Chips that he might have the pleasure of instructing the young ladies.

Fashion plate for July 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement
Fashion plate for July 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement

19 July 1807

Went to Church at 2 o’clock.  The service was half over when we got there.  Saw the Colebrookes, Sutherlands, Noyes and Walter’s.  Mr Wiltshire called just as we were sitting down to dinner.  He had had bad accounts of Maria from Cheltenham and was very low in consequence.  Walked up to Brailbrook after Tea.  Found the Workman’s there and Mrs Hendy and her Daughters.  The Jones’s all appeared much out of spirits but particularly Val.  He hardly spoke at all except to Mrs Horne and the Hendy girls.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and Pen Saker.

18 July 1807
Click to enlarge image

20 July 1807

Rain most part of the day.  Mr and Miss Lane call’d to take leave.  Miss L was so kind to send up her new Hat in the evening for us to see and a very pretty front of a gown, of which I took the pattern.  Walked in the garden after tea.  A lovely moonlight evening.

21 July  1807

A very fine day, went into the Village to buy two little Pigs of Mrs Dyer; saw them but did not settle about having them, till my Aunt knew the price.  Call’d at Davis’s to see the table. but could not judge how it would look, it was in so rough a state.  Mr Wiltshire call’d but I did not see him.  Val Jones call’d and sat an hour.  Told us a great deal of Bath Scandal and a long history of himself and a Woman who attack’d him in the street at Bristol.  He is going to London tomorrow.  The Workmans, Hendys and little Betsey came down in the afternoon but did not stay to tea.

22 July 1807

A very fine morning but extremely hot.  Miss Hendy and Eliza came to learn how to plait the shavings for bonnets. Had a large party to dinner.   Sir R  Baker, Maria, Sir G Colebrooke,  Mrs Sutherland, Mr and Mrs Noyes, Mr Allen and Mr Tudor remarkably pleasant and pleasant at dinner.  Lady Colebrooke, Mr and Mrs Walters, Mr and Mrs Croake and Miss Drewitt came in the evening.  Sir R. Maria and Mr Allen went away early, the rest of the party staid till past 10 o’clock.  Violent storms and rain at night and a great deal of lightning.  The hottest day and evening we have had this year.

23 July 1807

Mr Wiltshire called.  Still very bad account of poor Maria.  My Aunt Powell and I calld at the Jones’s. Saw Mr and Miss Jones, little Betsey and Mrs Hendy.  Mr and  Mrs Horne and the two girls were gone to Bath.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and Mrs Bastard.  John Holebrook came up in the afternoon and cut the myrtle by the library window.  A very damp evening.  Did not go out after tea.

24 July 1807

A sun shine day with very hard showers.  Mr Wiltshire call’d and promised to let my Aunt have two little pigs to fat. Sir G Colebrooke called to remind us of dining there next Thursday.  Too damp to go out.

25 July 1807

Showery morning.  Mr Wiltshire calld out from the road to know if he could do anything for us in Bath.  Maller the blacksmith came to alter the fastening of the library window.  Fine evening.  Walked in the garden after tea.  Mr Wiltshire sent the little pigs.

26  July 1807

Sunday too wet to go to church.  Read prayers at home.  Mr Wiltshire and John calld in their way to Bath.  Mrs and Miss Jones and Miss Hendy  walkd down and sat an hour.  Mr W. called again just as we sat down to dinner to say his accounts from Cheltenham were very indifferent but better from London.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Vassall and Mrs Denman and my Aunt N from Cooper.

27 July 1807

Monday   Sunshine in morning with hard shower.  Mr W calld before dinner to say poor Maria was very much worse, that he should wait for tomorrow’s post and if the accounts were not better he should go to Cheltenham.  Drank tea at the Crooks, met the Colebrookes, Noyes,Walters and Mrs Sutherland.  Spent a very cheerful, pleasant evening.  My Aunt heard from George Shirley.  Oil’d my table.

Tuesday 28  July 1807

A beautiful morning.  Went down to Bath in Mr Jones’s carriage. Sat an hour with my Mother.  Found her very indifferent and dear Emma apparently much out of spirits.  Call’d on Miss Grant and Mrs Scott and her two daughters, with whom Miss G is on a visit, broad scotch women, but good sort of ladys.  My aunt engaged them to breakfast here tomorrow.  Walked home a good deal tired – worked hard at skirt (?) of gown in the evening.  Mr W called while we were at Bath to say he was going to Cheltenham immediately.

High Street, Bath, 1807 (Victoria Art Gallery)
High Street, Bath, 1807 (Victoria Art Gallery)

Wednesday 29 July 1807

So very wet a morning that Miss G and her friends could not come to breakfast.  We could not go out the whole day.

Thurs 30 July 1807

Sunshine morning with showers.  My Aunt P went up to Mr Jones’s in the morning.  Gather’d a beautiful nosegay and sent to my mother by Harding. We all dined at Sir G. Colebrookes.  Met Sir R Baker and Maria, Mr and Mrs Noyes, Mr and Mrs Fraser, Mrs Sutherland, her son and daughter and young Trail – and in the evening Mr, Mrs and Miss Croake, Miss Drewitt and three of the Walters’s boys.  Pleasant day enough.  My Aunt set Mrs Croake down in our way home.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and Captain Broughton.

Friday 31 July 1807

Rained hard.  My aunt Powell very unwell with a complaint in her stomach.  So cold and damp we had a fire all day.  Cleared up in the evening.  Walked in the garden before tea.  Oil’d my table.  Some gentleman threw over with the newspaper a small box of Indian coins from Tom Porcher for my aunt P.  4 quarter ?, 4 Pagodas and 4 silver coins

 

Fashion plate for August 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement
Fashion plate for August 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement

Saturday 1 August 1807

A fine morning with occasional Showers.  Mr Jones had the kindness to lend my aunt the carriage to take us to Bath but it rained so hard the whole time we were there that I did not get out of it, except at my Mother’s, with whom my Aunt Neate spent the morning.  My Mother better.  Dear Emma looking remarkably well and in good spirits. Returned home before 4 o’clock that Mrs Horne (who went with us) might be in time for Mr Jones’s dinner.  A fine evening.  Saw Mrs and Miss Savage in the Road who told us Maria Wiltshire was much the same.

Saturday 1 August 1807

A fine morning with occasional Showers.  Mr Jones had the kindness to lend my aunt the carriage to take us to Bath but it rained so hard the whole time we were there that I did not get out of it, except at my Mother’s, with whom my Aunt Neate spent the morning.  My Mother better.  Dear Emma looking remarkably well and in good spirits. Returned home before 4 o’clock that Mrs Horne (who went with us) might be in time for Mr Jones’s dinner.  A fine evening.  Saw Mrs and Miss Savage in the Road who told us Maria Wiltshire was much the same.

Sunday 2 August 1807

A beautiful day.  My Aunt Powell and I walk’d to Church at 2 o’clock.  Very hot.  Saw Sir G and Lady Colebrooke and  Mrs and Miss  Sutherland.  My Aunt had a long letter from Mrs Hodge.  Walk’d in the garden a short time before tea, but the wind was too cold to continue out long.

Monday 3 August 1807

A very fine day.  Mrs and Miss Savage call’d and asked us to go to Bath with them in the Sociable.  My Aunt paid two or three Bill.  Went and chose the pattern of my Hat and left the chip to have it made.  They promised to get it done by Wednesday morning.  Called at the Suttons.  Saw Mrs S and June Hill. Both looking very well.  Met Mr S afterwards in the street.  My Aunt bought a sixteenth of a Lottery Ticket which I share.  I wish with all my heard it may be fortunate.  Mrs Savage brought us back at 2 o’clock.  My Aunt cut a good deal of the sweetbriar. In the evening she and I playd Cards till Supper time.

Tuesday 4 August 1807

A cloudy morning.  Gardiner was so fortunate to find Miss Johnson’s Ring which was lost in the Garden six weeks ago.  Miss Savage calld.  She had heard from Cheltenham.  Maria was rather worse than before.  Cooper was to be there this evening.  Lent Miss S one of my gowns to try on and gave her the pattern of it. My Aunt P heard from Cooper and had also a very affectionate letter from Mrs Fenwick pressing us all to go down to her this Summer.  Mrs Jones Maria and Mrs Horne sat an hour with us between dinner and tea.  I was employd almost all the morning making Chocolate Jumbles.  Walked in the garden after

(here was folded into the diary a draft of a letter from Fanny to Cooper and his reply.)

…Dinner.  Playd at Cards with my Aunt N in the evening.   Oild my Table.

Captain Cooper
John Hutton Cooper

Wednesday 5 August 1807

A very fine morning.  Got up early and walked in the Garden before breakfast.  Mrs Noyes and Mrs Wattens calld and sat an hour.  Mrs N good humourd and agreeable as she always is.  Mrs W miming piming  as usual.  They came to ask my Aunt to attend a meeting of the Club tomorrow to elect two new members in the place of the young Women who were expelld a short time ago.  Farmer Pritchard came about putting some Beasts into the Grass.  Mrs Jones Maria, little Betsey and Mrs Hendy and Margaret calld.  Poor Mrs Hendy was very much agitated and alarmed while she was here by little Betsey’s cutting Margaret on the forehead with a stone which she was throwing for Rover to run after.  The wound was very trifling and my Aunt has sent this evening to enquire how she did.  They sent word pretty well.  My Aunt had a letter of two sheets and a half from Mrs Williams, filld with such egregious nonsense that it was even too bad to laugh at.  Cold evening and too damp to go out.

Thursday 6 August 1807

Very wet morning.  Harding went down to Bath before breakfast and brought back my hat which is extremely ugly and much to big.  I was employd two hours and a half making currant brandy, which I hope will prove good.  Mrs Savage and Miss M Wiltshire called and bought back my gown.  They had had bad accounts from Cheltenham and Cooper had not arrived there when Miss W wrote.  My Aunt P went to drink tea at Mrs Walters at six o’clock and afterwards accompanied her  and the rest of the party to the Club.  I walked in the Garden and had a little game of Play with Rover.  It raind extremely hard in the evening but with a Plaid and umbrella my Aunt got home without being wet.

Friday 7 August 1807

Fine morning.  Mrs and Miss Savage and Miss M Wiltshire calld and brought my Aunts letters.  Little Maria not at all better.  Cooper at Cheltenham.  Harding went to Bath with letters to the Post – raind very hard from two o’clock.  Did not go out.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper and Mrs Porcher and my Aunt N from Mr Webb.

Saturday 8 August 1807

Very fine day.  Out in the garden the whole morning with the Gardener directing him how to cut the sweet briar in the front of the house and the hedge by the yard.  Had the Laurel tree by the housekeeper’s room and that by the Library windows very nicely tied up. Gathered a beautiful nosegay.  Miss Hendy – Susan – Eliza Margaret and little Betsey Jones calld and sat a short time.  I was too much tired to go out.  After Dinner my Aunt heard from Mrs Barwell.

Sunday 9  August 1807

Beautiful day.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at breakfast.  He returned from from Cheltenham last night. He gives a very bad account of poor Maria.  Went to Church in the morning.  Saw Lady Colebrooke, Miss Sutherland, Mr and Mrs Noyes and their children.  Mr and Mrs Walters , Mrs and Miss Croake, Miss Drewitt and Mr Batchelor.  Called at Mrs Noyes with the whole party except the Croakes.  Mrs N not very well with a swelld face from cold.  My Aunt Neate went to Bath to spend the day with my Mother.  Mrs Sutherland calld before dinner.  My Aunt P and I drank Tea at the Jones’s, only their own family party .

They were so kind to ask us to accompany them tomorrow on the Canal as far as the Aqueduct, where they are going to drink Tea, which we are to do.  My Aunt N called in her way from Bath and we walked home about ten o’clock.

Monday 10  August 1807

A cloudy looking morning but dry.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr Shreene (?)  calld at the door but did not get off their horses.  Mr W was on his way to Bridgewater.  Mrs Noyes calld to ask if either of us would like to go to Bath, but as we were to Dine at 3 0’clock on account of the water party, we declined her kind offer.  Mrs Jones and Mrs Hendy, Mrs Horne and Margaret went in the Carriage to Bath to get into the boat where they were joind by Mrs Ormsby.  Mrs Jones, Maria, little Betsey,Miss Hendy, Susan, Eliza and ourselves crossd at the ferry and met them at the bridge.  The evening was delightful, the party very chearful and happy.  We went on ? at the Aqueduct which is a very noble building, particularly the arches which are magnificent and grand, much beyond that idea I had formed of them.  We walked under the Canal and got into the boat on the opposite side about half an hour, after which they stoppd the boat for us to drink tea, with which we had a profusion of cakes and fruit.  Mr J., Mrs Henly, little Betsey and ourselves landed at Bathampton and walked home. The rest of the party went on to Bath.  We arrived at home a quarter before nine, everybody in good humour and all gratified and pleased with their evenings amusement.  Mrs Noyes sent up a quantity of flowers out of which my Aunt chose forty for Mrs Barwell.

Tuesday 11  August 1807

Dry morning.  Mrs Savage called to ask if we would go to Bath, but we were prevented by expecting Mrs Scott, two Miss Scotts and Miss Grant, who came about one o’clock.  Charlotte Savage called as did Miss M Wiltshire and Mrs S.  On their return from Bath they had had rather a better account from Cheltenham.  Miss Jones had the kindness to send my Aunt a gown and cap for the pattern, the cap new from Paris a few months ago, the prettiest thing of the kind I ever saw.   My Aunt had a delightful long letter from Cooper, my Aunt Neate one from Mr Touray.  A gloomy evening.  Did not go out.

Wednesday 12  August 1807

A fine day.  Hard at work the whole morning making a cap, the pattern of Miss Jones.  Dr. Davis calld and ate luncheon with us.  He was so kind to take my Aunt’s letters to the Post.  Gatherd a beautiful Nosegay to send to my Mother, which Harding took to her after dinner, also a cake to Mrs Scott.  My Aunt Powell and I walked to Mr Jones’s before Tea.  Found only Mr and Mrs Jones.  Mrs Horne, Maria and Eliza were walking , but returned before we left them.  We came home to Tea with my Aunt Neate, after which we went back to see the fire works.  Supd with them and did not get home till near twelve o’clock.  We were fortunate enough to escape a violent storm of rain, which began to fall just as we got into the Garden.  My Aunt Neate had not supd when we came back, so I had a second Supper with her.  My Aunt P and I sat up till near two o’clock playing at Gosch.

Fanny frequently mentions playing a game named Gosch; to date there are no clues as to what the game entailed
Fanny frequently mentions playing a game named Gosch; to date there are no clues as to what the game entailed

Thursday 13  August 1807

A gloomy morning, but turnd out a beautiful day.  I finishd the Currant Brandy.  Gatherd some Plums and Apricots for Jam, which I prepared.  Broke some Sugar and then went to work on my Stays.  Mr Wiltshire calld in his way home from Bridgewater.  He lookd in and was much out of spirits.  Had heard an account of Maria.  We drank Tea at Mrs Walters, where we met Mr and Mrs Noyes, Mr and Mrs Chapman, Colonel and Miss Hughs, Miss Stanley, Mr and Miss White and a young Lady with them, whose name I did not hear and Mrs Melmott.  Some of the party playd Cards and the rest amused themselves with finding out puzzles and spent a tolerable pleasant evening and walkd home about ten o’clock.  My Aunt P had a very affectionate kind letter from Pen Saker and one equally kind from Minah Warren.  Mrs Morsde  sent up some more of the flowers for Mrs Barwell’s friend.

plums and apricots 1849
Emilie Preyer (German, 1849-1930): Plums and apricots. (www.bonhams.com)

Friday 14 August 1807

A raining morning.  Cleard up about one o’clock and became very hot.  My Aunt P and I walked to the Jones’s to see Mr and Mrs Greave and Mrs Vassall.  Saw the whole family all looking extremely well.  Mrs V did not receive us with her usual kindness, but was very distant and at times almost rude.  The ? time we saw the rest of the party very obliging.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were out.  He left word Maria was a little better.  I went into the Garden for a short time after Dinner.  My Aunt had a note from Miss Grant and one from Miss M Wiltshire.  The old Cow Calved.   Finishd my Stays before Dinner and Tim came in the evening.  A stupidish sort of day.  Mrs Jones sent my Aunt a beautiful Melon and a basket of Apricots and Greengages.  A lovely moonlight evening.

Wednesday 19 August 1807

Very fine day.  My Aunt Neate went to Bath with Mrs Jones, who brought her back at four o’clock.  I waterd the Sweet Briar trees in the front of the House before Dinner.  While we were drinking our Wine, Mr Allen came in and spent the afternoon with us.  He appeared very much worried and out of spirits about his Brother’s marriage, but was very friendly and pleasant.  He left us about nine o’clock.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Porcher, Mrs Barwell and Mr Denman and my Aunt Neate from Mr Touray.  Mrs Manse sent up some more of  Mrs Barwell’s flowers.  A beautiful night.  We slept with our windows open for the first time this Summer.  Aunt Neate and I playd at Gosch till one o’clock.

Thursday 20  August 1807

Fine but cloudy.  Gatherd two fine Nosegays, one of which my Aunt sent to my Mother by Harding.  Gatherd a great many Plums and some Apricots.  Cut out two new Shifts, which I intend to ask Mary Tremlett to make for me.  Walked in the Garden before Tea.  Mrs Vassall and Mrs Graeme walked down in the evening and my Aunt Powell went back with them to Tea at Bailbrook, but returned to Supper.

Friday 21  August 1807

A beautiful day.  Mr and Mrs Jones, Maria, little Betsey, Mr and Mrs Graeme, Mrs Vassall, Mrs Horne, Mrs Ormsby, the Miss Workmans, Eliza Hendry, Betsey, Blenman, Tim and ourselves left home about half past ten o’clock to go up the Canal to Bradford where the whole party except Mr J, Mrs H and my Aunt N landed.  We had the hottest most disagreeable stinking walk I ever experienced, without anything at the end of it either to gratify or amuse us and returnd to the Boat the same way we went, when we found the Dinner very nicely set out.  We were obliged to go a little farther down the Canal, the Boat being moord in the vicinity of a Wasp’s nest, whose society we did not find a pleasant addition to our party.  Our Dinner passd pleasantly and at the end of it we again set forward and when we arrived at the Aqueduct, most of the party disembarked to view it, and when we again stopd to boil the water for Tea, some of us walkd as near Mr Shreenes pretty place at Wavley as we could, that me might enjoy the prospects around it, which are beautiful.  After having drunk Tea we pursued our way to Bathampton, where we landed about half past eleven and all walked home, having passd a delightful pleasant day.

Swing Bridge, Bathampton, Bath by Joseph Sheldon (c) Victoria Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Swing Bridge, Bathampton, Bath by Joseph Sheldon
(c) Victoria Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

My Aunt Powell found a nice letter from Captain Broughton on our return and a parcel from Mrs Williams containing a letter of two sheets filled in her usual stile, a workd stool cover (hideous ugly) which she had promised my Aunt when she left Bath.  Davis brought some Chips while we were out, but they were not good enough to plait.

Saturday 22 August 1807

Fine day.  Charlotte Savage called and sat an hour.  She had very indifferent accounts from Cheltenham.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd up to Bailbrook, saw Mr and Mrs Jones, Maria, little Betsey, Mr and Mrs Graeme and Mrs Vassall.  Mr J would not hear of my Aunt’s paying any of the expenses of the Boat to Bradford.  I waterd the sweet briars after dinner and in the evening my Aunt sent the fine Melon Mrs Jones gave her as a present to Mrs Noyes.  Wilmot brought some very good shavings which I had bespoke in the morning and I workd very hard all the evening plaiting them, while my Aunts playd at Gosch.

Sunday 23 August 1807

Fine day while we were at breakfast Mrs Lyne came to spend the day.  It is three years since we saw her last.  She does not appear to me to be at all altered, except that she is grown fatter and longer.  My Aunt P and I went to church at eleven o’clock.  Saw Mr and Mrs Walters, Mrs W and Sophia walked part of the way to Farmer Pritchard’s with us where my Aunt went to speak with about the cattle coming to eat off the grass.  We drank tea early that Louisa might get home before it was dark.  She sang us two or three sweet songs before she went.  I walked in the garden till the candles were brought in.  My Aunt P heard from Mr Wiltshire.  Maria much the same and my Aunt N had a letter from Mrs Webb.

Monday 24  August 1807

Very fine day.  My Aunt Neate walkd to Bath to see my Mother.  Mrs Savage calld at the gate and Mrs Shreene jumpt from the box over the wall to bring to bring a note from my Mother to my Aunt N.  Mr and Mrs Greane, Mrs Vassall, Mrs Hanne, Mr and Mrs Jones, Maria and Tim Blenman came down in the evening and drank Coffee here, but returnd home to tea.  Mrs Noyes and her two little boys calld in the morning.  A violent thunder storm came on soon after they left us and lasted more than an hour, but they fortunately got home without being wet.  Mrs N sent my Aunt two tippets as collar of a shirt and a ? for patterns.  Workd hard at the plaiting all day.

Tuesday 25 August 1807

Beautiful day.  Mrs Greane, Mrs Vassall, Betsey Blenman and Eliza Hendy came down to copy receipts for Mrs G.  Mr G, Val Jones and Tim came down at one o’clock. My Aunt P and I went to Bath with Mr and Mrs G, call’d on my Mother with the plait for her bonnet, but did not find her at home.   My Aunt bought two patterns for work.  My Aunt P had a short note from Cooper.  Wrote a long letter to dear William.

Wednesday 26 August 1807

Fine day.  Mrs Savage, Charlotte, S and Miss M Wiltshire called.  They had had a better account from Cheltenham.  My Mother brought a small garden ? for my Aunt, for which she gave 20/-.  The boy fetched it from Bath this morning.  I amused myself in the garden the whole afternoon.  My Aunts playd cards in the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Porcher and my Aunt N from Mr Webb.

Thursday 27  August 1807

Very fine day.  My Aunt had a note from Maria Jones and one from Rebecca Workman with a bottle of Gooseberry Wine.  Mr and Mrs Chapman calld in their way to Bath and took a letter to the Post for my Aunt P.  I gatherd a beautiful Nosegay.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bath after dinner to send of some Bath water to Mr Porcher, which he begd to have immediately.  Calld at my Mothers but I did not find her at home.  Walkd back again without sitting down.  Did not get home till nine o’clock.  Quite dark.  It was so intensely hot we could hardly breathe.  Raind now and then and lightened very much. My Aunt P heard from Mrs Porcher.

Friday 28  August 1807

A gloomy looking morning.  Tim Blenman came from Bailbrook to beg the garden door might be opend for Mrs Vassall, Mrs Greane and Miss Halliday.  Raind very hard soon after they came in, but did not last.  They staid two hours when the Carriage fetchd them to go to Bath.  Mrs V, Tim and my Aunt N playd Chess.  Mr Allen calld but did not stay long.  Mrs Vassall came again in the evening and drank Tea here.  She went home at ten o’clock.

Saturday 29 August 1807

A fine morning.  Val Jones calld to ask if he could do anything for us in Bath, but did not get off his horse.  Very hard showers in the course of the day.  Did not go out at all.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper and my Aunt Neate from Mr Webb’s Clerk and a note from my Mother.  Aunt N and I playd Gosch after supper.

Sunday 30 August 1807

A cold showery day.  We were afraid to venture to Church.  Read prayers at home.  Gatherd some beautiful Roses and a few other flowers for a small Nosegay.  Very cold and uncomfortable all the evening.

Monday 31 August 1807

Fine day.  Mrs Savage and Charlotte calld and took my Aunt P and me to Bath.  Calld on my Mother, but did not find her at home.  Was measured for a pair of Shoes.  Mrs S was so kind to take us to Mrs Chalies’ at Bath. I and Charlotte staid with my Aunt N. While we were gone Mrs Vassall, Miss Jones, Eliza, Hendy and Dr. Davies calld.  Found Mrs Chalie a pleasant agreeable Woman.  She shewd us all her new furniture, which is very smart and neat.  As we came away we met Miss Harper, Miss Arnold and Miss Chalie, who came visiting Mr C and had been walking.  In our way home we called at Mrs Crooks, saw Mr and Mrs C, their Son and Miss ?.  Walked all over their garden.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Bastard.

Fashion plate for September 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement
Fashion plate for September 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement

Tuesday September 1 1807

Fine day.  Walkd to Bailbrook.  Saw Mr and Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall, Mrs Greane, Mrs Hanne, Maria, Val and Miss Halliday.  Mrs J had been unwell and lookd languid and uncomfortable.

Wednesday 2  September 1807

Fine day.  Gatherd a beautiful Nosegay for my Mother which Harding took down in the evening and enough plait for a hat for Emma, which I had done for her.

Thursday 3 Sept 1807

Fine day.  Mr and Mrs Greane and Mrs Vassall calld.  I made a steel tassall for a purse for Mrs V.  Mrs Lyne came to spend the day.  She sang us some very beautiful songs.  She walkd to Bath in the evening.  Mr T Blenman came here after supper to sleep, being so full at Bailbrook they could not accommodate him.

Friday 4 Sept 1807

Rainy uncomfortable day.  Tim Blenman breakfasted here.  We all dined at Mr Fraser’s at Lambridge where we met Sir G Colebrooke, Mrs Noyes and Captain Littlehales.  Lady C came to Tea.  Saw Mrs F’s two little girls for the first time.  the eldest is lovely and plays very well.  I made the tea for Mrs F.  They have altered and improved the house very much.  A hum-drum sort of a day on the whole.

Saturday 5 Sept 1807

Cloudy day with Showers and high wind, which increased to a storm in the evening.  Mr Wiltshire calld and brought a very bad account of poor Maria.  Kilmaster sent a basket containing three Partridges and two Hares.  My Aunt and I walked in the garden in the evening.

Sunday 6 Sept 1807

Showery morning and blowing a perfect hurricane.  Could not venture to Church, but read prayers at home.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at breakfast.  Maria very bad.  Mr and Mrs Graeme and Miss Jones walked down.  Val and Mrs Beckford calld for them in the Carriage, but did not come in.  Maria Walkd home.  Mr G read two of Carlisle’s Poems to us delightfully.  We had a fine old day.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Porcher.

Monday 7  Sept 1807

Fine morning. My Aunt P and I were going to call on Lady Colebrooke, but met Mrs and the two Miss Allens at the bottom of the Land and returnd with them.  They were very pleasant and agreeable, particularly Jeanete.  Mr Wiltshire came in while they were here.  As soon as they took their leave we pursued our walk. Saw Sir G and Lady C, Mrs and Miss Sutherland.  they were in high spirits, having just heard that Captain Pignon (Lady C’s grandson) was landed from the East Indies.  Calld on Mrs Walters.  Saw her and little Sophia.  Had a glimpse of Mr W and Mrs Melmath who was leaving them for Bath. We afterwards attempted to go as far as Farmer Pritchards but were obliged to return on account of the rain. My gown was so wet I was obliged to change it. My Aunt Powell escaped. A woman very civily run after us and would insist on her taking an umbrella.  Walked up to Bailbrook in the evening, saw all the family except Mr Jones, who was gone  home.  Returnd home to Tea.  The hogshead of Malmsey arrived from Portsmith and was got down into the cellar safe.

Tues 8 Sept 1807

Fine day.  Mrs Graeme came down to breakfast, immediately after which Mrs G, my Aunt P and myself walked up the village to Farmer Pritchards.  Lookd over two houses that are to let in our way.  Called on Mrs Hayes, who received us very kindly and shewd us her house all over.  Saw Mr N and the two boys.  Little Herbert was going to have a party to keep his birthday.  We went into Stowers as we came home for Mrs Graeme to speak about her Lily of the Valley moats?  Met Mrs Savage and Charlotte at the bottom of the Lane.  They had very kindly walked from Shockerwick to bring my Aunt some orange blooms for the pot potpourri.  We could not prevail on them to return with us.  We found Mrs Vassall, Mrs Hanne, Mrs Sutton and Jane Hill at the Villa and soon after we came in Mrs Halliday, Eliza Hendy, Betsey Blenman and Val came.  Mrs Greane and Val went to Bath with Mrs Jones and Mrs Beckford, who called for them at the Green Gate.  The rest of the party staid till one o’clock.  I was employd all the time they were here plaiting chip for Mrs Greane.  It was so cold at dinner that my Aunt had the fire lit in the library. Playd at cards with my Aunt Neate after supper.  My Aunt P wrote a note to Mr Lye about the hay, but he declines having any at present.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Batheaston Villa c.1825 (Fanny's former home), courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston Villa c.1825 (Fanny’s home in 1807), courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Wednesday 9 Sept 1807

Very wet morning.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper and Mrs Fenwick and I to Miss Fremlett. She sent the letters by Harding to Mr Jones who said he would have them put into the post.  We all dined at Bailbrook.  Mr T was so kind as to send the Carriage for us.  A middling sort of day.  I made a tassall to a purse Mrs Vassall was netting for Val and sewd it onto the steel for her. We walked home at half past eleven.  A fine moonlight night.

Thursday 10 Sept 1807

Cold, uncomfortable morning.  Betty Glenman and Eliza Hendy called to bring my Aunts parasol, which she left at Bailbrook.  Mrs Greane, Betsey and Miss Halliday left Bailbrook to receive Mr and Mrs Matheson, who were to dine and sleep at Mr Jones in their way to Oldbury.

Thursday 11 Sept 1807

Fine day.  My Aunt and I walked to Bath.  Sat half an hour with my mother.  Found her and Emma both very well.  Did a great many commissions.  Called on the Workmans, where we very fortunately met Mr, Mrs and Val Jones who very kindly brought us home which saved us a great deal of fatigue, for we began to be a good deal tired and were wishing for a conveyance home.  Mr Wiltshire called.  Maria very bad.  Saw Mr Tudor and Miss Drewitt at Bath.  Mrs Vassall, Mrs Beckford, Miss Jones and Dr. Davies called while we were out.  My Aunt heard from Mr Yateman and Mrs Barwick.  My Aunt Powell read the first volume of The Infidel Mother to us in the evening, which we wanted.

Saturday 12 Sept 1807

Fine day.  Mr Wiltshire called in his way to Bath.  Mrs Vassall came and sat the whole morning with us.  Mr W came again as he went home.  Miss W’s letters said Maria was worse and he said he should go to Cheltenham tomorrow morning, but would see us before he went.  My Aunt and I walked in the garden after dinner.  She heard from Pen Saker, who is with her Aunt at Cheltenham and very anxious we should go there immediately.  I heard from Miss Tremlett by Day and sent her two shifts to make.

Sunday 13 Sept 1807

Fine day.  Mr Wiltshire called in his way to Church, from which he was going as far as Tetbury and to Cheltenham the next morning.  My Aunt P and I went to Church at two o’clock.  Saw the Waltons, Lady Colebrooke, Mrs Trail, Mrs and Miss Sutherland.  Walked part of the way home with Mrs and Miss S and the W.  Mrs Vassall came and dined with us and Val came to walk home with her in the evening. They did not leave us till after supper.  My Aunt heard from Mr Blackburn and two letters from Cooper, on enclosing Mrs ? ?, the other saying he would meet us at Cheltenham the 14th of next month.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Barwell and sent it to the post by Gardiner.

Monday 14  Sept 1807

Very fine morning, but cold.  Vesey the Coachman came to look at the Carriage, which he thinks not worth doing much to, but says it will carry us safe to Cheltenham and back. He is to varnish and clean it up to make it decent.  The Miss Allens and Emma Green called and sat an hour.  They were very chatty and pleasant, particularly Janetta.  They told us their Brother was gone to Cheltenham with Mr Wiltshire.  I walked in the garden after dinner.

Tuesday 15  Sept 1807

A beautiful day.  Mrs Edwards, who is so much better (I should hardly have known her for the same person) walkd from Bath to stay till Thursday.  We had got our Bonnets and Cloaks on to go to Bailbrook when Mrs Vassall came in.  She staid a short time and we walked as far as the end of the Terrace with her.  After dinner my Aunt and I walked to Farmer Pritchard’s to enquire for eggs.  They had very few, but promised to save all they had and get us some more.  My Aunt  wrote to Cooper and the older Colonel Bastard and sent them to the post by Gardiner.  She also wrote to the man about the Viranda and the Baker took the letter to Bath.

Wednesday 16  Sept 1807

A beautiful day.  Two men came to wash bottles.  My Aunt P and up walked up to Bailbrook, saw Mrs Jones, Val, Mrs Beckford, Maria and a Miss Smith who is staying there.  Mrs J and us went to the garden to see the grapes in the hot house, which are a great curiosity from the immense quantity and the size of the bunches.  Mrs Jones, Maria, Val and Miss Smith came home with us, but did not come in to the house.  I workd hard all the evening.

Thursday, 17 Sept 1807

A fine day.  Lady Colebrooke, Mrs Trail and Mrs Sutherland calld.  After they were gone Mrs Vassall came in.  She staid till near dinner time.  My Aunt and I walkd part of the way back with her, when she persuaded us to go to the the garden just above Bailbrook to see a warm spring which rises there.  Coming back we met Mrs Jones, the two Miss Workmans and Eliza Hendy.  I walkd in the garden after dinner.  My Aunt Powell read to us all the evening.  The man came from Bristol about the viranda.  He measured it and is to bring the materials next Tuesday to begin it.

Friday, 18 Sept 1807

A beautiful day.  The Miss Workmans and Lady Durbin calld.  After they were gone my Aunt P and I crossed the ferry to call on Mrs Allen.  We found her and Mrs Green at home.  The young people were gone to Bath.  We sat there about an hour and then walkd to Bath by the side of the canal.  We did all our commissions and walkd home at six o’clock to dinner, so tired.  We could hardly move.  I went to bed directly after tea.  We very unexpected met Mr Chisiene? in Bath.  He lookd very ill, poor fellow, but appeard glad to see us.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Bramwell.

Old Ferry, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Old Ferry, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Saturday, 19 September 1807

A very fine day.  Mrs Beckford and Mrs Vassall calld at eat some luncheon.  Mrs Jones sent down in the evening to borrow a pair of wax candles and two packs of cards.  I was too much tired to walk out all day, except up the garden with Mrs V. when she went away. My Aunt heard from Mr W.  Maria was alive, but that was all.

Sunday, 20 Sept 1807

A fine morning.  My Aunt and I went to church.  Saw the Colebrookes, Mrs and Miss Sutherland, Mrs Trail, the Noyes’s, the Walters, young Croake and his sister and Mr Peynon, to whom we were introduced.  He has a remarkable good humoured chearful countenance.  Lady C askd us to drink tea there tomorrow, which my Aunt agreed to do.  In our way home we calld there for a few minutes.  Mr T Chivers dined here.  Poor Fellow, the loss of his wife has affected him so much that at times he appears quite lost, but is just the same interesting young man he was formerly.  My Aunt had a long letter from Cooper and wrote one to Pen Saker, as I also did one to Henry and sent them to the Post by Gardiner.  It began to rain while we were at Dinner and had the appearance of being a wet night.

Monday 21 Sept 1807

A miserable wet day.  We did not see a creature out of our own family, nor we were able to go out at all.  It was so very bad that my Aunt sent an excuse to Lady Colebrooke.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and sent the letter to the Post by Gardiner who at the same time, took C’s gun to go by the Coach to Steyning, as he desired.

Tuesday 22 Sept 1807

A very wet morning but cleared up at one o’clock.  As soon as the rain ceased Mrs Vassall had the kindness to come down and sit with us till Dinner time.  She had not been gone more than half an hour when it begin to rain again and continued the whole evening.  My Aunt had a long letter from Cooper and one from Mrs Barwell to say she had received the flowers safe.  She also had a note from Mrs Noyes to excuse herself from breakfasting here tomorrow, which she was to have done, to go with my Aunt to call on the Jones’s.  It was so wet the man did not come to do the Viranda.

Wednesday 23 Sept 1807

Very wet.  Quite as bad as Monday.  Mrs Vassall was to have dined here, but sent an excuse on account of the weather.  Pritchard came to look at his beasts and agreed to keep them in a week longer.  It raind a perfect torrent the whole evening.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Henderson and Mrs Bastard.

Georgiana by Russell
Georgiana Jane Keate afterwards Mrs. Henderson (1770–1850)

Thursday 24  Sept 1807

A tolerable fine day.  Mrs Jones sent to offer to take any of us to Bath, but only my Aunt Neate accepted her kind offer.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Ransom and Morland and Mr Hare about the Viranda and sent the letters by my Aunt Neate to Bath.  My Aunt had a letter from Pen Saker.

Friday 25  Sept 1807

A fine morning.  My Aunt Powell was out almost the whole of it with Daniel planting shrubs on the Bank by the side of the lawn.  Mr T. Chivers walkd up from Bath.  He lookd very ill and was so hoarse we could hardly hear what he said.  I fear he must have got wet in going back, for there was a very hard shower soon after he left us.  He shewd us a letter he had had from his late Wife’s sister, the expressions of kindness in which had affected his spirits very much.  Soon after he was gone Mr James from Bath Ford came in.  He was very pleasant and chatty.  Charlotte Savage calld in her way home from Bath.  She had had rather more favourable accounts of Maria yesterday and today she read us a letter she had had from Miss Wiltshire, part of which my Aunt transcribed into one she was writing to Cooper and which she sent to the Post by the Gardener.  It raind a torrent in the evening.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Saturday 26 Sept 1807

A beautiful day.  My Aunt was in the garden the beginning of the morning with Daniel planting cuttings of different shrubs.  I pickd up a great number of walnuts.  While we were at luncheon Mrs Noyes came to ask my Aunt to walk to Bailbrook with her, which she did and Mrs N’s Carriage waited here till they returned.  They only saw Mr Jones and Maria.  The rest of the family were gone to Bath.  After my Aunt came home she went into the Fields to mark where she chose the dead hedges to be made and came in at dinner time very much tired.  She heard from Ransom and Morland, Pen Saker and George Blackburn dated at Sea.

Sunday 27 Sept 1807

Sunshine day with very high wind and hard showers occasionally.  We read prayers at home.  Mrs Vassall and Miss Jones called in and while they were here Mr John and Lady Durbin, who did not stay long.  Mrs V promised to dine with us next Tuesday.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Barwell, Mrs Blackburn and Miss Saker and sent them to the Post by Gardiner.

Monday 28 Sept 1807

A beautiful day.  We all walked to Bath and were a good deal annoyed by the people going to Kingsdown Fair.  We went thro’ Mr Jones’s grounds and when we got to the house my Aunt P found she had left her pocket handkerchief at home.  She stopped at Mr J and and sent in to beg they would lend her one and Maria very kindly ran after us and walked part of the way down the hill with us.  My Aunt P and I called on Lady Durbin in our way, who was so obliging to take us in to Bath with her.  She set us down at Fountain Buildings, from thence we went up to Admiral Phillips.

Fountain Building, Bath
Fountain Buildings, Bath

We only saw Mrs P who looks remarkably well, was very friendly and in excellent spirits.  From there we went immediately to my Mother’s who we found better than I expected.  Mrs Sutton, Miss Hill and Miss R Workman were there with her.  We left my Aunt Neate there while we went to do what we had to do.  While we were in a shop the two Miss Workmans came in, who surprised us very much by telling us Captain Broughton was arrived and gone up to the Villa.  While we were in the Market Place he overtook us.  He appeared  very glad to see us, has grown fat and looks well.  He told us a great deal of Regimental news and is to come up tomorrow morning to spend the day with us.  My Aunt asked the Workmans, but they were engaged and lamented much they could not put it off.  After having done all that was set down we returned to my Mother’s for a short time and then walked home.  We were a good deal tired, but not a quarter as much as the last time we went down.  I bought 6 pr of stockings, for which I gave one pound 19 shillings and a pair of shoes for 4/6d

Tuesday 29 Sept 1807

A miserable wet day.  The people came to bottle a pipe of Mr Zeat? Port Wine.  I went into the cellar with them for about an hour while my Aunt Neate settled the accounts, after which she went down.  It run fifty seven Dozen and was not finished till past eight o’clock.  We did not Dine till seven and my Aunt N had her dinner after us.  Captain Broughton dined and slept here, but the weather was so bad Mrs Vassall did not come.  Mr Wiltshire calld in the morning.  He was just come from Cheltenham and returns home tomorrow.  Maria is alive, but he hardly expects to find her so when he gets back.  My Aunt Powell has two letters from Cooper and I one from Harry.  It was a very wet night and a perfect hurricane.

Wednesday 30 Sept 1807

A beautiful day.  Captain Broughton left us soon after breakfast.  Mrs Vassall, Mrs Jones, Maria, Mrs Savage and Charlotte called and staid a long time.  The Jones’s were kind enough to take me to Bath with them and I walked back.  I found my Mother a great deal better and Emma very well.  They have got a very comfortable lodging in Westgate Buildings.  I laid out 4 pounds 4 shillings in Purse twist and Ribbon to trim my shoes.  My Aunt wrote to Minah Warren, Mr Hare about the Viranda and Elmsley to desire he will send the Courier to Cheltenham instead of the morning’s Post.  She sent them all down to Bath by Captain Broughton.  She had a letter from Margan Geatman? and my Aunt P from Miss Tremlett.  We were all extremely busy the whole evening preparing for our journey tomorrow.  My Aunt P wrote to Mr Geatman and means to send it to the Post tomorrow by Gardiner.  She also wrote a note to the Post Office to desire to have our letters forwarded to Cheltenham.

 

Fashion plate for October 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement
Fashion plate for October 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement

Oct 1st 1807 

A very wet morning.  Gardiner cut away part of the Jasmine by the library and naild the Passion Flower in its place.  My Aunt waited hour after hour in hopes it would be fine, but seeing no prospect of it she sent for the horses, when after eating some luncheon we got into the Carriage, about half past one and reached Gloster at eight o’clock. It rained almost the whole way.  We attempted to walk down Forester Hill but it was so extremely muddy we were obliged to get into the Carriage.  It was so dark before we got to Gloster that we could not see the Carriages and Waggons as they passed us and when we drove to the King’s Head they could not take us in, all their beds being engaged by people who were waiting to see the Prince pass through the next day on his way to Berkely Castle, but they procured beds for us at the Lower George, where we were very comfortably accommodated and treated with the greatest civility.  We met a great number of smart Carriages on the road but nevertheless had very good horses all the way.

Friday 2  Oct 1807

A beautiful day.  We left Gloster a quarter before eight and reached Cheltenham a little after nine, drove immediately to Mrs Saker’s, where we found her, dear Pen and little Jude looking remarkably well and delighted to see us.  We breakfasted with them, after which my Aunt and I went in search of lodgings.  We calld first on Mrs Newell who received us very affectionately and introduced us to her Brother’s Wife, Mrs Morris who is staying with her and appears a very chearful, pleasant Woman.  From there we went to the Wiltshires.  We saw Miss W and Miss Elizabeth. They gave us a long account of Maria who they all think a little better, tho she will not allow it herself.  Mr W was gone out in search of us.  After sitting some time with them we saw a great many Lodgings, but all of them miserable.  At last my Aunt fixed on one at no. 76 until we could get a better, which we are in expectation of.  At five o’clock we returned to Mrs Sakers’ to Dinner where we also drank Tea and then came to the Lodgings, very much tired and glad to go to bed.  We saw Mr Wiltshire and Mr Newell two or three times in the course of the morning, while we were making the tour of the Town.  Miss Wiltshire heard from Cooper, who was in town with his poor Brother.

Cheltenham High Street, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1740 (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Cheltenham High Street, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1740
(c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

 Saturday 3 Oct 1807

A very fine morning.  My Aunt P and myself were at the Well a quarter past seven where we met Mrs Moyle of Portsmouth who is here for the Waters and Miss Phipps of Bath with her.  We also saw Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh, Mr Wiltshire, Mrs Sober, Pen and little Jude.  My Aunt Neate breakfasted in bed.  In the course of the morning Mr and Miss Wiltshire, Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh and the Sakers called here.  The S’s eat some luncheon and we walked up the town with them, then took a little round.  Called at the W’s and Lady Saxton’s who was not at home, went to Seldon’s Library where my Aunt subscribed and then returnd home where Pen soon joind us and staid till we went to dress.  We dined at the Wiltshire’s where we met Mr Gee, a very pleasant, elderly man. Pen drank Tea there and John W came in the evening from Shockerwick.  Maria appeard to him to be better.  Pen and we walkd home at half past nine and she staid and suppd with us.  I wrote to my mother.

Sunday 4 Oct 1807

We all went to the Well.  A fine day.  Read Prayers at home, after which Miss W, Mr and Mrs Forth, Mrs Sober, Pen, Jude, Mrs Hodge, Lady Saxton, Mrs Moyle, Miss Phillips, Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh and Miss E Wiltshire called.  As soon as they were gone Mrs H, Pen, my Aunt and I walked round Mr Thomson’s walks, called on Mrs Welsford’s, but did not see her.  We walkd home with Pen, who by the bye was magnificently dressd and lookd very well.  My Aunt P wrote letters in the evening.  She heard from Cooper, Mrs ? and Mary Taylor.  Mr W called before he set off for Bath.

Monday 5 Oct 1807

A fine day. We all went to the Well early.  After breakfast my Aunt and I walkd up to Sandford to speak to Mrs Bastin about her house, but could not agree about the price.  Returning, we met Mr Newell and Mrs Marsh who told us of one in St. Granges Place, but when we went to enquire, it was gone.  We walked to the Turnpike at the bottom of the Town in search of Mrs Hoyles lodgings and found her at last at 272.  We then calld at the Wiltshire’s, saw Miss Elizabeth only.   Went to the Pastry Cook and eat some cakes.  When we came home found Pen, Mrs Hodge and Mrs Wilsford.  When they went away Pen and we went out again in search of Lodgings.  Mr Newell joind us and after walking some hours, we returnd unsuccessful.  We met Mr Fanguard in the street and afterwards Miss Wiltshire and Mr Gee on horseback.  Pen came down after Dinner and spent the evening with us.  I went to bed very much tired having walkd (I think) at least ten miles.

Tuesday 6 Oct 1807

A fine morning.  My Aunt and I went to the Well where we saw Mrs Moyle and Miss Phipps.  Instead of walking up and down the well walk we went to Sandford again about the house, but Mrs Bastin had promised the refusal of it the evening before to some Gentleman.  If he does not take it, she is to let us know.  In returning we met Mr and Mrs Witts who very kindly told us some friends of theirs were going away Sunday and advised us to go and enquire about it, which we did.  The woman very civilly promised us the refusal.  It appears a good House, is opposite the Plough Inn and the family have very politely allowed us to see it today. Mrs Witts and her son calld to tell us this.  Miss Wiltshire sat with us a short time.  We went to see the Lodgings, which are very comfortable and my Aunt agreed with the Mistress of them for a month at 4 guineas a week and 12 shillings the Cook.  We all calld at Mrs Hodges, where we cut a slice of Cake.  Left my Aunt Neate there and we went up to Mrs Saker’s.  We found them all at luncheon, had another slice of cake and a glass of Wine and then Pen went with us to Miss Wiltshire’s where we saw Mrs Hodge.  From there we went to Miss Lovelocks.  My Aunt saw a Pellisse which she did not much like, they they are to bring her some velvets to chuse tomorrow.  Pen Saker dined and spent the evening with us.  Mr Wiltshire returned from Bath.

Old Well Walk, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1780 (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Old Well Walk, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1780
(c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wed. 7 October 1807

A very fine day.  Went to the Well early, walked home with Mrs Hodge and Mrs Welsford.  After breakfast Pen brought little Jude down to chuse a 16th of a lottery ticket to be shared between Pen, my two Aunts and myself.  I accompanied Pen to see Jude chuse it.  The number 9018.  We calld on Miss Wiltshire, who was not at home and on the Wiltshires.  Mrs Hodge and Pen calld here while we were out.  We dined and suppd at Mrs Newell’s, where we met Mr and Miss Wiltshire and John and Mrs Marsh.  Mrs Hodge came in the evening.  Mr N and my Aunt N playd Chess and we had a little musick.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Porcher, Cooper, Kitty and Elmsley about the newspaper and put them in the post herself.  My Aunt bought a beautiful bit of workd muslin to make the middle of a cap for me.

Thursday 8 Oct 1807

Not a very fine morning.  We went to the Well, saw the Sakers, Mrs Moyle and Miss Wiltshire. Mr W and John calld soon after breakfast, as did Mr Newell.  We did not go out after breakfast, he street was in such a  bustle, it being Fair day, but Pen came to set with us and staid dinner.  Mr Newell calld in the afternoon and very kindly walkd up with us and Mrs Hodge to Mrs Saker’s, where we drank tea and suppd.  We met the Forths and a Mrs Bennington, a very disagreeable painted old woman.  We did not come home till near twelve o’clock and my Aunt Powell and I walked home with Mrs Hodge.

Friday 9  Oct 1807

A very fine morning.  Went to the Well early.  Saw Mrs Moyle, Mrs Hodge, Mrs Welford, the Sakers and Miss E Wiltshire.  Miss Wiltshire calld soon after breakfast, so did Mrs Newell.  We sat a short time with Mrs Hodge.  My Aunt wrote a note to Mrs Williams which Mrs H enclosed in her frank. Poor Mrs Welford had one of her bad headaches and was gone to lay down.  Mr and Mrs Forth and Pen called on Mrs Hodge.  While we were there we all took our leave on Dr Jenner being announced.  The S’s and Pen came in with us and staid an hour.  When they were gone we went over to the Library for some books and to read the Paper.  Pen drank Tea with us and Mr Newell came just before supper.  Eat a Pork Chop and mashd Potatoes  and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate till near twelve o’clock.  My Aunt P had a letter from Cooper which Disappointed us very much. He fears he shall not be able to join us here at all, but certainly not by the fifteenth which was his intention.  We were to have gone to Mr Lovelock’s to see the Comet, but it was a wet evening and it did not appear.  Mrs Shepard calld on us.

Saturday 10 Oct 1807

Not a fine morning.  We were late at the Well.  Saw the Sakers, Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh, Miss Wiltshire and Mrs Moyle.  I went out by myself after breakfast as far as Miss Lovelock’s to get a small piece of black net for my Aunt P to put under her lace where it is torn.  My Aunt Powell and I drank Tea at the Wiltshires.  Met Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh, Mrs Hodge and Mr Gee.  Pen spent the evening with my Aunt Neate, where we found her and Mr Newell when we came home.  They staid and suppd with us.

Sunday 11 Oct 1807

A fine day.  Went to the Well, met Pen, Mrs Moyle and Miss Wiltshire.  Read prayers, called at Mrs Shepard’s who was not at home and afterwards on Miss Wiltshire.  We then went to walk round Thomson’s field where Mr W joind and walkd with us till near five o’clock.  Mrs Hodge came in after dinner and while she was sitting with us Mr Lovelock very obligingly came to shew us the Comet.  My Aunt sent up to Pen to come immediately but before she could arrive it was obscured by a cloud.  We saw it very distinctly, but it did not answer my expectations.  Mrs H and Pen drank Tea with us but both my Aunt and Pen walkd home with Mrs H and sat an hour there.  Mrs Newell came and sat with us till after supper.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper, from whom she had a long letter.  Mrs Pitt Green calld.

Monday 12 Oct 1807

Not very fine.  Went to the Well very late. Met all our friends returning.  Were very busy all the morning getting into our new Lodgings. Mrs Hodge and Mrs Welsford called.   We went up to Mrs Saker’s to enquire after Mr Forth who was very unwell in the morning, but better when we saw him.  Dined late at our new Lodgings which are far more comfortable than the last, but not anything equal to those we had last year.  Pen drank Tea and suppd with us and Mr Newell came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.

Tuesday 13 Oct 1807

A very fine morning.  We were very late at the Well.  Saw Miss Wiltshire returning with Mrs Hodge,  also the Sakers and Mrs Newell and Mrs Marsh.  Met Lady Saxton in the walk.  Miss E W joind and staid with us till we came home.  In our way Mr W and Mr Gee overtook us.  Miss Silverthorn came to try on my Aunt P’s Pellisse which looks beautiful.  Mr Newell came in after Tea and plaid Chess with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and wrote to him by the same Post. She also wrote to Kitty and Miss W asked Mr Gee to take it to Bath tomorrow.  Calld on Mrs Shepard, who was out.

Wednesday 14 Oct 1807

A beautiful day.  Went to the Well but my Aunt did not drink the Water.  Calld on Mrs Pitt Green, who was not at home.  Walkd a long time and calld on Mrs Hodge and Mrs Moyle.  Saw Miss Phips only, but met Mrs M afterwards.  Pen and little Jude came to Dinner to go with us to the Puppet Show.  Calld on Mrs H in our way, who went with us, as did Mrs Moyle and Miss Phipps.  The performance was so very bad that we should have come away at the beginning, but that it would have been a disappointment to the little Girl.  We were surrounded by Ladies and Gentlemen out and in livery.  Pen came home and supd with us.

Thursday 15 Oct 1807

A beautiful day.  My Aunt and I went to the Well early.  I drank one glass of Water, after which we walked round Mr Thomson’s field and down the Street again before breakfast.  Mrs Newell and Mr Wiltshire calld.  We went to Mrs Travells, who was not at home and then to Mrs Welsfords who was just going to take a ride.  Met the Sakers in the street, throughout which we had great difficulties in passing, it was so crowded with country people come in to the fair.  Mrs Hodge, Mrs Welsford and Miss Mayes calld after their ride.  Pen spent an hour or two with us.  We had a large party to Dinner.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh, Mr and Miss Wiltshire, Mr and Mrs Forth and Pen – Mrs Hodge, Mrs Moyle and Miss Phipps came in the evening.  The whole party, except the Wiltshires, staid till twelve o’clock.  My Aunt heard from Mrs E  Bastard.

Friday 16 Oct 1807

A fine morning.  Went to the Well very late.  I drank a glass of Water at the new Well.  At the top of the walk we met Mrs Hodge and Miss Mayor returning as we went.  Mr Wiltshire, Mr and Mrs Newell, Mr and Mrs Forth, the Sakers calld in the course of the morning.  Mrs Saker, Mrs Forth, Pen and little Jude took a walk with us to Alston, a small village at the end of the Town.  We drank Tea and supd at Mrs Saker’s, quite in a family way.  We had a basket from home with some Butter and a cake and a letter from Kitty.  My Aunt heard from Captain Broughton.  My Aunt Neate wrote to my Mother.

Saturday 17  Oct 1807

A fine morning.  We went to the Well early.  I drank a glass of water.  Saw the Sakers, Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh, Mr and Miss E Wiltshire, met Miss Mayor returning. Mr Hodge joined us and staid with us until my Aunt had had her second glass of water, when we walked round by Cambray House.

Cambray House , Cheltenham 1838
Cambray House , Cheltenham 1838 (Ancestry Images)

In our way we met Miss Wiltshire who walkd up and down Cambray Street with us some time.  Mr Wiltshire, Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs Marsh and Pen calld, as did Miss Pitt Green.  As soon as she was gone we went out to walk.  Met Mrs Hodge and Mrs Shepard.   When we returnd Pen came and sat a short time and she and my Aunt went out together to get a pair of Sliders for my Purse.  They got a very pretty pair for a Shilling.  We had a basket from home with some butter, a Cake and some Pears, a letter from Miss Jones, a note from Kitty and a letter for Cooper in it.  Pen spent the evening with us and Mrs Newell came and plaid Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Pen was so kind to give me a very nice pair of Purse sliders, small gift ones.

Sunday 18 Oct 1807

A beautiful morning.  We were very late at the Well.  Drank a Glass of Water at the top of the walk.  Met Mrs Moyle and Miss Phipps going home.  Saw Sir Charles Saxton and Pen.  She walked round Thomson’s field with us and Prayers at home.  Mr Wiltshire came in after Church.  Mrs Moyle, Miss Phipps and Mrs Shepard calld to take leave.  They are all going to Bath tomorrow morning.  Pen came to walk with us.  Went to Mrs Welsford’s.  They were all out, but found Mrs Hodge at Miss Wiltshire’s.  We afterward calld at Mrs Newell’s to see Mrs Marsh, who goes home tomorrow.  We then went up the Town.  We left Pen at her Lodgings (where we saw Mr and Mrs Forth) and proceeded to Sandford fields to meet Mrs Hodge and Miss Wiltshire, with whom we returned as far as Mrs H’s, where we left her,as it was her dinner time.  Miss Wiltshire and ourselves extended and walkd and did not come home till past five.  Saw Mrs Newell in the Street.  Pen spent the evening with us.  She and my Aunt went down to Mrs Moyles after Tea with a letter which my Aunt had written to Kitty and which Mrs M kindly said she would put in the Post at Bath tomorrow evening.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and I from my Mother.

Monday 19 Oct 1807

A fine morning.  We were not very early at the Well.  Walkd round Thomson’s field.  Met Miss Wiltshire who joind and walkd up and down Cambray with us.  We calld at Mrs Saker’s but did not see Pen.  She was very busy packing, but came with Mr and Mrs Forth before dinner.  Mrs Hodge and Mrs Welsford calld. I gave Mrs W a Purse I had netted for her. Mr Wiltshire called to say he was going to Shockerwick but should return in a few days.  Pen spent the evening with us.  She did not go home till after twelve o’clock.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper.

Tuesday 20 Oct 1807

A fine morning.  We did not go to the Well.  My Aunt chose to omit the water and I was not very well.  I had a very bad pain in my stomach from four o’clock till past seven, which made me feel very uncomfortable the whole day.

Mrs Saker, Mr and Mrs Forth, little Jude and Pen calld to take leave.  The Sakers are going to spend a fortnight at the Forth’s about twelve miles from hence, so that I hope we shall see dear Pen again once or twice before we leave Cheltenham.  She staid with us till the Carriage was at the door to take them away.  Mrs Hodge, two Miss Wiltshires and Mrs Newell calld in the course of the morning.  We went to Mrs Newell’s to ask where Miss Hughes lives, but did not set down and afterwards walkd up and down Cambray for a short time by way of exercise.  The town was quite in a bustle the whole morning.  The Volunteers, both horse and foot, were drawn up before our house to be inspected and made a very gay appearance with colors and Band.

Mr Farquhar’s Carriage, driving very fast through the crowd, threw down a child, but fortunately the wheels did not go over it and it had no bones broke, only a few bruises.  Mr Newell came after Tea and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  I finishd my four spotted  ? shirts.

Wednesday 21 Oct 1807

A gloomy morning.  My Aunt went to the Well early but persuaded me not to go as it was damp.  It began to rain as we were at breakfast and continued to do so till two o’clock, when it cleard up and was very fine.  The rest of the day Mr and Mrs Newell, Mr Folkes, Miss Wiltshire and Mrs Pitt Green called.  My Aunt went out with Mrs Newell and Miss W to walk.  She calld  on Miss Hughes but did not find her at home.  We were very much amused the whole evening by the Band of the Volunteers which was playing to the Officers who dine at the Plough.  There was also some good singing, which we heard very distinctly.  It was a beautiful night and we saw the Comet to great advantage.  We had a basket from home with some butter and a cake.

Thursday 22 Oct 1807

A cold morning with a very thick fog, which turnd to rain and did not cease five minutes the whole day.  We were too late to have the Water at Mrs Fonty’s Well.  Met Mrs Hodge returning as we went.  Saw Miss Wiltshire, who walkd round Thomson’s field with us and left us at our own door.  Mr Newell calld, as did Mr Forth who, notwithstanding the badness of the day, drove over to fetch a young Lady and execute some connections here.  The Sakers were all very well he said and Mrs S delighted with his house.  Mr and Mrs Newell drank Tea and spent the evening with us.  My Aunt and they playd one rubber at Whist and then Mr N and my Aunt Neate went to Chess and my Aunt Powell taught Mrs N how to play Gosch.  Mrs Hodge and Miss Wiltshire were to have drank Tea here, but sent excuses it was so very wet they did not like to come out.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Porcher.

Friday 23 Oct 1807

A dry morning.  My Aunt would not allow me to go to the Well with her for fear of taking Cold.  She met Mrs Hodge and Mrs Rosedew who walkd with her.  She went out by herself to ask Mrs Hodge to walk with her.  Mrs Newell calld and sat half an hour with us.  My Aunt brought Mrs H in with her to see a gown, but she did not set down.  Mr Newell came at nine o’clock and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.

My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Henderson and my Aunt Neate heard from my Mother.

Well Walk, Cheltenham, 1813 (Ancestry Images)
Well Walk, Cheltenham, 1813 (Ancestry Images)

Saturday 24 Oct 1807

A very fine morning.  We were very late at the Well.  Met Mr and Mrs Pickwick and Mrs Rosedew returning.  Almost every person was gone home and we only walkd up and down the Well walk.  My Aunt treated Mrs Panty? to the play, for which she was very much obliged.  Miss Wiltshire and Mrs Hodge calld and sat some time.  When they were gone Mr Rosedew and Mrs Newell came.  As soon as we had had some luncheon we went to walk with Mrs N, but when we got out it lookd so black we were afraid to venture out of the street, so  we only walkd up and down for a short time, when it began to rain.  We could not prevail upon Mrs N to come in.  She was fearful of the Rain’s increasing and that she should not be able to get home.  My Aunt Powell and I, with Mrs Hodge and Mr Rosedew went to the Play to see Mrs Edwin in Lady Bell in Know Your Own Mind, Roxalana and Lady Contest.  She lookd extremely pretty and performd very well.  It was for her Father’s benefit, and the house was tolerably full.  Mrs H and Mr R returnd and supd with us.  My Aunt Neate went to play Cards at Mrs Newell’s, but came home while we were at Supper, accompanied by Mr Newell.  We had a basket from home with some Butter, Pears, a Cake and a letter from Kitty.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Vassall and says Mrs Jones has at last succeeded in selling Bailbrook.  A Mr Whitehead, a Banker in London, is the purchaser.  I wrote to my Mother.

Sunday 25 Oct 1807

My Aunt and I set out to go to the Well rather late.   When we had gone a little way it began to rain and was very muddy, so I returned but she went and drank the Water.  It continued to rain and shine alternately the whole morning.  We read prayers at home.  Mrs Hodge and Miss Wiltshire calld.  My Aunt went to walk with them.  Mr  Newell calld.  He was going to dine with Sir Walter Farquhar and said he would look in in the evening and tell us what sort of a day he passd.  He came about ten o’clock.  He had spent a very chearful pleasant Day.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and sent him a letter that was directed for him here.  She heard from Mrs Moyle to say that the ticket no. 1307, which my Aunt was anxious to have an eight of was all disposed before she applied for it.

Monday 26 Oct 1807

My Aunt went to the Well before me this morning.  I was to have followd her, but seeing Miss Wiltshire join her and it beginning to rain, I did not go.  It was a very wet morning till twelve o’clock, when it cleard up, but was not fine the whole day.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Pickwick and spent half an hour very pleasantly.  We then went to Mrs Erskines.  She was very chatty and agreeable.  Her Daughters both very pretty and apparently very good natured.  They shewd us a great deal of very nice work of their own.  Going from there we calld on Lady Saxton, found both her and Sir Charles at home.  I believe they had been quarrelling before we went and took the opportunity of our visit to talk at each other.  However, they were both very amusing in their way.  We lookd in at the Library as we came home where Mrs Hodge and Miss Wiltshire joind us and we took two or three turns in Cambray.  Miss W came in and sat half an hour with us. In our walk we met Mr Newell and Mr Rosedew.  Mr Newell came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Vassall and Kitty.

Tuesday 27 Oct 1807

A very damp wet morning.  We waited till the rain was over and then went to the Well.  It was so late we were there almost by ourselves.  The mud was so deep it was with difficulty we could get along.  Lady Saxton calld, so did Mrs Newell.  After we had had our Luncheon, my Aunt went out for a short time with Mrs Newell.  We all drank Tea and suppd at Mrs Welsfords, where we met Mrs Newell, Miss Wiltshire and Mr Rosedew.  While we were at tea Dr Jenner came in and he and Miss Mayor? retired together and we saw no more of them till after supper when Miss M returned, lolld on the sopha a few minutes and then went to bed.  Some of the party playd at Whist.  I did some of my Aunt P’s Spatting.  We spent a very chearful pleasant evening.  It was a beautiful clear night and we saw the Comet very plain.

Wednesday 28 Oct 1807

A cold, frosty morning but very fine.  We were all at the Well together.  I drank a glass of Water.  We met Mr and Mrs Pickwick returning as we went.  Saw Mr Rosedew and Miss Wiltshire.  She walked some time with us, but we did not go out of the Well walk.  It turned out a beautiful day.  My Aunt and I walkd in Cambray and went to see Miss Mekan’s house which is elegantly furnished and very comfortable.  Mrs Hodge overtook us in the Street, so did Miss Wiltshire.  We went with them to Haydens and Miss Lovelock’s and Mrs Hodge lookd at some laces for shoes and they tried on some caps and bonnets.  I Bought a small piece of Linen to work.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Mrs Bastard.  We had a basket from home with some butter and a Cake.

Thursday 29 Oct 1807

A very damp morning.  We were very late at the Well. My Aunt was there before us.  We walked a very short time.  While we were at breakfast Mr Forth and dear Pen came from Edgeworth, intending to stay an hour or two, but my Aunt prevailed on Pen to stay till Monday.  We had quite a levy all the morning.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs and the Miss Erskines, Mrs Hodge and Mrs Welsford.  Mrs Newell was going to the Play and very kindly said she would give me a ticket if I would go.  Mr Newell told us Mr Farquhar had given him five tickets and if we would all go they would be very much at our service.  Mrs N came and dined with us and we all went together and were very much more amused than we were the other night.  Mr N joind us at supper and afterwards playd two games of Chess with My Aunt Neate and Mrs N playd at Gosch with my Aunt Powell.

Friday 30 Oct 1807

A wet morning.  We did not any of us go to the Well and all laid abed very late.  Pen was very unwell the whole day with a bilious sickness.  Mrs Newell, Miss Wiltshire and Mrs Hodge called, so did a Mrs and Miss Bernington and Miss Saker, but I did not see them.  Mr Newell came in the evening and prescribed for Pen and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.

Saturday 31 Oct 1807

A beautiful day.  We were so late at the Well that my Aunt Neate returned before we went.  We met Miss Wiltshire who turnd back and walkd some time with us.  Pen remained in bed till after our breakfast, (for she eat some more herself) by Mr Newell’s desire.  Miss Wiltshire calld, so did Mr Newell.  He found Pen better and desird she would go out for a short time.  While he was here Mr Wiltshire arrived from Bath but only spoke to us on horseback as he had not been to see Maria.  We calld on Mrs Newell, who had a bad pain in her face and afterwards walkd round Thomson’s field and lookd at his Baths which are very commodious.  Left Pen at our Lodgings.  As we went by my Aunt thought she had had walking enough.  We went on to Miss Lovelock’s where my Aunt gave her the draft for forty five pounds, six shillings.  In returning we stoppd at Sedlons.  We read the papers and my Aunt subscribed for another week.  Mr Wiltshire called before dinner.  He is in great hopes he shall be able to move Maria in a few days as she was certainly better and was moved into another room yesterday. Mrs Hodge drank Tea with us and staid till nearly twelve o’clock.  I shewd her how to net a work bag in two colors, pointed at the bottom, the same as Mrs Porcher’s purses.  Mr Newell came and playd Chess with my Aunt N.  We had a basket from home with some butter and a Cake.   Mrs Hodge sent my Aunt a beautiful looking pheasant.  My Aunt Neate heard from Colonel Bastard about the Copper Mine.

Fashion plate for November 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement
Fashion plate for November 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement

Sunday 1 November 1807 

A very fine morning.  We were late at the Well.  Mrs and the Miss Erskines came after and joind us on the walk.  In our way home we went with them to enquire about a house next door to Coward’s, which they think will suit them and which will be vacant in ten days.  Mr Newell calld to see Pen.  Mr and Miss Wiltshire, Mrs Hodge, Mrs Welsford, Miss Mayor and Mrs Newell calld.  We had intended to walk to Mr Pitt’s farm but a shower of rain prevented us.  My Aunt P and I went to Church in the afternoon with Mrs Hodge and were to have gone with Pen to call on the Wiltshires afterwards, but the  rain came on again and did not cease until nine o’clock.  Mr Newell came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.

Monday 2 November 1807

A fine morning, but very cold.  We were late at the Well.  Met Miss Wiltshire who returnd and walked some time with us.  Mr Forth came over to breakfast to fetch Pen, but she agreed to stay till Wednesday.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr Newell calld and drank Tea and supt at Mr Newell’s. Met Mr Hodge, Mrs Welsford,  Mr and Miss Wiltshire.  They playd Whist and Chess and I watched.  It rained so hard  we were obliged to go in Chairs, but walkd home, all but Pen who came in a Chair  for fearing of taking Cold, for it raind hard enough to wet our heads through.  It was a dreadful night.  It blew a perfect hurricane.  The lightening was very vivid and I thought the windows would have been broken by the hail.  I wrote to my Mother.

Tuesday 3 November 1807

A very fine morning after the storm and the streets as dry as if it had not raind. Pen and my Aunt Powell went to the Well late.  My Aunt N and I did not go. Pen went to call on Mrs Cox, who had written her a note to beg to see her before she left Cheltenham.  Mr Newell and Mr Wiltshire called.  Pen, my Aunt and I called on Mrs Hodge, Mrs Erskine and the Wiltshires, afterwards met Mr and and Miss W on horseback.  Saw Mr W trying a horse which he bought for Miss Savage.  We walkd up to Mrs Hales and enquired what were the terms of her Lodgings at the different seasons.  She lets them at a guinea and a half a week all the winter, two guineas all April, three all May and four and a half the Season, the Servant half a guinea a week in the season and about eight shilling out of it and no other charges whatsoever.  Mrs Newell drank Tea with us and we had a long batch of  ?  I lost half a crown.  Mr Newell did not come in till after supper.  He had a little flirtation with Pen while we finished our Pool.  My Aunt Powell had two letters from Cooper after a silence of more than a fortnight and one from Minah Warren.  She wrote to Cooper.  Mrs Hodge sent us some grapes.

Wednesday 4 November 1807

A fine morning.  Pen and my Aunts went to the Well.  I did not.  Mr Newell and Mr Wiltshire called.  Dear Pen left us for Edgeworth at half past twelve and she went part of the way in a Chaise about eight miles, where Mr Forth was to meet her.  She was very sorry to go and we were equally sorry to part with her, but it was the only day Mr T could meet her.  My Aunt and I went walking.  My Aunt bought a row of white beads and some very cheap striped muslin.  Mrs Newell overtook and joind us.  We met Mrs Erskine and her daughters coming to make their excuses for not drinking Tea with us this evening, which they were engaged to do but they had had colds and were afraid to venture out at night.  We went to Mrs Williams’s to enquire if she had got the small myrtles she was so kind to promise my Aunt last year.  She was so obliging to say we might have three or four.  Mrs Newell left us there and we walked up to Mrs Hales to order some sugar and candles.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss Elizabeth, Mrs Hodge and Mrs Welsford drank Tea and supt with us.  Mr and Mrs Newell were askd to be of the party and we waited some time for them, when my Aunt sent out to say we were waiting. We found (owing to some misunderstanding) they were gone to a party elsewhere.  Our friends did not leave us till near twelve o’clock.  We had a basket from home with some butter and a Cake and a note from Kitty.

Thursday 5 November 1807 

A fine morning but very cold.  We were all at the Well together.  Met Mrs and the Miss Erskines who walkd with us as long as we stayd on the walk.  Mr Wiltshire called.  We went and spent an hour with Mrs Newell.  Lookd at Mr Kingston’s house in St. George’s Place and the house where my Mother lodged when she was here.  We walkd to Alstone in search of a farm house which has a very pretty plant growing against it, of which my Aunt wanted to get some slips, but we could not find out the house.  It is an exception  pretty walk across the fields.  Calld on Mrs Hodge who was not at home.  Saw Mrs Newell who said she had just met them walking.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Vassall and I from Emma, with a Postscript in it from my Mother.

Alstone Bridge, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire by Thomas Hulley, 1819 (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Alstone Bridge, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire by Thomas Hulley, 1819
(c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 6 November 1807

A very fine morning.  We were so late at the Well there was scarcely a creature remaining.  Miss Wiltshire calld while we were at breakfast.  Mrs Hodge, Lady Saxton, Mr Newell and Mr Wiltshire calld in the course of the morning.  My Aunt and I took a long walk, went to see Mrs Forty’s house on the Gloster road, a short distance from the Turnpike and afterwards to see Miss ?, which is the most elegant place I ever saw, a great deal too much so for a lodging house.  Met Mr and the Misses Erskins in the street.  My Aunt bought a muslin gown, two handkerchiefs and a pair of long sleeves, very cheap.  The sleeves she gave to me.  We drank tea and supd at the Wiltshire’s, met Mrs Hodge and Mr and Mrs Newell.  While they were at Cards, I went up with Miss Elizabeth to see Maria, who appeard in good spirits and acknowledged she felt better.  She lookd very much fatter and altogether  better than I expected to see her.  It was a very wet night and we should have been wet thro, but for Mr Newell’s umbrella, which he very kindly lent us.

My Aunt P wrote to Cooper and Kitty and I to Emma.

Saturday, 7 November 1807

A beautiful morning.  My Aunt went to the Well, but I did not, because it appeard so muggy.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Miss E Wiltshire and Mr W calld.  My Aunt and I took a long walk.  We tried to get to Alstone but the Lane was so muddy we could not cross it.  Calld on Mrs Hodge but she was not at home.  Went to Miss Lovelock’s to get some money for a draft and I desird her to send in her Bill,  We went to see Somerset House, which is miserably dirty, out of repair and ill furnished, but an excellent house.  Most of our things were packed up before dinner.  My Aunt Powell drank Tea and spent the evening at Mrs Hodges.  Mr Wiltshire was so kind to see her safe home.  Aunt Neate and I playd Chess after supper.

Sunday 8 November 1807 

A wet morning.  It raind so hard my Aunt would not let me go to the Well with her, but cleard up after breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire calld to say he had no letter from Cooper, nor had Dr. Boisragon* and to offer to do anything for us.  Miss Wiltshire came and sat an hour with us.  Mrs Newell, Mrs Hodge and Mrs Welsford calld, as they very kindly said to save us the trouble of going to them.  We left Mrs N and Mrs W with my Aunt Neate and Mrs Hodge and we went up the Town to Mrs Travers, who was gone to Church.  We then went to Mrs Erskines, where Mrs H left us.  We found Mr Newell with Mrs E.  She was very good humoured and chatty and is, I think, a remarkably pleasant woman.  We did not see Miss Maria.  She had got a bad cold and was not up, but shook hands with Miss Erskin.  As we were going to Lady Saxton’s (who, by the bye was not at home), Mr Wiltshire overtook us on horseback and read to us the story of the Sailor and Barber, which he had turnd into a remarkably good verse in his ride.  We calld at Miss W and went up to see Maria, who was very unwell.  she had put a Blister on her chest, which plagued her very much.  While we were with her, Dr Boisragon came, which shortend our visit.

Dr Boisragons home
Home and consulting rooms of Dr Henry Charles Boisragon http://www.royalcrescentsurgery.nhs.uk

We met Miss Elizabeth at the door as we came out and shook hands with her.  We then went to Miss Lovelock’s, where we were caught in the rain.  We staid till after the shower was over and fortunately got home before it began again.

Everything was finishd packing before dinner and my Aunt orderd the horses at eight o’clock tomorrow morning.  Miss Erskin sent a letter for my Aunt to take to Mr Porcher at Bath for him to frank, to one of the Miss Chamier’s.  Mr Newell came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.

My Aunt P wrote to Elmsley to have the News Paper sent to Bath Easton.  She had two delightful letters, one from Captain Broughton and the other from Mrs Fenwick.

Monday, 9 November 1807

A most beautiful morning.  We were up early to have everything ready to set off as as soon as we had had our breakfasts.  Mr Wiltshire sent a note to enquire if he could do any thing for us before we went and Miss W calld, as she was going by to the ? and staid with us till just as we were going.  As we drove down the town, we stopd at Mrs Williams’s for the Myrtles.  She gave my Aunt three.  When we got there, Stocker recollected she had left her watch behind, so we had to wait while Harding went back to fetch it.  We left Cheltenham exactly at nine o’clock and reachd home about half past six.  The roads were very indifferent, not to say bad, in many places, but we were very fortunately in the weather, which was really enchanting and the view from the Foster Hill beautifully clear.  We had excellent horses all the way.  It began to rain when we were about three miles from home and about an hour after we arrived it pourd.  We found every thing very well at home.  Rover looking beautiful and delighted to see us.

My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Mrs Williams and the letters were put into the Post at Cheltenham by Mr Wiltshire’s servant.  She also wrote to Miss Wiltshire after she came home and Gardener is to take it to Bath tomorrow morning, time enough for the Cheltenham Post.

Tuesday, 10 November 1807

A terrible bad day.  It rained and snowd very much in the morning, but about the middle of the day, for two or three hours.  It came down in such torrents as to overflow the fields entirely between us and the river.  We have great reason to be grateful for the delightful weather we had yesterday for it would have been impossible to have travelled such a day as this has been.  Gardiner went to Bath with the letter to Miss Wiltshire and to enquire after Mr Porcher and my Mother.  He brought word back that my Mother was but indifferent, dear Emma very well and Mr Porcher very poorly.  Miss Maria Wiltshire sent to enquire after us and how we left Maria at Cheltenham.  My Aunt wrote her a note back.  The Jones’s sent their love and desired to know how we were after our journey.  I was very busy the whole day putting my things away and drying my drawers, for we found everything in the house very damp.  We had large fires in the drawing room, library and dining room all day and in our room.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mr Hare at Bristol about the viranda.  The Baker took it to the post office.

Wednesday 11 November 1807  

A very fine day, but cold and windy.  Soon after breakfast Mr Porcher and Mr Chamier called.  Mr P looking remarkably well and in excellent spirits.  He gave my Aunt a frank for Cooper and one to Mrs Porcher.  I never saw Mr Chamier but once before and then I did not like him much and from appearances think he will not improve on acquaintance.  They did not stay long as Mr P was going on to Shockerwick.  When they were gone, I went into the garden but it was so cold I could not stay.  I gatherd a very sweet little Nosegay and was just sitting down to work when Mr Andrews came in.  He told us a great deal of news about the Regiment and was chatty and pleasant.  He saw Cooper last Saturday, who beggd him to say he should be at home the 2nd of next month, stay till the 8th and then go into Devonshire.  We were in the middle of having some luncheon when Mrs Vassall, Mrs Jones and Eliza Hendy walkd down.  Mr A took his leave soon after they came.  I never saw Maria look so well, but Mrs V did not look well and appeard out of spirits.  She brought her work with her and they stayd till near dinner time.  I do not believe Eliza H said three words the whole time she stayd.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper and enclosed Kitty’s two letters.  Mr Andrews was so kind to take it to the post.  My Aunt Powell told Stocker she meant to part with her.

Thursday 12 November 1807

It snowd a good deal early in the morning, but turned out very fine afterwards.  We were surprised by a visit from Mr Martin of Overbury, Miss Eliza M and a Miss Smith.  They are at Bath for a few days only on their way home from Clifton.  They sat here near two hours and were very pleasant, particularly Miss Martin.  They were hardly gone when Mrs and Miss Savage came.  They had very kindly walkd from Shockerwick thro all the mud and wet.  They stayd and had some luncheon and then walkd home again.  My Aunt sent the salts Lady Durbin requested her to get at Cheltenham down to her with a note, but as her Ladyship was at Bristol, Gardiner brought both back.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Porcher and sent it to the post by the Gardener.  She heard from Cooper, who was in the Isle of Wight, where he went to see Mrs Poone who was alarmingly ill.

Friday, 13 November 1807

A most beautiful day.  Hard frost with bright sun shine.  Dr Davis and Captain Simmons walkd up to see us.  They both looked remarkably well, but the Dr was not very chearful.  Captain S was in very good spirits.  Mr Porcher calld.  While they were here, he was as gay as a lark.  When they took their leave, I went to walk in the garden.  While I was out, Mrs Savage, Louisa and Miss M Wiltshire calld, but did not stay long.  It began to snow at dusk and continued the whole evening.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and Pen Saker.

Saturday, 14 November 1807

A miserable, wet day.  It did not cease raining the whole day long.  It was so bad, there was no chance of any body’s calling.  I cut my Aunt Powell’s hair and washd my feet and was at work on my cap all the rest of the morning.  My Aunt Powell had a letter from Mrs Poone and two from Cooper, one by M? and the other Mr Porcher sent up by his servant.  I wrote a note to my mother for Gardener to take down with him tomorrow morning.

Sunday, 15 November 1807 

A very gloomy, dull morning.  We read Prayers at home, for it was too cold and muddy to go to Church.  Mr and Mrs Jones calld and sat an hour and then walkd home.  They were both looking very well and in good spirits.  Gardener brought the Chess men and a note for my Aunt Neate from my mother.  Mrs Jones was so kind to send down the book of Bath characters, which he said he would lend us when he was here in the morning.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Poone and Gardener took the letter down with him went he went to Chappel.  I began taking my bark again.

Monday 16 November 1807  

A dry but gloomy morning.  Mrs Jones had the kindness to call at two o’clock and take me to Bath to see my Mother.  We stoppd at Mr Porcher’s and left some letters for him to be kind enough to frank.  Mrs J then took me to St. James’s Parade, where she left me and said she would call for me the last thing before she went out of Bath.  I found my Mother but indifferent with a cold, though looking well.  She was not up.  Dear Emma very well.  They were both very glad to see me.  Mrs J came and fetched me and we then calld on the Misses Workman to take them to Bailbrook to spend a few days.  They were both well and very friendly.  It raind so hard when we returned that Mrs Jones very kindly insisted on bringing me to the house, when instead of going back the roadway, she took our key of their gate and went up the Lane home.  My Aunt Powell, with a great deal of entreaty and persuasion, prevailed upon Kitty to consent to stay, giving up the situation of cook for that of upper housemaid.  My Aunt P wrote to Cooper and to Mrs Cooper and I took them to Mr Porcher to frank.

Tuesday 17 November 1807  

A gloomy day but not wet.  While we were at breakfast Captain Allen came in.  I never saw him look so well or in better spirits.  He is handsomer than ever and his eyes sparkled with pleasure when we congratulated him on his marriage.  Miss R Workman walked down from Bailbrook to spend the morning with us and when she came in he went away.  Rebecca was in high spirits.  Mr Porcher calld.  He brought up the Bath Characters and a note to my Aunt from Mr Wiltshire enclosed to him.  He also shewd my Aunt a letter from Cooper to him, in which C says his Brother had written to beg to see him and that he was going to London immediately but should return to Portsmouth on Thursday.  While we were at luncheon Mrs Noyes and her two little boys called.  She was very friendly and pleasant and staid till four o’clock.  When she went Rebecca took her leave and ran home as fast as she could, for they dined early at Bailbrook.  I went up the Garden with her and took a few turns afterwards, but it was very cold.  I worked very hard all the evening.  After supper my aunts playd at Gosch.  Aunt P wrote to dear Pen and Mrs Williams.  Mr Porcher was so good to take them to the Post.

Wednesday 18 November 1807  

A dull morning, but dry.  We were very agreeably surprised by seeing Mr Wiltshire.  He told us he had succeeded in bringing Maria home.  They arrived at Shockerwick last night at eight o’clock and she was not at all the worse for it today.  He told us she was in a great deal of pain or said she was all the way and was very anxious to stop but they would not allow it.  The road was so bad up Leckhampton Hill that the Carriage broke down at the top of it, but fortunately it was close to a Blacksmith’s Shop and near a Farm house so that they very soon repaired the damage and proceeded without any other accident.  He was so much affected, poor Man, when he told us, that he could not help shedding tears.  Major Durbin called in his way from Old Down Lane.  He looks very well.  As soon as he was gone my Aunt and I went up to Bailbrook.  Saw Mrs Jones, Maria, Mrs Vassall, the two Workmans, Eliza Hendy and little Betsey.  They were all very good humoured and chearful except Mrs V and she appeared very much out of spirits, poor thing.  My Aunt P wrote to Minah Warren, Cooper, a few lines to Mrs Hodge in Mr Wiltshire’s letter to her and a note to a Miss Cozens about a book, all of which Mr W was so kind to take to the Post.  She heard from Cooper who was with his poor Brother and answered that to London and sent it to Bath by the Gardener.

Cheltenham from Leckhampton Hill, Gloucestershire by British (English) School Bridgeman; (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Cheltenham from Leckhampton Hill, Gloucestershire by British (English) School
Bridgeman; (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday 19 November 1807  

It snowd most part of the night.  When we got up everything about us was white and it continued snowing till twelve o’clock, when it turnd to rain and poured the whole day without the least intermission.  We dined at the Jones’s.  Mr J was so kind to send the Carriage for us.  Met my Mother and Emma who were both very well and the Workmans who are staying there.  We were a party of Ladies quite, for the only Gentleman was Mr Jones. They were very anxious to persuade us to sleep there, but my Aunts declined it.  My Mother consented to do so.  We staid till supper and walkd home a little before twelve and very fortunately it was a fine night.  We spent a very cheerful pleasant day.  Much more so than I expected.

Friday 20 November 1807  

A very windy day and after twelve very wet.  Mr Porcher and Mr Wiltshire calld.  Mr P was in particularly good spirits.  While they were here Sir George and Lady Colebrooke came.  They staid and eat some luncheon and made a long visit.  Miss Wiltshire, Mrs Savage and Charlotte calld.  We were very glad to (see) Miss W after so long an absence.  She said Maria was not the worse for her journey.  They also told us of the Death of old Mrs Chapman of Paragon.  Mrs Savage talks of leaving Shockerwick on Monday.  Mr Porcher was so kind to give us a frank for my Mother to Mr Crafer?  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  It was enclosed to Mr Porcher and Mr Wiltshire brought it here in his way home.  Just as we were sitting down to Dinner we had Cards of thanks from Mrs Fraser on her lying in.

Saturday 21 November 1807   

A very fine morning, hard frost.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Bath soon after breakfast.  We did all our marketing the first thing and then went to the Pump Room where we saw Mrs Eyre and Sophy and the Suttons.

The Pump Room, Bath by John Claude Nattes (British Library)
The Pump Room, Bath by John Claude Nattes (British Library)

The former lookd remarkably well, but the latter lookd more vulgar and dirty than usual, which I though impossible, till I saw them today.  We also saw Mr Porcher, Captain Simmons, my mother and Emma in the Pump Room,  the latter were but just coming into Bath, for Mrs Jones had very kindly persuaded them to stay at Bailbrook from Thursday.  We went with Mr Porcher to Jaggers, where we saw a picture of Mr P, quite as much like him as either of those here.  We then calld on Mrs Simmons, who was out, met Mrs Horne in the street, who went with us to the Miss Smith’s.  We only saw one of them, the other was unwell.  Calld at the Workmans, who were just returnd from Bailbrook.  From there we went to Admiral Phillip’s.  We found Mrs P looking very well, but the poor Admiral deplorably.  He has been very ill with the gout in his head and is so much reduced, he looks like a ghost.  We got some books at Barrat’s and then came home.  Mr Porcher, Dr Davis and Mr Andrews dined  and sleept here.  They playd Cards (two Whist tables in the evening) and we passd a very pleasant day.  My Aunt P wrote to Cooper and a note to Mrs Preston for the Character of a cook.  She also sent a letter to C frankd by Mr Holdsworth.  Mr Porcher was so kind to put them in the Post for us.

Sunday, 22 November 1807 

A very bad day.  Continual snow and rain the whole day thro.  Read Prayers at home.  Mrs Vassall was to have dined here, but the weather was so bad she sent an excuse.  The Miss Workmans sent up a young Woman for my Aunt to see in Stocker’s place, but they differd about wages and she is to let my Aunt know if she will take what she gives.

My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Monday 23 November 1807 

A gloomy cold day but not wet.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was very much out of spirits.  Maria was worse and he was going to fetch Mr Tudor to bleed her.  Lady Colebrooke sent my Aunt some nice Begonias and Passion flowers and shamrocks and my Aunt prevaild on her to sleep here.  She was in better spirits than she has been for some time past and appeard to enjoy herself very much.  A person came to offer herself in Stocker’s place, but my Aunt did not think her equal to it.  My Aunt heard from George Shirley and Major Durbin was so kind to send his servant up with a letter from Mr Bussell to say the Regiment were ordered to Salisbury.

Tuesday 24 November 1807 

A very cold day with rain and then a flisk of snow.  Mr Porsher and Mr Wiltshire calld.  Mr W was so kind to write to Mr Perry at Cheltenham to try to get the money he owes poor Taylor and Mr P, with his accustomed goodness, gave my Aunts a two pound note for her.  Mrs Jones and Maria came in the Carriage to fetch Mrs Vassall, but did not stay long on account of the Horses.  A young woman came from Bath to offer herself as Servant and my Aunt liked her so much she agreed to take her provided her character answered for which my Aunt wrote by today’s post to a Miss Windham in London.  The young Woman who came after the Cook’s place a day or two ago came again today with a note from Mrs Preston giving her an excellent Character.

My Aunt heard from Cooper who is still in London and wrote to Miss Windham, a note to the Workmans and one to the person who came up yesterday to say she would not do.  Mr Porcher was so kind to take them to Bath  and said he would send his Servant with the Notes.

Wednesday 25 November 1807 

A very fine morning, tho it had snowd in the night.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He gave a very indifferent account of Maria.  Mr and Mrs Jones and Mrs Vassall calld to take us to Bath, just as we were going to have some luncheon.  We would not detain them, so took some slices of Cake in the Carriage, of which they partook.  We went to Norrises? to see some things said to be the Stock of a dress maker to be sold by Auction, but they were so very bad they must have been the property of a Pawn Broker.  Went to Mrs Simions to look at some Patterns of Worsted work.  Went with the Jones’s to Rosalie Baders.  Saw some very pretty Caps.  Calld at Barratts for some Books. Saw Miss Workman, the Miss Smiths and the Christies in the Street.  Went to Mrs Carrolls for the Character of a Maid who was a very good one.  Calld on my Mother and the Suttons.  They were all very well.  My Aunt  bought Saucepans and Canvass for the use of the House.  Mrs Jones brought us back and Mrs Vassall dined and slept here.  On our return my Aunt found a very polite note from Mrs Preston to say how poor Tom Chivers was and one from Major Durbin saying he would call here tomorrow.  Gardener and Daniel fetchd the beautiful red Thorn from Cannings and planted it in the field between the small plantations opposite the house.

Thursday 26 November 1807 

A very foggy morning.  Major Durbin came to breakfast before we came down.  He went away directly afterwards.  I was very busy cutting out a gown for Mrs Vassall.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not set down.  Miss Jones came and took us again to Bath.  We went with her to Simions.  Miss Lovelocks (who is not yet returnd from Cheltenham) and Miss Hoblins where we saw two or three beautiful Caps.  Calld at Mrs Bennets, Mrs Christie’s and Mr Hartley’s.  Did not see any of them.  Saw the Misses Workman, Miss Wiltshire and Charlotte Savage in the Street.  Went down to Mrs Horne’s where Mrs Vassall was waiting for us and Miss Jones came and took us up.  We went to see Mrs Edwards who is so much recoverd as to be able to lift her hand above her head and walks very well.  I was hard at work in the evening on Mrs V’s gown.

Friday 27 November 1807  

A very beautiful day with hard frost.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Mrs Allen’s to pay our compliments to the Bride who, tho not pretty, was very agreeable, chatty and apparently quite free from affectation.  The old Lady gave us a piece of delicious Bride Cake.  The Sun had thawd the Road so much while we were sitting at Mrs Allen’s that it was very muddy when we returned and we got our feet wet.  Mr Porcher calld.  My Aunt spoke to him about George Blackburn and he very kindly promised to do what he could for him.  Mr Wiltshire calld but I did not see him.  I was employd almost all the evening breaking sugar.

Saturday 28 November 1807  

A fine frosty day.  We walkd up to Bailbrook soon after breakfast but they were all gone to Bath, except Mr Jones and Eliza.  We staid with them about half an hour and when we came away Mr J lent us a Pamphlet written by an Officer who was at Buenos Ayres.  In the evening my Aunt had a note from Mr Wiltshire enclosing a letter from Mrs C to Cooper with a better account of the Doctor and one from Cooper to Mr Porcher in which he says he will be at home to Dinner next Thursday.  We received a Box by the Waggon directed to Cooper containing six frames Gilt and Glazed fill, with beautiful impressions from the antique.  My Aunt heard from Mary Tremlett.

Sunday 29 November 1807  

A hard frost but thick fog.  My Aunt P and I went to Church and heard an excellent Sermon.  We afterwards calld on Mrs Noyes where we met Mr Walters and little Sophia.  we walkd with the two latter to see Mrs W who has a very bad cold and is not able to leave the House.  Mrs Noyes lent us an Ann Bullen Cap for a pattern.  While we were at Luncheon Mrs Vassall and Miss Jones came and soon after we were agreeably surprised by a visit from the two Miss Palettes who walkd from Bath where they are come to stay the Winter.  They were just as friendly and pleasant as they used to be.  Mr Wiltshire calld just as we had done Dinner.  He had had a still better account of Dr Cooper today.

My Aunt P wrote to Mrs Preston and sent it to the Post by the Gardener and also a note to Mrs Carroll to desire the Servant may not come up till Tuesday.

Monday 30 November 1807

A very cold morning.  I had intended walking down to spend the morning with my Mother but it began snowing before breakfast and continued two hours, which made it impossible.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr Allen calld but did not stay long and Mr Wiltshire came again in his way home.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  The new cook came.

Fashion plate for December 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement
Fashion plate for December 1807 from The Lady’s Magazine, or entertaining companion for the fair sex; appropriated solely to their use and amusement

Tuesday Dec 1 1807 

A very foggy morning.  I was afraid to venture to Bath for fear it should turn to rain.  Miss M Wiltshire and Charlotte Savage calld and brought Mrs Hodge with them but did not stay long, as it was late when they came.  Mr W and Miss Eliza also calld, but she did not get off her horse.   Dryall, a Soldier, came to say Cooper meant to take him as his Batman while he staid at home, if my Aunt approved of him, which she did and he is to come when he comes home. Major Durbin sent up a letter he had received about Dryall from Mr Bussell.    My Aunt heard from Mr Bastard to say he, Mrs B and Edmund would be here next Thursday. She also heard from Cooper by Captain Chivers who arrived this evening and was so kind to send it up by Killpack.  Major Durbin sent a Pheasant. The new Servant came in Stocker’s place.

Wednesday 2 Dec 1807

A fine morning.  Mr Jones was so kind to take my Aunt and me to Bath where it was so very muddy we were almost smothered.  We did a great deal of business and calld on the Miss Palettes, who were very glad to see us and very good humoured and pleasant.  Met Mr Porcher.  He walkd as far as the Miss P with us, was in excellent spirits and very droll.  He was so kind to give my Aunt a frank for Miss Jones.  Saw Rebecca Workman on the Street.  She walkd a little way with us.  Went to the Pump Room, saw Mr P again and Mrs Vassall who told us Mrs Jones did not leave Bath till four o’clock, so we went and sat an hour with my Mother and dear Emma who were both very well and gave us some delicious pickled mussels for our luncheon.  At four o’clock we went to the Miss Smith’s to meet Mrs Jones who brought us home.   My Aunt heard from Mr Bussell, Major Durbin, Miss Wyndham (with Hart’s Character) and from the Mistress of the Inn at Gloscester to say she had got some plates which my Aunt wishd to have.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Colonel E Barton and we took the letters down with us

Thurs 3 Dec. 1807

( A very foggy day, so much so that in the afternoon we could not distinguish the road from the house – THIS IS THE HEADING, BUT HAS BEEN CROSSED OUT BY FANNY)

A very fine day.  My Aunt and I went up to Bailbrook directly after breakfast, saw Mrs Jones, Maria, Eliza, Betsey, Mrs Vassall and Mrs Harne, who looks very ill.  We staid but a short time, as they were going to Bath.  Captain Simmons calld.  He staid and had some luncheon.  Colonel Bastard and Edmund arrived just before dinner, both looking remarkably well and the Colonel in better spirits than I ever saw him.  My Wiltshire calld before they came.  My Aunt tried to persuade him to stay and dine, but he said he was not well enough.  My Aunt heard from Colonel Bastard to say Mrs B did not come with him.  Mr B brought my Aunt two couple of woodcocks.

Friday 4 December 1807

A beautiful day.  Mr Porcher and Mr Wiltshire calld.  Mr P as gay as a lark.  I walkd in the garden for an hour.  At four o’clock our dear Cooper arrived accompanied by Captain Roach, who we had not seen since his promotion.  Cooper looks remarkably well and in delightful spirits but ah! how alterd in his manner.  Captain Chivers and Mrs Hodge dined and slept here.  They made two  Whist tables and I workd.

Saturday 5 December 1807

A very gloomy morning.  Mr Porcher calld directly after breakfast to see Cooper.  Mr Wiltshire sent his carriage to take C to Shockerwick to see the two Maria’s.  Miss W came in it and sat with us till Cooper was ready to go.  My Aunt and I went to Bath to get what was necessary for dinner today and order for Monday.  It raind all the time we were there and was very uncomfortable.  We calld on Mrs Simmons, saw her, the Captain and little Mary, calld also on the Workmans just before we left Bath.  They were dressd to go to the Play and it was very late when we went to them, so did not stay long.  We had only our own family party at dinner and chatted and workd in the evening.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Barwell and Mrs Eyre.

Sunday 6 December 1807

A very fine day.  Mr Wiltshire came just as we had done breakfast and staid to prayers with us, when he drove Cooper to Shockerwick to see Maria.  Mr Porcher and Mr Wiltshire dined here and spent the evening.  Mr P was not in spirits and was fearful the Gout was coming on in one of his ancles.

My Aunt hear from Mrs Williams.  We receivd a basket by the Coach of a ham and two brace of partridges.  Mr Wiltshire brought a ham and pheasant and Mrs Welsford sent three couple of woodcocks.

Monday 7 December 1807

A dull looking morning but it cleard up after breakfast and was very fine.  It is our dear Cooper’s Birthday.  He compleated his forty second year and if wishes availd any thing he would experience every blessing and happiness the Giver of all good can bestow for as many years to come.  Immediately after breakfast my Aunt and I went up to Bailbrook to beg the Jones’s would be so kind to lend us some knives, forks, glasses, spoons etc. as our party is so large at dinner, we had not half enough.  Mrs Jones, Maria and Betsey went to Bath just as we went up, but we sat half an hour with Mr Jones, who returnd from London only last night and was laid up with the Gout in his foot.  He told us he feard the bargain was all off between him and Mr Whitehead.  When we returnd from there we went to Bath with Colonel Bastard, Cooper and Mr Bussell (who arrived from Salisbury to breakfast this morning).  At the bottom of the Lane we met Captain Simmons and Captain Saunders (who was coming up to be introduced to Cooper.  He is a gentlemanly looking man.  Colonel B put us down in Paragon and we walkd on to do what was necessary and then went to my mother’s, who was not at home, but we afterwards met her and returnd for a few minutes.  My Aunt took her a couple of woodcocks.  From thence we went immediately to Mr Wiltshire’s where we were to meet to go back together.  Mr W came in for a few minutes but could not stay with us.  Mr Bussell and we waited about a quarter of an hour before they came for us and then returnd as we came.  So many people were askd to dinner that we were obliged to remove all the furniture out of the drawing room and dine there and sit in the other two rooms.  At dinner we had Mr Porcher, Captain and Mrs Simmons, Captain Chivers, Captain Roach, Major Durbin, Mr Bussell, Mr Andrews, Mrs Hodge, Colonel Byng, the two Miss Workmans, Colonel Bastard and Edmund and Mr Wiltshire.  Miss W was to have been of the party, but owing to some mistake, she did not come.  The party divided after dinner, the Whist players in the library and the round table party in the dining room.  We did not break up until after twelve o’clock.  On this day last year I was one of the happiest of the happy, how different passed this day.

Tuesday 8 December 1807

A very heavy fall of snow.  Cooper and Edmund took the gun after breakfast intending to shoot their way to Shockerwick, but the snow came on so thick they were obliged to return and I never saw such figures as they were when they came back here.  Edmund was almost frozen.  Mr Tudor calld to take Cooper to Mr Wiltshire’s with him.  He staid and eat some luncheon, but went on before Cooper returnd and came again in his way back to speak to C about Maria.  It continued snowing fast the whole day.  We had no one at dinner.  After tea Cooper, my Aunt P, Colonel B and Edmund playd Whist.  My Aunt N and I read and lookd on.

Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards
Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards

Wednesday 9 December 1807

A very find sunshine morning but not warm enough to melt the snow.  Major Durbin came up to breakfast and soon afterwards Mr Broughton walkd up to see Cooper.  Miss Wiltshire came to take Cooper to Shockerwick.  After he was gone Captain Roach and Captain Nash calld but did not stay long.  When they were all gone, Colonel Byng came.  He sat here an hour and had some luncheon.  Miss W brought C back and askd if we would any of us go to Bath, but we declind it.  Mr W walkd home looking extremely ill and said he had been on the sopha almost all the day before.  He would not stay to dine but walkd on expecting Miss W would overtake him.  We dined alone again.  Cooper, my Aunt Neate, Colonel B and Edmund playd Whist.  My Aunt P and I workd very had on Cooper’s neckcloths.  My spirits were so depressed the whole evening, I was quite uncomfortable.  Cooper and my Aunt P calld at the James’s before dinner.

Thursday 10 December 1807

A very uncomfortable morning which turnd to rain and froze as it fell.  Mr Wiltshire calld and after we had had some Luncheon, Mr Bastard took Cooper, my Aunt, Mr Wiltshire and me down to Bath.  We went to Lucas’s to get some neckcloths for C, then for some fish and then to my mother’s, where my Aunt left me and took Emma with her to Mrs Taylor’s to meet Cooper who, with his usual goodness said he would see and prescribe for.  Mr Bastard calld and took me up at Mr Clarke’s.  We then proceeded to State Street, where we waited for C and my Aunt and then went to Mr Wiltshire’s, whom we brought back with us.  He and Mr Tudor dined here.  They did not come in to tea till late and went away before it was taken away.  Mr Tudor was in very good spirits.  They did not play cards.  My Aunt P and I workd as hard we possibly could to get Cooper’s neckcloths ready for tomorrow.   He was very much out of spirits.  My Aunt and I workd till two o’clock.  She heard from Miss Grant.

Friday 11 December 1807

A very foggy, miserable morning with a rapid thaw.  Cooper and Mr Bastard left us at ten o’clock for Salisbury.  I wrote a note to my mother and sent the ribbons from Mary Tremlett and the frank Mr B left for her and Cooper’s prescription for Mrs Taylor.  Miss Jones sent a note to my Aunt to beg for a frank for Val, but Mr B had been gone three hours.  Mr Wiltshire calld and said the trio left Bath at half past ten.  Mr W had a good account of Dr C in town.  My Aunt wrote Mr Porcher a note and sent him a pheasant.  She also wrote to Cooper to enclose a letter which came by the Post for him.  Dryall took it to Bath and Mrs Fenwick.

Saturday 12 December 1807

A dull day.  I began to work dear Mrs Vassall’s gown, but did not do much of it, having a cold and inflammation in my left eye.  Mr Wiltshire calld, so did Miss W to ask if either of us would to to Bath.  She did not get out of the carriage, as we declind going.  Poor Thomas Gate was so unwell all day he could hardly move.  Cooper was obliged to take Harding with him, for Thomas was so ill for two or three days before he left us that he could not do anything in the house.

I walkd in the garden for an hour before dinner, but it was very damp and uncomfortable.  My Aunt N and I play Gosch all the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper, Mrs Porcher, Pen Saker and Mrs Phillip to ask us to dine there Christmas day.  My Aunt Neate had a note from my mother. My Aunt P wrote to Miss Grant.

Sunday 13 December 1807

A very cold damp day.  We read prayers at home, after which I walkd in the garden half an hour, but it was so cold I could not stay out longer.  Mr Collins and a friend with him calld to pay his rent, which he did to my Aunt Neate.  I did not see them, for they staid a very short time.  My Aunt sent to enquire how Mrs Walters’ cold is, for she has been very unwell for some days.  She wrote notes to Mrs Jones and Mrs Noyes, the former was gone to church and the latter sent word Mr N and the children were very not well, particularly Mr N.

My Aunt heard from Cooper.  She wrote to Sir R Baker, Mrs Porcher, Mrs Phillip, Cooper, Mrs Williams and a note to Mr Porcher.

Monday 14 December 1807

A very fine day.  Mrs Jones sent to offer to take any of us to Bath and my Aunt Neate accepted her kind offer, as she wishd to see my mother.  Miss Wiltshire, Mrs Hodge and Mr James calld.  I am sorry to say Mrs H came to say she was going into Devonshire next Friday.  My Aunt promised to see her in Bath before she went.  I walkd in the garden for an hour.  While I was out Mrs Allen, Miss Janetta and Mrs H Allen calld.  Of course I did not see them.  While we were at luncheon Mr Wiltshire came over and partook of the Damson tart we were eating.  Mr Cowdrey sent a note for Cooper, which he begd might be forwarded to him and my Aunt enclosed it today.  Mr Wiltshire calld again in his way home to say he should go to Tetbury.

My Aunt P heard from Cooper.  He says the Regiment is orderd back to Portsmouth and that the first division march today.  He also says he has alterd his plan, (which was when he left us to have been back again on Christmas Day).  He intends going with Mr Bastard to Sharpham tomorrow and on to Kitley Thursday, stay there a fortnight, after that spend a week at Mr Bulteel’s  and be home about the sixth of next month.  So end all our air built schemes of happiness and pleasure.  My Aunt wrote two letters to Cooper, one enclosing Mr Cowdry’s note, the other a letter which came for Mr Bastard by today’s Post.  Mr Wiltshire took the first and Gardiner went down with the last.

Tuesday, 15 December 1807

A hard frost in the morning, but a thaw accompanied by a thick fog came on after breakfast.  Mr Porcher rode up and sat an hour.  He was very pleasant, but lookd unwell, tho he said the gout had left his foot and he had only weakness to complain of.  Mr Wiltshire and Miss Elizabeth calld at the door, but did not get off their horses.

My Aunt heard from Sir R Baker and Cooper, who says the order for the Regiment to march to Portsmouth has been countermanded and they are to stay at Salisbury till further orders.

Wednesday 16 December 1807

A very fine morning.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He gave a very bad account of both the Maria’s, but particularly his sister.  She has been getting gradually worse for some time and is now so very ill that Mr W thinks she cannot live many days.  Mrs Jones had the kindness to take my Aunt and me to Bath.  She put us down at Guinea Lane and we walkd to Sir R Baker’s.  Neither he or Maria were at home, but we saw Louisa, Emma and Onslow.  From there we went to Lady Colebrooke’s, Lady Smith’s and Mrs Sutherland’s only, left our Cards at each, met Sir J Smith and Mr Ensor in the street.  They were both very gracious and “so polite all the while”.  Went to Mrs Hodge, who has alterd her plan and does not go into Devonshire till the beginning of January.  She expects her son at that time and they are to go together.  Met Mr Wiltshire at her house, who very kindly undertook to find Sir R Baker and get the direction to Mrs Sitwell, direct my Aunt’s letter to her and put it in the Post.  Calld on my mother for a few minutes.  Found her very well and dear Emma’s cold better.  Went into the Pump Room where we met Mrs Jones who brought us back again.  Little Betsey and Eliza went down and returnd with us.

Thursday 17 December 1807

A very black looking cold day.  Mr Wiltshire calld in his way to Bath.  Both his sister and Maria were very bad.  I sent a note to Emma to offer her one of my necklaces etc. etc. for tomorrow.  My mother sent me a note back to say she had sent me a ticket for the Children’s Ball by Mrs Jones, who was going and would take me and bring me back and she particularly wishd me to go.  Had a note from Miss Jones while we were at dinner, with the ticket and to say Mrs J could not go tomorrow, as they had had a very distressing account of Mrs Pringle from Mrs Vassall.  I then determind to give up the ticket and send it back to my mother, when another note came from her to say she was very anxious I should go and if I would walk down I could sleep at her house.  Accordingly I agreed to go.  I wrote a note of thanks to Miss Jones, but could not send it till tomorrow.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Blackburn.

Friday 18 December 1807

A dull cold morning.  I sent my note to Miss Jones, who very kindly returnd for answer her sister was going to Bath and would take me.  They came about half past one and took my Aunt Powell and me down.  We went to Slacks and got six cravats for Cooper for which my Aunt gave 2.2.0., then ordered fish and got some tea.  Went to the Post Office and then met Mrs Jones at the Pump Room door where I left my Aunt and proceeded on to my mother’s, who I found in the middle of dinner.  We scrambled ours down as fast as we possibly could and Emma and I dressd ourselves and at half past four my mother walkd with us to Miss Guy’s in Gay Street where we waited some time for the Miss Couchers, but as they did not come Miss L Guy, Miss Merry, Emma and I walkd to the Rooms.  The two Miss Couchers and Miss Doleman soon joind us with the addition of Miss Guy and Miss Handley.  As soon as the doors were opend we went into the Ball Room, but the crowd was so great we got very indifferent seats at the bottom of the room.  It was really a beautiful sight, the children were so delicately dressd and danced so delightfully, particularly two little creatures who, I am sure, were not more than four years old.  The figure dances were very elegant.  At half past nine all the company went into the Tea Rooms and Emma and I, thinking we should get our more comfortably than we should, when every body was going, took ourselves off, got chairs without any difficulty and were at home before ten o’clock.  Poor Emma had a dreadful headache when we got home, but it soon wore off and after a good supper and a great deal of chat we went to bed.

Saturday 19 December 1807

A cold but dry morning.  My mother went out for a short time after breakfast. Soon after she returnd Durell Stables calld looking so ill and so altered, I should hardly have known him.  He said he had been very ill for two months past and was now sent here to try the warm Bath and if he found any relief, he should stay some time.  Mr F Mahew calld and as soon as he went away Miss L Guy and Miss Doleman came in, but did not stay long, soon after which Mrs Jones was so obliging to send the carriage for me.  We took her, Eliza and little Betsey up at Hazard’s, calld at Miss Workman’s for some parcels, but did not get out of the carriage and then proceeded on to Bailbrook, from whence I walkd down the Lane home, where I found my Aunts and Mrs Hodge, the latter came yesterday to stay a few days, all very kind and very glad to see me.  In the evening my Aunt Powell read to us while we workd.  I began a new purse.  My Aunt sent a box to Cooper this morning by the Coach to Plympton, with his new cravats and some other things and a letter which came by the Post for him and she wrote a few lines.

Bailbrook House (via www.bath-business.net)
Bailbrook House (via http://www.bath-business.net)

Sunday 20 December 1807

A cold raw day.  We read prayers at home and after we had had our luncheon my Aunt P and Mrs Hodge went to call at Bailbrook and Lambridge and from thence walkd as far as Lady Durbins.  They met Mr Wiltshire in the road going to fetch Dr Parry to little Maria, who they thought much worse.

My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper.  Poor dear old Henry died last night.  When Gardener went into the stable this morning he found him laying as if he were asleep, so that I trust he had a very easy death.

Monday 21 December 1807

A very thick fog the whole day.  Mr Wiltshire calld to say Maria was a little better.  Mrs Simmons and two of her boys, James and Charles, walkd up, eat some luncheon and staid two or three hours.

Tuesday 22 December 1807

A beautiful sunshine morning, but with a good deal of fog.  Mrs Hodge took us into Bath with her, went to the Post Office, where my Aunt gave Mr Tippets five shillings for a Xmas box for herself and Cooper.  Got some tincture of myrrh for Thomas at Mr Timner’s, calld on the Suttons, Mrs Flynn and my mother.  She and Emma were just going out, but we sat half an hour with her.  We three all went out together and they went as far as Cox’s with us, where my Aunt bought some edging.  We shook hands with them there and then, went to the hospital to ask Mrs Edwards to dine here xmas day.  From there we went to Favemans for some colord worsteds, but it was too late to distinguish the shades, so we proceeded home and should have had a very pleasant walk, but that the fog had increased so much that we could with difficulty see the carriages as they passed us in the road.  I bathed my feet after dinner,netted all the evening and playd cards with my Aunt Neate after supper.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mrs Sitwell.  She wrote a note to Sir R Baker and enclosed Mrs S’s letter in it and sent it to him by Dryall when he went home at night.

Wednesday 23 December 1807

A very fine sunshine frosty morning, but still foggy.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at breakfast.  He said Maria was a little better, but that she was so bad yesterday he was obliged to fetch Dr Parry again, who had ordered her to have off the little wine that Cooper allowd her.  Desired she would be bled every day and take no kind of nourishment but milk and water, whey and liquids of that kind.  The Miss Palettes came in while we were at luncheon, of which they partook and staid till three o’clock.  Mr Tudor calld in (on his way from Shockerwick, where he had been to bleed Maria) to see Thomas, who he found so much better that he told my Aunt she might write Cooper word he was convalescent.  I walkd in the garden for an hour.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Barwell and to Mr Clarke enclosing seventy pounds.  She heard from Mrs E Bastard, as elegantly written a letter as I ever read.

Thursday 24 December 1807

A very thick fog and not a pleasant day.  We walkd to Mrs Noyes, but she was not at home.  Calld also on Mrs Walters, where we met Lady Colebrooke and Mrs Joliff, the former looking very ill, the latter taking great pains not to speak to or notice us at all.  Went in the carriage in our way back and paid for the red thorn we had there.  He charged 4 shillings, which was extremely reasonable, for I expected it would have been at least half a guinea.  Met Mr Wiltshire in the Lane who said Maria was very bad.  He was waiting for Dr Parry, who was going out to see her.  I wrote a note to my mother, which Dryall took with some old cloaths for Mrs Taylor’s boy.  My Aunt heard again from Mrs E Bastard and wrote to Cooper.

Friday 25 December 1807

A very fine sunshine morning. My Aunt Powell and I walkd to church, but had great difficulty in getting along, it was so slippery and muddy.  We came across the fields back again.  Tom Eyre calld unexpectedly.  He looks remarkably well and was in very good spirits. We dined quite alone in the parlor, but in addition to the servants in the kitchen there was Mrs Edwards, old Baterbury and Dryall’s wife.  My Aunt Powell heard from Minah.

St John's Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
St John’s Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Saturday 26 December 1807

A very bad day.  It raind incessantly.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but was too wet to get off his horse.  Maria was a little better.  I workd hard all the morning and broke a bag of sugar before dinner.  My Aunt Neate and I playd a game of Chess after dinner.  My Aunt P wrote notes to Mrs Hodge, Miss Palettes and Mr Turner, to all of which Dryall brought back answers.  Mrs H sent us some Totnes squats.  I playd at Gosch with my Aunt N after supper.  My Aunt had a note from Miss Jones, saying her brother was again confined with the Gout.

Sunday 27 December 1807

A beautiful day, so warm and mild that we sat some time with the window open and my Aunt walkd in the garden without her pelisse.  We read prayers at home.  My Aunt sent up to know how Mr Jones was and to borrow the Bath Paper, which they sent and said Mr J was in a great deal of pain.

My Aunt had two letters from Cooper and one came for him.

Mr Wiltshire calld in his way from Bath, where he had been to get a prescription of Drs Parry and Bounagan made up for Maria, who is much the same as she was yesterday.

Monday 28 December 1807

A very wet day with a tremendous wind.  My Aunt Neate gave me a new piece of plain muslin, of which I made a mob cap.  Workd very hard to finish it before dinner.  Did not see a creature all day out of the family.  The Singers came after dinner and sung two hymns in the hall.  My Aunt gave them 2/6 for their xmas box.  Mrs Noyes sent for a gown of my Aunt’s for a pattern.  My Aunt wrote to Mary Taylor and Cooper.  Dryall took them to the Post, also a letter for Cooper, which came yesterday with the Maidstone Post mark.

Mr Wiltshire calld, but was too wet to get off his horse.

Tuesday 29 December 1807

A wet day and the wind worse than it was yesterday, at times so high it was really frightful.  Mr Wiltshire calld but I did not see him.  My Aunts said he was particularly low.

Wednesday 30 December 1807

A beautiful morning, but it afterwards turnd off and was very showery the rest of the day.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He said Maria was as bad as she possibly could be.  She has had incessant  vomiting for three nights and day.  Dr Parry and Dr Bounagan were gone there.  My Aunt sent to know how Mr Jones was.  Maria wrote back word that he was still suffering very much, that the Gout had attackd his knee and that if we were to see his hand, we would be frightend.  She also sent word that the Carriage was going down tomorrow to fetch the Miss Smiths and we could go in it if we liked.

My Aunt heard from Cooper.  She wrote to him and Mrs Bastard and enclosed a letter to him that came by the Post.  Dryall took them to Bath.  Thomas is so much recoverd as to be able to wait again.

Thursday 31 December 1807

A showery uncomfortable day notwithstanding which my Aunt Powell and I went to Bath in Mr Jones’s carriage, which came to fetch us at one o’clock.  We were very fortunate while we were in Bath.  It raind very little and was not very muddy.  We did all we had to do in the shopping way and then calld on my mother, who was just knocking at the door as we went there.  My Aunt was so kind to take her a pot of lampreys, which she bought at Hemming’s.  We did not see dear Emma.  She was gone on a message.  From there we went to the Post office and then to Mrs Hodges.  We had hardly time to shake hands with her and Miss Welsford, who looks just as she did when we saw her four years ago in Devonshire, for fear of making Mr J’s carriage wait, so from Mrs H we galloped to the Miss Smiths, who were to go back with us to stay a few days at Bailbrook and luckily were with them in very good time.  In our way home we stopd at Lansdowns about the candles and while my Aunt was there I thought the carriage would have been blown over, the wind increased so much and at night it blew a perfect hurricane.  My Aunt heard from Major Durbin enclosing a letter to him from Cooper.

 

* Dr Henry Charles Boisragon of Cheltenham, died 1852; spouse Jemima. He was also extra physician to the Prince of Wales and he treated Lord Byron, mentioned here.

 

 

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

 

11 thoughts on “1807 Diary

  1. Hi, George & Amanda – what a wonderful thing you have done, sharing these diaries online!

    The family I research lived during Fanny Chapman’s lifetime.Of course, I always look; rarely _find_ information about them. BUT BIG surprise: Fanny Chapman mentions a branch of the family: Sir George and Lady Colebrooke. A Thrilling Find!

    Thank you!!

    Kelly

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  2. Dear Kelly,

    One important reason for publishing these was the expectation that someone else in Fanny’s circle would also have kept a diary or might have kept their letters from her or her aunts.

    I don’t suppose you have anything?

    I suspect that Sir George may have been at the least acquainted with Fanny’s father, Henry or her grandfather William Neate. If I am correct Sir G was involved in the North American trade? I’d be interested to know more.

    Kind regards

    George

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  3. Hi, George – I, too, am hunting for “more” (letters and diaries). Have more for the 1830s and beyond, than for the 1810s and prior. And yet: I live in hope of other items turning up (so much HAS been saved; and it depends on the ‘avenue’ items have taken over several generations).

    I did have a look through my letters file, but do not find the name ‘Chapman’; still, while I can _place_ people in Bath, I have very little from their stays.

    Sir George Colebrooke himself is slightly outside my current digging; it’s more his wife (widow) who interests me. I can recommend a couple of books on the Colebrookes, which touch on this earlier generation, though. One is new-ish; one old.

    Rosane and Ludo Rocher, “The Making of Western Indology: Henry Thomas Colebrooke and the East India Company”; a good amount about Sir George and his generation, although a biography of the son.

    And “The Life of H.T. Colebrooke” by his son Sir T.E. Colebrooke.

    Although I’ve not seen it, there is also Sheila Binns’ “Sir Edward Colebrooke of Abington and Ottershaw” (that one might have to come from the U.K.).

    MUST say, though, I’ll keep my eyes open for Fanny Chapman!

    k

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  4. Dear Janeite,

    I guess we both just have to keep looking. We are working on a full index of names and Sarah will add it to the site once it is complete. It would be worth having a look through that. One of the name which may crop up in any Colebrooke papers is Cooper – they would have been moving in the same circles – Rotten Boroughs and the like. If he gets a mention (possibly as Colonel Cooper) that would be a find!

    Kind regards

    George

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  5. Thanks so much for bringing this to light. I find this diary very triste for some reason, perhaps because it reminds me so much of the lives of several of my elderly aunts from the 1900s to the 1980s. Please know that all your dedication and hard work is appreciated, even by the casual reader.

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    • Thank you so very much for your kind comments, we’re always thrilled to hear that people enjoy reading about Fanny 🙂

      Like

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