1841 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1841 from World of Fashion. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for January 1841 from World of Fashion.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday 1 January 1841

I commence the year with a grateful heart and sincere thanksgivings for the numerous blessings and comforts we have experienced during the past years and a humble hope that the Almighty, in his mercy, will vouchsafe us his protection and guidance in those to come!

We dined at Admiral Shirleys!!!.  Met a Miss Lyons, a most agreeable person and a Miss Oakley at dinner and two Miss Gardeners came in the evening.  The Admiral came up to the drawing room before dinner and also at tea, but went to a party at Mrs Pierrepont’s afterwards.  He was looking very well and in good spirits.  We went and returned in Chairs, as it snow’d in the morning and rained in the middle of the day, tho’ dry in the evening, but so terribly muddy that we should have found it difficult to walk.  Pass’d a hum drum sort of a day, tolerably chearful and nothing disagreeable.  At dinner we had Filleted Soals (excellent), stew’d rump of beef, roasted turkey, sausages, jeruselem artichokes, potatoes (mashed and plain), macaroni and minced pies.  Oranges, pears, apples, chestnuts and medlars.  In the evening cake and wine.

I wrote to Mrs Stephens for some cards of the Royal Naval Female School.  I heard from Miss Wood.

Saturday 2 January 1841

A dry day and very cold.  We neither of us went out.  Miss Workman dined with us on the beautiful turkey dear Mrs Quarnier sent us (accompanied by a tongue and a very fine wild duck) and it proved as good as it look’d, for it was delicious. Rebecca was very well and in good spirits, but getting more forgetful every day, repeating the same thing over and over again.  She was very impatient for her Chair to come and appeard to think “ten o’clock” would never arrive.  It rained when we went to bed.  I had symptoms of a cold coming.

Sunday 3 January 1841

A fine looking morning with bright sun, after a tempestuous night,  high wind, frightful thunder and lightning!!!  and torrents of rain.  Emma went to St. John’s.  Soon after she went, it began to rain, then hail’d and just after she returned there was as heavy a fall of snow as I ever saw.  It was so thick it made it quite dark.  Happily it did not continue long and soon melted, but in the evening it froze again and the streets were like glass.

Monday 4 January 1841

A fine morning with bright sun, but it began to snow a little about twelve o’clock and a sleet fell at intervals the rest of the day.  We expected to see Miss Wilson, as she was to be at Mrs Drummond’s on Saturday to stay till Monday (and I am sure Mrs Drummond would not press her to stay a day longer), but she did not call.  Mrs Drummond ask’d us to “tea”, either Saturday or Sunday, but I said we were engaged both days.  We were really so on Saturday, but not yesterday.  I refused the invitation, as I have no idea of being ask’d only as a “stop gap”, when she only wanted us to make a little variety for Miss Wilson.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Tuesday 5 January 1841

A severe frost and quite dry in the morning.  I heard from Mrs Stephens with some of the printed cards of the Royal Naval Female School, which I had written to her to send, in hopes of being able to procure some votes in favour of one of her children.  Emma took them to Mrs Drummond, who had kindly said she would shew it to all her Navy acquaintances.  She met Mrs Roger Western there.  As she came out, she ask’d the servant when Miss Wilson went home.  He said she came on Saturday and went back yesterday morning.  Emma call’d on Miss Workman, Miss Pyne and Miss Hellican to enquire after Mrs Slade, who is very ill.  Snow and sleet in the evening.

Wednesday 6 January 1841

Frost in the morning, but it thawed in the middle of the day and the streets were terribly muddy.  Emma went as far as Miss Pyne’s, but found the walking very disagreeable, not only from the mud, but from the slippery state of the streets.  It froze again in the evening and was severely cold, as it has been for the last fortnight.

Thursday 7 January 1841

A dry day overhead, but sadly muddy.  Emma call’d to enquire after Mr Wiltshire, desired Noble would send for the clock (which has taken into its head to strike 60 or 70 times together) and went to Miss Pyne’s.  Miss Shirley and the two little Hales call’d.  Mary came from Miss Workman to enquire after my cold.  She brought the Bath Paper.

Friday 8 January 1841

A very fine, frosty day.  Emma walk’d to Partis College to see Miss Wilson, who she found pretty well.  Soon after she returned, Miss Fanny Grevile calld and sat a long time. It was fine all day.

Saturday, 9 January 1841

A dark, heavy day, but nothing fell till the evening.  Emma went to Mr Wiltshire’s with her Certificate, which he kindly witness’d.  She also call’d at Admiral Shirley’s, who is very poorly with the gout in his hand and after dinner got some canvas for working.  Miss Workman’s Mary came to enquire after us and brought a kind message from Mrs Jones, sent by the Miss Bells.  Poor Maria! had been confined to her bed six weeks with gout!

It began to snow heavily between 8 and 9 o’clock and continued a great part of the night and froze very hard.  The river is so firmly frozen that a man walk’d across by the old bridge yesterday.  The cold has been intense, the dress’d potatoes were frozen crisp thro’ yesterday in the servants’ hall, as well as the milk and the butcher was obliged to chop and saw the meat as they do the bone and when they want to cut steaks, heat their knives red hot!!!

I heard from Miss Wood with a letter of credit for the £2.19.0 I laid out for her.  Wrote to Miss Wood.

Sunday 10 January 1841

A bright looking morning, but the snow some inches deep.  Men came about before Church time to ask if people liked to have it cleared away before their doors.  Two men came here and offered to do it for 6d!! I desired them to do it, and gave them a shilling for which they were most thankful.  The snow was so deep and slippery it was painful to see the fear of the poor horses, who could scarcely stand.  It thawed a little in the middle of the day, but froze again in the evening and night.  I Wrote to Peter Touray with Emma’s Certificate for her half year’s annuity.

Monday 11 January 1841

A hard frost.  A great many men were employ’d to clean the snow from the pavement, but it was very difficult to do, it was so hard frozen.  It began to thaw in the middle of the day and was very sloppy, but froze again at night, when the streets were like glass.  I had a note from Mrs Day to say she expected Hockey to go to her tomorrow and had intended to send the Poney Carriage to fetch her from Bath, but as the weather was so inclement, she had written to her to come in the close Caravan, as being warmer for her, but fearing she might not get her letter in time, she begged if she came to us in her way, that we would tell her so.  I really never saw any thing equal to the kind old lady’s anxiety to make every thing comfortable for Hockey.  I am sure she can never be sufficiently grateful to her.  We had a most kind note from dear Miss Allen to ask us to dine next Wednesday, but I was obliged to send an excuse, as both our colds are too bad to go out.  I sent Mrs Day’s note to Miss Chambers, in case Hockey should call there, but she neither went there or came here, so whether she came at all, I know not!!  Miss Workman sent to enquire after us.

Saturday 12 January 1841

A disagreeable day, thawing fast.  There were a great many men employ’d with carts, taking the snow from the streets, but could only take it from the surface, it was so hard frozen.  Miss Shirley call’d, but had not been here many minutes when Mrs Thornton came and Miss S went away.  Mrs T paid a long visit and was very agreeable.  It rain’d fast when she went away and I wished her to stay, but she wanted to go to a shop, from which, if the rain continued, she said she should take a Chair home.  She borrow’d an umbrella and said she would sent it back this evening or tomorrow morning, but in half an hour Major Thornton left it with a great many thanks.  Miss Pyne sent to enquire after us.  It froze again at night.  Mrs Thornton told us they saw from their windows in Camden Place a great number of boys sliding on the river!!  We saw the Death of Mrs John Appleton in the “Observer” Paper.

Camden Place, Bath 1829 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Camden Place, Bath 1829 (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Wednesday 13 January 1841

A disagreeable day.  The men came again, busy taking away the snow, but it was so hard frozen and beat together they could only remove the surface that had been loosen’d by the partial thaws.

Miss Boade sent her beautiful piece of work, the peacock and flowers intended for a skreen, for us to look at.  It is most exquisitely done and really looks more like a painting than work.  It is to be disposed of by drawing for it next week.  She has already got 42 subscribers at 5/- each.  I took a share, tho I could ill afford it and have no hope of getting it, but merely from compassion, as she is in a very distress’d state, poor thing.

Heard from Peter Touray with £14.7.6, Emma’s half year annuity.  Wrote to Peter Touray, Miss Appleton and Miss Wilson with a card of the Royal Naval Female School.

Thursday 14 January 1841

Such a very dark morning we could scarce see to breakfast at 10 o’clock without candles! and the sky appear’d loaded with snow.  It soon began to fall in sleet, which afterwards became snow for some hours and then turned to rain and sleet again.  A rapid thaw, but it froze and snow’d a good deal during the night.

I heard from Miss Armstrong with enquries after us from Mrs Scott.  We had a Portsmouth Paper of January 4th, 1840!! having had one last week Jan 2, 1841, both directed “Mrs Chapman, Bath”.  I cannot guess who they came from.

Friday 15 January 1841

A good deal of snow feel last night and peaple were busy cleaning the pavement, which was difficult to do, it had frozen so hard, but it began to thaw rapidly between ten and eleven o’clock and the sun shone out brightly. Miss Workman sent to enquire after us and sent us her Paper.  The wind blew so violently Mary said she could hardly stand and it froze again in exposed situations.  The wind was frightfully high in the night.

Saturday 16 January 1841

Dark, showery and dismal all day with very high wind, but not so cold, as the wind was westerly and alarmingly high all the evening and night.  The gusts were so violent at times they shook the house and I thought the chimneys would have been blown down.  I bathed my feet at night. I had a very kind reply to my letter to Miss Appleton, expressing a wish to hear from me again.  She says her poor sister Jemima remains in the same sad state of health she has been in for fourteen years past!!, but herself, Susan and Harriett are quite well, but does not mention her married sister Kate.  Poor Mrs Appleton was only ill three days, her complaint a “rapid congestion of the lungs occasioned by the extreme severity of the weather”!!

Sunday 17 January 1841

A very wet morning, but much milder, tho’ the wind was very rough.  We read the Service at home, both morning and evening.  The rapid thaw on the heavy fall of snow occasioned a most fearful flood this morning.  It began between three and four o’clock this morning and rose with such rapidity that the poor people in the lower parts of the city and the suburbs had difficulty in saving their lives, as many were waked by the water coming into their beds!!  The night was very dark and the crys of the unfortunate creatures for assistance and the fearful noise of the rushing waters was awful and disturbing in the extreme.  In the lower part of Southgate Street the areas and kitchens were full and it was some feet deep on the street, as it was also in Avon Street, Milk Street, Kingsmead Terrace and all those low part of the town.  The servants’ apartments at the Miss Hellicans on the North Parade were filled nearly to the ceiling and the servants were obliged to take possession of the dining rooms.  In the Dolmeads the water was above the window of the ground floor rooms.  Freeman and Ann went to see so extraordinary sight (and both Emma and I would have done the same, but our colds would not allow of our going out) and on their return they said “look where you would from the Parades, there was nothing to be seen but an immense expanse of water, with here and there the tip of a hay stack or the top of a tree”, and that “it was impossible to trace the boundary of the river.”  What struck them as very singular was the gas lamps burning brightly in the Dolmeads and those streets that were over flowed, which they did the whole day, the men not being able to get at them to put them out. I sent to enquire after Mrs Slade and the Miss Hellicans and also Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers, the former better, all the latter pretty well. I heard from P Touray with our Dividends, £48.4.7 and wrote to him of their safe arrival.  The Post must have been detained as the letters were not delivered till 2 o’clock!!!  I forgot to mention yesterday that Hockey call’d in her way from Charlton to Mrs Day’s at Hinton.  She came by the Carrier last night and slept at Miss Pyne’s, who was so kind to let her sleep with Ann.  She had a very uncomfortable journey from Charlton, the snow being very deep in the roads the other side of Wells and between their place and Bath.  Hockey is looking very well and I hope she will answer Mrs Day’s expectations. If she does, I think she will have a very comfortable and happy situation.  She dined here and was to go by the Carvan that leaves Bath at 5 o’clock for Hinton.

North Parade, Bath, 1804. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
North Parade, Bath, 1804. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

Monday 18 January 1841

A damp day, with occasional small rain, but so warm it was like Spring!!!  Such a contrast to the late intense cold.

Miss Fanny Pyne call’d looking very well.  She has been like “A fish out of water” without her brother, but expects him back the 20th.  She told us that tonight is the first Subscription or “Bread and Butter” Ball at the Rooms and she also said the flood had greatly subsided, which is a blessing to all those poor creatures who are suffering from it.

The atmosphere this evening is like Summer.  The snow last Thursday was fifteen feet deep!!! in many parts of the road between Bath and London.  The Mail and other Coaches were obliged to be dug out and roads cut thro’ the fields for them.   The floods, in consequence of the rapid thaw, have been dreadful and disruptive all over the country.  At Bath the river rose twenty feet above its usual level.

Tuesday 19 January 1841

A fine day, but colder than yesterday.  Emma call’d at Miss Pyne’s and the Miss Hellican’s.  Mrs Slade a little better.  She also took the Note for £48.8.87 to the Grocer’s to get it changed.  They gave her £8.8.7 and said they would send the £40 tomorrow.  Emma brought the “John Bull” from Miss Pyne.  It froze in the evening and all night.

Wednesday 20 January 1841

A beautiful sunshine day, but very cold.

Mr Bradly brought the £40 in change for the Note Emma left with him yesterday.  Emma call’d at Miss Pyne’s, Mrs Pierrepont’s, Miss Webb’s, Miss Grevile’s, Miss Workman’s and Mr Horton’s to enquire after him.  He remains much in the same state.  She also went to see the old Clerk at St. John’s, who is much better.  While she was out, Miss Drewett and Miss Allen call’d. The former said she had met Emma at Miss Workman’s, who had ask’d her to tea tomorrow and us to meet her, but I told her I could not venture out while this cold weather continued, independent of which Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey had sent word they would come to us tomorrow evening if we were disengaged. Dear Miss Allen sat some time after Miss Drewett went away.  She told me of the death of poor! Miss Harrison, after only three day’s illness, occasioned by the intense severity of the weather.  I was very much shocked to hear of her death.  It was so sudden and unexpected.  Mrs Pierrepont did not mention it to Emma!!!  Freeman’s brother came to take directions for making an “Ease and Comfort”, Emma being about to work a cover for it for Dr Quarnier.  I sent Ann with a shilling to poor Mrs Osborne.  I wrote to Miss Armstrong.

Thursday 21 January 1841

A beautiful bright day, but frosty and cold.  Emma call’d at Miss Workmans’ and Miss Pyne’s.  I heard from Miss Wood to beg I would get her a pair of Gilt handles and two buttons for a pair of her patchwork skreens.  Emma went to Dalaway’s to desire them to send some handles for me to see, which they did and I chose a pair at 1/6d.  The buttons she could not get so long as the pattern Miss Wood wishd, but we chose two very pretty ones at 0/4d each. Miss Harvey and Miss Wilson spent the evening with us.  We play’d at Cassino and they went home in a Fly at half past nine o’clock.

I heard from Miss Wood.

Miss Webb call’d yesterday and read us a letter from dear Georgina Chamier. They have not fix’d any time for coming back, “She is so happy she dreads the time for leaving London.”

Friday 22 January 1841

A fine looking morning, but every body said it was not pleasant out.  Emma call’d at Miss Workman’s and Miss Pyne’s.  I was busy writing to Miss Wood and securing (as far as I was able) her screen handles to go by the Post, to which Ann took them and paid 6d for the Postage.  Miss Shirley call’d, unfortunately just as dinner was put on the table, so she did not sit down.  Freeman’s brother sent the “Ease and Comfort” this morning, very nicely made.It began to rain about five o’clock and continued all the evening and poured during the night.

I wrote to Miss Wood.

Saturday 23 January 1841

A very bright looking day with chearful sunshine and dry pavement, but apparently very cold.  Mrs Woodespoon came before our breakfast to ask where Miss F Pyne lodged in Charles Street, as she had been to see her lodgings for a friend of hers and Mrs W could not give an answer till she heard from a gentleman and lad, who were about them.  They had sent her word they should not take them and she wished to let Miss F P know they were at liberty, but could not find her.  Emma gave her the information she wanted.

While Freeman was in the act of taking the breakfast things away, Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She was in such a hurry and, as usual, had so much to do, that she did not stay long.  I did not see her, as I was not up when she came.

To my surprise, Mrs Drummond call’d.  It is quite an age since she favor’d us with a visit.  I suppose she wished to know if I had heard from Mrs Quarrer, which she has not.  She was agreeable as usual and made a long visit, which I think was one of convenience, as she was to meet a lady at Simm’s at two o’clock and fancied it would be more snug and warm sitting here than in his shop!  Soon after she left us, Miss Sarah Grevile came in.  Our dinner was just put on the table, but Freeman took it down and put it in the oven (which is quite a little treasure) till she went away, which she did not do, till past four o’clock.  Mary came in the evening for Miss Workman’s Paper for those tiresome Miss Bells to send to Oldbury.  I wish with all my heart they were gone back to London, for they are always interfering about the Paper in some way or other.

Sunday 24 January 1841

A bright sunshine morning.  Emma went to St. John’s.  She had scarcely got there before it clouded over and it hailed very thickly. so as to make the ground quite white.  After a short time it turned to snow for about half an hour, when the sun came out again very brightly, melted the hail and snow and it continued very fine the rest of the day.  The wind was brisk and soon dried the streets and in the afternoon it froze again very hard and was very cold.  Emma call’d on Miss Workman in her way home from Church and found her very well.  I read the Service in the morning and we read it together in the evening.

Monday 25 January 1841

A beautiful bright day, but extremely cold.  I went out for the first time since New Year’s day.  We went to look at poor Miss Shute’s house and furniture, the latter is to be sold tomorrow.  The house is very small, but very pretty and convenient and the furniture excellent.  There are two or three things I should like very much to have.  In our way back we call’d on Mrs Hardcastle, who was complaining of a pain in her face.  Just as we were coming away, Miss Ravenshaw came in, but we did not sit down again.  We then call’d on Mrs Kiplin, who received us very kindly.  There was a very agreeable lady there, who I suppose is on a visit to Mrs Kiplin, as she appears quite at home and was very obliging in shewing us her work, which was a very pretty foot stool  in a shade of blue and drab, but was more like embroidery than worsted work.   Miss Shirley call’d and staid till five o’clock.  Miss Workman sent Mary to enquire after us in the evening.  As we were going up Brock Street we met the three Miss Greviles, who were going to take their walk and as we were returning we met Miss Hill and Mrs Hudson, who were going up to Miss Shute’s and in Milsom Street we met Mrs Smith, who said it was the first time she had been out for seven weeks!  She look’d very ill and is sadly altered.  Emma call’d on Miss Pyne, who was not very well today.  We were to have drank tea with her, but she did not feel equal to receiving us this evening.  As it happened, it was fortunate we did not go, as it turned out wet in the evening. Mrs Harrison’s lodgers went away.

Milsom Street, Bath in 1828. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Milsom Street, Bath in 1828.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Tuesday 26 January 1841

Not a pleasant looking day.  Miss Hill call’d in her way to Mrs Pierrepont’s, who had kindly allow’d Miss Bode to have the Subscription to her beautiful piece of work, the “Peacock” assembled at her house to “draw” for it.  Miss Hill said she would call in her way home to tell us who got it, but she did not.  Miss Shirley call’d and sat till near five o’clock.  Miss Pyne sent in the morning to say she was better, but not well enough to enjoy our society in the evening.  I had no intention of going and it proved wet, as last night.  I wrote a note to Mr Gore to beg to have his account.  The account of the floods in the neighbourhood of London and Salisbury are quite appalling!!

Wednesday 27 January 1841

A beautiful looking day and much milder than it has been for some time.  Emma call’d on Miss Pyne and Miss Workman, the former still poorly, the latter pretty well.  She also took back the Bath Paper Mrs Kipling kindly lent us on Monday.  Dear Miss Allen call’d and was as kind as usual.  Miss Chambers came to ask Emma to go with her to Mrs Wooderspoon’s about the lodgings for Mrs Stuckey, who has agreed to take one of the Drawing Room apartments for a month certain, at 3 guineas and a half a week.  While Emma was gone, Mr Gore sent his account £6.10.0, the 10/- was for Ann.  As soon as Emma returnd, she took the Bank Post Bill I received from Mr Touray to Butcher the Grocer and got the change, £14.7.6 and I enclosed seven pounds in an envelope and she left it at Mr Gore’s.  I heard from Mr Touray with the Powers of Attorney to enable him to sell out £900 of Emma’s Stock and £1,350 of mine to sink into a Joint Annuity.

Thursday 28 January 1841

A very fine day.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s, who was better, but still not comfortable.  Kate Pyne has been in Bath ever since Saturday last, but has not call’d here!!  I do not know why and it does not signify .  She is with her sister Fanny in Charles Street, but that will not last long. Mary, instead of coming here with Kate, which was their original intention, is going to Clifton for a month.  They are the oddest people I ever met with.  They have given up the plan of coming to live at Bath altogether, for which I am very glad and are going to remove from Kingdon to their brother’s house at Charlton, which I fear will be a great annoyance to dear Miss Pyne, as their disagreements and oddities keep her in a constant state of agitation when they are near her.

I wrote a long letter to Miss Appleton.  I had a very friendly note of acknowledgement from Mr Gore for the seven pounds I sent him yesterday.

Friday 29 January 1841

A thick fog in the morning, but the sun dispersed it between eleven and twelve o’clock.  Emma went to Admiral Shirley’s to ask him to witness the Powers of Attorney for us, but he was in bed with the gout again.  She then went to Mr Evans’s.  He was not at home, but she saw Mrs Evans, who said she did not expect him till six o’clock, but would let us know at what tine he would call tomorrow, which she was sure he would do with pleasure.  Emma afterwards went to Miss Pyne, who is still very poorly and Miss Allen’s.  She found only Miss Janetta at home, whose cold is better.  Miss Barry and young Sam Delprat call’d but did not make a long visit, as she did not like to keep the horses at the door.  It began to rain just as they went away and continued all the evening.  Miss Workman sent us the Paper, but Mary was in such a hurry she could not stay to come up.  I had a parcel from Mrs Keen with one in it for Dr Laneworthy, some Penny Magazines and a shawl, and imitation in cotton of the Chenille ones, as a present to me.  It is very kind of her, but I had rather she had not sent it, as I have plenty.

As we were sitting in the evening, Miss Hare stopd in her Chair in her way to the Harmonic at the Rooms to leave us “Nicholas Nickleby” and three numbers of “Master Humphrey’s Clock”.  It was really very kind of her.  I heard from Mrs Keen.

Saturday 30 January 1841

A very wet day.  It rained without intermission the whole of it.  I had a kind note from Mr Evans to say he would be here at 12 o’clock to sign our Powers of Attorney.  I sent to beg, when Mr Vezey came to the shop, he would be so kind to witness them, but Mr Evans was gone before he arrived and it was of no consequence, as Mr Evans said we could ourselves witness each other’s, which I was not aware of.  Mr Evans was all kindness while he was here.  Mrs Pierrepont calld but Freeman told her we were engaged, so she did not come up. Dear Miss Allen, with her usual kindness and consideration, sent us a nice piece of griskin from a pig fatted at their own farm.

I wrote a long letter to Mrs Keen and also one to Peter Touray, enclosing the two Powers of Attorney, but as there is no Post to London today, I shall not send it to the office till tomorrow now.

Sunday 31 January 1841

A very wet day throughout.  Emma worked.  I read the morning and evening Service at home.  The wind rose in the evening and the rain turned to snow, which only laid on the leads and tiles about an inch deep.  I recollected, after I had sent my letter to Mr Touray,enclosing our two Powers of Attorney for selling out $1,250, I had quite forgotten to beg he would acknowledge the receipt of them by return of Post, so I wrote a few lines to beg him to do so and Freeman took them to the Office in her way to Church, Ann having taken the enclosed Powers to the Post in the morning.

Mrs Scott sent us the Times and Harry his New Zealand Journal.

Fashion plate for February 1841 from Godey's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for February 1841 from Godey’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Monday, 1 February

A dry, cold day with now and then a few flakes of snow, and in the afternoon bright sunshine for a short time.  Emma went to see Miss Pyne and Miss Workman. The former she found very poorly and Miss Chambers very uncomfortable about her.  Mr Kitson said she had a good deal of fever and inflammation about her, but there was not any thing to be alarmed about.  Miss Workman was very comfortable.  There was a little snow again in the evening.

Tuesday, 2 February 1841

A fine sunshine day, but very cold.  There was a great bustle in the street from half past 8 to 10 o’clock from carriages and peaple going to the Jayite Breakfast at the Rooms in commemoration of Mr Jay having completed the 50 years! of his Ministry at his Chapel in Argyle Street.  His congregation and others of his persuasion have made a Subscription to present to him after the breakfast this morning and in the evening the younger part of his followers give him a beautiful pair of stone pillars surmounted with lamps, as an ornament for his Chapel and the children gave him a beautiful embroidered bag (which was requested to be kept as an Heirloom in his family) to hold the Silver Medal which had been previously given him.  I had a note from Miss Chambers to say she had got a ticket for the Chapel in the evening and her Aunt was very anxious she should go to see the presentation, but she could not think of leaving her, except Emma would come and spend the day with them and that the earlier she came the more agreeable, and Miss Pyne insisted on sending her home in a Chair at night.  So Emma took her work and went to them at one o’clock.  Captain Pyne and his sister Kate call’d and sat some time.  Kate’s greeting was all warmth and Captain Pyne was very friendly.  Emma came home about ten o’clock in a Wheel Chair, Miss Chambers, having returned from Mr Jay’s Chapel at eight, very much gratified and where she had heard some very good speeches and beautiful music. The meeting was not over till ten o’clock, about which time it began to snow and fell about an inch deep.

(crossed out:  I heard from Peter Touray to acknowledge the receipt of the powers of attorney and also from dear Lady Cooper, with a kind present of 20 pounds, but her note enclosing the draft was quite unintelligible.  Emma took Lady Cooper’s d….)

William Jay by William Day Sr, published by Rowney & Forster, after William Henry Hutchisson, lithograph, circa 1819-1824 (National Portrait Gallery).
William Jay by William Day Sr, published by Rowney & Forster, after William Henry Hutchisson, lithograph, circa 1819-1824 (National Portrait Gallery).

Wednesday 3 February 1841

A very bright, sunshine day, but most intensely cold, the frost covering the inside of our windows.  Emma went to enquire after Miss Pyne and found her better.  In her way she took Lady Cooper’s Draft for £20 to Mr Tugwell’s and got the change and also got the three pounds, for Miss Wood’s Irish Draft at Butcher’s, where they told her that the cold last night was more severe that it had been this Winter, as the ink froze! in their shop, which it had not done before.  She took Miss Pyne half a dozen sponge biscuits from Forts, as she complained what Ann got for her were not good.  Fort provided the breakfast at the Rooms yesterday and he told Emma there were eight hundred and fifty peaple at it!!! and they had applications for some hundred tickets, but they had not accommodation for more.  The purse presented to Mr Jay contained £650!  After dinner Emma went to Miss Workman’s and sat with her till five o’clock.

I heard from Peter Touray to acknowledge the receipt of the Powers of Attorney and also from dear Lady Cooper, who most kindly sent us £20.  I wrote to thank her.  Emma calld at the Miss Hellican’s’ and saw them all, Mrs Slade in the Drawing room much better.  There was a slight shower of snow at night and the frost was so thick on the windows I could not see thro’ them.

Thursday 4 February 1841

A heavy looking day with a very snowy appearance.  There were a few flakes fell now and then and the cold was intense.  Miss Fanny Grevile, Miss Wilson and Miss Helen Wiltshire call’d and were all very agreeable.  Miss Wilson had heard from her sister, who told her poor Mrs Cole! had lost her youngest daughter and that the Quarniers, who were very well, had been in Portsmouth to assist in the arrangement of her funeral, which is to take place at ? , in which Parish Dunannie is situated and that they had returnd to Dunannie.  The Quarniers have come into possession of  “Little Green”, the term for which the Dr let it having expired and they mean to take the best part of the furniture from the house in Portsmouth there, which looks as if Eliza had gained the point she had set her heart on, the Dr giving up residence in Portsmouth.  Emma was putting on her cloak to go to Miss Pyne’s when Ann came from her to ask for us and to beg she would not go down, it was so very cold.  Ann said the wind cut so sharp it felt as if it would take the skin off her face.  Miss Pyne felt very comfortable today and Mr Kitson said she might eat whatever she liked.  She was very much pleased with Fort’s sponge cakes.  I wished very much to see poor Cryer, and Britton very kindly found where he lived and sent him here.  Poor Creature!  He was very thankful for the shilling I gave him, as he said he was almost starved!  We told him to come again next week.  I had some cawdle made for poor old Hawkins and took it to her in the evening.  There was a slight shower of snow at eleven o’clock.

Friday 5 February 1841

A very cold dry day, with a strong Easterly wind, which appeard cutting.  Emma call’d on Miss Workman and Miss Pyne, the former pretty well, the latter so much better that she was quite comfortable.  She also call’d at Mrs Partis’s door, as she has been very ill, but is better, and then went on to Miss Hill’s, who was very well, but complained she could not keep herself warm, tho she had a very good fire.  She gave Emma two or three soup tickets and 1 coal ticket for the poor.  Mrs Hudson was very poorly.   I had one of the most affectionate letters that ever was penned, from dear Mrs Vassall of Devonshire, a transcript of her affectionate, warm heart.  She tells me that her eldest brother Bert married two years ago his great niece’s (Miss Rae’s Governess) to their astonishment and disapproval and that he is living at Hillingdon in a very pretty place left him by his Uncle.  I am sure the family must be vex’d at his marrying so imprudently in point of age, for I imagine the lady is young enough to be his daughter, besides which she may have influence enough to induce him to give her all his property, which I have always understood is very good, and that will be a sad disappointment to his family.  I never expected to hear of his marrying, as I always set him down as a confirmed old bachelor!  Miss Hough call’d and sat till near five o’clock.

Saturday 6 February 1841

The cold quite as severe as yesterday and the day very gloomy, with the wind frightfully high as it was all last night.  Emma call’d on the Miss Greviles and took them some more of the mixture for their chilblains.  She also went to Miss Pyne (who is pretty well again) and to Mrs Palmer’s to ask if she would allow poor Cryer to go there to eat his soup, for which Miss Hill gave us the tickets, as if he takes it home, his infamous wife will most probably throw it in his face or, at all events, not let him have a drop of it.  She very kindly said he might.

While Emma was out, Mrs Pierrepont call’d, but did not stay minutes.  She said the cold was too severe to go from warm rooms to the open air and she really lookd purple with cold, tho’ she was as much wrapped up as possible.  She ask’d us to go to her on Monday, but I declined while this inclement weather continues.  She expects the Uniacks on Tuesday, but not to stay with her.  The former are coming to lodgings for two months.  Mrs Woodespoon’s daughter came to ask if Mrs Stuckey would come to their lodgings on Monday and whether they were to make fires.  I said I could not tell, but Emma would ask Miss Pyne and let them know.

There was a slight shower of snow before we went to bed and the wind “blowing great guns” from the East, cutting like a knife.  I heard from Mrs Quarnier to tell me poor Mrs Cole’s daughter died a few days ago and enclosing two letters, one from her sister before her death to Mrs Q, the other (a most elegant one) from Mr Williams, the medical man who attended her, to Dr Q after her death!

Sunday 7 February 1841

The wind still blowing violently from the East, with every appearance of snow, so much so that Emma took her umbrella to St. John’s in the morning.  I read Prayers at home.  In her way home she call’d at Miss Workman’s, who told her “She had not an ache or pain to complain of.”  What a blessing!  We read Prayers together in the afternoon, for the cold was too intense for Emma to go to Church again.  In her way there in the morning, she met Miss Chambers and told her Mrs Woodespoon wished to know when Mrs Stuckey was coming, that she might have fires made and every thing comfortable for her.  Miss C said she would call there and tell her all she knew.  I had sent Ann, before she went to Church, to tell Mrs Woodespoon she had better go to Miss Chambers and make the enquiries of her.

We have been sadly incommoded by smoke in the Drawing Room for four or five days past owing, I imagine, to the violence of the wind from the East, as we never had it so before.  When Freeman came home between eight and nine o’clock, she said there had been a little snow, which had turned to rain and froze as it fell and that the streets were like glass!

Monday 8 February 1841

Quite a white world this morning, the snow having fallen about two inches deep during the night.  The wind has abated, but not the cold, as that is still intense.  There have been very few peaple or Carriages passing on the streets.  Fortunately for us, our annoying smoke has vanish’d with the wind.  We have not had any today.  Miss Shirley calld and staid till near five o’clock.

Tuesday 9 February 1841

The snow still remaining on the house tops and in the streets.  Emma was preparing to go to Miss Pyne’s, when Ann came from her with the John Bull News Paper. She said her Mistress was much better and felt very comfortable and that Miss Chambers was pretty well, so Emma did not go out, as it began to thaw and was sloppy in some places, but the thaw did not continue long, as it froze again in the evening. We had a News Paper from Mrs Scott.

Wednesday 10 February 1841

The houses still white with snow, but it was thawing, tho’ very gradually and the cold as severe as when it was freezing.  Emma call’d at Miss Pyne’s and the Miss Hellicans’.  Mrs Slade was not quite so well as she had been, but was in the Drawing Room.  Miss Hare, with her usual kindness, lent us the last number of “Master Humphrey’s Clock” and also some very pretty patterns of bunches of flowers for worsted work, which she kindly said Miss Wilson might have, if she liked either of them, for the back of her chair.  Emma went to Dunn’s wife with Miss Hill’s coal ticket, knowing she had many poor people lodging in her houses.  She said she had a poor widow, who would be most thankful for it, so Emma left the ticket and the 3d that must be paid for the coals with her for the poor woman.  The thaw continued and it rained slightly all the evening.  I had a long letter from Miss Appleton, with an account of all the family.

Thursday 11 February 1841

The snow has all disappeared and so gradually that I hope there will be no flood, tho’ it has rained the whole day without intermission, sometimes very fast.  To our surprise, Miss Webb call’d, for I should have thought no one would have gone out that could have staid at home!  She had heard from dear Georgina Chamier, who says there is no time fixed for their returning to Bath and she dreads the thought of it, as she is the happiest of the happy when she is surrounded by relations, who are all desirous she should remain near them.  Miss W intended to bring her letter to read to us (which she desired her to do), but by mistake brought another.  She said, however, she would bring it another day.  She was detained here a long time by the rain, which fell very heavily after she came in and went away at last in the midst of it, as there was no appearance of its ceasing.  Mary came for Miss Workman’s last week’s Bath Paper, for those tiresome Miss Bells to send to London.  I wish they had sent themselves with it.  To night it is the Master of Ceremonies Winter Ball, which I daresay will be a good one.  Miss Webb had a ticket, but was not going.  I wrote a note to Miss Wilson to beg Mr and Mrs Harvey to come into chuse from Miss Horne’s pretty patterns and take their tea with us as soon as agreeable.  I sent some cawdle to the poor old Clerk who I am afraid is declining fast.

Assembly Rooms, Bath, mid nineteenth-century Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Assembly Rooms, Bath, mid nineteenth-century
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Friday 12 February 1841

A beautiful bright sunshine day and everybody said quite mild and warm out, a great change and contrast to the late severe cold.  Emma call’d on the Miss Pynes, their Aunt, Miss Workman and the Miss Helicans.  She saw Kate Pyne (Fanny was not at home) who says she is much better from drinking the Waters.  The Helicans all pretty well, except Mrs Jane, and she was only poorly, nothing serious.  Miss Pyne, Miss Chambers and Miss Workman very well.  Just before our dinner (luckily) Mrs Kiplin and her agreeable visitor (who I think she call’d Miss Burt) call’d.  They were both very pleasant.  The latter is going home next week, after a visit of three months, having been detained some time by the severity of the weather.  The streets dried nicely in the middle of the day, but towards evening became very wet again, tho’ no rain fell.  I sent old Hawkins some cawdle.  She is very poorly.

Saturday 13 February 1841

It rained with intermission the whole day.  We did not see any body, nor did Emma go out.

Sunday 14 February 1841

It was fair in the morning, tho the streets were very wet.  Emma set out to go to St. John’s, but it began to rain before she got halfway down the street and she returned.  The rain continued more or less the whole day and about three o’clock it poured, with a good deal of hail.  The water ran with such force down the street that it carried all the mud with it and left the street quite clean.  We read the morning and evening Services.  I had a note from Miss Wilson in the evening to say she and Miss Harvey would take their tea with us tomorrow.  Mrs Scott sent us The Times Paper.  I sent to enquire after Mrs Stuckey and Miss Parsons, who arrived at Woodespoon’s lodging last evening, both very well.

Monday 15 February 1841

A heavy rain the whole day.  To our surprise, just as we were sitting down to breakfast, Mrs Pierrepont came in.  She had been to Market, this beautiful morning, and call’d in her way home.  I wonder she was not wet through.  I hardly think Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey will come this evening, the weather is so bad, tho very mild, which it has been ever since Friday.  The Misses Wilson and Harvey did not come.

Tuesday 16 February 1841

A very dark morning, but it did not rain till about 12 o’clock, from which time it continued the rest of the day.  Miss Wilson call’d between four and five o’clock.  I was very much surprised to see her in such weather, but she said she was obliged to come in for something she wanted and when she and another of the ladies of the College set out, it did not rain.  She walkd in and had so many commissions to do for others, she was quite tired and exhausted.  She had a glass of wine and a bit of bread and butter, which refreshed her.  She could not stay more than half an hour, as she was going back in a Fly with three other ladies and could not make them wait.  She was delighted with the patterns Miss Hare had the kindness to lend us and made choise of a beautiful bunch of flowers for the back of her chair, which she has promised to take great care of.  We did not have dear Henry’s Observer Paper this morning, which is very unusual, as I have not heard from him for a very long time.  Both circumstances combined make me fearful he is not well.  I therefore wrote to him to make enquries.  Miss Pyne kindly sent us the John Bull Paper.  She and Miss Chambers are both very well.  Mrs Harrison let her lodgings again and I believe to Mrs Denshire.

Wednesday 17 February 1841

A dry day.  Emma got some canvas and wools to work some little holders as a present to Miss Hare for her bazaar.  She call’d on Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers returned here with her to ask us to spend tomorrow or Friday evening with them.  Miss Shirley also call’d. The Admiral was not very well.  She laughed and said she told him she knew he had over eaten himself at Captain Barlow’s supper the evening before.  Emma call’d after dinner on Miss Workman, who was complaining, but was going to take her usual remedy tonight and will no doubt be better tomorrow.

Dear Henry’s Observer came today.

I wrote to Eliza Quarrier.

Thursday 18 February 1841

A fine and mild day.  I went out for the first day since the 25th of January.  Call’d at Miss Workman’s, who was pretty well and very glad to see me, at the Miss  Pyne’s, who received us with great kindness.  We then went to Dr Davis’s, where we were equally well received by Mrs Davis and her niece (the Dr was not at home).  We then went to the Miss Allens, who were also out.  Met Captain Pyne in the street, who was very friendly.  We also met Mrs Pierrepont and her son, the former evidently saw us, but did not chuse to do so, so we pass’d without notice on either side.  We were engaged to drink tea with Miss Pyne this evening or tomorrow.  I wrote a note to Miss Chambers to ask which it should be.  She was not at home, but Miss Pyne sent her love and said she should be glad to see us this evening.  It was quite dry and very mild when we went down.  We found Miss Pyne very comfortable.  She had been out in a Chair for the first time for many weeks and it appeard to have been of service to her.  We spent a very chearful evening, but as it had rained between the time of our going and returning, the streets were wet and some of them muddy, but not sufficiently so to prevent our walking home, as it did not rain and was quite warm!!  I heard from dear Henry and Miss Wood.

Tuesday 19 February 1841

A very fine day.  Miss Chambers call’d early for Emma to go to Hornby’s, Rigby’s and the Stay Makers with her.  Emma got a very pretty cap at Rigby for 3/10d and a halfpenny!! and told them to send some for me to see.  Miss Chambers bought a cap like Emma’s and a great many things at Hornby’s.  Mr Tucker returned from London yesterday, with an immense quantity of immensely cheap things, amongst others, lace collars work’d, only a penny halfpenny each!!!  Emma said they had got a great quantity of black lace, very great bargains, so after dinner we call’d at Mrs Stuckey’s, who was not at home and then went down to Hornby’s, but they had sold all their broad ones but two and there was not enough of either of them for a cloak.  Mr Thomas had told Emma that they had got a beautiful black sateen, very cheap and so it was, but it was not good enough, in my opinion, for a dress.  He said they had not unpack’d a quarter of their goods from London, but on Monday he thought he could shew me a much better one and he sent up in the evening to say they should have more black lace on Monday.  Mrs Gore calld while we were at dinner, so we did not see her.  Miss Sarah Grevile also calld and sat some time.  I began to make one of the little patchwork screens.

Collar made of Honiton bobbin lace, c.1830s (V&A).
Collar made of Honiton bobbin lace, c.1830s (V&A).

Saturday 20 February 1841

A very wet morning, but it turned out a very fine afternoon with a bright sun.  A very civil young person came from Rigby’s with the caps for me to see.  I bought one like Emma’s at 3/10d halfpenny and another at 2/6d.  Betsy West send in a sparerib of pork that she bespoke for us at Corston.  I wish it had come yesterday, and then we should not have had any roasting beef till next week, which would have been more convenient.  No one call’d and we neither of us went out.  I workd all day on my screen.

Sunday 21 February 1841

A very fine, bright day, but colder than it has been for some days past, as it was a white frost.  I persuaded Emma not to go to Church, as she has had the tooth ache for some days and I was afraid she would encrease it.  We read the two Services at home.

Monday 22 February 1841

A beautiful, bright day, but still a white frost.  I had a note from Miss Chambers before I was up, to tell us they had just heard of the death of General Michell (Miss Pyne’s nephew). He died in Syria, the 26th of last month.   [Brigadier General Edward Thomas Michell died on 24 January, 1841 at Jaffa.]  Poor Mrs Stuckey is greatly distress’d, as he was her favourite brother. Miss Chambers sent to ask if Emma would oblige her by spending the day with her Aunt, as Fanny Pyne wished her to go to Wells with her to see her sister Mary and she could not go, except Emma would supply her place with her Aunt, who would not have any one else, as “No other human being suited her so well.”  I sent word Emma would be with them as soon as possible.  She hurried over her breakfast and was at Miss Pyne’s a little past ten, very soon after Miss Chambers and Fanny had set off.  I was getting ready to go to Hornby’s, when Mr Thomas sent to beg I would come, as he had got the black lace for me to see.  I went there immediately.  There was only one peice I liked and that was 6/9d a yard, which was certainly very cheap, but on unfolding it to measure off the 12 yards I wanted, I found there were three joins in it, so I objected to taking it.  Mr Thomas  went with it to Mr Tucker, who said if I liked to take the remnant (16 yards as it was), I should have it at 6/6d.  I agreed to have it, as I do not think I could get so good a one for the money any where else.  I also bought a beautiful black satin, 15 yards at 5/11d.  Both the lace and the satin are for Emma.  I ordered some salt fish at Coles for Wednesday and then went to Miss Workman’s, who I found tolerably well and in very good spirits.  In my way home I call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  Miss Shirley was not at home and as the Admiral had a visitor with him, I did not go in.  When I came home I found to my great disappointment that the dear Miss Allens had call’d while I was out.  Soon after I returned Mrs Davis and her two nieces call’d.  The former was extremely pleasant and agreeable, as I have always found her and I daresay her nieces would be so, for there is a great deal of warmth and friendliness in their manner of shaking hands, but they never speak where their Aunt is, except she addresses them.  They are remarkably plain girls and and so vulgarly and badly dress’d that it makes them look worse.  Miss Pyne’s Ann walk’d home with Emma a little past ten o’clock.  I sent to enquire after Mrs Stuckey.

© Jeru09 on Flickr
© Jeru09 on Flickr

Tuesday 23 February 1841

A very fine day.  Miss Chambers call’d early for Emma to go shopping with her to buy mourning.  Just as we had dined Mrs Waring from Lyme paid us a visit.   She is looking remarkably well and was very fashionably dress’d.  She returns to Lyme Thursday and offered to convey any parcel or letters for us.  Admiral and Miss Buckle also call’d and sat some time.  They were both as pleasing and obliging as usual.  I bought two bonnet shapes for Freeman to cover for us, 1/6d each.  I work’d on my screen, but had not much time for it.  Emma met Miss Webb, who said she had heard again from Georgina Chamier and was going to call with her letter, but as she had seen her, she would put off her visit till tomorrow.  The Char woman brought the 15 shillings I lent her a few days ago.

Ash Wednesday 24 February 1841

So thick a fog early in the morning that the houses opposite were scarcely distinguishable and when that had dispersed it was so dark I could hardly see to make the breakfast and stirred up the fire to gain a little additional light.  It began to rain before ten and eleven o’clock and soon became lighter.  Poor Emma had one of her bad headaches.  She got up but was obliged to lay down on the bed again, where she remained till tea time, when she left the bed for the sopha.  I wrote a note to Miss Drewett to say it was not in our power to go to her tomorrow evening, as I was not yet equal to going out at night.  Very soon after Ann returned from taking it to Miss D, comes a most kind one from dear Miss Allen to ask!! me and my sister to meet her and her sister at dinner tomorrow.  I could not resist the pleasure of passing a few hours with them, (particularly as they are to be alone), so sent word we would go.  I do not know what Miss Drewett would say if she knew it.

I wrote to Mrs Keen, to go by Mrs Waring, fancying she was going to Lyme tomorrow, but when Emma returned from taking the letter to her, she told me her servant said they were going on a visit in the neighbourhood of Bristol before they returned to Lyme which, if I had known,  I should not have written by her.  Miss Pyne sent us her “John Bull” and to enquire after us.  She and Miss Chambers were very well.  I sent them The Observer.  I heard from Mrs Quarrier with a commission to send her some cucumber and leek seed  and Freeman’s brother sent the lead colour paint for me to paint the mignonette box and tin flower saucers, which I shall do tomorrow.

Thursday 25 February 1841

A dry and fine day.  Emma’s head was much better, but I persuaded her to remain in bed till it was time to dress to go to the Miss Allens.  Mrs Thornton was so kind to call again, tho’ I have not been able to return her last visit.  She staid some time and was very friendly and agreeable.  We dined with the dear Miss Allens, who were all kindness, as they always are, and spent a very chearful, pleasant evening.  We went and returned in Chairs which they, with their usual kindness, insisted on paying for.  Mrs Groynn came into the Drawing Room after dinner to thank us for having so frequently enquired after her during her long confinement from her terrible burns, which are now heal’d, but she has not the perfect use of her right hand yet and she looks pale and much thinner.  We came home at ten o’clock, when it was raining fast.  Miss Wilson sent to enquire after us.  I sent her Mrs Quarrier’s letter.

At dinner, Mock turtle soup, Harrico pheasant, sea Cale, Potatoes, delicious little greens, millet pudding and apricot puffs.  After, oranges, apples, Brandy cherries and preserve of plums.  I sent to enquire after Mrs Stuckey and Miss Parsons.

Friday 26 February 1841

A dry morning.  Emma call’d on the Miss Hellicans and Miss Pyne.  Both families were well.  She met Fanny Pyne on the street, who was very gracious.  While she was out, Miss Pyne sent to enquire after us.  Ann told me her Mistress!!! and Miss Chambers drank tea with Mrs Stuckey last night.  I was very much pleased to hear it, as it is the first time she has been out of an evening since she came to Bath.  Miss Wilson call’d.  She brought back Eliza Quarrier’s letter.  She did not stay long, as she was afraid it was going to rain, which it did, soon after she went away, but she was going home in a Chair.  She told me poor Miss Harvey! was greatly distressd at the loss of one of her nieces,, who died last week!  Emma met Miss Wilson as she was going out.  We had a parcel from Mrs Keen, who kindly sent Emma a very pretty muslin de Laine dress, (I wish she had sent me one, instead of the shawl she sent me, it would have been much more useful and acceptable), and filld up the parcel with some magazines.  She also sent 2/6d for some more pens and a Sovereign for the Subscription  to the sufferers from the flood at Shrewton, but if that subscription had closed, we were to give it to that of Bath for the poor.  On inquiring, Emma was told that so much money had been collected for the destroyd objects at Shrewton and the neighbourhood that they had quite sufficient for their relief and the books had been closed some time.  I wrote this to Mrs Keen and said I should keep the Sovereign till I heard from her again and thought so much had been given for the coal and potato charity here, that her money might be better disposed of.

Saturday 27 February 1841

A dry day, but very cold.  Emma got the cucumber (3 sorts) and leek seeds for Mrs Quarrier and a whole piece of plaiting net with a bland edge for bonnet caps for ourselves at Hornby at “three yards a penny”!!!, very nice and good.  I gave Freeman two dozen and four yards of one at the same price.

Miss Drewett call’d and paid a long visit.  She wanted us to go to her on Monday, but I declined and beggd of her to come here on Tuesday instead, which she agreed to do.  Just as she was going away, Mr Wiltshire came in.  I have not seen him for many weeks, I may say months.  He said he had been very ill, a great part of the winter.  He lookd paler than I ever saw him and walkd very feebly.  He made a long visit and was very chatty and pleasant.

Sunday 28 February 1841

A fine day, but very cold.  Emma went to St. John’s in the morning and call’d on Miss Workman in her way home, who she found pretty well.  Emma told her Miss Drewett was leaving here on Thursday evening and asked her to come and meet her.  She said she would, if she was well enough.  I read the Service at home.  Emma did not go to Church in the afternoon, so we read the evening Service together. It began to rain about seven o’clock and continued the rest of the evening.

We had dear Hal’s New Zealand Journal.

Fashion plate for March 1841 from Ladies' Cabinet. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for March 1841 from Ladies’ Cabinet.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Monday 1 March 1841

A dry morning, but it began to rain between ten and eleven o’clock and continued the rest of the day.  Mr John Wiltshire was so kind to call about getting Cryer into the “Union”, which he said he fear’d could not be done, but he would do all in his power to effect it.  I sent for Cryer, who told me he did not wish to go in now, as in consequence of the weather being milder, he had got some work at a shilling a day.  So I had to write a note to Mr J Wiltshire to beg him not to give himself any further trouble about it.  I also sent a note by Cryer to Mrs Palmer to continue his soup and bread and gave him 3/- for a pr of second hand shoes.  I gave a second coat of paint to the mignonette box and the tin flower saucers.

Tuesday 2 March 1841

A complete wet day.  No person call’d.  Miss Pyne sent us the John Bull Paper and to enquire after us.  Her face is better.  Miss Drewett and Miss Workman drank tea here.  The former very chearful and agreeable.  It is quite distressing to be any time with poor Rebecca.  Her mind gets weaker every day.  She asked the same question twenty times over this evening and she is so tenacious that if you do not particularly attend to her and pay her great attention, she is displeased.  I wrote to Mrs Quarrier and sent her the cucumber and leek seeds, in two covers, with two heads on each 4d.

We did not have dear Henry’s Paper, but I am not alarmed at it now I know that Hal, when there is any thing particular in it, detains it for a day.  Miss Pyne sent us her John Bull Paper.  An elderly lady and gentleman in a very handsome Carriage, with a man and maid servant, came to Eyre’s lodgings, the first time they have been let for 9 or ten months.

Wednesday 3 March 1841

A beautiful morning after yesterday’s rain, but cold.  Miss Chambers call’d and sat some time.  Just as she was going away, Miss F Pyne came in.  She did not stay long and only came to make enquries about netting a purse.  Before she went away, Miss Shirley call’d and staid some time.  She is going to Clifton on Saturday to stay a fortnight with the Miss Justice’s.  Emma’s teeth were not well enough for her to go out.  Had dear Henry’s Paper.  I had a note from Miss Wilson to say if Friday was fine, she and Miss Harvey would spend the evening with us.

Thursday 4 March 1841

Fine in the morning, but very wet in the evening.  Mrs Drummond call’d!! which she has not done since the 2nd of January.  She was very agreeable, as she always is and made a thousand enquiries about Eliza Quarrier’s two letters, which I answered, but did not produce the letters.  She two or three times said “It is so long since I saw you last that I thought you had given me up.”  I said “I thought she had done the same by us.”  “Oh, I have not been well and have not been out much, indeed I go out very little.”  Now I know it is just the contrary, as very few people, if any, go out so much as she does, for she is constantly engaged out.  She askd us to meet the Miss Allens this evening, but I declined.

Friday 5 March 1841

A pouring rain all day.  Of course it was not possible for Miss Wilson or Miss Harvey to come from the College.  I heard again! from Eliza Quarrier with a note enclosed for Miss Wilson.  Eliza says she wishes Emma and me to work her a seat of a chair each and she will send us the canvas for it immediately.  I do not know how we shall get though them.  She has written to Miss Wilson to the same effect. I wrote a note to Miss Wilson enclosing Eliza’s to her and Ann took it to the Post.  The wind was very high all day, frightfully so at times, particularly in the evening.

Had an invitation to a “party” for the “23” of March from Mrs Wilson Brown.

Saturday 6 March 1841

A beautiful day throughout.  Miss Hill did us the honor of a call.  While she was here, Mrs Thackery call’d and was very agreeable.  She and her husband were just returned after an absence of eight months, leaving their two hopeful daughters with their Aunt in London.  Just as Miss Hill was going, Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey came in.  They came to see if we were disengaged this evening and on finding we were, they went to execute all their commissions and return’d and took their tea with us and were very chearful.  They went to the College in a Fly at half past 9. Cryer came to ask when I should like to have the Kitchen and area whitewashd.  He is to come and do it next Tuesday.

I heard from dear Henry and wrote to him and Peter Touray.  Miss F Parsons calld.  She is looking not only well, but very handsome.

Sunday 7 March 1841

A fine day.  Emma and I read the morning and evening Service at home.

Monday 8 March 1841

A beautiful day.  Emma’s teeth were so much better that she ventured out for the first time for some days past.  She call’d on Miss Pyne and Miss Workman, the former was pretty well and the latter she met in the street in a Wheel Chair, a proof she felt well and comfortable.  Emma got some ribbon at Hornby’s for our bonnets and brought home a pattern of silk, which she thought would do to cover the eider down quilt with and it was so very cheap, I was tempted to take 15 yards and a quarter at 1/2d three farthings a yard!  While she was out, Miss Grevile and her sister Fanny call’d.  We had a great deal of laughing about their insuring their lives before they set out and taking a basket to collect their dogs and arms in that might be torn off in their journey to Bristol tomorrow by the Rail Road.  Miss Wilson sent to enquire after us.  I finished painting my mignonette boxes and tin saucers.

Mrs Scott sent us the “Times” Paper.

Emma Chapman
Emma Chapman, when elderly and blind.

Tuesday 9 March 1841

A beautiful day.  Emma went to Miss Pyne’s to see if Miss Chambers would like to walk to the College, but found that Mrs Stuckey was going to take her and Miss Pyne there in her carriage, so she returned and after we had dined she walk’d there alone.  Miss Wilson was at home, but not Miss Harvey.  While she was gone, the dear Miss Allens and Miss Webb call’d.  The two former were just as they always are, all kindness and good natured.  They told me there is going to be an Amateur performance at the Theatre, but they did not know when it would take place.  Mr Monkland, Mr Jacob Barrow and Mr Holtham are among those who are to perform.  They heard that the Play was to be Town and Country, but Miss Webb afterwards told me that it was to be a new Play written by a gentleman who lives in Weston Lane and that it was to take place on Saturday, for the benefit of Mr Stirling, the Stage Manager.

Miss Webb came to say she heard again from dear Georgina Chamier this morning and they have fixed to return on Friday next.  She had been looking for lodgings for them. Georgina writes that she has been very unwell, or they would have been here last week.

Cryer came to whitewash the premise below and is coming again tomorrow.

I heard from Peter Touray to say our Annuity business was finished by sinking £2,250.  We get £140.2 a year for our joint lives.  I wrote to him and dear Henry, enclosing the letter, Peter’s letter to me and enclosing to Peter a £5 note to pay the expenses of the Transfer.

Miss Workman sent Mary in the evening to enquire after us.  Had dear Henry’s Observer.

Wednesday 10 March 1841

A lovely day, quite Spring, and so warm.  I sat with the window up all the morning.  Miss Chambers came before I was out of my room (I being obliged to move very slowly, having a great deal of giddiness in my head, which became better in the middle of the day).  She came to ask Emma to go with her to the Bible meeting at the Rooms, as she did not like to go by herself.  Soon after they were gone, Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She said she had not seen us so long.  She came to enquire how we were going on.  She look’d very well and very smart, but did not stay long, as she is always in a hurry.  Miss Chambers and Emma returnd sooner than I expected and before the former went away, Mrs Admiral Weston call’d and sat some time.

Emma drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  I did not go, for tho my head was better, I thought it most prudent to stay at home quietly.

I had a note form Kate Pyne to excuse her spending an evening with us, as Mr Kitson wished her to change the air again, as so soon as possible and she was going to Charlton on Monday, Aunt Charlotte having most kindly lent her her house till theirs was ready.

Thursday, 11 March 1841

As fine a day as yesterday.  Miss Fanny Pyne calld and Miss Chambers came for Emma to go with her to call on the Miss Greviles, who were not at home.  They afterwards call’d on Mrs Drummond, whom they saw.  Emma also calld on Miss Workman and Admiral Shirley, both of whom were poorly.  We both drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  It is a long time since I have been there, owing to my leg, but it has appear’d better within this two or three days, which I attribute to putting it in hot water every night when I go to bed.  Fanny Pyne came to tea at her Aunt’s and we spent a very chearful evening, Miss Pyne being comfortably well and appearing to enjoy our society and Miss Chambers was in excellent spirits.  I walkd there and back.  Cryer finished the white and yellow washing and began to take up the drain in the scullery to remedy an obstruction that made it offensive.

Friday 12 March 1841

A lovely day.  We dined early and afterwards went to see Kate Pyne, having first netted up and stretched Fanny’s purse, which we took with us.  Kate was just coming in as we knock’d at the door.  She was very much pleased to see us and after sitting a short time, Mrs Stuckey, Miss Chambers and Fanny Pyne came in, the former looking very ill.  Fanny was much pleased with the finishing of her purse.  We sat about half an hour there and then went to Miss Workman’s.  She complained of headache, having had a bad night and lookd unwell, but was in very good spirits.  We sat with her till her dinner was ready and in our way home call’d at the Admiral’s and sat with him till past five.  He was better and freer from pain than he has been for this week past.  Just as Freeman was opening the door for us to go out, Mrs Drummond knocked at it.  I could not persuade her to come in, but she said she would come again in a day or two.  She walkd with us to the bottom of Milsom Street.  In our way we met Mrs Smith in her chair.  She stopd to speak to us and to enquire after the Scott’s and said she was coming to call on us, but would now defer it. Cryer found, on opening the drain, that it was completely choked up and required a great deal done to it.  He opened it in four different places and took out an immense quantity of filth, which must have been accumulating for some years, and at last succeeded in making a passage through.  It was fortunate we had the drain opened, as it was so fill’d nothing could pass and had there been two or three days of rain, the kitchen and passages would have been overflow’d.  I sent to Mr Vezey to know the state it was in, hoping he would employ poor Cryer (who had had all the horrid dirty and offensive part of the work to do) to finish it, but he would not, chusing to have the man he employs to do it, so poor Cryer was sent away in a hurry, Mr Vezey insisting that he had opend the wrong drain, but when his own man came, he convinced him it was the right one.

Saturday 13 March 1841

Quite a Summer’s day.  We call’d on Mrs Stuckey, who was looking better than she did yesterday.  We had not been there long before Mr Kitson came in, so of course we took our leave.  Miss Parson was in bed with a bad cold.  They go to Langport on Monday for a week, then spend another week here and go from here to London for a month.  From there we went to Mrs Chamier’s (who returnd from London last evening and is at present at 2 Russell Street, Mrs Taylor’s lodgings being let), found her looking very well, but dear Georgina quite the contrary.  She is very thin and pale and does not look like herself, but her manner is not at all altered, for she was all kindness and affection, as was Mrs Chamier also.  We sat with them near two hours and in our way home call’d at Mrs Drummond’s, who was not at home.

On our return, I was sorry to find that Mrs Brymer had call’d while we were out, as she is a most agreeable, pleasant person.  She left the Arch Deacon’s name, as well as her own.  Miss Workman had also calld and left her card.  She sent Mary in the evening to know how we did and to say it was very rude of us to be out when she call’d.  I sent her our love and we were sure she thought this beautiful day would tempt us out, and therefore she had call’d!  I finished trimming Emma’s blue and brown bonnet and the peaple below finished their work.  I heard from Miss Wood.  It is settled that her pupil is to come to school at Miss Aldeney’s in Camden Place, in consequence of which Miss Woods leaves Kilwaughter in June.

Sunday 14 March 1841

A very fine day.  Emma went to St. John’s twice.  I read the Service at home.  She saw Mr de Visne, who she said was looking very ill and out of spirits and I do not wonder, for they have been obliged to send their unfortunate daughter to Bailbrook!  She had become so violent and ungovernable they could no longer keep her at home!  We read the Prayers together in the evening.

Monday 15 March 1841

A beautiful day.  Emma walkd up to Mrs Turner’s, who she found but poorly.  While she was gone, Miss Hellican and Miss Hare call’d and were both very friendly.

To our great gratification, about four o’clock dear Mrs Jones and Mrs Jones Graeme came in.  They drank tea with us and staid till half past nine.  They were both looking remarkably well.  Poor Maria! is a shade better and they are in great hopes of moving her to Bath, to try the effect of the Waters.  Mrs Jones searched for lodgings but could only find one that would suit, as they must be on the ground floor and that is on the South Parade, which she is fearful will be too warm for Maria at this season of the year, but she has taken it for a week (to commence next Saturday) to try.  Mrs Jones returns to Oldbury tomorrow.

South Parade, Bath by Robert Woodruffe, 1828 (Victoria Art Gallery).
South Parade, Bath by Robert Woodruffe, 1828 (Victoria Art Gallery).

I wrote to Mrs Quarrier and sent her the kettle holder that Emma has work’d for her.

Mrs Stuckey went to Langport this morning for a week.  Emma call’d at Miss Pyne’s, who has got a bad cold.  Kate did not go with Mrs Stuckey as was intended, the latter, I believe, having declined taking her, or something like it.

Miss Hill sent to enquire after us.

Tuesday 16 March 1841

Another beautiful day, but with a cold wind.  Emma took the kettle holder she has work’d for Mrs Drummond to her.  Mrs D paid her the half crown for it.  Mrs Drummond said she was coming here with a letter she has had from Mrs Quarrier, in which she says the Dr is suffering again from the Ague, having caught cold in his journey to London.  From Mrs Drummond’s, Emma went to the Miss Hellicans’, found them all pretty well, except Mrs Slade and she is better than she was.  Miss Hare was not at home, but Emma left four of her work’d kettle holders as a present to her, for her Bazaar.  On calling at Miss Pyne’s, she found her in bed, her cold having increased.  She met Mrs Brymer there, who was extremely kind and obliging and also Captain and Fanny Pyne.  Mrs Chamier and dear Georgina call’d and sat some time, both very kind and the latter looking better than she did on Friday, but not as she did when she left Bath last year.  It rained slightly when we went to bed.

Wednesday 17 March 1841

Wet in the morning, but it ceased raining about eleven o’clock and was fine the rest of the day.  Emma went to enquire after Miss Pyne, who was better. There she heard, to her astonishment, that Fanny Pyne had set out this morning to follow Mrs Stuckey to Langport.  The latter had been anxious to take her with her, but could not prevail on her to go.  The freak took her so suddenly that she even left her cloaths about her room, for the Mistress of the house where she lodges, to put away for her.  After she left, the woman told Miss Chambers she really thought she must be mad! and I think she is not far from it.  She left poor Kate (with whom she quarell’d most violently yesterday) very unwell.  Emma also call’d on Miss Workman, who was not very well.  Miss Sarah Grevile call’d and sat some time.  Miss Workman’s Mary came here about six o’clock, to tell us that Hornby’s shop was on fire!!  She was just going into it when the gas in the window caught something near it and in an instant the contents of the window were in a blaze.  Freeman went down with her, but could not get near the shop, the crowd was so great.  Happily, the fire was soon put out.

Thursday 18 March 1841

A showery day.  No one call’d and Emma did not go out.  Mrs Scott sent us the Times News Paper.  Mary brought us Miss Workman’s Bath Paper.

Friday 19 March 1841

A showery day, but fine between.  Miss Chambers call’d early to ask Emma to go and sit with Miss Pyne while she went to buy some things for Kate Pyne.  Emma quite misunderstood the history of Fanny going to Langport, as it seemd she was engaged to meet Mrs Stuckey there, tho’ she objected to go with her.  Captain Pyne has had the opinion of Dr Watson for Kate, who agrees with Mr Kitson in thinking she is in no danger at present, but he wishes her to continue in Bath and drink the Waters and Bathe regularly for three or four months, which he thinks will restore her health, so the plan of her going to Miss Pyne’s till her brother’s house was ready is given up and I believe all idea of their going to Charlton at all, as their disagreements have tired Captain Pyne out and he now says he will not live with any of them, but take a housekeeper capable of managing every thing for him when he likes to go to the house, which he hopes now he has put it in decent repair and furnishd it, he shall be able soon to let.  Emma returnd from Miss Pyne’s at two o’clock.  Mrs Chamier and Georgina call’d and sat till very near six o’clock.  They ask’d us for tomorrow evening, if it was fine and we agreed to go.  I had a “circular” from Mr Dowding to say there was to be a meeting of Mr Hale’s creditors at his house, in the vineyards on the first of April (a very appropriate day for such a meeting) to consider the expediency of “compounding” Mr Furlong’s debt to the Estate and to beg I would attend to give my assent or dissent to the same!!

Saturday 20 March 1841

Wet in the morning, but fine (with the exception of one or two showers) the rest of the day.  Emma call’d on Miss Pyne, who was better, and on Miss Workman, who was very poorly.  No one call’d.  It was so cloudy in the evening that I sent an excuse to Mrs Chamier and it was fortunate I did, for before Ann returnd the rain pourd down and we should have been caught in it about halfway to her.  I sent to enquire after Mrs Hardcastle, who is better.  Miss Workman’s Mary came in the evening to tell us that the Jones’s had arrived and that poor Maria bore the journey better than they expected.  Miss Bowie is with them.

Every person who can get places are flocking to the Theatre to see the Play of “Money”, in which ten amateur gentlemen perform for the benefit of Mr Davidge, the Manager who has had so bad a Season he is obliged to close the Theatre two months earlier than usual.  I should very much have liked to have been present, but Alas!

Sunday 21 March 1841

Fine enough in the morning for Emma to go to St.John’s.  She call’d at Miss Pyne’s.  It began to rain soon after she came home and continued more or less the rest of the day.  I read the Prayers in the morning and we read them together in the evening.

Monday 22 March 1841

A bright looking morning, but a very high wind and frequent very heavy showers of hail and rain in the course of the day.  Miss Chambers call’d early to ask Emma to go out with her, which she did.  They took shelter once at Kate Pyne’s and during another of the showers  Emma was at the Miss Hellican’s.  She call’d at Miss Pyne’s and also at Mrs Jones’s and found Maria better than she expected and very glad to see her, as they all were, including Miss Bowie, who is with them.  Miss Hill sent to ask us to meet Mr and Mrs de Visne tomorrow evening, but I declined it.  I sent to enquire after Miss workman, who returnd her “Love and she was pretty and well.”

Tuesday 23 March 1841

A fine and dry day, but a rough wind and cold.  Miss Hill call’d to ask if I intended to go the the Meeting of Mr Haley’s Creditors.  If I did, we could go together.  I said I had no intention of going, but should get someone who did to act for me.  While she was here, Mrs Drummond calld to enquire if I had hear from Mrs Quarrier, which I had this morning, she having sent a box containing the canvas for three chair sets, some floss silks for Miss Wilson, bits of silk for Emma to make her some patchwork, some beautiful bunches of flowers cut out of old brocaded satin, to be work’d on velvet for a chair and a quantity of tinted letter paper, note, ditto of two sizes, envelopes, sealing wax and pencils, a large bottle of lavender water and one of Eau de Cologne, all the latter as a present to me, besides a large pot of orange marmalade.  She also sent a lace scarf to be washed.  I gave Mrs Drummond the canvas intended for her, with which she was not pleased, it being so fine she said it would try her eyes and I must say it is foolishly fine for the purpose.  She took her piece away with her.  She told us that poor Miss Allen had been very ill with a Quinzy sore throat and that Miss Janetta has got the influenza, which I am sincerely sorry for.  Mrs Pierrepont has also been unwell since she was here, but is better.  Mrs D was going to meet a Dinner Party there today.  Miss Hill call’d a second time.  She had been to Mr Dowding’s, relative to the meeting and had desired him to act for her as he would for himself, and very good naturedly begged him to do the same for me.   She brought a letter from him authorising him so to do, which I signed and sent back by Ann.  We were very much and agreeably surprised by a visit from dear Maria Jones.  She had been to take the Water and came here after, but could not get out of her Chair, which was drawn into the passage and I went down to speak to her.  She was looking much better than I expected to see her and was very affectionate in her manner.  It was very kind of her to call.  Miss Wilson also came in from the College, but could not stay long, as she was going back with one of the ladys in a Fly at four o’clock.  I gave her the silks and canvas, the latter of which she was not better pleased with than Mrs Drummond, both saying it was ridiculously fine and would ruin their eyes.  Emma call’d at Miss Pyne’s and Miss Workman’s, both of who were poorly.  She ordered some pills for which she paid 9d at Steele’s and some Salts and Magnesia at Stacey’s.  She met Major and Mrs Thornton when she was out.  The former had had no notice of the meeting of Mr Hale’s creditors, which is extraordinary.  He had heard of it by accident, but was determined to go to it.  Emma went to see the old Clerk, who is very poorly.  I had some Caudle made for him, for which he was thankful and his niece fetched it at 6 o’clock.  We had dear Henry’s Observer.  I wrote to Mrs Quarrier.

Wednesday 24 March 1841

A very fine day and dry the whole of it.  Emma calld at Miss Pyne’s (who was pretty well) and at Admiral Shirley’s, Mrs Pierrepont’s and at dear Miss Allens’, the two latter were better, but she did not see them.  The Admiral expects Miss Shirley from Clifton tomorrow.  Miss Chambers call’d and while she was here, to my surprise, dear Miss Janetta Allen came in who, from Mrs Drummond’s report, I imagined was confined with Influenza.  Happily she did not appear to have any thing the matter with her, as she was in her usual good spirits.  She and Miss Chambers were very sociable.  Before Emma came home, Miss Brabant and a Miss James (with whom she is staying) call’d.  Miss Brabant has grown very thin and has lost her colour.  She is not quite so die-away as she used to be and her hair has lost somewhat of it fiery tint, which is a great improvement.  She was elegantly drest and altogether looked very genteel and ladylike.  Miss James is an old friend and favourite of Mr Wiltshire’s, who both she and Miss J Allen told me had been dangerously ill with one of his attacks on his chest.  Fortunately he was taken ill in Bath and had immediate advice, otherwise the consequences might have been very serious.  He was so much recovered today as to be able to return to Shockerwick.  Mrs Evans and her dear little dog “Flora” calld.  She sat some time and was very pleasant and agreeable. Ann is very unwell again, but I hope it is only a cold.

Thursday 25 May 1841

Another very fine day, without any rain.  Emma call’d at Mr Wiltshire’s, (who she heard was better), Miss Pyne’s and Mrs Jones’s.  Miss Pyne was pretty well and Maria Jones going on very favourably, the rest of the family well.  While she was out, Mrs Drummond call’d.  She had had a letter from Mrs Quarrier to say we were to work what we liked on the chairs and might get coarser canvas if we liked, but Mrs Drummond says she shall work a bunch of flowers on the piece Eliza has sent her, so I think I shall do the same.  Mrs Chamier and Georgina call’d.  They askd us to spend tomorrow evening with them, but the dear Miss Allens had kindly sent in the morning to ask us to dine with them.  I paid Mr Vezey his quarter’s rent and spoke to him about having something done to the Drawing Room, as it is getting very dirty.  He very civilly said he would have it stencilled and painted when we went to Miss Pyne’s, should that happy event take place during the Summer.  Emma took the black lace I bought at Hornby’s some time ago, they having agreed to change it for something else, in consequence of its having so many joins in it that it is of no use, back to them, and when I am able to go out, I am to select what I want en lieu of it.  Ann is a little better than yesterday, but has been in bed all day.

Friday 26 March 1841

A fine morning.  Dear Miss Janetta Allen call’d early to give us the 2 shillings for our chair hire, which they always in the kindest manner insist on our having when we dine with them.  Major Thornton call’d and made a long visit.  He was very friendly.  We dined with the dear Miss Allens and met a very agreeable young man of the name of Austin, from whom we gained a great deal of information about the Railroad, very pleasantly given, he having been an Engineer on some part of the works.  I never saw Mr Allen so agreeable.  He was in excellent spirits and was very amusing.  The dear Miss Allens were, as usual, all affectionate kindness.  Miss Janetta was engaged to a Party, but did not go till 9 o’clock, and we came home at ten, after spending a very pleasant day.  I wrote to dear Henry.  Ann continues so unwell that I sent for Mr Gore, who tells me there is nothing to be alarmed at.  He is going to send her some strengthening medicine and he says she must live well and drink Porter or good Beer.

Friday 26 March 1841

Emma calld at Mr Wiltshire’s, who is better, at Mrs Jones’s and Miss Pynes.  The former has got a bad cold, the latter is pretty well and expects Mrs Stuckey and Miss Parsons to return to Woodespoon’s this evening.

Saturday 27 March 1841

A very fine day, but a cold wind.  I went out in consequence of the dear Miss Allens having given Emma five pounds yesterday to buy me some Port Wine, which they said they were sure would do me good, for they did not think I lookd well.  I can never be sufficiently grateful to them for the interest they take in us and the affectionate warmth with which they invariably treat us.  We call’d there to thank them, but found only dear Miss Allen at home.  We sat with her some time and then went to Miss Workman’s.  Emma went on to return Miss Brabant’s and Miss James’s visit, who she found at home.  She after joind me at Miss Workman’s, who was very well and in good spirits.  In our way home, we calld at Mrs Gore’s, Mrs Evans’s and Admiral Shirley’s, the two former were out, but we sat a short time with the Admiral, who said Georgina was gone out with the intention of calling on us.  We met Miss Hough just at our door and persuaded her to come in.  While she was here, Miss Shirley came.  She, fancying that we had dined, staid till past 5 o’clock, so that when she went we were quite ready for our dinner.

Sunday 28 March 1841

I had intended to go to Church, but it was very showery, so I read the Service at home.  Emma went to St. John’s in the morning.  She call’d at Mrs Jones’s to take Miss Bowie with her, but she had a bad headache and could not go.  Mrs Jones’s cold was very bad and Maria’s gout very troublesome and painful.  Emma did not go to Church in the afternoon, so we read the evening Service together.  Miss Chambers left a note at the door to beg Emma to go there in the evening, as she wish’d to go to Church but did not like to leave Miss Pyne alone.  Soon after she was gone, Mrs Chamier and dear Georgina call’d to ask us to dinner with them tomorrow, which I declined, but said we would go to tea, which they would not agree too. They went away protesting that they should wait dinner, and I declaring I would not go till tea time.  It was very wet in the evening and Emma returned from Miss Pyne’s in a Chair.  Mr Gore calld to see Ann and found her much better.  He did not come up stairs.

Had the New Zealand Journal.

Monday 29 March 1841

A fine morning, but turned out wet in the middle of the day and continued the rest of it.  I wrote a note to Mrs Chamier to say we could not dine with her, but would go in the evening.  She and Georgina call’d at the door soon afterwards and left word she would not let us off, so go we must.  Captain Pyne call’d to take leave.  He goes to Charlton tomorrow.  He was in very good spirits and very agreeable.  We were obliged to have Wheel Chairs to go and return from Mrs Chamier’s, where we spent a very pleasant day.  Georgina shew’d us some beautiful trinkets given her by her relations in London, a beautiful gold bracelet, set with Turquoise from Mrs Leslie, one still prettier, with an Emerald in the clasp from Mr Mackey, a beautiful brooch set with a large Topaz and small Emeralds from her uncle Gowen and a pair of earring which she has had made to match it and for which he gave her £5 (they came to 5 guineas), a very pretty ring her mother gave her (4 pearls and Emerald spark in the centre, besides a number of other pretty things, such as bags, pincushions etc.  She also shewd us many pieces of pretty work she is about.  Mrs Chamier is doing a beautiful cushion for a sopha.

Emma call’d at Mrs Brymer’s, Miss Drewett’s, Miss Hill’s, Mrs Partis’s and Mr Wiltshire, the latter much better, the former all out.

Miss Bowie call’d here and Mrs Polwhele left her Card at the door and some paper for Emma.  She has moved from Daniel Street to Northampton, for why I do not yet know.

I heard from Miss Armstrong. The rain and hail pourd in torrents when we went to bed.

Tuesday 30 March 1841

A fine looking morning, but it soon became gloomy and threatening.  Emma call’d at Mrs Jones’s, Miss Pyne’s and Miss Workman’s and Mrs Jones’s cold was still very bad and Maria very poorly.  Miss Pyne and Rebecca pretty well.  Mrs Drummond call’d.  She said she had changed the canvas for some of the Penelope sort, nearly as fine, but easier to work, and not so trying to the eyes and advised me to do the same.

Ann, who is much better, took some tea and sugar to old Hawkins.  Mrs Drummond told me that Mrs Western’s grandson was dead.  The dear Miss Allens sent us two tickets for Miss Richards’s Concert Saturday morning next.  Their kind attentions are unremitting.

Wednesday 31 March 1841

A fine morning, but blowing a perfect gale of wind.  Miss Grevile and her sister Fanny call’d just as we were going to dinner and staid a long time.  They said the wind was so rough they could hardly stand, but they did not like to let a fine day go without going out.  When they took leave Miss Grevile said “We have made you a very long visit, but we generally spend the day here when we come.”  As soon as we had dined, Emma went to thank the dear Miss Allens for the Concert tickets they so kindly sent us yesterday.  She intended to have gone to Mrs Jones and Miss Pyne, but it began to rain and she came home.  It was fortunate she did, as it continued wet the rest of the day and evening.  Miss Pyne sent the “John Bull” and to ask us for tomorrow evening, if it was fine.  I said we would go, but begg’d she would not expect us if it was wet.  I sent Ann to enquire after Admiral Western.  She said the house was not shut up and the servant said his Mistress was very well and gone out, so I hope Mrs Drummond’s intelligence of the death of young Western is not correct.  Ann also went to Mrs Chamier’s to tell dear Georgina that the best French white Brandy was to be had at Killey’s in Broad Street, at eight shillings the bottle.

Fashion plate for April 1841 from Godey's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for April 1841 from Godey’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Thursday 1 April 1841

A dry morning.  Miss Wilson brought the beautiful chair she has been working for Dr Quarrier, for us to see before she sends it away.  While she was here Major Thornton call’d to ask what time was appointed for the meeting of Mr Hales’ Creditors.  We told him 11 o’clock and as it was then half past twelve, he could not sit down, but said he would come and tell us what had pass’d.  Soon after he was gone, Miss Hill call’d and I persuaded her to stay till he returned, which she did.  When he came back, he told us there had been a general assent to Mr Furlong’s proposal of paying £600 in lieu of the £1,000 he owes, provided he would also pay the interest due.  If he agrees to this, the affairs will be wound up and a final dividend declared, which they “hoped would be 1/6d”!!! and so will end this nefarious business, the whole of the dividends being 3/6d in the pound.

Before Major Thornton and Miss Hill took leave, Miss Drewett came in.  She has been  staying at Clifton for some weeks.  It began to rain about three o’clock and continued the rest of the day and evening.  The dear Miss Allens sent us tickets for Miss Richardson’s Concert on Saturday morning.  Poor Freeman has got a very bad cold in her head, which she has had for some days.

Friday 2 April 1841

A fine day.  Emma was out almost all the morning.  She took the screens I have just finished to shew to Miss Pyne and the Jones’s, who thought them very pretty.  She call’d on the dear Miss Allens to thank them for the Concert tickets they sent us yesterday and she went to Miss Bade’s to ask what she would ask for working the two chair seats Mrs Quarrier has sent to Miss Wilson and me, as we agreed if it was not too expensive, she should work the flowers and  we would ground them, but she says she cannot do them under 15/- each and doing one only would be 18/-!!  This, I fear, will be more than Miss Wilson can afford, but to her it is not of the same consequence as it is to me, as she is very fond of the work and is in the habit of doing a great deal of it.  Miss Pyne kindly wished us to go to her this evening, but I could not go with convenience, so she beggd us to go tomorrow, if it should be fine.  Mrs Stuckey and Miss Parsons call’d in their way to Miss Pyne’s, but Mrs Stuckey felt tired and said she would sit here a while.  Fanny went to “Aunt Charlotte’s” and she could call for her as she came back,which she did.  Mrs S found herself so comfortable in the armchair that she staid nearly two hours.

I wrote a long letter to Miss Armstrong and a note to Miss Wilson about the price of working the chairs.

The dear Miss Allens sent us a delicate little loin of pork.  Freeman’s cold still bad.

Saturday 3 April 1841

A fine morning, but between ten and eleven o’clock there was as violent a shower of rain and hail as I ever saw, which lasted more than half an hour and the hail lay very thick for a considerable time afterwards.  Fortunately for us the streets cleard nicely before it was time for us to go to the Concert.  Just as we were going to put on our bonnets, Miss Wilson came in, but not in consequence of my note, as she met the Postman on the road and took it from him.  She brought back the pattern Miss Hare was so kind to lend us for her and askd us to borrow another for her to work Mrs Chamier’s chair seat.  As soon as she went away we proceeded to the Rooms and were in time to get my favourite places near the orchestra.  We heard Miss Woodyatt (who, tho’ a fine singer with a good and sweet voice is not so great a favourite of mine, as of most peaple), Mr J Parry (who was worth all the rest put together, particularly in the comic songs of “A wife wanted” in which he was inimitable and an Italian singing  lessons to a child. It was very provoking that he was not encor’d, as he would have sung “Wanted, a Governess” which is as good, I am told, as his “Wife Wanted”).  Mr Burnet, Mr B Taylor and Mr Millar, Mr Elsain on the piano (beautiful), Mr Hervey on the clarinet, Mr Cooper (who had the only encore) on the violin and Miss Richardson on the harp.  The Concert was not over till half past four.  We had a few drops of rain in our way home, but not sufficient to put up our umbrella and it was very fine the rest of the day.  Mrs Chamier and Georgina call’d to say they were going to Miss Workman to ask her to dinner on Monday and they very kindly ask’d us to meet her. They are to let us know tomorrow if she accepts the invitation.  We spent the evening very pleasantly at Miss Pyne’s.  She was in good spirits and kind as usual.  Miss Chambers, as she always is, chearful and agreeable.  It was very fine for us to walk home, a lovely bright moon and not at all cold.  I pack’d up my patchwork to send to Mrs Keen with her pens and the Sovereign she sent for the sufferers by the flood at Shrewton (but which was not required) and wrote to her in the parcel which Ann took to her uncle’s for Mr Seates to take with him to Lyme on Monday, but on our return from Miss Pyne’s, I was much disappointed to find my parcel on the table, Mr Seates having altered his mind and given up going to Lyme.  Freeman’s cold not at all better.  she thinks it is the Influenza, and I believe it is.  Mrs Hardcastle and Miss Bowie call’d while we were at the Concert.

John Orlando Parry (1810-1879) by Daniel Maclise, painted c.1840. Amgueddfa Cymru — National Museum Wales
John Orlando Parry (1810-1879) by Daniel Maclise, painted c.1840.
Amgueddfa Cymru — National Museum Wales

Sunday 4 April 1841

Fine till about six o’clock in the evening, after which it was very wet.  We went to St. John’s in the morning and read the evening Service at home. Mrs Chamier and Georgina call’d to say Miss Workman had accepted their invitation (“with avidity”) and they should expect us.  Freeman’s cold appears to be giving way.

Monday 5 April 1841

Fine all day.  Emma call’d at Mrs Jones’s, Miss Pyne’s, Miss Workman’s.  Mrs Chamier call’d at the door to beg us to bring our “fish and cucumbers” with us in case Miss Workman should like to play at Cards.  Mrs Jones Graeme and Miss Bowie came in with Emma to see the screens, which I unpackd to shew her.  Miss Shirley call’d, but I did not see her, as we were dressing to go to Mrs Chamier’s, where we spent a very pleasant day, as we always do there.  Rebecca was in very good spirits and more collected than I have seen her for some time past.  We play’d two Pools at Quadrille and she really playd very well and appear’d to enjoy it very much.  We walk’d home about eleven o’clock.  The moon was beautifully bright.   We did not see a creature the whole way, except a lady and her man servant walking home.

Fried soles, currie veal cutlets, rice, sea Cale, potatoes, ball pudding and batterd ditto.  Oranges after dinner.  There was cake and wine before we came away, but we did not take any.  Mrs Chamier moves into her lodgings in Alfred next Thursday, which will be still nearer to us than where she is at present.

Freeman’s cold better.

We had the “Times” from Mrs Scott.

Tuesday 6 April 1841

Fine all day.  Emma call’d at Miss Workman’s (who was all the better for her visit to Mrs Chamier’s yesterday), Miss Pyne’s and Miss Hare’s.  The latter was so kind to lend her some more patterns for Miss Wilson.  While she was out, Miss Bowie call’d with a message from dear Mrs Jones to ask us to dine there tomorrow.  I said to Miss Bowie “Do you think Mrs and Miss Jones are equal to receive us?  Will it not be too much fatigue for them?”  She replied “I suppose they are, or they would not have askd you”!!  Miss Wilson and Miss Harvey spent the evening with us, the latter is looking poorly, not yet having quite recovered the attack of Influenza she has had, but both she and Miss Wilson were in very good spirits and appeared very happy.  Miss Wilson selected a very pretty pattern from Miss Hare’s (a bunch of Jacobean Lilly) and took it home with her to see if it would be large enough for the seat of Mrs Quarrier’s chair. Freeman is pretty well again. The family at Eyres went away today.

Wednesday 7 April 1841

Dry till the evening.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and made a long visit for her.  Mr and Mrs Uniack are gone, but her son still continues with her. She askd if I would take a drive with her tomorrow and is to call for me at about two o’clock.  Mrs Jones very kindly stoppd at the door to say she would send the carriage to take us to dine with her today, which I was very glad of, as it saved me a long walk.  Just as we got into it, Miss Webb was passing and stopp’d to speak to us.  Dear Mrs Jones and Maria received us with their usual kindness, the latter had been out in the carriage for the first time and enjoy’d it very much.  Miss Workman dined also and we spent a very chearful, pleasant day.  Just as the fish was removing from the table, Mrs Goodford call’d.  Mrs Jones sent out word she was at dinner and begged she would come in and partake of it.  She did come in, but would not have any, as she was going back to Clifton to dinner.  She came over and was going back the Railroad.  She did not recollect me and therefore I did not make myself known to her.  She is much altered since I saw her last and was in deep mourning for her eldest sister who, she told Mrs Jones, had lately died at the great age of 90!!!, she herself being 83 and she is a surprising woman to do as she does at that age, for tho our dear friend Mrs Jones intellect is as perfect at 82 as it was at 20, her bodily strength is not so good as Mrs Goodford’s.

It turned out, unfortunately for us, a very wet evening and we were able to have Wheel Chairs home, for which they charged us two shillings.

Thursday 8 April 1841

A fine morning, but it began to rain at noon and continued till about 6 o’clock with now and then bright, but brief sunshine.  Emma could not get out all day, nor could Mrs Pierrepont take me out as she intended.  I wrote a note to dear Mrs Jones and Ann took it to her with the receipt for her cough and the News Paper she lent us yesterday, in the evening.  Poor Freeman was on the bed all day with one of her bad sick headaches.  I had a long letter from Miss Wood, who does not mean to return from Ireland via Bath, as her time will be so very short between leaving Miss Agnew and going again to Mrs Darwin, that she wishes to spend the whole of it with her mother, but says she will come and see us in the Winter, on her way home from the Darwin’s, as she does not expect to stay at Elston more than six months. Mrs Denshire left Mrs Harrison’s lodgings this evening and went to Flaherty’s.

Good Friday 9 April 1841

A very fine day throughout.  We went to St. John’s in the morning, but my leg was so painful walking home, that I was afraid to go the second time, but Emma did.  Old Mr Hughes did the Duty in the morning, so I suppose Mr de Visne is again unwell.  Mrs Jones and Maria call’d at the door, but did not come up.   Dear Mrs Jones’s cold still very bad and Freeman said she lookd very ill.  Mrs Pierrepont also calld at the door to say as the weather prevented her giving me a ride yesterday, she would take me out tomorrow, if it was fine.  Emma call’d at Miss Pyne’s (who was but poorly), Mrs Jones and Mrs Chamier’s.  She took the Bath Paper to the latter who, she says, has got delightful lodgings in Alfred Street, beautifully furnished.

St John's Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
St John’s Church, Batheaston in the mid nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

Saturday 10 April 1841

A very wet morning.  Mrs Pierrepont sent the coachman to say if the rain ceased before half past two she would call for me, but if it did not, she should not go out.   Dear Mrs Jones sent us a bit of Oldbury brawn and to enquire after us.  I had a note from Miss Hill to ask us to meet Mrs and Miss Polwhele (the latter is staying with her) at dinner on Wednesday next.  It continued wet till the evening.

Easter Sunday 11 April 1841

A fine looking morning.  Emma and I went to St. John’s, where Mrs Jones, Maria! and Miss Bowie were also.  We had Mr de Visne and so many Communicants that we were late out of Church, added to which the Jones’s delayed us so long we were caught in a shower in Union Street and it pourd so violently we were obliged to take shelter in the Corridor, where we staid near half an hour and then walkd home through a more moderate rain.  I did not get wet, thanks to my cloak, but that was very wet.  We did not go to Church a second time.

Monday 12 April 1841

A gloomy looking morning, but it turned out a beautiful day, tho’ the wind was cold.  Mrs Pierrepont sent to say she would call for me at half past 2.  Before that time we went to take leave of Mrs Stuckey, who goes to London tomorrow.  We found Miss Chambers with her and Fanny Parsons.  We had been there a very short time when a gentleman came in and we came away.  Mrs Stuckey preferred us very much to call again tomorrow, as she should not leave till 5 o’clock, intending to sleep at Chippenham.  Mrs Pierrepont took me to Miss Wilson’s, who was astonished to see me.  We sat half an hour with her and then drove round the Park two or three times and came home after spending an hour and a half very pleasantly.  While I was out, Emma call’d on the Jones’s, Miss Pyne and Miss Workman, which she ought not to have done, as she had the toothache and her face was beginning to swell.  She suffered very much all the evening, the pain being very violent and extending to her head, which was so tender she could scarcely bear to lay it on the pillow. Mrs Chamier and Georgina call’d to take some flowers out of her drawers here to trim Georgina’s dress for the Club Ball tomorrow evening.  Miss Shirley call’d.  Wrote to Miss Wood.

Tuesday 13 April 1841

A dark gloomy morning.  Poor Emma’s face and head very bad.  I went as far as Mrs Stuckey’s (only to 7 Edgar Buildings) to shake hands with her before she went.  I found a lady (who I believe was Mrs Lean) with her and Fanny Parsons.  I had not been there long before it began to rain, and I came home.  Mrs Polwhele call’d before I went out to ask it we were going to Miss Hill’s tomorrow, as she was askd to meet us, but understood if we could not go, she was not expected.  I told her I was going, but Emma was too unwell to think of it.  She would not sit down, as she was afraid of the rain coming on.  Mrs Chamier came in a great fuss, (having had a ticket given her for the Club Ball this evening) to take out a hat and dress, both of which were to be altered.  The hat she took to Madame le Hock herself and was then going to Jolly’s to get some lace to trim the dress, which was to be sent to Miss Bush to have new sleeves and other alterations.  This was between two and three o’clock!!! and raining fast.  Emma is a little better today, but still in a great deal of pain and does not intend to get up.

I heard from dear Henry to announce the birth of a fine little grandson, between 11 and 12 on Saturday night.  Its father is absent on the Northern Circuit.  I wrote to dear Henry to congratulate him.

Wednesday 14 April 1841

A wet, damp uncomfortable day.  Emma better, but not intending to get up.  While I was dressing to go to Miss Hill’s, Mrs Jones Graeme and young William Vassall and his sisters call’d.  I had said not at home to any one.  It was very unlucky they should have come just at the time I could not see them.  I went and returned in a Wheel Chair, as the walk is too long for me now, particularly by myself.  There was no one at dinner but Mrs and Miss Polwhele, myself and Miss Hill.  Miss Shirley came to tea.  She looked remarkably well and was in very good spirits and very agreeable.  We all had our work and Georgina playd some Waltzes after tea.  Mrs Polwhele’s Chair came for her at half past nine.  Miss Shirley walkd home a little before ten and Brittan came for me at ten.  We had at dinner as good a piece of salmon as I ever tasted with very good lobster sauce, a beautiful leg of lamb, veal patties, beef olives, sea cale, summer cabbage, potatoes and salad, plum pudding and a tart, Bath and other cheese, oranges, apples, French plumbs, almonds and raisins and biscuits and before we came away sandwiches and cake and whiskey cherries.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and most kindly brought us a present of a very pretty shawl each.  It is really very good of her and what we have no reason to expect from her, for she is under no obligation to us.

Thursday 15 April 1841

An April day:  heavy showers and bright sun between and a cold wind.  The Mason, who was here yesterday to repair the chimneys, came again today to finish them,  Miss Pyne sent to enquire after Emma and sent the John Bull.  After I was gone yesterday to Miss Hill’s, Mrs Chamier call’d to enquire if she had left a bunch of keys here Tuesday as, if not, she was afraid she had dropped them in the street, as she could not find them and was very much inconvenienced in consequence.  Georgina Shirley call’d and sat a long time and was very chearful and agreeable.  I sent Ann to enquire after Mrs and Miss Western, as young Western died last Friday.  She took the “Observer” to Mrs Chamier, who sent her love and begged I would come and drink tea with them, which I did, and spent a very very pleasant evening, as I always do with them.  Freeman fetched me home.  It was a beautiful starlit night and now Mrs Chamier is in Alfred Street, the distance is nothing in comparison with what it was in Rivers Street.  Emma was better today, but did not get up, except to have her bed made.  Miss Workman sent to enquire after Emma.

Friday 16 April 1841

A fine looking morning, but while we were at breakfast there was a heavy shower of hail and rain, which lasted some time, after which it was very fine the rest of the day.  Mrs Chamier and Georgina came to select what things they wanted to move to their lodgings. Georgina sat with us while Mrs Chamier went up stairs with her Chairmen to point out what she wanted.  She took away two chests of drawers and several trunks and other things, but what she did not immediately want, she left here.  While the men were gone with as many things as they could carry, she came down and sat with us till they returned.  She was here two hours, during which time Mrs Pierrepont call’d and sat some time.  She only saw Mrs Chamier for a minute, as the latter was in the act of going up stairs as Mrs Pierrepont came in, and did not come down again till long after Mrs P was gone.  The Chamiers did not go away till half past four o’clock.  I had a kind note from dear Henry to say that “Kate and the boy” were going on as well as possible, that Hal had returnd from Leeds and that in consequence of his return the eldest Miss Brewer, who had been staying at Henry’s, was obliged to leave them, as they had not a bed for her when Hal came home, which dear Henry appears to regret, as he says “I miss her very much, as she is one of the most gentlest and most amiable beings in existence.”

Emma was better and got up soon after breakfast, but felt very languid.  She has determined to take a Calomil Pill to night and a draught tomorrow morning and Freeman has orderd it at Steele’s.  Miss Workman sent to enquire after Emma and Miss Chambers call’d at the door for the same purpose.

Saturday 17 April 1841

A fine day throughout, but the wind (as yesterday) very cold.  Miss Hill and Miss Maria Polwhele calld, but did not stay long, as they were going to take a walk.  Emma did not see them, as she had not left her room when they were here.  Her medicine of last night and this morning has had an excellent effect and I daresay she will be all the better for it.

Mrs Chamier sent to enquire after her and at the same time sent the two pound of Green tea she was so kind to procure for us from London.  We had the “Times” Paper from Mrs Scott.

Sunday 18 April 1841

A fine day, but a cold and high wind.  Emma better today, but her throat is still sore and uncomfortable.  As soon as she got up, we read the morning Service.  Mrs and Miss Jones call’d at the door to ask if I would take an airing with Miss Jones round the Park, but I declined, as I was fearful of taking cold, the wind blew so strong and it was so cold.

Mary came from Miss Workman to enquire after Emma.  We read the evening Service before we went to bed.

Monday 19 April 1841

A fine day, but the wind very rough and cold.  Miss Shirley came and sat some time, as did Miss Wilson.  While she was here, the dear Miss Allens call’d and soon after they went away Miss Jane Pyne call’d.  She told us that her sister Mary was come to Bath and had taken lodgings intending to drink the Water.  They are the strangest and must uncertain peaple I ever met with.  It would certainly (at least, in my opinion), have been more respectable if the three sister had been together, but I suppose they would not have agreed, even for a month.  What a pity it is, as it takes very much from their respectability. Heard from Mrs Keen.

Tuesday 20 April 1841

A cold and gloomy looking day, but with the exception of a very slight shower, it was dry.  I went to Miss Bode’s to chuse some colourd wools for Emma to begin her “ease and comfort”  for Dr Quarrier.  Met Miss Chambers and Jane Pyne in Milsom Street.  The former said she was coming to call, and I found her on my return.  Miss Harvey, Mrs Drummond and Mr Wiltshire, Mrs and Miss Chamier.  Mr Wiltshire very kindly brought us tickets for the Horticultural Shew in the Park and Miss Helen sent us tickets also, but as Emma could not go, I declined them.  I paid Mrs Chamier 14/- for the two pounds of Green tea she was so kind to procure for me from London.  Between five and six o’clock, to our surprise, Miss Workman came in.  She had walkd here with Mary, and as she was going to walk home, I could not persuade her to stay to tea.  She was in very good spirits and said she had no uncomfortable feelings to complain of. What a blessing!

Miss Hill send to enquire after Emma, as did Miss Pyne.  The latter sent us her John Bull Paper.  Emma is a little better.  Mrs Jones sent us some nice Sea Kale.  Miss Bode sent the wools in the evening with a bit of the pattern work’d, for Emma to begin by.

Milsom Street, Bath c.1830.
Milsom Street, Bath c.1830.

Wednesday 21 April 1841

A fine and dry day with a cutting North East wind, which must have almost frozen the people on the Down, this being the first day of the Spring Races.  Mrs and Miss Jones call’d at the door to enquire after Emma, who is much the same.  Miss Forbes (who has come from Portsmouth for a few days to see Lady Belmore), very kindly call’d.  She returns to Portsmouth on Wednesday next and in June goes to Exeter, Colonel Forbes’s appointment ceasing at that time.  Miss Forbes is looking very well, but has grown very fat, the good effect (she said) of the Portsmouth air.  Mrs Quarrier, she tells me, is also grown very fat.

Miss Workman sent Mary in the evening to enquire after Emma, who intends to take another dose of Calomel tonight.

There was a curious hoax play’d off yesterday.  Hand Bills, which had been printed in London, had been circulated about Bath giving notice that at such an hour “a man would walk on the water”, in consequence of which all the bridges and the banks of the river were crowded (to the amount of many thousand) with sight hunting peaple. But, as might have been expected, no man made his appearance.

Emma began her canvas work.

Thursday 22 April 1841

A dry day, but with the same cold wind as yesterday and all the people in the streets were wrapped in their cloaks and furs, and it had all the appearance of a return of Winter.  Miss Chambers call’d and gave a good account of Miss Pyne.  She askd me to drink tea with them tomorrow,  which I said I would do, if it was fine.  I wrote a note to Mr Wiltshire to beg him to call tomorrow to sign my Certificate.  There was a slight shower of rain between seven and eight o’clock, but it did not last and upon the whole the race goers should have been fortunate to have had two dry, tho very cold days.

Friday 23 April 1841

A bright sunny day, but very cold.  The dear Miss Allens sent a beautiful Griskin of their own pork.  They call’d at the door to enquire after Emma, but could not come in, they being obliged to go to the upper part of the town.  Mrs Pierrepont sat here some time and was in very good spirits and very kind and friendly.  She is going tonight to Lady Parry Jones’s gay fancy Ball at the Rooms.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d late.  Dear Georgina lookd tired and languid.  They are also going to the Ball and I persuaded her to lay down for an hour or two after dinner, before she dress’d.  They most kindly press’d me very much to dine with them tomorrow, but I declined, promising to pass the evening with them if it was dry.  I have neither seen or heard from Mr Wiltshire, so I fear he is again laid up.  I drank tea at Miss Pyne’s and found her wonderfully well and both she and Miss Chambers in good spirits and very kind.  I walk’d there and back.  Freeman came to walk home with me.  It was a very fine night and did not appear so cold as when I went down.  Miss Workman sent Mary with the Bath Paper in the evening and to enquire after Emma, who is better.

We had the “Times” Paper from Mrs Scott.

Saturday 24 April 1841

A very gloomy dark morning.  I had a note from Mr Wiltshire early, to say he was like an “Outward bound East India man, detained by the North East wind.”, which had brought back his Influenza and confined him to his room, but he had written to Mr Allen to beg him to call and sign my Certificate, which the latter very kindly did and was extremely obliging and agreeable.  He was going to walk to Hampton and said he had brought his umbrella, as he thought it would rain, which it did soon after he went away and continued without intermission and very hard the rest of the day and evening, which prevented my going to Mrs Chamier’s, for which I was sorry, for the distance to her is now so short it is no inconvenience.

Miss Pyne sent Ann to enquire after Emma, who returned her love and she was so much better she hoped to go and see her in a few days.  I wrote to Peter Touray with my Certificate signed by Mr Allen, but shall not send it to the Office till tomorrow, as there is no Post today to London.

Sunday 25 April 1841

A showery day and a very rough wind.  We read both morning and evening Service at home.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and staid some time.  They kindly ask’d me to go to them tomorrow evening, if it should be fine.

I heard from Miss Wood.

Had the New Zealand Journal from Hal.

Monday 26 April 1841

A showery morning with strong gusts of wind, but not so violent as yesterday.  I sent Ann to Miss Bode’s to desire she would send up some more wools for Emma’s work.  She also enquired after Mr Wiltshire, who is better, but not well enough to come into Bath, at Miss Pyne’s, who is very well, but Miss Chambers very poorly (bilious) at Mrs Jones’s, Maria better, Mrs Jones not so well, at the Miss Helican’s, who have all been very ill, but are better.  Ann brought back some wools from Miss Bode, from which we selected as many as came to a shilling.

Monday 26 April 1841

Mrs Pierrepont call’d, but did not stay long, as the room was too warm for her.  She is going to Bristol tomorrow and does not return till Wednesday.  She gave us a short account of Lady Parry’s Ball, but said she would tell us more on her return.  Soon after she was gone, Mrs Kiplin call’d and was very obliging.  Mrs Flayer is staying with her and tells her Mr Reginald Smith is better, which I am glad to hear.  Mr de Visne call’d.  For the first time he brought a Card of invitation from Mrs de Visne to their Musical Party on Friday next, which I declined, not going to parties now.  Miss Shirley came to ask if I would like to go with her tomorrow to see Colonel Cockman’s house and beautiful furniture, which is to be sold, the Sale continuing eight days!  We agreed we had better to tomorrow if it was fine, for fear it should be wet on Wednesday (the two days for viewing).  Emma ask’d her to lend the “Old Curiosity Shop” to Miss Chamier, who wish’d very much to read it. She, very good naturedly, said she would send it home with the Catalogue of Colonel Cockmans’ Sale for us to look over, which she did in the evening and I took it with me to Mrs Chamier’s, where I drank tea and spent a very pleasant evening.  Freeman fetched me home and tho’ the moon shone bright, there was a drop or two of rain, and in a few minutes after we got in the streets were quite wet.

Tuesday 27 April 1841

A beautiful day, quite Summer.  Miss Shirley sent early to say she and her father were going up to Colonel Cockmans’ at eleven o’clock and to beg I would go with them.  We hurried the  breakfast and I was with them before 11.  The Admiral went up in his Chair, Georgina and I walk’d. Just as we got there, Mrs Jones, Mrs Jones Graeme and Miss Bowie came up in the Carriage.  Mrs Jones had very kindly call’d here to ask me to go up with her and, finding I was gone, wished Emma to take the place intended for me, but she (tho’ much better), was afraid to venture.  The beautiful things more than answered my expectation and fully repaid the fatigue (for I was very much tired) of going and returning.  The gardens were in such order, as I never saw euqal’d and the roses, pinks, mignionette, stocks, double wall flowers, geraniums and other green house flowers, perfumed the garden round the green house and made me long for some of them.  Georgina was very kind and went every where with me and when we had seen all we wishd, we walk’d home.  It was very warm, at the same time there was a brisk wind.  To our surprise, Miss Pyne call’d after I returned.  She came to say that Mr and Mrs William Pyne came to Bath yesterday, were going on to London Thursday and Miss Chambers was going with them.  They would be absent ten days or a fortnight and she wishd Emma to stay with her while Miss Chambers was away.  Emma was nothing loth and so she is to go on Thursday.  Dear Miss Pyne was looking wonderfully well and appeard delighted with this arrangement.

Wednesday 28 April 1841

As fine and warm as yesterday.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  On hearing Emma was going to Miss Pyne’s on Thursday, she very kindly askd me to dine with her for Friday.  While she was here Miss Shirley and the two little Hales came.  They had been up to Colonel Cockman’s, but the crowd was so great the children had not much chance of seeing any thing.  Miss Chambers very kindly call’d to wish us good bye, before she went to London.

It was so very warm, we let the fire go out after breakfast.

I heard from Mrs Keen and Peter Touray and answer’d both their letters,2d.

Thursday 29 April 1841

A very warm day, but there was a brisk and cool wind on the Parades.  I walk’d down with Emma to Miss Pyne’s, going first to Mrs Jones’s, but did not see them, as the Carriage was at the door and they were preparing to go out.  We found Jane and two of Mr W Pyne’s children with Miss Pyne (the most uncouth, disagreeable brats I ever met with, their manners are really not those of civilised society).  Emma was very much tired with her walk and look’d very pale.  After I left her I calld on Mrs Chamier, who asked me to dine on Saturday and to tea this evening.  I staid with them a long time and then went to Mrs Drummond’s, who has been unwell, but is better.  While I was there Miss Janetta Allen came in.  I staid but a short time after.  Miss Wilson had been at Mrs Drummond’s and (as wonders are never to cease), she askd her to return and dine!!!!  I expected to have found Miss Wilson waiting on my return, but she did not call, at which I was almost as much surprised as at Mrs D’s asking her to partake of her dinner.  She was not so liberal to me, only asking me to meet Miss W at tea.  I was very glad I was engaged to Mrs Chamier, where I spent a very pleasant evening and Freeman fetched me home at night.

I left off fires.

I took a Sovereign, at Mrs Keen’s request, to Carrington’s, for the Distress’d Clergyman in London, but to my surprise, found the Subscription was closed, they having received sufficient for his present wants.  This is the second time the circumstance has occurred to her, once before, to the Shrewton sufferers.

Friday 30 April 1841

A very warm day.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d early to ask me to dine with her tomorrow and go to the Play.  I told her I was engaged to Mrs Chamier, but she said she was sure Mrs C would let me off.  I call’d on the dear Miss Allens, who were not at home, and then went to Miss Workman’s, where I could not stay long, as I was to be at Mrs Pierrepont’s at two o’clock to draw for a chance of a beautiful piece of work done by Miss Bode (The Young Chieftan’s First Ride) for Miss Pyne.  I was the first there.  The other subscribers (30) soon arrived.  I was very pleasantly seated next to Mrs Chamier and Georgina (who kindly excused my going to them tomorrow) and near Miss Pyne Coffin and Miss Monkland, the former of whom was very friendly and obliging, as she always is, and the latter, to my surprise, was very gracious.  I was not fortunate for Miss Pyne, Miss Monkland gaining the prize, but I spent a very pleasant chearful hour there and then came home, where I staid quietly till five o’clock and then went to dine at Mrs Pierrepont’s, only her and me.  She was very kind and I spent a very pleasant evening.  Freeman walkd home with me at ten o’clock.

Ann went to enquire after Emma, who was better and Miss Pyne very well.  I hear from Peter Touray with £15.15.6.

Fashion plate for May 1841 from World of Fashion. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for May 1841 from World of Fashion.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Saturday 1 May 184

Still very warm.  I went down to see Emma, who was looking better.  I sat there till the Wheel Chairs came to take her and Miss Pyne out, the latter having most kindly insisted on Emma’s having an airing in a Chair.  I then went to Mrs Jones’s.  They were all out.  The heat was so great, I could not go anywhere else after I returned.  Miss Allen call’d.  While she was here, Miss Shirley and a little Hale came in.  Dear Miss Allen staid long after Miss S went away and was as agreeable and kind as usual.  At five o’clock I went to Mrs Pierrepont’s to dinner and accompanied her to the Play, where I was much amused with “London Assurance”, the first time of its being performed here.  It lost much of its interest, however, by poor Woulds, who had a principal character in it, having been arrested at the Suit of his good for nothing wife, two hours before the Play was to begin which, of course, disarranged it very much.  It was a very bad House and we came away at the end of the Play, leaving Mrs Simpson in the next Box.  Mrs Pierrepont kindly set me down at home.

Sunday 2 May 1841

A showery day, but I got to St. John’s in the morning without wet.  Miss Janetta Allen sat in our seat, as did Miss Pyne, but she and Emma came so late we were obliged to squeeze to accommodate them, there being 9 in the Pew.  Miss J Allen and Miss Pyne staid till the second Service.  It was raining a little when Emma and I came out and had pourd just before.  We took shelter under the Portico of the Hetling Pump Room till it had ceased, when Emma walkd to Miss Pyne’s and I took a Chair home and did not go out afterwards.

Monday 3 May 1841

A showery day, so much so I did not go out.  Mrs Pierrepont calld for a few minutes.  Miss Jones brought a note of invitation from Mrs Jones for me to dine there Wednesday or Thursday.  I went down to speak to Maria, who could not get out of her Chair and fix’d Wednesday. They are going back to Oldbury, I am sorry to say, the latter end of the week.   I had a note in the evening from dear Georgina Chamier to dine with them tomorrow.

Tuesday 4 May 1841

A fine and warm day.  I went to Miss Pyne’s, found her indifferent, but Emma better.  Calld in my way at Miss Bode’s and got some more wools for Emma’s work.  Had a kind note from Miss Allen, asking me to dine there tomorrow, to which I was obliged to send an excuse, for which I was sorry (my friends are all so very kind to me).  I sat some time at Miss Pyne’s.  A Mrs Redwood came in while I was there and staid till Miss Pyne’s Chair came to take her to drink the Water when she went away, but I staid some time after with Emma.  On my return home I found dear Miss Janetta Allen had call’d and Mrs Smith of Milsom Street.  I went to Mrs Chamier’s at 6 o’clock, where I was most kindly received and spent a very pleasant, chearful evening.  Freeman fetched me home at 11 o’clock.  The wind was so high when I returned from Miss Pyne’s, it was with difficulty I could stem it.

Wednesday 5 May 1841

A very cold, lowering day, with frequent showers and very high cold wind.  Mrs Clark, from Lyme (Mrs Keen’s friend) call’d and sat some time.  She appears a very good tempered, pleasant person.  While she was here Mrs Jones calld to say she would send the Carriage to take me there about 3 o’clock.  As soon as Mrs Clark went away, I dressd to be ready, thinking they would send the Carriage empty, but Miss Bowie came in it and took me down.  Miss Workman was there before me, tho’ it wanted an hour to dinner.  I regretted very much that Emma could not be of the party, and so did she, but she could not leave Miss Pyne.  I never saw Mrs Jones Graeme look so well.  She was elegantly dressd and when she came into the room her fine figure and handsome countenance appeard to more advantage than I had ever seen it before.  Maria look’d and appeared to feel languid, but I hope it was only owing to her having been in the Bath.  After tea the conversation, by accident, led to Wills, and Mrs Jones took the opportunity of impressing (or rather trying to do so) on Miss Workman’s mind the necessity of her making one and after a great deal of talking on all sides, she promised Mrs Jones she would do it tomorrow and Mrs J begged I would go to her in the morning and remind her of it.  There was a little rain after dinner, but it did not last, and it was quite dry when Freeman fetched me at ten o’clock.  I spent a very pleasant, chearful day.

At dinner we had:  mock turtle soup, very good fore quarter of lamb (without the shoulder) excellent, and a made dish of veal, new potatoes, spinach, broccoli, cucumbers, asparagus and rhubarb tart – oranges, cake and damson cheese. Miss Janette Allen call’d again after I went to Mrs Jones.

Thursday 6 May 1841

A very showery day, with violent storms of hail.  I went between the showers to Miss Workman’s, as agreed last night.  She had entirely forgotten all that had pass’d relative to her being prepared to make her Will and I had to recapitulate all the Mrs Jones had said on the subject.   After being there more than an hour, I prevailed on her to let me ask Mr Evans to draw out a Will for her to sign.  She consented so far as to beg I would request Mr Evans to go to her and take her directions.  I went immediately to his house.  He was not at home, but saw Mrs Evans to whom I told my business.  She was all kindness and said she would tell him, but she feared he would not be able to go to Miss Workman, as he told her when he went out, he had so much to do he could not be back to dinner till half past seven.  He came in, however, unexpectedly when I was there and in the kindest manner wrote a paper for her to insert what she chose to give to her great nephew and to Mary, which would stand good, in case any thing happened to her before he could make her Will, and I was to ask Mrs Jones to join me in witnessing it.  The rain held up in the evening and I went down to Mrs Jones, who very kindly said she would call and take me to Miss Workman’s at twelve o’clock tomorrow.  She asked me to stay and drink tea, but I had had my tea before I went there, and after sitting a short time with her, Maria and Mrs Jones Graeme, I went to Miss Pyne’s, who I found at tea, and Mary Pyne with her and Emma, Mary looking very ill and so altered I should not have known her.  Miss Pyne was very unwell the day before yesterday, but is pretty well again and Emma is much better.  I staid with them till it was quite dusk and then walk’d home.  It was a very fine evening.

Miss Bowie calld to take leave.  She and Mrs Jones Graeme go to Oldbury tomorrow and Mrs Jones and Maria on Saturday.  I had a kind letter from my nephew Henry, giving a very good account of Kate and his boy.

Friday 7 May 1841

A very wet morning, but it fortunately ceased raining before 12 o’clock.  Mr Evans came to know if Miss Workman had signed the Paper he wrote for her yesterday and was glad to find Mrs Jones had not yet calld to take it to her, as he wished to make an alteration that would secure firmly to Mary, whatever Miss Workman chose to leave her.  He took it away with him and I told him we would call at his house for it.  Mrs Jones came for me a little past 12 and we drove to Mr Evans, who was not ready for us, so we went to Nobles, where Mrs Jones paid a Bill and then to Hornbys for Mrs J to get a pretty ribbon for her bonnet, and a frock for a poor child, both of which she bought.  Mr Thomas shew’d her a beautiful shaded gray chene silk, one of the new ones.  It was so pretty she said, she should like to give a dress of it to Mrs Jones Graeme and desired that  he would send it to her lodgings, as she she should not like to buy it if Mrs J G did not fancy it.  We then went back to Mr Evans’s, but as he had not yet finished, we drove to Hick’s, the China shop, to pay for a glass shade, then to Cuffs to have a bottle fill’d with something and then to Mrs Mie’s, where we got out to see a piece of Berlin work, calld the Female Poletition and an old woman with her spectacles reading the John Bull News Paper with her cup and saucer, gold tea pot and spoon on a table by her side.  The countenance is wonderfully well done and so indeed is the whole of the picture and the price is only 3 guineas.  I am sure no one would work it in England under double that sum.  From there we drove again to Mr Evans’s, who very politely came to the Carriage with the Paper, which to my surprise was a regular and proper Will, and Miss Workman would have no trouble but to put the sums she intended for each person and sign her name and we were to sign ours as witnesses.  It really was most kind of Mr E to take so much trouble for nothing.  We went immediately to Rebecca, who was very well and in very good spirits, but had quite forgotten every thing that had been said about her Will and we had to bring it to her recollection, which took some time.  At last she said she was ready and willing to sign it, but when she was told she must insert the sums first, she flew off and it required further explanation.  At last she said she should like to give £500 to little Henry Broughton and she wrote it properly, but when Mrs Jones said “and now you must put down what sum you intend to give Mary as an annuity, before we can witness it” she said “she had no intention of giving Mary an annuity, she should give her a lump of money after her death.” “That is not giving her any thing for except it is in your Will, she will not have it.”  “Oh yes, she will, if I tell Robert, he will do what is right.”  All dear Mrs Jones’s powers of persuasion were exerted but in vain, and after staying near two hours, we came away, Mrs Jones evidently very much hurt and disgusted at Rebecca’s unfeeling and ungrateful conduct to a servant, who has served her faithfully twenty one years, the latter part of the time has been a perfect slave to her and who she acknowledged she could not do without.  It would really serve her right if Mary was to leave her.

When we left her, we drove to Nelson Place to call on a friend of Mrs Jones’s, who was gone to see her and then Mrs Jones set me down at home.  It was raining very fast and continued more or less the rest of the day.  Miss Drewett calld while I was out and kindly left a few bits of silk for my patchwork.  Miss Workman sent Mary in the evening with the Bath Paper and her love and that she had been very much agitated by Mrs Jones’s visit.

Mrs Scott sent us the “Times” Paper.

Saturday 8 May 1841

So showery I could not get out, notwithstanding which I had several visitors, among the rest, to my surprise, Miss Workman.  She walkd here alone, having first call’d at Mr Evans’s, who was not at home, but who she saw yesterday, after Mrs Jones and I left her.  She has decided on not leaving Mary an annuity, but talks of giving her a legacy of 10 or 20 pounds!! which she thinks is very handsome, but which I told her was nothing and not worth Mary’s acceptance and we were so near a serious disagreement on the subject, that I told her I would have nothing more to do with the business.  I tried to change the conversation, but she still kept harping on the handsomeness of 20 pounds to poor Mary, to all which, as I could not agree with her,  I turned a deaf ear. She staid some time and when she was going away it began to rain and hail very fast, but luckily, as she stood at the window, a Chairman going by chanced to look up and she beckoned him over.  We parted good friends, but I was very glad when she went away, soon after which Mr Evans came.  He has had the kindness to write another Will (the third he has had the trouble of writing without any remuneration) for her.  He begged I would give it to her for he was so thoroughly disgusted by her heartless ingratitude , that he did not like to take it to her himself, nor would he have had any thing to do in the business if he could have supposed she would have acted so unjustifiably towards Mary.  Soon after Mr E went away, Mrs Evans came to tell me what had pass’d, not knowing her husband had been here.  She said Miss Workman was very high and mighty when she call’d on her, found great fault with medical men and absolutely abused lawyers, which was not very polite to Mrs Evans, said they were all rogues and cheats, but unfortunately, one could not do without them.  Mrs Evans, instead of being angry, only said “Why, they have generally a bad name, but I do not think they all deserve it.”  A great deal more pass’d, relative to her Will, but all Mrs E ’s pleadings could make no impression in Mary’s favour, added to which she has now determined to have her great nephew only £200 instead of the £500 she wrote down before Mrs Jones.  Mrs Evans went away in the rain, as she had to go somewhere else before she went home.  Miss Shirley call’d and staid till five o’clock.  It rained very fast when she went away, but as there was no appearance of it holding up, she thought she had better go.  Emma sent Miss Pyne’s Ann up with two of Mrs Jones’s Cards of T T L for me to send to Mrs Pyne Coffin, as the rain prevented her calling there this morning before she went away.  Ann took them, and at the same time, the News Papers to Mrs Chamier.  Miss Wilson’s maid calld with her Mistress and Miss Harvey’s enquiries after us.  It was pouring with rain and she had no umbrella, so I lent her one, for which she was very much obliged.

Ann took Emma’s clean linen down to her for tomorrow.

Sunday 9 May 1841

A fine day.  I went to St. John’s in the morning, where I met Emma.  Old Mr Hughes and Mr Audry did the Duty.  I went with Emma to Miss Pyne’s, who was not very well and then came home and did not go out again.  The dear Miss Allens call’d and sat some time.  They ask’d me to dine with them on Wednesday.

I read the Evening Service at home.  Mrs Evans call’d and askd me to tea on Tuesday to meet Miss Hill and Miss Workman.

Heard from Miss Wood to get her some gold braid.

Monday 10 May 1841

A wet day.  I did not go out, except to Mrs Mee’s to get some gold braid for Miss Wood and no one calld here.  Heard from Mrs Scott.  Wrote to Mrs Scott and Miss Wood.

Tuesday 11 May 1841

A fine day.  Miss Wilson calll’d.  While she was here, Mrs Gore came in and I introduced Miss W to her as a patient of her husband’s and they had a good deal of chat together.  Mrs Chamier call’d and staid some time.  She askd me to dine on Thursday.  I went to see Miss Pyne.  She was very poorly and not up.  I also call’d at Miss Workman’s, drank tea at Mrs Evans’s (the first time), met a Mrs Crutwell, Miss Nihil, Miss Shute, Miss Drewett, Miss Workman, Miss Hill, Miss Polwhele and Dr Pring.  Every thing was very elegant.  A supper table laid with sandwiches, cheese cakes, tartlets, jellys, three cakes and oranges, port, sherry, and delicious old Constantia, all of which was dispersed with the greatest hospitality.  Mrs Evans tried to make a Card table, but no one wish’d to play and there was plenty of conversation.  Upon the whole it was a chearful, pleasant evening.  I ordered my Chair at ten o’clock, but they did not let me know if it was there till half past ten and I had to pay 6d for their waiting the half hour.  Mrs Drummond call’d while I was out.

Wednesday 12 May 1841

A fine day.  Miss Workman’s Mary came to say her Mistress was very unwell, but she had not desired her to let me know it.  I went down to her.  She was looking very ill, but I soon found it was occasioned by her having eaten too much cake and jelly and had drank Constantia at Mr Evans’s last night, and that there was nothing to be alarmed at.  After sitting some time with her, I call’d at Miss Shirley’s, where I met Mrs Hale and the two eldest girls.  I also calld on Mrs Chamier who, with Georgina, walk’d as far as the Admiral’s with me.  I went to Miss Pyne’s and saw her in bed very poorly, but better.  Miss J Allen calld to give me the price of the Chair to and from their house today, but I was firm in declining it, as I could not bear that their affectionate liberality should be so tax’d.  I dined there and spent a very pleasant day, which I did not altogether expect, as I knew I was to meet the elder Miss Liddell, who I used to think very high and impertinent, but she was very agreeable, tho’ rather prozy, which evidently annoyed Mr Allen.  The dear Miss Allens were all kindness, as usual.  They ask’d me to accompany them to the Play on Saturday, which I agreed to do, on one condition, but dear Janetta stopd me by saying “O! I never make conditions with my friends.”

Thursday 13 May 1841

A fine day.  I went to Miss Workman’s, who had quite recovered her yesterday’s indisposition.  In my way I met Miss Wheeler coming from her.  She told me Miss W had been asking her what she ought to give to Mary.  Miss Wheeler told her she could not think of giving her less than twenty pounds a year and that would only be an act of common justice, not of generosity and begg’d me to enforce her doing it immediately.  I found her with the Will before her and after a great deal of talking, she inserted the £20 a year for Mary, having before put £500 as a legacy to Harry Broughton.  I call’d at Mr Evans’s in my way home, but they were neither of them at home.  I also calld at the Admiral’s, saw him and Miss Shirley.  I dined at Mrs Chamier’s.  Miss Webb came in the evening and I spent a very pleasant day.

We had soales, veal olives, curry, asparagus, potatoes and a very nice pudding and oranges after dinner.

I expected Emma to come home to day, as Miss Chambers returns from London with Mr and Mrs W Pyne this evening, but Miss Pyne will not part with her.

I wrote a note to Mr Gore to ask him what hour would be convenient to him to meet me at Miss Workman’s tomorrow to witness her Will.  He appointed 2 o’clock.  I call’d at Mrs Smith’s in Milsom Street.  She was not at home.

Friday 14 May 1841

A fine day, but cold, as it was yesterday.  I call’d at Miss Workman’s, where Mr Gore most kindly met me and we both witness’d her Will, which I am to copy for her and Mr Gore is to keep the original.  After that was settled, I went to Miss Pyne’s, who was better, but not down stairs.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d, as did Mr W Pyne twice, but I did not see them.  I went to Miss Allen’s to pay for my ticket to the Play tomorrow.  Miss Allen, who was the only one at home, would not hear of it.  I dined at Admiral Shirley’s and met a Miss Fanny Oakley, a very pretty and agreeable girl and spent a chearful day.  The Admiral went to a large party at Mrs Smith’s in the Square.

Wrote to Lady Cooper at Richmond to congratulate her on the birth of and a son and heir to Sir George Baker.

Extract from Rebecca Workman's will, showing Fanny Chapman's signature as a witness to it.
Extract from Rebecca Workman’s will, showing Fanny Chapman’s name as a witness to it.
National Archives, PROB 11/1990/329.

Saturday 15 May 1841

A fine day.  Emma came up while I was copying Miss Workman’s Will.   She did not stay long.  As soon as I had finished the copy, I took it with the original to Miss Workman, where I sealed up the Will in her presence and carried it myself to Mr Gore’s.  He was not at home, but Mrs Gore was, to whom I gave it.  I sat some time with her and saw her eldest boy, a dear little interesting fellow, the image of his father.  From her I went to the Evans’s, saw them both.  They were very glad that the Will business was finished, but would not believe it would ever have been done, if Mary had not given warning.  I then went to Mrs Kiplins, Mrs Pierrepont’s and Mrs Drummond’s.  Only the latter was at home.  I left a Card at Mrs Kiplin’s for Mrs Floyer, who is staying with her.  At Mrs Drummond’s I met Mrs Chamier and Georgina and there was another lady there also, who name I did not hear.  Mrs Drummond shewd us the chair she was working for Mrs Quarrier, from whom she has not heard.  The Chamiers and I came away at the same time and walkd together as far as the York House. I met Mrs D Fellows and Captain Lye in the Street.  Mrs Polwhele call’d here while I was out.  She is going on Tuesday into Cornwall for the Summer.  Miss Wilson sent to enquire after us.  She has been very unwell with her painful complaint, spasms in her chest, poor soul.  Dear Miss Allen sent me the ticket for the Play, to which I went a few minutes before seven and went up to Miss Liddell’s Box.  The music was playing, but except the performers in the orchestra, there was not a creature in the house, but myself.  The Miss Allens soon joined me, but Miss Liddell did not come till after the Play had begun.  It was the School for Scandal and was very well performed to as thin a house as I almost ever saw.  Poor! Mr and Mrs Brougham, whose benefit it was intended, must have lost by it.  The entertainment was Rory O’More, which I wished very much to have staid to see, but the Miss Allens were tired and we therefore came away after the first scene, When we came out there was no closed Chair, but plenty of open ones.  John got one closed one in a few minutes and I came home in a Wheel one, with a particularly civil man.

Sunday 16 May 1841

A dry, but very cold morning and a wet evening.  I went to St. John’s, which was crowded.  Emma met me there.  Mrs Ball, her son and two daughters were there, the latter sat in the seat with us and were very polite in their enquiries after our health since they saw us last and Mrs Ball bow’d from an opposit seat. We had Mr de Visne.  I went to Miss Pyne’s (who was better) and staid till Miss Chambers returnd from Church.  While I was there, Mrs Kitson, Mr and Mrs William Pyne and Betsy came in.  I came home in time to have my dinner and go to the three o’clock service, at which there was a full congregation.  The Miss Balls sat again in our seat and Mr de Visne read the Service.  Mrs Captain Jones was there and nodded to me.  My leg ach’d when I came out of Church, so I came straight home and did not go out again.  The dear Mrs Allens call’d when I was out.

Monday 17 May 1841

A showery morning.  Emma came up and pressed me to go to Miss Pyne’s in the evening, but it turned out very wet and I could not go.  I wrote all day, first to dear Hal and then a very long letter to Mrs Jones at Oldbury to tell her what had been done about Rebecca’s Will.  Wrote to dear Hal and Mrs Jones.  The latter letter will not go till tomorrow.

Tuesday 18 May 1841

A very fine day for the Horticultural Meeting at Sidney Gardens, but the wind was so high I did not go out in the morning.  Kate Pyne and the two little girls call’d, the latter are very much improved and behaved very well.  Mr W Pyne also calld and sat half an hour.  Mrs Chamier and dear Georgina also call’d, the latter came into the room holding out her gown and exclaiming “Spick and Span, Spick and Span” and a very elegant dress it was, a shot and figured silk bought at Croker’s and elegantly made. It is a shade of brown, but not very dark.  Mrs Chamier very kindly askd me to dine on Thursday.  Miss Workman walk’d here.  She complained that her spirits were very much depress’d and Mary had persuaded her to come out for a little change.  She did not stay long, as she was going to see the fashions at Miss Bushes.  I spent the evening at Miss Pyne’s, but as they did not expect me, Miss Chambers was gone to drink tea with Kate and Jane and only came home a short time before Freeman fetched me.  Miss Pyne was in very good spirits and appeard to be very comfortable.  Emma came up in the morning and staid some time.  Heard from poor! Lady Cooper, but cannot make out her letter.

Sydney Gardens, Bath: the canal bridges Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Sydney Gardens, Bath: the canal bridges
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Wednesday 19 May 1841

A very showery day, notwithstanding which I had a good many visitors.  First Mrs Clarke, to say she hopes to go to Lyme on Friday and would take my parcel to Mrs Keen, then Mr, Mrs and Jane Pyne, then Mrs Western, who was very pleasant and it was very obliging of her to call again, as I have never returned her last visit.  After she went away, Miss Shirley came and sat some time and lastly, Mrs Chamier, who came while was at tea, but did not stay, as it was only to ask me to go to her Friday, instead of tomorrow, as Portbury askd to go out tomorrow to see some friends who are come from London.  Miss Wilson sent to enquire after us.  She is better, but still very poorly.  She has heard from her sister that the Quarriers are in London, but she has had no letter from Eliza!!!

Mary came from Miss Workman to enquire after me, as I had not been there today.  She thought I was unwell.  I treated Freeman and Ann to see the Queen’s Pennard Cheese, which is on its way back to where it was made to be kept two years, till it is fit to be cut.  Ann took my parcel for Mrs Keen to Mrs Clarke and the John Bull Paper home to Miss Pyne.  I wrote to Mrs Keen in the parcel.

The Pennard Cheese, made for Queen Victoria
The Pennard Cheese, made for Queen Victoria

Thursday 20 May 1841

A cold, uncomfortable day with alternate bright sun and showers, which pourd down in torrents, with large hail stones.  I did not go out.  Between five and six o’clock dear Georgina Chamier call’d and sat here while Mrs Chamier went shopping.  When Mrs Chamier came, she said her dinner must be waiting and she could not stay, as Portbury would be very impatient to go to her friends after she had dined.  Mary sent Miss Workman’s Paper and beggd to have it back tomorrow morning, as her Mistress had not read it.  I sent the Observer to Miss Pyne.  It was so cold, I had a fire.

Friday 21 May 1841

A showery morning, but fine between.  Emma came up soon after breakfast and was detained by the rain.  As soon as it was over, she went back to Miss Pyne’s.  Miss Hill call’d between the showers and was also kept here some time by the rain.  She told me that there was thunder yesterday, during one of the hail storms.  I did not hear it, but I saw two flashes of lightening.  Poor Kitty had 40 squares of glass broken by the hail.  Mrs Wilkinson call’d between three and four o’clock.  It was raining slightly, but it soon began to pour and did not cease the rest of the day and night.  Mrs Wilkinson staid till past five, in the hope the rain would cease, but as it did not, she walk’d home and a sad walk she must have had to Springfield Place, in such a pouring rain.  I wished her very much to have a cloak, but she would not.  She was very pleasant and agreeable the whole time she staid.  I dined at Mrs Chamier’s and was obliged to have a Chair, both to go and return.  Miss Webb drank tea there and I spend a very pleasant day.  Dear Georgina was in remarkably good spirits.  I ordered the Chair at eleven o’clock, but it did not come till near twelve and was very near not coming at all, as a lady detained John an hour waiting for her and he got another man to bring me home, which man never came.  Luckily for me, Freeman began to be uneasy at my being so late, and went once or twice to the door to see if I was coming and at last saw John going by and ask’d him if he had forgot me.  He said he had sent a Chair at eleven o’clock for me and was quite surprised when she told him I was not come home and came and fetch’d me immediately.  It was most fortunate Freeman saw him, otherwise I should have been obliged to walk home thro’ a pouring rain. Had a fire.

Saturday 22 May 1841

So much appearance of rain, I did not go out till after dinner.  I calld at the Miss Allens’.  They were not at home.  Mrs Gwyn opend the door to me and was very glad to see me.  She is much better, but feels the effect of her terrible burn, particularly at any change of weather.  From there I went to Miss Workman’s, who I found very well and in excellent spirits.  Mrs Chamier had just been there and askd her to dine one day next week to meet me, and was to let her know what day I was disengaged.  In my way to her I met Mrs Gore and had a little chat with her.  I got 5 pennyworth more wool at Miss Bode’s and took them to Emma at Miss Pyne’s, who was better and pressed me to stay and spend the evening, but as it rained slightly all the way from Miss Bode’s and look’d very threatening, I was afraid to say.  I might, however, have done so, as it turned out a very fine evening and night.  In my way to Miss Workman’s in the morning, I met Miss Chambers and Jane Pyne. The latter told me her sister Kate was at home and would be delighted to see me, if I would call, so I went on there and found a Mrs Colther and her daughter with Kate.  The latter was very glad to see me.  Had a fire.

Sunday 23 May 1841

A fine day.  I went to St. John’s.  In my way I met Mrs Clarke, who I fancied had gone to Lyme on Friday, but she does not go till Wednesday next.  Emma was at Church before me (which was crowded and very warm), and I went with her to Miss Pyne’s, where I staid till it was time to go to the three o’clock Service, which saved me the walk home and back again, so I did not dine till after I returned from Church.  Dear Janette Allen sat in our seat in the morning.  Mrs Chamier and dear Georgina call’d to ask me to meet Miss Workman on Tuesday and hoped Emma would be of the party, that we might have a little Quadrille in the evening.  Left off fires again.

Monday 24 May 1841

A very fine day and very hot.  I was out the whole morning enquiring about lodgings and boarding at Miss Wood’s request for Miss Jones in Ireland, who wishes to be boarded in a private apartment, but I could not find such an accommodation any where.  I call’d on Miss Drewett, Miss Pyne and Miss Workman.  While I was out, the dear Miss Allens call’d to ask me to dine there on Wednesday.  Freeman told them she knew I was engaged to Miss Hill on that day.  Rebecca wanted me to stay and drink tea, but I was so tired I could not, for I really was quite overcome with heat and fatigue.

Tuesday 25 May 1841

A very fine day, but the wind extremely high.  It was the Horticultural Show at the Victoria Garden and I really wonder how the company could stand the wind there.  Miss Drewett call’d to fix my spending the evening with her on Friday next.  Emma came up to dress and go with me to Mrs Chamier’s, where we met Miss Workman at dinner and Miss Webb came in the evening.  Dear Georgina was not well and was languid and not in spirits and Miss Workman eat such an enormous dinner that she was very uncomfortable and not in good humour in the evening.  We playd at Quadrille.  I won 2/6d, Miss Workman won 1/-, Mrs Chamier lost 2/6d and Emma lost 1/-.  It was a very fine night to walk home.  Emma slept here.  I heard from dear Mrs Jones a long and kind letter, in which she say she hopes to see us in Oldbury in the course of the Summer and wish’d I could devise some means of our coming without Miss W, for in the latter’s present state “it is an affliction I dread to undergo and would be an almost intolerable charge day after day.”

At dinner we had Salmon, green goose, fricasee of veal, asparagus, potatoes, cucumber, a delicious pudding calld “Friar’s Omelet” and boil’d custards, oranges and figs.

Mrs Simpson call’d to ask me to go to the Play with her next Saturday, Woulds’s Benefit, and very kindly said she had a ticket for me.

Wednesday 26 May 1841

A very fine day, but very warm and the wind very high.  Emma breakfasted here and we call’d together at the Miss Allen’s and Miss Workman’s.  We saw only Miss Janetta at the first place, who was all kindness.  She was sorry I was engaged today, as there would only have been themselves and me (Mr Allen dining out) and we should have had a merry chat.  She kindly ask’d me for Friday but, unluckily for me, I am engaged to Miss Drewett, for which I am very sorry.  From her, we went to Rebecca, who I expected to find very ill after her dinner of yesterday, but Mary had taken cautions to prevent it and she was very well and in good spirits.  From her we went to Grove Street with a shawl and scarf of Emma’s to be cleaned, for which we are to give Mrs Dover 2/6d.  We call’d at Mr Evans’s to ask him to witness a Power of Attorney to enable Peter Touray to receive our new Annuities, but he was not at home and we were in our way to call on him again when we met Miss Wilson’s Maid, who told us her Mistress was waiting our return home, so we came back, instead of going to Mr Evans’s.  Miss Wilson brought the Chair seat she has been working for Mrs Quarrier and it is beautiful.  She goes to Portsmouth next Thursday.  As soon as she went away, Emma returned to Miss Pyne’s and I prepared to go to Miss Hill’s to dinner.  The wind was so violent in Pulteney Street that, tho’ the sun was scorching hot, I could not keep my parasol up and I was almost broiled.  There was no one but myself at Miss Hill’s and I spent a quiet day. The heat was very great in the afternoon, particularly at tea time.  Freeman came for me a little before ten.  It was a beautiful night and then very cool and pleasant.  I did not see Mrs Hudson, but heard she was very well.

Pulteney Street, Bath, early nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).
Pulteney Street, Bath, early nineteenth-century (Victoria Art Gallery, Bath).

We had a boiled chicken, pigeon pye, cold ham, asparagus, potatoes, Bread pudding with currants and plums and a gooseberry tart.  Oranges, figs and biscuits.  In the evening, cakes and sandwiches.

Thursday 27 May 1841

The heat so intense and oppressive that whole day, that I was almost melted when sitting quite still.  I wrote a note to Mr Evans, to ask what time would be convenient for him to receive us, either tomorrow or Saturday, but he misread my note and sent word he would call here in an hour.  Ann went directly to beg Emma to come up, which she did some time before Mr Evans came, but was very much over come by the heat.  When Mr Evans came, I sent to ask Mr Vezey to come up and witness the Power with Mr Evans, which he very civily did.  No one could be more obliging than Mr Evans was, as he always has been since I have known him.  As soon as he went away, I sent for Mr Vezey again to enquire about a Carriage for Miss Hill.  She is desirous to have one for travelling this Summer with the option of purchasing it when she returns, if she likes it, and begg’d I would enquire about it for her.  He told me he had a very handsome one he could let her have at 5 guineas a month and that the price of it was £140, but to a friend of mine he would sell it for £120, taking off the amount of the hire even from that sum and that he would find a standing for it and keep it in order for £5 a year.  Emma returnd to Miss Pyne’s to dinner and after tea I walk’d down there, but found only Emma at home.  Miss Pyne and Miss Chambers did not return till half past eight.  I sat with them till near ten and then walkd home.  The heat was intense and there was great appearance of rain all the evening, so much so, that I hesitated whether I should go out or not, but fortunately I got home before it fell.  I had scarcely taken off my bonnet before Ann exclaimed “O, Ma’am, how lucky you are, it is pouring.”, soon after which there was a great deal of lightening, which was very vivid, but the thunder was at a great distance.  The rain pourd in torrents for some time.  I wrote to Miss Wood.

Friday 28 May 1841

A fine day and very much cooler than yesterday, the thunder and lightening of last night having cooled the air, which was most oppressively hot.  I drank tea with Miss Drewett, met Miss Shute and a Mrs Gower.  Miss Drewett askd Miss Workman, but she declined going.  I went and returned in a Wheel Chair.  A hum drum sort of an evening.

Mrs Simpson calld with the ticket for the Play, but did not come up.  Emma and I went to Miss Smith’s, where I bought a very pretty cap for Emma and ordered a white silk bonnet for her.

Saturday 29 May 1841

A very fine day.  I did not go out till the evening.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d, but did not stay long.  I went to the Play and sat with Mrs Simpson in Miss Ford’s Box below stairs.  It was poor Would’s benefit and of course he was most enthusiastically greeted.  The Entertainment were “The Climbing Boy”, “The Love Spell” and “The Middy Ashore”, all new to me and with which I was very much amused.  We came away before twelve and therefore saw only half of “The Middy Ashore”, which I was sorry for, as it was very amusing and we also did not hear Woulds’s’ speech of thanks, which I should like to have heard very much.

Sunday 30 May 1841

A fine day.  I went to St. John’s both morning and afternoon.  Emma came in after me, as did Miss Janette Allen and we all returned together as far as the bottom of Milsom Street, where we parted, Janetta going home, Emma to Miss Workman’s and I coming home to dinner.  I drank tea at Miss Pyne’s.  Miss Chambers went to Church in the evening and I sat with Miss Pyne and Emma.

Monday 31 May 1841

A fine day, with a cool air.  Emma came up in the morning and staid all day and slept here.  She selected the things she wishd to take with her and I packd them.  We drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s, to meet Miss Ashe and play Quadrille.  Miss Webb also drank tea there.  Miss Ashe was very agreeable and we spent a very pleasant evening.  Miss Drewett call’d in the morning.  Miss Wilson call’d to take leave.  She goes to Portsmouth on Thursday next.

Fashion plate for June 1841 from Godey's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for June 1841 from Godey’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Tuesday 1 June 1841

A fine day.  Emma breakfasted here and went to take leave of Admiral and Miss Shirley, before she returnd to Miss Pyne’s.  I was busy all the morning getting things ready for her to take with her.  Mrs Drummond call’d, but I did not see her.  I promised Emma I would go down to Miss Pyne’s after tea, which I did.  I found a Miss Tuson there, who appeard a very agreeable person.  Miss Chamier was gone to take leave of her cousins, but came home before I left them, which I did about half past 9 and walk’d home by myself.  Mary came to ask me to drink tea at Miss Workman’s tomorrow, but I declined it, as I am sure I shall not be in spirits to go out, after taking leave of Emma.  I said I would go there Thursday.

Wednesday 2 June 1841

A very fine day.  Emma came up while I was at breakfast and staid here till one o’clock, when I went with her to Miss Pyne’s, where I staid till they were going to sit down to dinner, when I took my leave and came home, as I could not bear to see Emma go away.  I finished packing Emma’s two Boxes and the Porter fetched them to go by the Carrier to Charlton.

Thursday 3 June 1841

A fine day.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She had not been here many minutes when, to my surprise, Miss Hay was  announced.  Poor Soul!  she was looking very well and is not alterd since I saw her last, tho’ it is some years, and she is now totally blind.  Her manner was affectionate and warm in the extreme and she held both my hands in hers the whole time she was here.  She is going to Weymouth next week for two months.

I drank tea with Miss Workman, only myself and her and I was not sorry when Freeman came to fetch me home.  Jane Pyne call’d and asked me to go to them tomorrow evening.

Friday 4 June 1841

A fine day.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d to ask me to dine on Sunday, but as it was Communion Sunday, we agreed to put it off till another day.  Mrs Day from Hinton paid me an early visit.  She appears to be pleased with Hockey.  She very politely said she hoped I would come and stay a day or two with her, before I went to Miss Pyne’s.  I call’d on Mrs Chamier, where instead of staying ten minutes, as I intended, I staid an hour and a half.  From them I went to Mrs Drummond’s, who was not at home.  I left word I had heard from Portsmouth.  From there I went to the Grevile’s, found Miss Sarah at home and two young ladies, their nieces, who are staying with them.  Miss Grevile and Miss Fanny soon after returnd from their walk and with them another morning visitor.  Nothing could be more friendly and kind than all the three sisters were.  They shewd me a beautiful sopha cushion that Miss Grevile has work’d and of which they are very proud.  I sat some time with them and then went to Miss Hough’s.  She was not a home, next call’d at Mrs Lowry’s, she was better, her servant said and would have been happy to see  me, but she had seen three or four peaple and felt fatigued.  I left a Card for Mrs Jackson.  from there I went to Mr Davis’s, saw poor Mrs Langden’s nice maid who told me the two brothers left Bath yesterday.  She took my Card to give them when they return.  Between five and six o’clock Mrs Drummond call’d.  She said she was at home and was vex’d that I was not let in this morning.  She ask’d me to tea on Wednesday next and did not go away till near six o’clock and I was obliged to scratch a note to Emma to enclose Miss Pyne’s butcher’s Bill, which they left unpaid, and I then hurried down to the Miss Pyne’s, where I was most kindly received and spent a quiet evening.  While we were at tea, Kate talk’d a great deal and was in very good spirits, too good indeed, as they appear’d to arise from excitement.  Freeman fetched me home at half past nine, but they had her in the Drawing Room and talkd to her some time, so that it was near ten when I came away.  I hard from Emma. They had a very pleasant ride to Charlton, where they arrived at half past seven, having  left Bath at three and Miss Pyne was not at all fatigued, but enjoyd her ride very much, had a good night and felt very comfortable the next day.  Mrs Chamier very kindly asked me to dine there tomorrow, but I declined.  I heard from Emma and wrote to her.

Saturday 5 June 1841

A fine day with a good deal of cold wind.  Jane Pyne calld to say she had heard from Miss Chambers and they were all well.  I call’d at Mrs Chamier’s to ask if they would like to come here at 4 o’clock to see Lord Duncan and Mr Roebuck make their public entry as colleagues to represent Bath in the next Parliament.  I did not sit down at Mrs Chamier’s, for fear I should stay as long as I did yesterday.  Just as I was coming away, Mrs Crawford came in.  We pass’d in the doorway and she very smilingly askd me how I did, which I courteously returnd and we parted.  I went up to Mrs Simpson’s, who was not at home and then to Mrs Thornton’s, saw her and the Major.  After sitting a short time, I went to Mrs Western’s, who was not at home and then to Mrs Hardcastle’s, saw her and a young lady who is staying with her.  In my way home I call’d on Miss Shirley, who was out, and when I came home Ann said she had just been here.  Miss Martha Helican and a very lovely girl, whose name she did not mention, came here to see (which Mrs Chamier did not) Lord Duncan’s and Mr Roebuck’s public entry, but were disappointed, as they were obliged to go home to dinner at 5 o’clock and the Radicals did not arrive till eight, attended by such a concourse of the lowest order of Rabble as was scarcely ever seen in Bath before.  His Lordship made his entry in an open Carriage and four, he standing with his hat in his hand, looking  like an Oaf and not appearing to take notice of any body or thing.  By his side was seated Dr Harvey (Quack) and opposite also seated Jacob Barrow and his Pa and on the Box Mr Jolly, an appropriate companion for the other four.  They alighted at their Committee Room at Miss Williams’s and made their speeches to the mob from the leads over the shop.  The noise and uproar as they pass’d down the street was deafening, but there was no confusion or riot at night. There was a heavy shower of rain when I went to bed.

John Arthur Roebuck by Maull & Polyblank, albumen print, arched top, published August 1856 (National Portrait Gallery).
John Arthur Roebuck by Maull & Polyblank, albumen print, arched top, published August 1856.
(National Portrait Gallery)

Sunday 6 June 1841

A fine day.  I went to St. John’s twice and staid the Communion.  Saw Mrs Captain Jones and her son there in the afternoon.  I did not go any where but to Church.  Heard from Miss Chambers.  Miss Workman sent Mary in the evening to enquire after me, fearing, as she had not seen me for two or three days, that I was not well.  I was very cold in the evening.  I heard from Miss Chambers.

Monday 7 June 1841

A fine day, but very chilly.  I did not go out all day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and sat some time.  They kindly ask’d me to dine with them tomorrow.

Lord Duncan and Mr Roebuck are going to all the shops in Milsom Street to ask for votes.  I should not think they were very successful at this end of the street, as most of the inhabitants are Conservative.

I wrote to Miss Chambers.  Miss Hill call’d and ask’d me to tea tomorrow to meet Miss Shirley, but when I heard Mrs Ridpath and her sister were also to be there, I declined, as I do not know them and do not wish it.

Tuesday 8 June 1841

A very cold day and gloomy looking.  I call’d on Miss Workman, who was very well and ask’d me to tea this evening or tomorrow, both which days I am engaged.  From her I went to get some red wafers to kill the cock roaches (one or two having appeared lately) and some steel pens.  I was very cold when I came home.  Two of the Miss Grevile’s call’d while I was out and Mrs Kipling paid me a long visit after I returned.  I dined at Mrs Chamier’s and Miss Webb came to tea, after which Mrs Chamier play’d Cribbage and Georgina and Miss Webb work’d.

At dinner we had a very nice looking veal pie, curry, beautiful peas and new potatoes, an open fruit tart and a very nice baked pudding and after, a large dish of delicious strawberries.  Freeman fetch’d me at 11 o’clock.  It was fair, but the night look’d very black and it was very cold.

Wednesday 9 June 1841

Gloomy and very cold in the morning, but the sun came out in the middle of the day, which made it much more chearful looking, but not warmer.  Miss Shirley call’d.  She did not go to Miss Hill yesterday evening, having sat up the whole of Monday night at Bath Easton with Mrs Hale’s youngest child, who had one of the fits all her children have been subject to and in which the poor little creature continued insensible for nearly six hours, during which time she was cupped in four different places, leeches put on wherever they would bite, the temporal artery opened, mustard poultices to her feet and the calves of her legs, without having any effect, and at last the medical man applied cotton dipp’d in ether and set on fire, in four different places to the back, under cupping glasses and that brought her to her herself.  I do not suppose she was sensible to the tortures she was undergoing at the time, but she must be suffering severely now.  The medical man never left her for five hours.

Batheaston near Bath: a street scene, 1834. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston near Bath: a street scene, 1834.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Jane Pyne calld, and while she was here Mrs Hardcastle and her young friend, whose name I do not know, came in.  Mrs H had heard from Oldbury and kindly came to tell me that both Mrs Jones and Maria were better.  Jane Pyne offered to lend me her little hen canary to put with Emma’s bird, to see if they would breed and went home and fetched it and we put the two cages close to each other, that they may become acquainted, before they inhabit the same cage.  I had a note from Mrs Drummond to say she was in bed with a cold and to put me off till tomorrow or Friday.  I fix’d the latter day.  About half past seven, to my surprise, Miss Workman came in.  She said she did not expect to see me, as I had told her I was engaged, but she thought she would call.  I believe she came to see if I was really engaged.  She did not stay long, as she was going to take her walk,  rather late I think, such a cold evening.  Jane Pyne wanted me to go to them this evening or any evening this week, as did Miss Workman.  I told the former I would go to them on Saturday, but excused myself to the latter, till next week, as there is only tomorrow and I did not wish to go to her so soon again.  I heard from Miss Wood, who was to leave Ireland last Monday.

Thursday 10 June 1841

Still very cold.  I did not go out all day and no one call’d.  Mary came from Miss Workman to enquire after me in the evening and brought the Bath Paper.  Mrs Bird, who lived with us formerly in Edgar Buildings, came to see Freeman and came up stairs to see me.  She is looking remarkably well and is certainly not so deaf as she was.  I wrote to Peter Touray and enclosed the Power of Attorney to receive our new joint Annuities.

I put the two little birds together and they agree very well.

Friday 11 June 1841

A fine day out, but still cold.  Mrs Clough came with a message from Miss Chambers to say every thing had been explained satisfactorily regarding the Butcher’s Bill!! I suppose I shall hear more of the matter by and bye.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and askd me to dine with her on Sunday.  She is very sanguine of the success of Lord Powerscourt and very anxious for his being returned.  There has been a party of very little boys going about the streets with Roebuck’s colours all day, but in the evening they become more numerous, being joined by a large body of much bigger one, who made a great shouting and noise. About ten o’clock a great Mob went up, hurraing most vociferously.  They were apparently escorting two or three who were walking at their head, but it was too dark to distinguish whether it was Mr Roebuck, but I conclude it was by the class that composed the attendants.  When they came to this part of the street, there was as much hooting and hissing as cheering.  I was to have drank tea with Mrs Drummond, but I did not feel very well, so I wrote her a note of excuse, for which I believe she was much obliged, as she sent word her cold was still very indifferent.  I wrote a long letter to Emma.

Richard Wingfield, 6th Viscount Powerscourt by Alfred, Count D'Orsay, pencil and chalk, 1841. (National Portrait Gallery)
Richard Wingfield, 6th Viscount Powerscourt by Alfred, Count D’Orsay, pencil and chalk, 1841.
(National Portrait Gallery)

Saturday 12 June 1841

Fine, but cold.  I call’d on Mrs Chamier. She was just gone out, but I sat some time with dear Georgina and then went to Mrs Drummond, who had got her bonnet and shawl on to take a ride with Mrs Pierrepont, who came for her in a few minutes and I went to Miss Shirley’s.  Saw her, but the Admiral was out.  When I came home, Freeman told me Miss Hough had call’d and had left some intelligence that she was sure would shock me; the death of poor Mr Darwin!! after only two days’ illness.  I am sincerely grieved, for tho’ I should never see him again, I can never forget the many pleasant, chearful hours I have pass’d in his society and his loss will be irreparable to his wife and children, for there never was a more affectionate husband and father. I drank tea with Kate and Jane Pyne, the former appears better.

Sunday 13 June 1841

Dry, but very gloomy looking.  I went to St. John’s twice.  The Chapel was crowded in the morning.  Mrs and one of the Miss Balls sat in our Pew, the latter was suffering from a headache, which she said proceeded from the heaviness of the air, and she was sure there was thunder about and there was certainly great appearance of it, for when I came out of the Chapel, the whole sky was darkened clouds, as black and heavy as I ever saw them.  It was frightful, but they pass’d off without falling.

I call’d on Miss Workman in my way home from Church and found her very well.  I dined at Mrs Pierrepont’s, who was very kind, met Miss Uniack, who is so much alter’d I should not have known her, she is looking so ill and thin.  She appears to be going into a Consumption.  It turned out a fine evening and Mrs Pierrepont and I walkd about her garden for half an hour after dinner, at which we had a Dory and shrimp sauce, roast beef, asparagus, new potatoes and most delicious gooseberry Fool.  Freeman fetched me before ten.  Mrs Smith call’d while I was out and left word she would call again between 12 and 1 tomorrow.

Monday 14 June 1841

A fine day, but a good deal of wind, which was chilly.  Mrs Drummond call’d early.  She wanted to know if she had extended the work of her chair seat to the proper size, which I could not tell her, as Miss Bode has still got mine, which I do not believe she had began, as she will not let me see it, tho’ she promised I should have it finished today.

Miss Hough also call’d.  She told me poor Mr Darwin died of obstruction of bowels!  He was taken ill on Tuesday night and died Thursday at 4 o’clock!  Poor dear man!  He has left few like him.  Mrs Smith neither came or sent, which was very rude I think, as she kept me at home till 3 o’clock, when I went twice to Miss Bode’s, but could not see her either time.  She press’d me very much to stay and drink tea with her.  She expected Miss Shute and somebody else, but I could not have staid if she had been alone, as I had to finish my letters to Miss Wood and Emma.  From her I call’d at Mrs Pierrepont’s door to tell her she might hear the day fix’d for seeing the Pictures at Corsham at the York House.  I then left word at Mrs Drummond’s that I had not got the size of the chair seat, but would send it her tomorrow.  I came home quite tired.  While I was out, Mrs Thackery call’d (the third time, I am sure it is kind of her) and Mrs and Miss Chamier had a letter in the evening from the latter, enclosing one for Miss Shirley, which I was to send if I was disengaged and could meet her at their house tomorrow evening.  I sent the one to Miss Shirley (who was disengaged) and wrote one of acceptance to dear Georgina.  Mrs Drummond sent to beg I would not take the trouble to send the patterns, as she would call on me tomorrow, about twelve o’clock.  I wrote to Miss Wood and Emma of the melancholy event at Elston.  The little bird laid an egg.

Tuesday 15 June 1841

A dull looking morning, but the sun came out afterwards and it look’d more chearful.  As Miss Bode did not send me the pattern last night, I desired Ann to go while I was at breakfast to say I must have the work, and she was not to come away without it, but she returned without the work, but bringing the size of it in paper, and saying that Miss Bode was coming to me.  I immediately went to the shop, where I could make nothing of her prevaricating sister, so I proceeded to her lodging in Cleveland Place, and there a very civil girl told me that she had been gone out about ten minutes and that she was gone  “to Mrs Admiral Pierrepont’s and a Miss Chapman’s.”  I returned as fast as I could and was very tired, for it is a long walk for me, and soon after I returned, she came, but without the work, and from what she said I am certain she has not yet began it.  She talked a great deal also about her poverty and her anxiety not to offend any one and that if she had not laid mine by, to do some for a lady who was going out of Bath, she would have lost three pounds.  This was all very well to say, but I would have given her four pounds, the three pounds lady’s work would have been put aside for mine.

Mrs Drummond call’d.  She complained of not feeling well and was going home to take a remedy.  She heard this morning from Mrs Quarrier, but did not bring the letter with her.  I gave her the pattern of the chair, with which she was satisfied, without asking again to see the work.

I was surprised by an unexpected visit from Captain Pyne, accompanied by Jane.  He is on his way to Bristol on business and came through Bath to see his sister and kindly call’d to tell me that he left Emma at Charlton yesterday morning, quite well.  I drank tea at Mrs Chamier’s. I met Miss Shirley and Miss Webb.  Miss Shirley has finished one of the Bell pulls she is working for Miss Justice and it is beautiful.  She went away about half past ten, but Freeman was not to come for me till eleven, and when she did come, Miss Webb and I did not come away till near twelve.  We had some delicious cream ice and cake at ten o’clock.  The streets were very quiet when I came home, but Freeman said there had been a great deal of noise and confusion in the earlier part of the evening.

There was a second little egg in the nest this morning.

No Observer!

Wednesday 16 June 1841

A very dull looking day with but little sun.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d.  She came to conciliate between Miss Bode and me, at Miss B’s request.  I told her that there was no necessity for it, for I had no intention of taking the work from her.  The old housekeeper that used to live with the Darwins came to ask if I had heard any thing of them or Miss Wood lately.  She said she had dreamed so much of Mr Darwin this week, that she could not help coming to enquire if they were likely to come to Bath again.  The good old soul was greatly shockd when she heard what had happend and said “Oh, how I pity poor, dear Mrs Darwin.”

Miss Drewett call’d and made a long visit.  She has been staying at Mr Crook’s and only returned on Saturday.

The evening’s Post brought me a beautiful lace bordered envelope enclosing two Cards tied together with silver cord, with “Mr and Mrs Smith” on them.  I could never have guess’d whose marriage they were meant to announce, but the outer envelope also contained a Card of Mrs Lukis’s.  I should like very much to know who she has married and whether it is with the approbation of her family.

A third egg this morning.

No Observer!!

Thursday 17 June 1841

A fine day, but cold in the morning and not very warm afterwards.

Just as I had done breakfast, Ann said Lord Powerscourt was going up the street canvassing, and I had a very good view of him as he went in and out of the shops opposite.  He is not so handsome as he was, but most gentlemanly in his appearance.  I went to Miss Pyne’s to speak about having my straw bonnet cleaned and altered, left my watch at Noble’s for him to see what had occasioned it stopping. Spoke about the urns being mended in the corridor, got a piece of velvet for my head and then came home till after dinner, when I took the “Observer”, which came this morning, to Mrs Chamier’s  and 45 stamps which have pass’d thro’ the Post Office to dear Georgina, who is collecting them for some gentleman, who has laid a wager that he will obtain enough in a certain time to paper a room!  There is nothing too ridiculous to wager upon.  I sat with them more than an hour and then went up to Mrs Thackery and Miss Webb, neither of whom were at home.  In my way back I calld at Mrs Drummond’s, who was denied and then went to Miss Shirley’s, who told me she had just been to call on me.  I sat with her about half an hour and then came home, a good deal tired.

Mary brought me Miss Workman’s Paper in the evening.  There was a heavy shower of rain about 12 o’clock, but it did  not last long.

A fourth egg.

Friday 18 June 1841

Waterloo Day.  Not a very bright one, but it was dry till the evening, when there were one or two showers, but only enough to lay the dust.  I did not go out all day and for a wonder no one call’d.  I heard from dear Hal a very kind letter to ask me to stand Godmother to his little boy, who is christened by the names of “Henry Brewer” after his two Grandfathers, who one is to be the little fellow’s Godfather.  I wrote to Hal to decline the compliment, as I consider the office a very serious and responsible one.  I shall be very sorry if they feel hurt or offended by my refusal, as I do not think the request was meant merely as a compliment, as Hal says “It will gratify us all, particularly my father, if you will be the little fellow’s Godmother.”  Hal, his wife and child go into Yorkshire on Saturday 26th for a month.  The young gentleman begins his travels at an early age, two month’s old!

It began to rain about ten o’clock and I believe continued all night.  It will do a great deal of good, as it was much wanted.

Not another egg.

Saturday 19 June 1841

A very cloudy, heavy looking morning and not warmer for the rain of last night.  It rained fast here for a short time about 11 o’clock, but was fair the rest of the day, with a high wind.  I did not go out at all.  Mrs Cazelet Smith call’d and was very obliging in her manner.  She has not yet heard again from Mr Harrison, so could tell me nothing new about poor Mrs Darwin.  In the course of conversation, she said she was in her 80th year!!!  I could scarcely believe her, for she has such a smooth skin, without a wrinkle and her eyes are so bright, no one would take her to be more than 60.  She does not look so old as I do.  She very politely said she would be happy to see me, if I would call.

The man sent the urn home, apparently very nicely mended, for which he charged 3/-.   Mrs Pyne also sent my straw bonnet, so beautifully done it looks like a new one, but she has not made it deep enough behind, so the young person who brought it (and who was one of the civilest girls I ever saw) took it back to add a few rows and I am to have it again on Monday.  The little bird has not laid any more eggs, so I suppose she will now sit on the four she has laid.

The clock stopped, without any apparent cause, at three minutes past four this morning.  I chanced to wake about an hour after, and set it again, and it has gone very well ever since.

Sunday 20 June 1841

So much appearance of rain that I took my umbrella to Church, but fortunately did not want it, as it continued dry till after I returned.  The Chapel was more crowded than I ever saw it.  The Miss Balls sat in our Pew and were very polite.  I shook hands with Mrs de Visne and her son and youngest daughter.  It began to rain fast about half past two, which prevented my going to Church a second time and continued without intermission till six, after which it was fine.  I read the Service in the evening to Ann and went to bed early, not feeling very well, owing I think to having dined on peas, which made me feel uncomfortable.  I had a kind note from dear Georgina Chamier to dine with them tomorrow.  I sent a verbal answer in the affirmative.  I hear from Miss Wood, but with nothing new respecting Mr Darwin’s death.

Monday 21 June 1841

A very showery morning, but fine in the afternoon.  To my great surprise, dear Mrs Turner of Perrymead paid me a visit, accompanied by Miss Barry and Sam Delprat, the first time the former has call’d since dear Mr Turner’s death.  She was looking, I thought, very well for her, but she said she did not feel so well as at this time last year.  She was very kind and press’d my going to spend a day with her before I went to Charlton, which I promised to do.  I dined at Mrs Chamier’s, who was not well after dinner, occasioned I think from the mixture of stewed veal, “Frier’s Omelet” and strawberries in her stomach.  She laid on the sopha till tea time, when I persuaded her to have some strong green tea, which took away her headache.  Dear Georgina kindly allowed me take the pattern of one of her collars in the evening.  Ann came to walk home with me at seven o’clock,  poor Freeman having one of her bad sick headaches, but I found her at the door looking out for me, having been alarmed between seven and eight o’clock by a noise, two or three times repeated up stairs, as if someone was attempting to get into the house.  Both she and Ann were dreadfully frightened. The latter went to Edgar Buildings to see for John Cummings, but there was not a Chairman on the Stand.  She then went next door to Staffords.  They very civily allowed her to go out at the back of their house to see if any one was on the roof of ours.  As she could not see any body there, they gained courage to go into the Garrets, where they found every thing safe, just after which Robert Tugg call’d unexpectedly in his way thro’ Bath and very good naturedly went up stairs and examined all the rooms and even the chimneys and opened the trap door to the roof, but there was no appearance of any person having been there, which set their minds at rest and allay’d their alarm in some degree, particularly as Robert thought the noise proceeded from rats.

At dinner we had a stewed breast of veal with peas, curry and rice, new potatoes, cauliflower and a delicious gooseberry Friars omelet, and very fine strawberries after dinner.

Tuesday 22 June 1841

A showery morning which was unfortunate as it was the Rose Shew at the Victoria Garden.  Mrs Hardcastle and her young friend called before the rain began, as did Mr Wiltshire, the former to ask me to go to her Thursday evening to meet Mrs Harvey and play Quadrille, the latter to ask us (for he did not know Emma was gone to Charlton) to go with him to the Gardens.  He very kindly said he would take me and bring me home, but I was afraid to venture, and it was fortunate I did not, for about three o’clock it raind very fast and continued some time.  I have not seen Mr Wiltshire look so well for a long time as he did today.

Miss Shirley call’d to say good bye, as she is going to London on Thursday next, instead of the first or seventh of July, as she intended, taking advantage of Mr Hales going as an escort.  She told me she had just seen the death of Mr Ensor in the Paper, at the age of 67.  I should have thought he was much older.  It rained so fast when she went away, that she borrow’d an umbrella, which she soon returned.  I had a note from Mrs Drummond to ask me to meet Mrs Chamier at tea on Thursday and she also sent me a letter to direct to Miss Wilson, which I did, and her servant waited for it, but I wrote a note and sent it by Ann to say I was engaged to Mrs Hardcastle and at the same time sent the Observer (which came this morning) to Mrs Chamier and Ann also paid the grocer’s monthly Bill.  When Mrs Hardcastle was going away, she said “As you are alone, you had better come and dine on Thursday and then we will be ready for the Quadrille.  That there will be only yourself and I shall make no difference in my dinner.”  So I am to dine there at half past 4.

Wednesday 23 June 1841

A showery day.  Miss Hill call’d and saw Mr Vezey here about a Carriage.  She was detained some time by a shower.  She askd me to dine with her on Friday, to meet Mrs and Miss Coates, who are coming from Clifton by the Railroad to spend the day and to return the same way in the evening.  She intends going to Brighton next Thursday to stay some time.

Thursday 24 June 1841

A fine morning.  I call’d on Miss Workman and the Miss Pynes.  Kate is looking better and thinks herself so, Miss Workman very well.  I dined at Mrs Hardcastle’s.  It rained slightly as I went, but not enough to make the streets wet.  Instead of my being the only guest there, Mrs Harvey, Mrs Hinton and Dr Spry at dinner and in the evening a Mrs Hunt and her neice and Mr and Mrs Ware (Mrs Densher’s friends).  A Whist and Quadrille table at the latter, of which I playd with Mrs Harvey, Mrs Hinton and Mrs Hunt and won 2/6d.  We playd quite a new game to me, Spades, the common suit for which we were paid 1 fish for our Mats. Aces and Game Hearts, 2 for each, Diamonds 3 and Clubs 4, but no buying Kings.  I like our own old game much better.  Freeman came to fetch me, but it had been raining all the evening, so I sent her home, Mrs Harvey saying she would send back her Chair for me, and it was very fortunate for me that she did so, for the rain poured in torrents.  It really sounded on the top of Chair, as if it was poured from pails.

We had at dinner a very fine piece of Salmon, boil’d leg of lamb, a goose, peas, new potatoes, cucumber, a custard pudding and currant and raspberry tart, and beautiful strawberries and cakes after dinner.

Friday 25 June 1841

A showery day, in a heavy one of which I was caught going to Miss Hill’s and the wind was so high I had difficulty to hold the umbrella.  Jane was very kind and Mrs Coates very obliging, as she always is, and her daughter intending I believe, to be equally so, but she is not so agreeable as her mother, and is, I think, conceited and inclined to be pert.   They went away at half past seven and Freeman came for me at a little past nine, but sat with Mrs Hudson a quarter of an hour, as I had done before dinner.  Fortunately it was a very fine evening for my walking home, tho’ rather cool.

We had at dinner an excellent green pea soup, ribs of lamb, veal pie, peas, new potatoes, cauliflower, bread pudding and currant tart.  Strawberries, cherries and a glass of wine before I came away, as had Freeman.  When I came home I learnt Mrs Chamier was suffering very much from the toothache.

Saturday 26 June 1841

A showery morning, but fine in between.  I call’d on Miss Workman, Mrs Chamier and Mrs Pierrepont.  Miss W was very well, but both Mrs P and Mrs C very poorly.  I drank tea at Mrs Drummonds, met the two Miss Mackays, Lady Leighton and a friend of the latter’s.  I was disappointed at not meeting the Chamiers and Mrs Pierrepont.  I took my work, but I might as well have left it at home, as Lady Leighton’s eyes were so weak she could not bear the candles on the table.  It was very stupid and I was glad when the Chair came for me at ten o’clock, which I was obliged to have both going and returning, on account of the rain.

Monday 28 June 1841

A fine day, with the exception of one vivid flash of lightening, followd instantaneously by a very loud clap of thunder, a violent shower of hail and rain, which dispersed the Mob before Mr Roebuck’s and Lord Duncan’s Committee Room at Miss Williams’s while it lasted, this being the day for nominating the Members, and a tumultuous day it was.  A scene of riot, drunkenness and confusion from morning to night.  I did not go out, nor did any one call, the streets being full with processions of Chartists, Socialists, Trades Unionists and Railroad labourers, nearly all in a state of drunkenness.  Mr Vezey’s windows were broken at his Manufactory and I expected they would be the same here, but fortunately we escaped.  I did not go to bed till after 2 o’clock, I was so afraid of some riot and mischief.

I wrote to Emma.  Heard from Mrs Jones.

Tuesday 29 June 1841

A very fine day, but one of tumult from beginning to end.  The Radicals parading the streets with their Bands all day, with the cry of “Roebuck forever” vociferate incessantly.  I believe it was known from the beginning that Lord Powerscourt had no chance of success, but it was supposed that Mr Bruges was certain of being elected.  He, however, shared the fate of Lord Powerscourt and the two “out and out Radicals”, Mr Roebuck and Lord Duncan brought in with a triumphant majority of upwards of 3 hundred!!!  The hustings were decorated with two Caps of Liberty and a tricolourd Flag!!!  and such a scene of riot and uproar was never witnessed in Bath before, there being at least fifteen thousand Radical Wretches collected and they bore down every thing before them. The poor Blues were most infamously treated and the speeches on the Hustings from the Radical Party were most inflammatory and seditious.  There was a good deal of clamour and noise in the evening, but not so much as I expected, and the night passd quietly.

The Election: The New Member Addresses the People by C. F. Wicksteed, 1838 (c) Palace of Westminster; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Election: The New Member Addresses the People by C. F. Wicksteed, 1838
(c) Palace of Westminster; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

I wrote to dear Mrs Jones in reply to her kind invitation received last night, to say it was not in my power to go to Oldbury till after I had paid my visit to Charlton, but should it be convenient to her to receive me after that, I should have much pleasure in going to her. I wrote to Emma.  Heard from dear Henry.

Wednesday 30 June 1841

A fine day for Chairing the New Members.  I wish it had poured and that they and their Mob had been wet to their skins.  It would have been of great service to the latter, as I do not believe the majority of them had been washed since they were infants.

My Lady Camperdown breakfasted with Mr Jolly at his shop in Milsom Street to “See the Shew”!!! which consisted of an open Carriage, drawn by six of the York Horse Greys, with Lord Duncan (looking as if he was going to be hangd and as if he richly deserved it), Mr Roebuck (all smiles and bows) and three of their Radical friends.  A Carriage and four Greys filled with incendiaries, General Andrews’s Carriage empty and two of Mr Perfect’s (to shew that he had two, I suppose).  The rest of the trail, composed of Flys and carts, followd by very many thousands of the Scum of the Earth, carrying two or three hundred banners and emblems.  Amongst the former was one representing a Clergyman in the Pulpit, with two or three men, I might almost say Devils, rushing forward with hatchets in their hands to cut him down!! and in the latter, three coffins, two of them black with P on one and B on the other, intended to designate Powerscourt and Bruges, with a figure dressd in a surplice with a book in his hand, to represent a Clergyman reading the Burial Service, placed between them.  The crowds in the streets were immense, but only the Radical shopkeepers at their windows. In Gay Street every blind was drawn down and it was the same at every Conservative House that the procession passd, except at this.  Mrs and Miss Chamier and Miss Webb were the only persons who came here.  They got out on the leads and the Mob very gallantly hissd and hooted us as they passd, which they ought not to have done, as Miss Webb very improperly and to my great annoyance had dressd herself in pale blue from “top to toe”, bonnet, cap, shawl and gown!!  It made me so angry I could scarcely be civil to her.  There were a great many peaple seriously injured by the liberal Mob, particularly a Mr Goldstone, a very handsome, fine young man, who had headed the Blue procession of the day of nomination.  A Wretch cut him across the forehead, from temple to temple with a knife and he is considered in a very dangerous state.  Poor Lord Powerscourt has been treated most infamously, from the day he came to canvas to the end of the contest.  I should think he would never visit Bath again, as long as he lives.

Fashion plate for July 1841 from Graham's Magazine. (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for July 1841 from Graham’s Magazine.
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Thursday 1 July 1841

A wet day, but quiet and comfortable after the riot and din of yesterday.  I did not go out, nor did any one call.  I got up early and workd the whole day on Eliza Quarrier’s chair.  I never moved from it, but to eat my dinner and drink my tea.  I wrote to dear Henry.

Friday 2 July 1841

A fine day, with slight showers in the morning.  Mrs Hardcastle and Miss Hughes call’d.  Mrs H had heard from Mrs Jones, telling her she had askd me to go to Oldbury, in consequence of which, she very kindly came to say, she was going there on Tuesday next and would take me.  I told her I had written to Mrs Jones to say it was not in my power to go at present.  Mrs Slade and Miss Helican call’d, but would not come up, as it was the first time Mrs Slade had walkd out since her illness.  I had also a visit from Mrs Day of Hinton, who came up to ask me to spend a few days with her, and appeard really anxious that I should do so.  I told her the same as I told Mrs Jones and the old lady said she was much disappointed.  She had hoped to see me before, but her house had been so full she had not had a bed to offer me, but she hoped, when I returnd from Miss Pyne’s, she should have the pleasure of seeing me.  Mrs Chamier call’d at the door to ask me to dine with her tomorrow.  Wrote a long letter to Miss Wilson.  Mrs Harrison let her lodging this morning.  A lady and her daughter arrived in a very handsome Carriage, with a man and a maid servant and there are also two lads, who appear to be her sons.  Mrs Turner, accompanied by Sam and Miss Barry, call’d again to remind me of my promise to dine with her and fix’d next Monday.  She most kindly said she would sent the Carriage for me.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and askd me to dine with her on Sunday.

Saturday 3 July 1841

A very warm day, with now and then a slight shower.  I call’d on Miss Workman, Admiral Shirley, the Miss Pynes and the Miss Helicans.  They were all at home and I sat some time with each, except the Miss Helicans, where I found their brother was just come from Bristol, to stay only a few hours, so I would not sit down, as I know how disagreeable it is to be interrupted on those occasions – I was quite uncomfortable when I came home, from the heat, so I dressd directly, by way of refreshing myself.  The clouds lookd so black, there was every appearance of thunder and rain, so I hurried to Mrs Chamier’s some time before dinner.  They did not hear me knock and as they were not in the Drawing Room I begged Portbury would not let them know I was there.  I took a book and sat near half an hour before Georgina came down, who was all astonishment to find me there, as she had been ready for some time, but did not come down, not suspecting that I was arrived.  Miss Webb was there in the evening and I spent a chearful, pleasant day.  While I was out in the morning, I met Mrs Drummond, who askd me, if I had nothing else to do, to join her.  I went with her to a Trunk makers in Union Passage, where we heard a most beautiful musical instrument, which formed a Band and playd delightfully.  Mrs D said she should like to possess it, but the price was 600 guineas!!!  I walkd with her as far as the York House, where we took leave.  She hoped I would excuse her calling, as she had seen me, as she had a good deal to do before she went, which she intends doing on Wednesday and she should be very busy packing all Tuesday “and I shall take your collar with me.” I could not understand what she meant, till she explaind that she never saw me in the collar I had on, trimmd with the beautiful Valenceines lace, that she did not wish to take possession of it.

York House, early nineteenth-century. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.
York House, early nineteenth-century. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath.

At Mrs Chamier’s we had for dinner an excellent green pease soup, a most tender, savoury goose, then delicious peas, new potatoes and currant and raspberry tart and cherries and gooseberries after dinner.

Mrs Kiplin call’d in the evening, while I was at Mrs Chamier’s, to say she was going away Wednesday for the Summer.

Sunday 4 July 1841

There was a little rain in the morning and it lookd so threatening, I took my umbrella to Church, but had no occasion to use it, as it continued fine all day and was very warm.  I went again at 3 o’clock. Mrs and the two Miss Balls sat in our Pew.  The boys and children made so much noise in the court behind the Chapel that it was quite annoying.  Mrs Ball said it was very improper it should be allowd, there ought to be a Policeman stationed there during the Church Service to keep the boys quiet.  I dined at Mrs Pierreponts, and owing to the difference of the clocks, I was not there when dinner was ready to put on the table and she was going to send John for me.  She was very friendly and kind and would not believe it was ten o’clock, when Freeman came for me.  She told me she had given Mrs Uniack all her jewellery and ornaments when she was here, except her Diamonds and one set of Gold. Those she had also given her, but retained them to wear if she liked.  She shewd me a beautiful pair of earrings, broach and ornament of Opals set in Diamonds, which was very beautiful.  Mrs Uniack is very lucky, for her mother had a large collection of very expensive jewellery.

We had a better dinner than usual, a very nice piece of Salmon, but no sauce but melted butter and fish sauces, a roasted fowl, very tender, a very good tongue, nice young peas, potatoes, currant and raspberry tart and a Lobster.  If the latter had been made into sauce, it would have been a great improvement to the Salmon.  There were raspberrys and the usual cakes after dinner.

I heard from dear Henry.

Monday 5 July 1841

A fine day, tho’ it look’d threatening in the morning. While I was at breakfast.  Miss Sarah Grevile call’d to say she was to meet at Mrs Turner’s at dinner, that the Carriage was to go to her, and she was to call for me, and that she ordered a Fly to bring her home at night and should be very happy if I would allow her to bring me back and that she had call’d thus early fearing that I might make some arrangement for returning before she saw me.  Nothing could be kinder.  She call’d for me about half past two and we had a pleasant ride to Mrs Turner’s, for I was not afraid of her horses.  Dr Hardy was just taking his leave as we arrived.  Mrs Turner pressd him very much to stay and dine, but he said he could not.  Mrs Turner was in very good spirits and quite alert.  She had a very elegant cap on and lookd very pretty.  She did not go down with us to dinner, so there was only Miss Barry, Miss Grevile, Sam and me.  There was a very handsome dinner, as there always is there.  After dinner we walkd in the garden for a long time, most part of which I had rather have been with Mrs Turner, for tho’ it was very pleasant, it seem’d unkind to leave her alone so long and I fear she thought so, for when we went up stairs she said, good humouredly “I thought you never intended to return.”  She shewd us some worsted work sent her by a young friend (flowers on a buff ground) intended for two round hassocks, but I persuaded her to have them made up as stools, for they were too handsome to be used as footstools.  Sam insisted on her shewing us some work of her own doing, which he said was beautiful.  It was a collar, done in the present fashionable work of muslin on lace, and was very beautiful.  Mrs Chamier herself could not have done it better.  I told Sam I admired his taste.

The Fly came a little past nine, with Miss Grevile’s servant, so I was not so much alarm’d as I should otherwise have been and I got home safe, thank God for it, before ten, after spending a very pleasant day.

We had at dinner green peas soup, a beautiful salmon, peel boil’d chickens with white sauce, a made dish of veal, roast beef, cauliflowers, potatoes, cucumbers, currant and raspberry tart, boil’d custards and cheesecakes, and after dinner very fine raspberrys and a profusion of delicious strawberries, so many, that not above two thirds were eaten!

Tuesday 6 July 1841

A fine day.  I  wrote a note to Mr Wiltshire to beg him to call to sign my Certificate, but he did not come, so I fear he is unwell.  Miss Webb call’d and sat a long time.  Just as she was going away, Mrs and Miss Chamier and Captain Holmes came in, the latter came to them unexpectedly on Sunday, but only for two or three days.  He is looking very well and talks of his returning to India soon, but that he has done ever since he came home. They all went away together.  I work’d all the afternoon and evening on Eliza’s chair. Miss Sarah Grevile most kindly brought me a pattern with a white rose in it, which her sister has workd, and it looks beautiful, but it is too large for my work. Mr Allen very kindly sent me three beautiful white cauliflowers and a dish of beans.

Wednesday 7 July 1841

A wet day.  Mr Wiltshire came and signed my Certificate having, as he said, quite forgotten to call yesterday, tho’ he passd the door twice with my note in his hand that he might remember it.  He looks very well,but complains of his breath.  He paid me a long visit and we had a chearful chat, chiefly chat relative to the election, the results of which he laments as much as I do.  I askd him to go to Mrs Chamier to do for her as he has done for me, which he kindly said he would.  I sent Ann to Mrs Chamier for the pattern with the white rose, which fits the space in my work.   I wrote to Peter Touray and sent him my Certificate.  The Eyres have let their lodgings to a young couple, who came in a handsome travelling Carriage, with a very smart ladies maid.  They appear to be a Bride and Bridegroom.

Thursday 8 July 1841

A fine day with the exception of a slight shower now and then.  I went to Russell’s to get the wools for my white rose, for which I gave 5d and 4d for a skein of white silk.  I also went to Brown’s for some pearl buttons and house flannel.  In my way back I met Dr. Davis, who greeted me very kindly, as he always does.  He askd me if I did not feel for him in their disgrace.  I told him so much so, I had not recoverd it yet.  Jane Pyne call’d, but did not stay long.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d while I was beginning my rose.  They told me I had not got the proper shades and dear Georgina very kindly went to Russell’s and Mie’s, but could not get them.  I went in the evening to the shop in the Corridor, to Brown’s and Miss Germain’s, with no better success and I do not know what I shall do.  In my way to Miss Carpenter to pay for my cap (6/6d), I met Kate and Jane Pyne and had a little chat with them.  Mrs Pierrepont calld while I was out.  Mrs Chamier kindly askd me to dine with them on Saturday.  Miss Carpenter sent for my cap to alter and I gave my straw bonnet for her to trim with some white ribbon I had by me, for which she only charges 6d.  I also took my Mechlin lace, which I had again torn, to be mended.  Miss Workman’s Mary brought the Bath Paper.

Friday 9 July 1841

A fine day.  I sent Miss Grevile’s pattern home and the Bath Paper to Mrs Chamier.  Mrs Pierrepont calld again today.  She said she came yesterday to ask me to dine with her on Sunday, but as I was not home, she did not leave the message.  There was a slight shower while she was here and she staid till it was over.  Ann has just told me that Blanch is a Bankrupt!!! and all his goods are to be sold on Monday.  There is no end to the failures in Bath.  Mrs Chamier sent to beg I would go to her at 5, instead of 6 o’clock tomorrow, and bring the fish and counters with me.  Concluding on the message that she had some friends in the evening, I wrote a note to say I was sure it would be more convenient if I went in the evening, instead of to dine and therefore she must expect me till seven.  She sent word she should expect me at five.

There was rather a heavy shower in the afternoon.

Saturday 10 July 1841

A fine morning, with a brisk and cold wind.  Freeman brought me up some black and red currants and some gooseberries, part of some of her sister Betsey sent her, soon after which Mr Allen most kindly sent me a quantity of very fine red and white currants and a large plate of strawberries.  It is really very kind of him.  Miss Harvey, and a very genteel young friend of hers staying with her, but whose name I could not catch, and a Mrs Stubbs call’d.  Miss Harvey said she had been unwell and felt very languid and uncomfortable and she look’d very poorly.  A man came to the door at the same time that they did.  He came to say “Mrs Vassall” was in Bath at no 3 Lion Place.  I was in great hopes it was dear Mrs Vassall from Devonshire, but just as I had finished dressing to go to Mrs Chamier’s, Ann Vassall came in.  They came over from Sudbury in the morning and Mrs V was gone to see a friend who lives in Lion Place and staid till I fear’d I should be late at Mrs Chamier’s, but I was there some time before the dinner was announced. There was a Loo party in the evening, Miss Ash, who is always good natured and affable, a Miss Otley, very quiet and pleasant, Miss Webb and a Miss Elizabeth Morris, a great friend of Mrs  Pierrepont’s, but who is the most disagreeable woman I ever saw, snatching at every thing eatable that came in her way and so grosely rude at cards, I scarce be civil to her.  I won 12/- a halfpenny Loo!!! and at one time had won a great deal more, but as every one at the table was losing,  I thought it but right to give them an opportunity of wining some thing back, so I playd every time, by which means I diminishd my gains considerably.  It turn’d out a most tempestuous evening.  The wind was very high and the rain pourd (literally in torrents).  When Miss Ash’s Chair came, Miss Morris had not arrived and she began to think, as the weather was so very bad, they would not come, and as Miss Ash good humouredly askd her if she should send hers back for her, she said yes, but when she found it was not a Sedan, she said she would not have it, as she could not think of going in a Wheel Chair in such weather.  While she was hesitating, Miss Ash went away, but Mrs Chamier kindly desired Portbury to call after the man and desire him to return for me, which he did in a few minutes.  When Miss Morris, without the least ceremony, chose to take him and said she would send him back for me.  When I came home.  Freeman said it was very lucky I got a Chair, for they could not get one to send for me, the rain pourd in such torrents, the men would not continue on the Stands.  I gave the man a shilling, instead of sixpence, for which he was very much obliged.

We had at dinner a very excellent green pea soup, a duck as big as a goose, a curry, rice, peas, new potatoes and a currant and raspberry tart and strawberries and raspberries after dinner, and in the evening sandwiches and hot negus.

Sunday 11 July 1841

The streets were washd clean by the deluge of last night and were quite dry, but it lookd so threatening for rain that I took my umbrella to Church, but fortunately did not want it in the morning.  The two Miss Morris’s were at St. John’s.  Miss Elizabeth bow’d very civilly to me as she pass’d.  They were there again in the afternoon and, to my surprise, it was Mrs Pierrepont who askd if she might come into our Pew. She told me she had call’d in her way down to ask me to take her with me but, finding I was gone, she followed’d me.  When we came out of Church, the Miss Morris’s joined us and Miss Elizabeth hoped the Chairman returnd for me last night and that I got home without inconvenience. She staid back to walk with Mrs Ball and her daughters, who staid in our Pew.  Mrs Pierrepont and I walk’d home together.  It rained a little as we came up the street and she wanted me, as I was going to dine with her, to go on there, but I said I must wash my hands first.  It was so dark and the clouds were so black, I made haste to go, for fear of being obliged to have a Chair. It rained a little, but not enough to wet me, and the wind was so high it dried as it fell.  Mrs P was very kind.  Freeman fetch’d me at half past nine and it was quite fine to walk home.

We had at dinner fried Soal, a very fine duck, peas, potatoes and a very bad cherry pie.  I never tasted so bad a one, and very large gooseberries after dinner.

Monday 12 July 1841

A cold day with now and then a slight shower.  I went to see Miss Workman, found her very well and in good spirits, dressing to dine at Mrs Nicholas’s.  I sat with her more than half an hour, when there was so much appearance of rain, I came away.  There was a sharp shower as I came thro’ the Square, but it did not last long.  I call’d at Miss Carpenter’s to pay her 6d for trimming my straw bonnet.  I bought a cap for Emma and paid 6/6d for it and bespoke one of the same sort for myself.  As I was sitting at work after tea, Kate and Jane Pyne call’d, but did not stay long.

I had a note from Miss Chambers to tell me that our kind old friend Mrs Keen was so ill, there was no hope of her recovery!  I was very sorry to hear it, for she has been very kind to us and she will be a great loss to the Poor, to whom she was very good.  I wrote to her servant Elizabeth to enquire after her and enclosed it to Mary Freeman, as I do not know her name, so could not direct to her.

Tuesday 13 July 1841

A showery day again, but the rain was very slight and did not last many minutes at a time.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d and sat a little while.  I heard from Peter Touray with the second half of the B P B for £82.0.4.  I join’d them together and Ann took it to Mr Tugwell and got £70 in their notes and £12 in cash.  I workd hard all the afternoon on Eliza’s Chair and did not feel very comfortable when I went to bed, my head being rather giddy.

Mrs Osborne came to tell me how kind Mrs Earl has been to her. In addition to many comfortable things she has given her, she has promised to allow her 6d a week towards paying for her lodging.  I gave her 1/-.

Wednesday 14 July 1841

A dry morning, but not chearful looking and between two and three o’clock there was a heavy shower and I heard two claps of thunder at a distance.  The rain continued (but more moderately) for two hours.  My head was so giddy when I got up, I was obliged to have recourse to my usual remedy of Magnesia, which relieved it, but I was not comfortable all day.  No person call’d and I did not go out.  Miss Carpenter sent my cap, for which I paid, but returned it to be altered, as it is so much too large I could not wear it, but the rain coming on, I could not go to speak about it.

Thursday 15 July 1841

St. Swithin, and tho’ the Saint appeard very much inclined to weep, he restrained his tears, as it did not rain the whole day, but it was very cold and particularly at night.  My head still indifferent and I did not go out all day.  Mrs and Miss Chamier calld and said they were sure it arose from my sitting so much to the worsted work, but I do not think that is the cause.  Mrs Chamier ask’d me if I would meet Miss Ash and Miss Otley tomorrow evening (provided they are disengaged) to play Quadrille.

I heard from Elizabeth Adams (Mrs Keen’s servant) that our kind old friend is better.  I wrote to Emma to tell her so.  Mary brought me Miss Workman’s Paper.  Mrs Chamier told me that she has just heard that Miss Gower is to be married, “Not a very brilliant match” the young lady herself says (why they should expect “Brilliant matches” I cannot tell) “but with every prospect of happiness.”

I heard from Elizabeth Adams, Mrs Keen’s maid, to say her Mistress was pronounced out of danger and had sat up for an hour yesterday.  I wrote to Emma.

Friday 16 July 1841

Alternate clouds and sunshine.  I went to Hornby’s and got some stockings, muslin for blinds and brown Holland for a cover for the Drawing Room chair.  From there I went to see old Hayward and tell him to send up for some Caudle.  The poor old man complained of being very unwell.  From there I went to Mrs Palmer’s to desire she would continue the soup to Cryer, while I am away.  I gave her 2/6d on account.  I ordered some Port Wine at Reilly’s and then went to Mrs Chamier’s.  We just met at her door. She and Georgina were coming to it, just as I did.  They said they were going to call to tell me that Miss Otley was engaged this evening but could come tomorrow, if I could.  I staid while Georgina went to Miss Ashe to ask if she was disengaged and, as she was, it was agreed we should assemble at 7 o’clock tomorrow evening.  Mrs C and Georgina came out with me and I intended to call at the Miss Grevile’s and go about my cap, but the clouds were so very black and heavy I thought I had better come home.  While I was out, Janet, Mrs Harvey and Mrs Hinton, who were very obliging and we, had a long chat and the rain pass’d off without falling, tho’ it look’d so threatening.

Saturday 17 July 1841

Fine and warm.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d early.  She said “I did not ask if you were at home, but if you had breakfasted”.  She ask’d me to dine with her tomorrow.  She was going to the Market and begged me to say if there was any thing I preferred, as she could just as well get that, as any thing else.  I assured her it was quite immaterial, as it was her society, not her dinner, that I accepted her kind invitation for.

I spent the evening at Mrs Chamier’s, met Miss Ashe, Miss Otley and Miss Webb.  We play’d Quadrille and I won 5/- and spent a very pleasant, chearful evening. I went in a Wheel Chair, because I put on my new Lilac and white shot silk dress for the first time and I was afraid of spoiling it walking there in the dust, being daylight I could not hold it up.  I walk’d home, as then I could take it up under my cloak.  It was a beautiful night and very mild.

We had, by way of supper, some very nice raspberry ice (so very hard frozen it was with difficulty Mrs Chamier could cut it, even with a knife) and cake.  I heard from Emma and wrote to her.

Sunday 18th July 1841

My Birthday and quite a Summer day.  The heat was so great in St. John’s (which was very crowded) that two ladies went out.  The whole family of the Balls were there, but in three different seats, Mr and Mrs B in one, the two young ladies in another one, their brother in a third.  Mrs B very politely spoke to me as she pass’d and the young ladies bow’d.  The Miss Morris’s were also there.  I bow’d to Miss Elizabeth, who took it so coolly, I determined I would not do it again.

I went to Miss Workman’s on my way home and sat with her a long time, and then call’d at Admiral Shirley’s.  He was just arrived from Clifton to see his daughter Ally, who is going on a visit somewhere.  He told me, to my astonishment, that since I call’d there a fortnight ago, he had been to Waterford, Milford, Tenby and back again to Clifton, where he returns this evening!!  He is looking remarkably well.

Clifton by Charles Branwhite, 1842 (c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Clifton by Charles Branwhite, 1842
(c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Mrs Pierrepont came to go with me to St. John’s at three o’clock.  Miss E Morris sat in our Pew, as did Mrs Ball and her daughters, who appear intimate with the former.  Mrs P and I came out before them, but the Miss M’s joind and walkd with us, Miss E M being very gracious.  We parted at their door, Mrs Pierrepont saying “I shall see you again soon.”  I dined with her. Miss Carpenter has made her a very pretty cap like mine, out of her own materials, which she shew’d me and two other beauties, bought at Mrs Powell’s.  I spent a very sociable, pleasant day and Freeman fetchd me at half past nine.  It was a very cool evening, after a very warm day.

We had at dinner a boild pike and shrimp sauce, roast beef,  Yorkshire pudding, potatoes and delicious raspberry cream, which Mrs P insisted on my taking a second glass of.  I assured her I could not eat any more it was so rich, but she persevered, so I was obliged to compromise, by agreeing to divide one with her.  The cream was so thick, I was very much afraid it would disagree with me, but it did not.  There was white heart cherries, gooseberries and cake after dinner.

I had the New Zealand Paper.

Monday 19 July 1841

A very warm day and dry, tho’ the clouds were sometimes so black it look’d as it it was going to pour.  I went out with the intention of calling on the Miss Grevile’s, but went to Mrs Chamier’s first.  I found only dear Georgina at home, but Mrs Chamier soon returned and the time passd so pleasantly, that to my astonishment, when I came away I found it was twenty minutes past four!!, too late to go to Miss Grevile’s, as I do not know what time they dine, so I went to Miss Carpenter’s to speak about having my cap altered.  She was very civil and said she could do it very easily.  I then went to Fluke’s in the Corridor to match up the wools Miss Bode did the red and crimson roses with in Eliza’s Chair seat, but without success, and then came home, as it was too late to go to Hornby’s.  Miss Webb came in to Mrs Chamier’s while I was there, but I did not stay longer than to shake hands with her.

Tuesday 20 July 1841

A showery day.  Mrs Pierrepont call’d in the morning and sat some time and Jane Pyne came between four and five o’clock.  She has some idea of going to Charlton for a week.  Kate wished her very much to go and see her brother.  If she does, she has decided to go the same day I do, which I think will be Thursday week.  There was a very heavy shower while she was here, but it did not last long.

I had dear Henry’s “Observer”.

Wednesday 21 July 1841

Some slight showers, but not enough to make the streets wet for any length of time.  Mrs and Miss Chamier call’d and kindly asked me to dine with them tomorrow.  They sat here till near six o’clock.

Thursday 22 July 1841

I do not think there was any rain, tho’ it threatened frequently.

These last entries are notes written on the cover of a letter.

Saturday I calld at Chamiers, Greviles, Houghs, Davis’s, Workmans, went to Bennets for tea, to Butchers for grits and sugar, to Stacey’s for pills, tooth brushes. Shower, morning.

Thursday, Miss Philpot’s, went to Hornbys, dined at Chamier’s.  Drewett calld.

Friday went out with Mrs Pierrepont.  Got wools at Bodes.

The diary ends here.

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