1808 Diary

Fashion plate for January 1808 from Le Beau Monde (via SceneInThePast on Flickr)
Fashion plate for January 1808 from Le Beau Monde (via SceneInThePast on Flickr)

Friday, 1 January, 1808

A most beautiful day, bright sunshine and as mild and warm as spring.  Lansdown sent up the candles.  Dr Davis calld, but I did not see him.  Mr Andrews sat here an hour.  My Aunt askd him to dine, but he was engaged.  Mrs Hodge came at one o’clock and left Miss Wellsford here while she went to Shockerwick.  She returnd again about three.  As they were to spend the day with us they brought their cloaths with them and dressd here.  They, the Miss Pailletes, Tom Eyre and Mr James dined here.  Every one was very good humourd and chearful, particularly Mrs H.  I never remember seeing her in such good spirits and the day passd very cheerfully.  We all playd Speculation and did not part till twelve o’clock.  We were very much vexd at finding out just before dinner that it was the Lady’s night at the Catch Club, as we have had tickets for some time and tho we most probably should not have gone ourselves, it was a great pity to waste them, when so many people would have been delightd to have had them.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper.  Dryall took it to the Post.

Saturday, 2 January, 1808

As beautiful a day as it was yesterday.  We walkd up to Bailbrook soon after breakfast.  Poor Mr Jones had had a dreadful night and was suffering very much.  Maria had had a pain in her face and Mrs J was out of spirits and looking very not well.  Eliza and one of the Miss Smiths had gone to the Dancing School with Betsey and Jane.  My Aunt P had a note from Mrs Hodge to say she had altered all her plans for that she had had a letter from her son to announce his having found an attachment, which would prevent his visiting Bath at present and, as he is very anxious to introduce the lady to his mother, she thought most preferable she should go to Norfolk instead of Devon.  A note also from Mr Wiltshire the younger.  Maria worse, if possible, than yesterday.  My Aunts playd at Chess before tea and at Gosch after supper.

Painting of a family game of checkers ("jeu des dames") by Louis-Léopold Boilly, c.1803. (Wikimedia Commons)
Painting of a family game of checkers (“jeu des dames”) by Louis-Léopold Boilly, c.1803. (Wikimedia Commons)

Sunday, 3 January, 1808

A very fine day.  We read prayers at home.  John Wiltshire calld.  He brought a very bad account of Maria.  Mr and Mrs Walters and three of their children calld.  I was walking in the garden, so did not see them.  Miss Jones and Miss Smith walkd down from Bailbrook. Mr Jones was a little better.  Mr Graeme arrivd just as they were going out, Mr Wiltshire came in.  As he went home he lookd and said he was so ill he could hardly move.

Monday, 4 January, 1808

A dry day, but not very fine.  I walkd in the garden for an hour.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was himself better, but Maria very bad.  I workd hard all the day and evening.  My Aunts playd cards after supper.

Tuesday, 5 January, 1808

A very wet morning.  It cleard up afterwards, but was showery all day. Lady Smith, Mrs Morland and a young lady with them calld.  Her Ladyship was as silent and insipid as usual.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Maria very bad.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  I wrote a note to my mother with a prescription in it from Cooper for Mrs Taylor.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Porcher and Eliza Haylin.

Wednesday, 6 January, 1808

A fine day with one slight shower. Captain Simmons calld and eat some Luncheon with us.  Mr Wiltshire and Dr. Boisragan calld.  They brought a better account of Maria.  She was much easier and Dr B thought her better.  Mr W was quite chearful again.  I walkd in the Garden a short time.  My Aunt wrote two letters to Cooper which Dyall took to the Post, one to Mr Elmsleys and Mr W was kind to take it to Bath.  She also sent an excuse to an invitation to a Ball and Supper at Mrs Chalies for tonight  My Aunt Neate heard from Mr Webb.

Thursday, 7 January, 1808

A damp foggy morning.  Mr Jones calld.  He sat more than an hour and gave us a long account of the Ball at Mrs Chalies, which he said was very delightful and extremely well conducted.  There were about eighty peaple there and the party did not seperate till 6 o’clock in the morning.  I walkd in the garden a short time.

Friday, 8 January, 1808

A fine day. We walkd up to Bailbrook before Dinner, saw Miss Jones, Betsey and Eliza.  Mrs J was gone to Bath.  Poor Mr Jones was not much better.  Mr Wiltshire calld just as we had done Dinner.  He said Maria was much the same as before this last severe attack.

Mrs Hodge calld before breakfast in her way to London, where she is gone to meet her Son and accompany him to Norfolk to be present at his marriage, which I believe is to take place soon.

Saturday, 9 January, 1808

A fine mild day.  Dr Davis sat here almost all the morning and was very chearful and pleasant.  My Aunt Neate gave me a strip of new Muslin to lengthen the beautiful workd gown she gave me some years ago.  I walkd in the Garden for an hour.  My Aunt Powell had a long but melancholy letter from Minah Warren.

Sunday, 10 January, 1808

A dry day, but cold and uncomfortable.  We read Prayers at home.  Major Durbin calld and sat a long time.  He is going to the Regiment on Wednesday.  Mr Wiltshire calld and sat more than an hour with us which is very unusual for him to do.  Maria is just the same.  He told us he had heard from town that Mrs Wheat was very ill there and that Dr Vaughan thought her in danger.  The Joneses sent word after dinner that Mr Jones was a little better and had got down stairs for the first time.

Monday, 11 January, 1808

A dry day, but not pleasant.  Tom Eyres sat almost all the morning with us and was very good humoured and pleasant.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at dinner, but did not stay five minutes.   My Aunt had TWO letters from Cooper and I wrote to Mrs Henderson, Pen Saker, Eliza Heylin and Tom was so kind as to take them to the Post and also a note to my mother from my Aunt Neate.

Tuesday, 12 January, 1808

A very fine day.  We ALL walkd to Bath and a very unpleasant walk it was.  The road was so very muddy, my Aunt Neate went directly to my Mother’s, while we did what we had to do in the shopping way.  Met Miss Wellsford, who was very friendly and kind in her manner.  She told us a good deal of news and, among other things, that Maria Bent is going to be married almost immediately to a Mr Abrams, who is more than 50 and has NOTHING to RECOMMEND him, but large PROPERTY and good nature.  I am sincerely sorry she should have made such a sacrifice.  Saw Dr Boisragon, who said he thought Maria Wiltshire better.  Went to S… and was measured for a pr of boots.  When we had done everything, we went to my Mother’s, where we found my Aunt Neate alone, as my Mother and Emma had gone out at 11 o’clock and did not return while we staid, which was till near 4.  We found the walking much better on our return, than in the morning and got home about 5, a good deal tired.  I broke sugar and played cards with my Aunt N all the evening.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Eyre at Salisbury and Major Durbin is take it with him tomorrow.  She heard from Mrs Barwell.

The Cathedral at Bath from the lower meadow, 1810 (Victoria Art Gallery).
The Cathedral at Bath from the lower meadow, 1810 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Wednesday, 13 January, 1808

A beautiful day.  Betsy Jones came in for a short time.  She told us her Mama was gone to Bristol.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He rode Cooper’s Horse to Bath.  We called at Mrs Walters’s and Mrs Noyes’s.  They were not at home.  We then went to see a poor woman in the village who is truly an object of Charity.  Her name is Whiterose, she has six children and has been ill two years. On our return we met Mrs Walters and Sophy going to the Coal pit.  Saw Mrs Noyes in the Carriage.  Calld at Kites to enquire if my Aunt could have some Asses milk, which they promised she should tomorrow.  Mr Tudor called while we were out to see Thomas.

Thursday, 14 January, 1808

A tremendous wind with occasional showers.  Mr Wiltshire called but I did not see him as I was washing my feet and combing my hair.  He sent a cart load of trees for planting.  Mrs Noyes and Mr Littlehales calld.  I did not see them.  My Aunt sent Mr Wiltshire a bread cake.

Friday, 15 January, 1808 

A very hard frost with beautiful sunshine.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was in better spirits than he has been for some time past.  Tom Eyre and Sophy sat almost all the morning with us.  They were both very good humoured, chatty and agreeable.  We expected Cooper and the Bastards to Dinner, but as they did not come, at 6 o’clock we sat down to Dinner and just as we had done, Cooper and Mr B only arrived, Mrs B and Edmund having postponed coming till they knew how the Waters agree with Mr B, who looks very much better than he did and I thought appeared mortified that we did not wait Dinner for them and was evidently out of spirits, but recovered himself when he had eat something.  They brought us six woodcocks, two pines and some game.

 Saturday, 16 January, 1808

A very fine day with hard frost.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Cooper I thought received him more coldly than I ever saw him do before, at which he was evidently distressed and mortified.  He did not stay long, but calld again before Dinner and went up to Cooper in his own room.  I walkd in the Garden a short time, but it snowed a little all the time.  We dined alone and they playd Whist in the evening.

Captain Cooper
John Hutton Cooper

Sunday, 17 January, 1808 

A very fine day. We read Prayers at home.  Soon after which Miss Wiltshire calld.  She wished Cooper to see Mama, but he said that was impossible, except Drs Parry and Boisragon met him, which they are to do on Tuesday.  Mr W calld in his way to Bath. They eat some Luncheon and then Miss W went home.  C wrote a great many letters, after which my Aunt and he walkd up to Bailbrook.  They found poor Mr Jones on the bed, not able to move and Mrs J with a bad cold. We dined alone again and Cooper amused us in the evening by making charades, two or three of which were very good, one on Swannage another on my name and one on my Aunt Powell.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Hodge.

Monday, 18 January, 1808

A beautiful day.  Mr Jones sent down three Charades of his own making.  One a very good one on Cooper – we all went to Bath with Mr Bastard.  He and Cooper went to Dr Parry’s, then returned home and sent the Carriage back for us, after my Aunt P and I had done all we had to do.  We went to my Mother’s where my Aunt Neate was waiting for us.  Found my Mother and Emma looking very well.  Dined alone.  They playd cards in the evening and I read.  I took Cooper’s watch to get a glass for it.  I met Mr Cox in the shop, who told us they were just come to Bath and that Mrs C was gone up to the Villa.  I was not a little rejoicd.   We were not there to see her.  Met Mrs and Miss Bowen in Bond Street.  They were very sociable and appeard glad to see us.  They are now living at Middle Hill and my Aunt beggd they should make the Villa their halfway house.

Tuesday, 19 January, 1808

A fine day but very muddy in Bath (where we went (that is my Aunt P and me) with Mr Bastard) owing to the thaw.  Went into the Pump Room to meet Mr Andrews with a message to him from Cooper, which we delivered and then went to my Mother’s to take her ten pounds from my Aunt Neate.  Met her and Emma in the passage going out, so did not stay a minute.  My Aunt bought the worsteds and cotton to work a stool.  Went to Mr Bastard, who was waiting for us at Gibbon’s door and returnd with him.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Dined alone.  Cooper in particular good spirits at tea time.  Playd cards after and I netted.

THE PUMP ROOM, BATH by John Claude Nattes (British Library)
The Pump Room, Bath by John Claude Nattes (British Library)

Wednesday, 20 January, 1808 

A fine day but damp.  Mr Wiltshire calld, so did Sir T Gilman.  Mr Bastard went to Bath and brought back the Miss Workmans to stay till tomorrow.  They and Mr Andrews dined here.  Captain Shenstan, Dr Davis and Captain Chinens sent excuses.  We all playd Speculation in the evening, so was not very well the whole day.

Thursday, 21 January, 1808

A fine day and frosty again.  Mr Bastard took the Miss Workmans to Bath after breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not stay long.  Sir John and Lady Durbin calld.  Cooper was not better today, but more particularly uncomfortable in the evening, with pain in his stomach.  They playd cards and I netted.  Intensely cold.

National Trust; (c) Clevedon Court; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Sir John Durbin as a young man. National Trust; (c) Clevedon Court; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 22 January, 1808 

A beautiful day.  Mr Bastard kindly took me to see my Mother, who was gone out when I got there, so I did not see her.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  A man brought some artificial flowers.  My Aunt gave me a very pretty white one.  John Wiltshire came just after my Aunt and Cooper had walkd to see John Holbrook, who is very ill.  While I was at Bath Sir W Mane and the Walters calld.  J Wiltshire dined here, but went away while we were at tea, as he was engaged to a Dance in Bath.  I netted in the evening and they playd cards.

Saturday, 23 January, 1808 

A damp morning which turned to rain.  Mr Bastard took my Aunts and me to Bath.  I had not time to go to my Mother, as we had a good deal to do and Mr B did not stay long.  Poor Cooper.  Very unwell with a pain in his side, but he went at Mrs W’s request to see Maria.  Mr W and Dr Davis calld while we were at Luncheon.  Mr Wiltshire dined and slept here.  He read some of Mr Duncan’s poems to us, some of which he has allowed my Aunt to copy.  Cooper a little better.  I netted.

Sunday, 24 January, 1808

A fine day but damp from its having rained all night.  Mr Wiltshire calld soon after breakfast, before we read Prayers, but did not stay.  As soon as Mr Bastard was gone to Bath, Cooper read part of the Prayers, for he was too weak to read the whole Service.  Mr W calld again.  Mr Andrews was to have dined here, but did not come in the evening.  My Aunt copied Mr Duncan’s poems.  Mr Bastard wrote and Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.

Monday, 25 January, 1808 

A very bad morning. Thick fog with some snow and rain but afterwards it cleard up and was fine.  I went to Bath with Mr Bastard and staid an hour with my Mother, assisted Emma in cutting out some gowns.  On our return to Bath Easton found Lady Mane and her grandson.  While I was out the two Miss Wiltshires and Tom Grant calld.  Mr Wiltshire came before Dinner but did not stay.  Dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.  In the evening Mr Bastard wrote and my Aunt P and I workd. Cooper afterwards wrote some Charades, one very good. Captain Chivers calld.

Batheaston Villa c.1825 (Fanny's home in 1808), courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Batheaston Villa c.1825 (Fanny’s former home), courtesy of Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Tuesday, 26 January, 1808

A very fine day with an intense hard frost.  Miss Wiltshire calld. I left her here and went down to Bath with Colonel Bastard.  Cut out the body of a gown for Emma.  Found Mr Andrews here on our return, who waited to take a letter to Bath for Cooper.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  Dined alone.  The evening passd as yesterday;  my Aunt Neate heard from Mr Webb.

Wednesday, 27 January, 1808 

A hard frost in the morning but it went off about one o’clock and the rest of the day was completely wet.  Miss Spyers calld while we were at breakfast.  She walkd on to see a house at Bath Easton and sat a short time on her return.  Mrs Ellis, Dunnell and John Stables calld and sat two hours.  They stayd and eat Luncheon, as did Captain Eckersall, who also calld.  My Aunt sent to enquire after Mr Jones who is still confined with the Gout.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Dined alone.  Mr Madden (son of Captain Madden of Portsmouth) calld, but staid so short a time only Cooper saw him.  Dined alone.  In the evening Mr Bastard wrote.  My Aunt P and I workd till Mr B had done his letters, when my two Aunts, Mr B and I playd two Rubbers at Whist. Cooper wrote a long medical letter to Mr Chamier.

Thursday, 28 January, 1808 

A tolerable fine day.  Mr B took my Aunt Neate to Bath with him.  Captain Chivers. calld  My Aunt N came back by herself, as Colonel and Mrs Bastard brought up Mr B with them.  They arrived at Bath last night and meant to have left it tomorrow, but Mrs B was so very unwell Cooper advised her by all means to stay till Saturday, which she with a great deal of persuasion at length agreed to do.  Cooper dined at Lady Louisa Lennox’s, where the B’s are staying.  Mr B wrote in the evening, we workd.  C returnd at 10 o’clock.  John Wiltshire calld to say his father was gone to Tetbury and would not return till Monday.

Friday, 29 January, 1808 

A fine day.  Mr Bastard, Cooper, my Aunt P and I went to Bath.  Calld on the Miss Paillets, to whom my Aunt took the Tickets for the  Catch Club for tonight.  They were engaged to the Play, but said they had much rather pay for their places and not go than lose the opportunity of being at the Catch Club entertainment, as Mrs Siddons was to perform.  My Aunt, who was very anxious to see her, agreed to take their Tickets.  Calld at Lady Mane’s, where Cooper was to meet us , found her at home and saw her daughter Mrs Maling who has just returnd from India in very ill health.  She is very interesting and pleasing in her manner.  Little Charles was delighted to see us.  We were there near half an hour before Cooper came, soon after which Colonel and Mrs Bastard calld for us and Sir William came in.  From there we went to Mrs Cox’s, found her at home looking remarkably well.  the two Miss C’s came in from their walk before we came away, but Mr C did not make his appearance, at which I heartily rejoiced.  When we came home my Aunt ordered some Chaps? to be dressd ?immediately, while we went to make ourselves smart, that we might be ready to go with Cooper to Bath, who was engaged to dine at Lady L Lennox’s again and was to call at the Play House at night for us, but while we were swallowing our Dinner as fast as possible, a note arrived from Miss Paillets to say the Lady who procured their Tickets for them had disposed of them to some friends of hers, so we very quietly finished our Luncheon instead of Dinner and staid at home, tho I must own I was a little disappointed, as I wishd much to go.  Mr Bastard wrote in the evening and we workd. Cooper came home at ten o’clock.  My Aunt sent my Mother a Hare and I wrote a note to Emma.

Mrs Siddons 1804 Sir Thomas Lawrence 1769-1830 Presented by Mrs C. FitzHugh 1843 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N00188
Mrs Siddons 1804 Sir Thomas Lawrence 1769-1830 Presented by Mrs C. FitzHugh 1843 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N00188

Saturday, 30 January, 1808

A wet day.  Mr Bastard went to Bath immediately after breakfast to see the Colonel and Mrs B before they left it.  We saw them go by at half past eleven.  Cooper wrote all the morning.  Dined alone.  They playd Chess and Whist all the evening.

Sunday, 31 January, 1808 

A fine day.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast, soon after which Mr Bastard went to Bath.  Mr Allen calld and staid some time and partook of our Luncheon.  Miss Wiltshire calld to speak about Maria, who is just the same and so is likely to remain as she is so self willed and obstinate she will not do anything but what exactly agrees with her own opinion.  Dined alone.  After Tea Cooper answered in verse seven Charades he received this morning from Mr Bayley; and made three very good ones to send to him, after which he and my Aunt  Neate playd Chess.  Mr B wrote many letters and my Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Hodge and copyd some of Cooper’s Charades into her book.

Fashion plate for February 1808 from Le Beau Monde (via SceneInThePast on Flickr)
Fashion plate for February 1808 from Le Beau Monde (via SceneInThePast on Flickr)

Monday, 1 February, 1808

A very uncomfortable day. Nevertheless my Aunt P and I went to Bath with Mr Bastard.  It raind all the time we were there and we went in the Coach to all the places we could.  Met Emma at the Pump Room door.  She told us my Mother was not very well, but we were so pressd for time it was not in our power to call.  Calld in our way home for my Aunt’s Gown, which has been so long about.  They have done it very well and I think there is enough to make a Gown for us both.

While we were out John Stables and Mr, Mrs and Miss Chapman from Bathford calld.  Dined alone in the evening.  Cooper and Mr B wrote some letters and Charades and then C and my Aunt N playd Chess.  My Aunt P and I word.  Cooper and Mr Bastard after Supper wrote some quizzical answers to some charades Edmund and Mr Baylay had sent them.  My Aunt P wrote a postscript in Cooper’s letter to Mrs Poone.

Tuesday, 2 February, 1808

Quite an April Day, Sunshine and Showers alternately.  Mrs Manne sent up the flowers for Mrs Barwell.  John Stables was to have dined here but sent up a note of excuse in the morning.  Mrs Jones calld and sat two hours.  While she was here Mr and Mrs Noyes, Mrs and Miss Fraser came, the latter looking lovely, but Cooper was so much taken up talking to Mr Noyes he said he did not see her, tho’ she sat opposite to him.  I never saw any man so altered in manner in my life as Cooper is.  Formerly he made up to and complemented every Woman he was in company with, now he does not appear to care about anyone.  He did not speak one word to Mrs Fraser, who really lookd very pretty and hardly noticed Mrs Noyes at all and begd we would not be at home to any body else when they were gone.  Sir W and Lady Mane, Mr, Mrs and the two Miss Cox’s, Major Durbin and Capt. Sherston Dined her.  A very stupid, disagreeable day.  They did not go away till past twelve I wishd them at home long and long before that time.

Mr Wiltshire calld but would not stay to Dinner.  Major Durbin brought my Aunt a letter from Mrs Eyre at Salisbury.

Wednesday, 3 February, 1808 

A fine sunshine day with a few showers, but particularly one of hail, which was very violent.  Cooper went to Bath with Mr Bastard, paid some visits and walkd back.  My Aunt P was out all the morning, showing David and Gardener where she would have the trees placed, that Mr Wiltshire was so kind to send.  They are planted each side the Lane, from the road to the house.  Cooper came back in very good spirits and answered the Charades in verse, that Edmund sent him this morning.  The Miss Wiltshires calld, but did not get out of the carriage.  Mr W came in his way home, but could not stay many minutes.  My Aunt P and Cooper dined at Sir John Durbin’s.  Mr Bastard, my Aunt Neate and I, dine alone.  Mr B wrote in the evening.  I finished my Aunt N’s purse and wrote a note to my mother.  Cooper and my Aunt did not come home til half past ten.  I waited supper for them.  Cooper was a little tipsy, but good humoured.  They told us all that happ’d and what they had for dinner.  The party was very well, but nothing particularly pleasant.  All strangers, but Captain Shinston.  The Major, my Aunt said, was very awkward and stupid and hardly spoke ten words the whole day.  Mrs Noyes was so kind to send me the second edition of the Bath Characters and the first volume of Dr. Beath’s life.

Thursday, 4 February, 1808

A very fine day.  While we were at breakfast an invitation come from the Hawkins for us to dine there next Tuesday.  Cooper and my Aunt accepted it, but my Aunt Neate and I declined it.  My Aunt was out almost all the morning planting.  Mr Shanston, a Mr Duggan (a stranger to us) and the Marriots calld.  Cooper had walked to Shockerwick, so did not see any of them.  He found Maria worse than she was, he thought very much altered since he saw her last.  Cooper wrote two or three very good charades in the morning.  Dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd chess in the evening.  Mr Bastard wrote letters and my Aunt P and I workd.  I spread a blister for Thomas before I went to bed.  While I was about it, Cooper sent me a Charade down, which he had written after had had got into bed.  We could not find it out.

Friday, 5 February, 1808 

A very wet morning, but cleard up and was fine afterwards.  My Aunt intended to have gone to Bath, but was prevented by the rain.  Mr Wiltshire calld in his way to Bath and was kind enough to say he would try to get places for us at the Play tomorrow night, to see Mrs Siddons in Belvedera.  He came in his way home to tell us he had succeeded.  My Aunt P and Cooper walkd about the Garden and field a short time before Dinner. Dined alone.  Something disconcerted Cooper very much, but we could not tell what.  He was cross and uncomfortable all Dinner time and most part of the evening, the first time it has occurd since he came home, and I hope will be the last.

Mrs Sarah Siddons (1755–1831), as Euphrasia (from 'The Grecian Daughter' by Arthur Murphy) by William Hamilton, 1784 (c) Stratford-upon-Avon Town Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Mrs Sarah Siddons (1755–1831), as Euphrasia (from ‘The Grecian Daughter’ by Arthur Murphy) by William Hamilton, 1784
(c) Stratford-upon-Avon Town Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

He and my Aunt N playd Chess from tea till bedtime.

Mr Bastard wrote.  My Aunt P and I workd.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs ? and heard from Mrs Rickets and Mrs Williams, the latter of whom arrived at Bath last night.

Saturday, 6  February, 1808

A miserable wet day.  I do not think it ceased raining half an hour.  My Aunt P and I went to Bath but we were obliged to go about in the Coach.  Saw Mr Cox and a young man with him.  Got some ribbon to trim our Stuff Gowns.  Calld on Mrs Ellis, saw her and poor Durell.  Sat half an hour with Lady Mane and Mrs Maling.  Little Charles put on his new Scarlet cloaths for us to see and handed us into Carriage.  Mr Wiltshire calld in the morning.  We Dined early and got to the Play House in good time.  Mrs Siddons performed Belvedera inimitably and Mr Egerston Jaffier very well.  The entertainment was of Age tomaman and fortunately was amusing.  The House was crowded and towards the end of the evening very warm.  We got out very cwik and the Carriage was ready for us at the door.  Found Mr Bastard and my Aunt up when we returnd.  Had some hot Supper and enjoyd it.

My Aunt P wrote to Mrs Bastard.

Sunday, 7 February, 1808

A wet morning, but was fine afterwards.  Just as we were going to read Prayers Miss Wiltshire came to ask Cooper if he would go to Shockerwick to see Maria.  If he would, she would stay and read the Prayers with us and take him there afterwards.  He said he should walk back but she wishd him to come back with Mr W and Sir W Clayton.  Whether he will or not I don’t know.  Cooper and Mr Wiltshire walkd  back together.  We Dined alone.  I sent Miss Workman’s ring to her with a note.

Cooper and my Aunt Neate Playd Chess all the evening.  Mr Bastard and my Aunt P wrote and I read.

Monday, 8 February, 1808 

A very wet morning.  My Aunt Powell and I went to Bath, but it was so wet and muddy we could not walk about.  We did all we had to do at the Shops and then went to my Mother’s.  Staid there a short time and took her and Emma with us in the Coach to an Auction of wearing apparel.  Left her there and went to Mrs Flinns to see Mrs Williams, whose shocking vulgarity I think increases every year.  Mrs Flinn appears to me to be going very fast.  She is very much altered since we saw her last.A very pleasant woman who reminded us both very much of Mrs Fenwick and Mrs Tyson.

Mr Wiltshire and Sir William Clayton calld while we were at Bath.  We had a party at Dinner.  Sir John Gilman, Sir W Clayton, his brother Colonel Clayton, John Wiltshire, Mr Allen and Mr Tudor.  Mr Wiltshire was to have been of the party, but had so bad a headache he could not come.  Mr Tudor went away before Tea and all before Supper, except Sir T G and Mr Allen.  Sir W C was in good spirits, talkd a great deal and was very good humoured and pleasant.  They were all a little tipsy.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Poone and Mrs Barwell.

Mr Rick calld.

Tuesday, 9 February, 1808 

A most beautiful day. Mr Bastard took me to Bath but I did not find my Mother at home.  Mr Wiltshire, Sir William and Colonel Clayton, Mr Baker, Captain Shenston, Mrs Ellis and Dunell and John Stables calld.

My Aunt P and Cooper were out all morning planting evergreens opposite the House and I made my throat sore calling out to them where they shall be placed.  Cooper and my Aunt Dined at Sir John Hawkins.  Mr Bastard, my Aunt N and I at home.  Mr B wrote in the evening and went to bed at his usual time, my Aunt N at twelve.  I sat up till they came home, which was at half past twelve.  They had not sup’d.  Cooper was very tipsy, not to say drunk.  They passd a middling sort of a day, but everything extremely elegant and  well conducted.  Did not go to bed till two o’clock.  My Aunt Powell heard from Miss R Ludlow.

Wednesday, 10 February, 1808

A very fine day, extremely cold.  Captain Sherston came to breakfast.  Mr Bastard took my Aunt, Capt. J, Cooper and me to Bath with him.  We calld on Mrs Mammot and Lady George Sutton, but did not find either of them at home.  We then bought what she wanted and luckily meeting Cooper with Miss Workman in the street, he went with us to the Cox’s.  Saw Mrs Cox only, who lookd remarkably handsome.  Mr Cox was fiddling in the Parlor below, but had not the politeness to come up and see Cooper.  Mrs Cox gave my Aunt some Honey in the Comb in a glass hive, which she had from home.  We came home with Mr Bastard and Cooper walkd.

Mr and Mrs Williams, Captain Chivers and little Charles Browning dined here.  Mrs W was very much out of humor the whole day and particularly with Cooper, to whom she was quite rude.  He tried every thing in his power to conciliate her for some time, but as it did not answer, he gave it up.  She pretended she was out of spirits on account of one of her children being ill, but I believe she was angry because Cooper had not calld on her, but be it what it will, she was extremely disagreeable.  The whole time she was here we playd at Speculation and they staid to Supper.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Fenwick and Pen Saker, my Aunt Neate from Mr Webb.

Thursday, 11 February, 1808

A very bad morning, snowing and raining.  Cooper was to have breakfast at Mr Wiltshire’s but sent an excuse and went in Mr Bastard’s Coach when it came for him.  He and Mr Wiltshire returnd in it together and Mr W went on to Bath with Mr B and returnd with him.  Cooper was out all the morning planting evergreens in the Lane, which is very much improved by it. Mrs Williams sent a note to my Aunt to say the child was better and another to Cooper, a copy of the one to my Aunt, with the addition of an Apology for her manner yesterday and an invitation to him to Breakfast there tomorrow, which he accepted.  Mr Wiltshire wrote two letters here and then went home.  My Aunts and I heat up some lemon juice and Lard for Mr Bastard.  Dined alone.  My Aunt N and Cooper playd Chess all the evening.  Mr Bastard wrote and my Aunt and I workd.  My Aunt heard from Mrs E  Barton.

Friday, 12 February, 1808 

An intense cold day, tho bright sun shine.  There had been a good deal of snow in the night which having practically melted made it very wet in places.  Cooper went to breakfast with Mrs Williams and Mr Bastard took my Aunt and me to Bath with him.  We calld at Mrs Cox’s to take up Cooper but did not get out of the Carriage.  From thence we went to Mrs Duggan’s where we saw Mr and Mrs D, Mrs Betts (Mrs D’s Mother) and a Miss Rogers. a very beautiful girl.  Mr and Mrs D appear to be very pleasant and agreeable people.  Met Captain Cross in the Street and had a little chat with him.  Did what we had to do at the shops and then took up Colonel Bastard at the White Lion and came home.  Cooper dined at Mr Shenston’s, but came home to supper and told us all that hapd.

My Aunt Powell and I workd on the Bonnet in the evening.

Fanny Chapman
Fanny Chapman

Saturday, 13 February, 1808 

More snow last night but firm, tho as cold as yesterday.  We were surprised by a visit from Major Coffin, the first since he married.  He was very chatty and pleasant.  Mr Wiltshire calld but would not stay to dinner to meet a party consisting of Sir John and Lady Hawkins, Mr and Mrs Coles, Mr and Captain Shenston, Mr Allen, Mr Banton and Captain Cross.  A middling sort of day.  Lady H lookd beautiful and most elegantly dressed, with beautiful diamond ornaments.  They all went away before supper.  We sat down snug and talkd over the events of the day.

Sunday, 14 February, 1808

Very hard frost, but extremely fine.  Mr Cox came up just as we had done breakfast and went back with Mr Bastard.  They leave Bath tomorrow.  Colonel Phelps and one of his daughters called.  He came to beg Cooper would be President at the entertainment given by the Harmonic Society to the Ladies, but C was obliged to decline the honor, as he will be in town the night it is to be given.  Mr W, Miss Wiltshire and John walkd here, as did Miss Jones and Betsey Blenman.  My Aunt and Cooper went in the Coach to Lambridge to call on Mrs Fraser, whom they found at home.  She told them they were going to leave Lambridge and assignd as a reason the great expence which they could not afford.  Cooper returnd much pleased with her, for he had taken a dislike to her before and very unjustly too, for he had never seen her.  Mr F was not at home.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  Mr Bastard and my Aunt P  wrote to Mrs Poone and Miss ?  She heard from Mrs Poone.

Monday, 15 February, 1808 

A very rapid thaw attended with rain which made it very wet and uncomfortable.  Cooper, my Aunt and I went to Bath with Mr Bastard.  I went directly to my Mother’s , assisted dear Emma with the Pelisse the time I staid with them.  Went to Gibbons to meet my Aunt, had great difficulty to get along the Circus, it was so great in the streets owing to the Fair.  Cooper and my Aunt had been to call on Miss Shenston (who they did not find at home), Mrs Phillips and Mrs Coffin, the latter of whom my Aunt did not like at all.

We took up Mr Bastard at the White Lion and then proceeded homewards, having stoppd in our way at Mrs Hannes to enquire about the flowers which she has promised to let us have on Wednesday.  Overtook Cooper on the road between Lambridge and Bailbrook.  It was so wet he got into the coach and came with us.  Mr Graeme and Mr Fraser calld before we went out and sat some time.  Mr Wiltshire dined and slept here.  They read Mr Bayley’s and Edmund’s verses in the evening and my Aunt Powell workd.  I wrote a note to Emma and sent it by Dugall who was to bring back the muscles with him.

Tuesday, 16  February, 1808

A showery morning.   Mr Wiltshire breakfasted here and he and Cooper went in the carriage afterwards to Sir John Hawkin’s.  They took my Aunt Neate to Bath with them and she and Cooper returnd together.  Mr Jones calld but did not stay.  Mrs Bastard and Edmund arrived before dinner.  I never saw the latter looking so well.  He is growing quite handsome.  Mrs B looks in good health, but is as usual.  We had only our own family party at dinner.  Cooper was in remarkably good spirits till after ten, when he was depressd and uncomfortable.  We had no cards, but workd.  As I read, Edmund produced some very good verses of his own composition.

Wednesday, 17 February, 1808 

A miserable wet morning with thick fog.  Cooper and my Aunt meant to have gone to Church, it being the general Fast Day, but it raind so hard they were prevented.  After reading the service at home, they went to Shockerwick and were to call at Mr Noyes, Mr Walters and the Jones’s on their return.  Mr Wiltshire calld, so did Captain Chivers and brought with him two of his nieces, very odd looking girls.  Sir John Hawkins, Mr Coles and Captain Hawkins calld, but did not come in as Cooper was not at home.  Mr and Mrs Duggan, Miss Rogers and Dr Davies dined here.  They are unaffected pleasant people. They did not play Cards.  Cooper read some of Edmund’s and Mr Bayley’s poetry to them.  They went away early, but ? staid supper.  I wrote to my brother Henry and Mr Bastard was so kind to frank it.

Thursday, 18 February, 1808 

A damp morning, which afterwards turnd to rain.  My Aunt and Cooper went to call at the Chapman’s, Noyes’s, Jones’s and Walters’s and then went to Bath where the calld on a hundred people.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund also went to Bath.  I was fully employed while they were out marking Cooper’s shirts’ pocket handkerchiefs and neckcloths.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but could not stay to dine.   Mrs Manse sent up the rest of Mrs Barwell’s flowers and two beautiful bouquets for Cooper to take as presents to Mrs Porcher and Mrs Bastard.  We dined alone and workd hard all the evening, making neckclothes for Cooper, which my Aunt bought in the morning.  My Aunt had a long letter from Mrs Hodge and a note from Mrs Williams.  Mr and Miss Sherston and the Miss ? calld, but were not let in.

Friday, 19 February, 1808 

A very fine day, tho a Black one to us, as the Bastards and Cooper left us for London.  They set off exactly at ten, Cooper and Mr B in C’s Carriage, Mrs Bastard and ? in her own Carriage, with Edmund on the Box and Thomas, Robert and Mrs B Cook in a Hack Chaise.  Cooper has promised  to dine with us on the 31st of March and we told Mr B we should depend on him for the performance of the promise.  Mr Wiltshire breakfasted here, to see them before they went.  He calld again before dinner to see (as he said) if we lookd miserable and melancholy at the loss of our friends.  Sir John Hawkin’s man brought two cows in exchange for Cooper’s two beauties, which he took away with him.  My Aunt had a letter from Miss Pope (Mrs Poone’s Governess) with the account of the death of little Jane Poone, who has been ill almost ever since Mrs P died.

Saturday, 20 February, 1808 

A fine morning, but it raind in the course of the day.  My Aunt was engaged all the morning cutting out shirts for Cooper.  I was very unwell early in the morning, with a violent pain in my stomach and sickness which left me very languid, added to which my finger was painful and prevented my doing anything as I was obliged to continue the pultice which I have had for these two days past.

Mr Wiltshire calld in his way to Bath, but did not come in till he returnd.  While we were at dinner a Postillion of the name of George, who used to drive us backwards and forwards to Swanage, came to enquire how we did.  He had driven some lady to Bath and as he was not to go back till tomorrow, he said he would come up and see us.  He told us who was married and who was dead and all the news of that part of the country.  He is looking just the same as he did when he used to drive us and appeard very glad to see us again.  My Aunt gave him half a crown to drink.

My Aunt had a poetical letter from Cooper dated Newbury.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards all the evening.

Sunday, 21 February, 1808 

A beautiful day.  We read Prayers at home.  Mr and Mrs Williams walkd up and sat an hour or two.  As soon as they were gone Mrs Jones and Mr Graeme calld and sat some time.  Mr Wiltshire lookd in as he went home.  My Aunt had a parcel by the coach from Miss R Ludlow, enclosing a letter and the terms of her school.  She wrote to Cooper, Mrs Poone, Mrs Hodge and Mrs Porcher.

Monday, 22 February, 1808 

A beautiful day, but very cold.  My Aunt had a note from Mrs Phillips, before she was up in the morning, to beg if Cooper was not gone to town he would have the goodness to see the Admiral, who was extremely ill and very anxious to see him.  My Aunt and I went to Bath, calld on my Mother, to whom my Aunt had the kindness to take a Pine Apple and some collard Pig’s head.  Emma had a little inflammation in her eyes.  From there we went to Petnes the gardener, but could not find him.  Stopd at Mrs Flinn’s in our way back, to whom my Aunt took some head also.  Mrs Williams was not at home when we went, but she came in with Mr W before we came away.  Saw Mrs Tyson there.

A general view of Bath, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).
A general view of Bath, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Went to Towson’s where my Aunt bought some boot stockings for Cooper, a pr of silk and some cotton ones for herself and my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt made me a present of a very pretty white satin cap which she bought at Coxes.  Calld at Admiral Phillips, where we were admitted.  Found Mrs P as mad as a march hare, but very glad to see us.  She has not had her clothes off since Friday.  The poor Admiral was seized on Saturday night with a paralatic stroke and has been very bad ever since;  he saw my Aunt, but was so much affected that it distressd her and Mrs Phillips very much.  I fear he will not recover, tho Mrs P does not apprehend any danger.  We staid there an hour and a half and my Aunt be’g Mrs Phillips would send to her if she could be of the least use to her.  The Miss Paillets walkd up and sat all the morning with my Aunt N, but were gone before we returnd.  Mr Wiltshire call’d  also while we were out.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Minah Warren and Mr Goldfrap (?) is to take it to her Wednesday when Mr Williams and he go to town together.

Tuesday, 23 February, 1808 

A dry day, but extremely cold.  My Aunt had had a note from Mrs Phillip to say the Admiral was better.  I finishd hemming the rest of Cooper’s new neckcloths.  My Aunt sent them and his boot stockings in a parcel for Mr Williams to take to town with him tomorrow.  Mr Wiltshire calld .  His family are just the same.  I walkd in the garden for an hour and came in almost petrified.  Cooper writes my Aunt Mrs Wheat is extremely ill, confined to her bed and has lost the use of her legs.  She is attended by Drs Vaughan and Baily and Mr W told us he heard they both say she cannot recover.  Mrs Fraser sent my Aunt a note to beg she would lend her any book that had Caland flowers in it, as she was in great distress for some to copy.  My Aunt sent her the only one that is here, which is Curtis’s.  My Aunt Neate sent a bundle down to my mother and I wrote a note to beg Emma would lend me her scarlet bonnet for a pattern.  I had a very kind letter from Harry and my Aunt Powell heard from Cooper and Miss R Ludlow.  She wrote to Cooper and notes to Mrs Phillip, Mrs Williams and Mrs Fraser.  A Simnell cake arrived by the Coach for Cooper, which by the direction, came from Mrs Goodman.

Wednesday, 24 February, 1808

A dry day, but very cold.  Mr Wiltshire calld and was kind enough to say he would bring the letters for us.  The Phelps calld, but were not let in.  Miss Jones sent to borrow a cap of mine for a pattern.  Mr W brought the letters in his way home.  My Aunt heard from Cooper enclosing Mr Atkin’s letter to him about Gurner.  Dryall brought Emma’s bonnet.

Thursday, 25 February, 1808

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bath.  Found the road quite dusty.  We had a very pleasant walk but it was intensely cold in Bath.  Met Mrs Noyes and her two little boys on the road.  Went to Towson’s and paid his bill, paid for the ink and alphabets at Eyres, saw Mr Papham at the post office. Met Sir John Hawkins and Miss Workman in Bond Street and Mrs Eyre and Sophy in Milsom Street.  Had a great deal of chat with them, then eat a cake at Mallards, sat half an hour with Lady Mane and Mrs Maling.  From there we went to Admiral Phillips.  Did not see him, but Mrs P told us he was better.   While we were there my Aunt wrote, at her request, to Mrs Calmady, Captain Nunn and Mr Lane.  While she was doing so I went out and got some eider down to make a pillow for the Admiral.  We were there two hours and a half and did not get home till near seven o’clock.  Before we went to Bath Gurner came by appointment and my Aunt paid him a draft from Mr Atkins for twenty pounds which he receivd from Cooper yesterday.  Mr Wiltshire calld and we saw Miss W in Bath and also Mr Ian Hartley, who had a great deal to say.  He and his amiable daughter are going to town Saturday to spend some time with Mrs Francis.  Met Miss Fellows and Mrs Dorret and they are come to stay a fortnight for Mrs D F to drink the waters, who is looking remarkably well, tho she says she is very much otherwise.  My Aunt heard from Cooper who gives a very bad account of the elder Mrs Bastard.  She also had a short letter from Mr Bastard.

Friday, 26 February, 1808

A very fine day.  Mrs Williams walkd up to breakfast.  She told us a great many historys of herself and family, not above half of which was true to our knowledge, but the other half I very much suspect was false, as one or two of the storeys she told two or three times and they varied each time.  She staid till three o’clock when her servant brought a carriage to take her back, as she was engaged to dine out and did not like the trouble of walking back.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not stay a minute, as his sister was on horseback waiting for him. I walkd in the garden for half an hour.  Mrs Phillips sent word the Admiral was much the same.  I sent Emma’s bonnet home and I sent a note to my mother.

Saturday, 27 February, 1808

A dry day, but very cold.  Mrs Graeme and Miss Jones walkd down and staid till the carriage came to fetch them.  While they were here Mr Worth left a card, but did not come in.  Lady Colebrook calld. She lookd remarkably well and was in good spirits.  I washd my feet.  Major Durbin sent word by Dryall he should call this morning, but did not.  Dryall brought up the receipt from Gurner.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and Minah Warren.  She wrote to Cooper and Mr Bastard and when she went to bed put a blister on her arm.

Sunday, 28 February, 1808

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell did not get up till the evening. Her blister was so painful she could not move.  Major Durbin calld.  He says he is going to the Regiment next Friday.  Mr Wiltshire came while the Major was here.  Poor man, he was very much out of spirits.  Maria, he said, was worse than she had been for some time.  He had been to Bath to fetch Dr Parry, but he could not go to Shockerwick till five o’clock.  We had the pleasure of hearing dear Mrs Porcher was brought to bed yesterday at five o’clock of a little girl.  My Aunt had a letter from her today written the day before she lay in and also a note and letter from Cooper.

Monday, 29 February, 1808

A gloomy looking day, but so warm out it was like summer.  I walkd in the garden for an hour and a half.  My Aunt Powell came down to day but finds the blister very troublesome.  It discharges so much she cannot keep the things about it dry.  Miss Wiltshire calld to enquire how she was, but did not get off her horse.  Maria is a little better.  My two Aunts playd cards after tea and I read.  My spirits were so depressed and low the whole day, I was quite uncomfortable and unfit for anything.

Fashion plate for March 1808 from Le Beau Monde (via theclothingproject on tumblr)
Fashion plate for March 1808 from Le Beau Monde (via theclothingproject on tumblr)

Tuesday, 1 March, 1808

Still gloomy looking but as pleasant out as it was yesterday.  Mr Wiltshire calld, so did Dr Davis.  He sat some time and had some luncheon.  Told us a great deal of news and was in very good spirits.  Captain Elphinstone calld and left word when my Aunt wrote to Cooper he would be obliged if she would mention he had been here. Sir John and Lady Durbin sent to enquire after my Aunt, so did the Joneses.  My Aunt had two letters from Mrs Barwell with the money for the flowers and a short one from Cooper.  She wrote to C and enclosed a letter to him which came by yesterday’s post.  I walkd in the garden for half an hour.

Wednesday, 2 March, 1808

Much such a day as yesterday.  My Aunt’s blister a little better today, but not much.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  I saw him in the yard and spoke to him from my Aunt’s window.  Maria still very bad and Dr Parry was going again to Shockerwick.  Major Durbin calld to ask if he could do anything for us at Salisbury, as he joins the Regiment Friday next.  Captain Chivers, Mrs Jessand, Mr James and his brother Captain James calld, but were not let in.  I wrote a note in the evening to Miss Paillet to ask if they would subscribe to Catalani with my Aunt Powell, which would make the tickets come to half a guinea instead of a guinea.

Thursday, 3 March, 1808

A fine mild day.  My Aunt a little better. She had a note from Mrs Phillip to say she thought the Admiral better.  Mrs Graeme walkd to see my Aunt.  Mr Wiltshire calld but I did not see him.  The Miss Paillets walkd up.  They did not see my Aunt but sat in the dining room and had some luncheon with my Aunt Neate and me.  They came to say they should be very glad to partake of my Aunt’s subscription to the concert and brought some patterns for working.  They were very good humoured and pleasant, but did not stay long. Mrs Noyes calld, but was not admitted.  A poor woman came with a note from the Joneses to say she was really an object of charity and in great distress.  My Aunt gave her seven shillings.  I was out in the garden for an hour and a half and spent most of the time nailing up the Laurels against the Walk in the shrubbery.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter to him which came by today’s post.  She also wrote a note to Mrs Phillip and one to Mrs Williams.  She receivd an answer to Mrs W’s.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 4 March, 1808

One of the finest days I ever saw.  I was out in the garden an hour and a half.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He told us poor John was very ill, confined in Bath.  He cut his leg very badly about a fortnight ago in pruning a tree for his Aunt Elizabeth and he has been under Mr Tudor’s care ever since.  Mrs Williams walkd up and dined and slept here.  She told us a great deal about herself and her family, not above a third of which was true.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.  My Aunt Powell very indifferent.  I gathered a violet and I saw a beautiful yellow butterflie.  Mrs Williams wrote to Mr W at my Aunt’s desire to beg he would buy a quarter of a lottery ticket for her and let her know the number by the next post

Saturday, 5 March, 1808

A fine day, but cold.  I was engaged all the morning with leeches on my temple for an inflammation in my eye, which I have had some time.  Mr Wiltshire calld and, my Aunt said, was much out of spirits.  Mrs Williams went away at three o’clock.  Mrs Graeme, Miss Jones and Betsey Blenman calld and sat some time with my Aunt Powell, but I did not see them.  I had a very bad head ache all day, which encreased at night very much.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper, who desired she would foment her stomach and take sixty drops of Laudanum in the course of the day.  My Aunt wrote a note to Miss Paillet to say she should like to put off going to the Concert till Friday.

Interior of the Bath Concert Room, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery)
Interior of the Bath Concert Room, 1805 (Victoria Art Gallery)

Sunday, 6 March, 1808

A beautiful day, but a little frosty.  My head very indifferent.  My Aunt had a note from Mrs Phillip, who says the Admiral has been very unwell again, but is a little better.  My Aunt Powell very unwell.  She did not get up till supper time, just to have her bed made.  I walkd in the garden an hour.  Mr Wiltshire calld and the Walters sent to enquire after my Aunt.  Mr Fraser calld, but was not let in.  My Aunt heard from Mr Williams with the number of the Ticket he has bought for her.

Monday, 7 March, 1808

A very fine day, but cold with a strong North wind.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  I walkd in the garden near an hour.  Captain Chivers calld and sat some time with my Aunt Neate.  I shook hands with him just as he was going away.  My Aunts playd Cards after tea and I read.

Tuesday, 8 March, 1808

A fine day, but still very cold, with high wind.  Miss Wiltshire calld and sat half an hour.  Poor John is very ill with the jaundice.  I washd my feet, did not go out, as it was so cold and my head was very indifferent.  I wrote a note to my mother and my Aunt sent her a piece of Simnell.  My Aunt had a melancholy letter from Cooper.  Poor Mrs Porcher was dangerously ill and Mrs Bastard so bad Cooper thought she could not live many days.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper.

Wednesday, 9 March, 1808

A very fine day.  I walkd to Bath after breakfast to see my mother, who I found very unwell with a violent cold.  She has put a Blister on her chest and I hope will find relief from it.  Emma, too, has been unwell, but is now better.  Saw Mrs Sutton and Mrs Hawes there.  I staid with my mother as long as I could and then walkd back to dinner.  While I was out, Captain Chivers, Mr Wiltshire, Miss Jones and Betsey Blenman calld.  My Aunt Powell wrote a note to little Betsey Jones and sent her the honey comb she had from Mrs Cox.  She heard from Cooper a bad account of Mrs Porcher but rather better of Mrs Bastard.  She had also a long letter full of nothing from Mrs Williams.  She wrote to Cooper.

Thursday, 10 March, 1808

A very gloomy day and extremely cold.  Sir William and Lady Mane walkd from Bath.  While they were here Mrs Savage, Charlotte, Louisa and Miss Wiltshire walkd from Shockerwick.  They all staid and had some luncheon and were all very chearful and pleased.  Soon after they were gone Val Jones came looking remarkably well, tho suffering from a bad cold.  He has grown very thin, not above half  the size he was, which I think a great disadvantage, for he was getting so fat he was a perfect Punch.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  My Aunt heard from Cooper a rather better account of Mrs Porcher.  Mrs Bastard much the same.  My Aunt wrote to him.

Friday, 11 March, 1808

A beautiful day tho the wind is very cutting.  Mr Littlehales calld and sat half an hour.  He looked remarkably handsome and was gentle and pleasant as usual.  I walkd in the garden an hour.  When I came in I found the Miss Paillets here.  They had some luncheon and staid teaching and learning different stitches for working till past four o’clock.  Little Betsey Jones came in for a few minutes, but could not stay as her brother was going to London at six o’clock.  Mr Wiltshire calld and appeard in better spirits, but was very much tired.  John was better.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Barwell of the safe arrival of the flowers.  She also had a note from Mrs Williams.  Madame Catalani was too ill to sing tonight and has put off the concert till the 30th of this month.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and enclosed two letters which came for him by the post.

Angelica Catalani by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1806
Angelica Catalani by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1806

Saturday, 12 March, 1808

A gloomy morning but pleasanter out than it appeard.  I walkd in the garden an hour.  Went to see the little pigs.  While I was looking at them Mr Wiltshire rode into the fields.  He asked if we had had our letters when he found us.  We had not.  He said he would go back to Bath in search of Dryall, for he could not go home till he knew how they were going on in London.  While I was out Mrs Walters and her daughter calld, but they were gone before I came in.  Mr Wiltshire brought our letters and told us of an extraordinary report in Bath of our dear Cooper’s death.  A great number of people he said had lamented it very much and askd him if it was true, particularly Mr Ball, who said how much he was shockd to hear it “but it is not true”.  “Oh indeed it is I have it from very good authority.  He died suddenly in a fit.”  Mr Wiltshire could hardly persuade him it was not a fact.  We were greatly rejoicd to hear from Mr Bastard that Cooper was in perfect health.

My Aunt Powell heard from Mr Bastard a better account of Mrs Porcher, Mrs Bastard much the same.  She also had a long letter from Mr Appleton.

Sunday, 13 March, 1808

A very gloomy, cold day.  While we were reading Prayers, Sir John and Lady Durbin and Mr Allen calld.  Of course they were not admitted.  Soon after Mrs Jones and Miss Smith walkd from Bailbrook and staid a long time.  They were hardly gone before Mrs Graeme came, and before she went away Mr Wiltshire calld.

My Aunt heard from Cooper.  She wrote to him and a note to Mr Clarke, at Cooper’s desire.

Monday, 14 March, 1808

A gloomy day and very cold.  I walkd in the garden an hour.  Mr Wiltshire calld while we were at dinner and came in at the Library window.  The Chapmans of Bathford sent to enquire after my Aunt.  Mrs Williams sent up a note.  I playd at Cards with my Aunt Powell after supper.

Tuesday, 15 March, 1808

One of the finest days I ever saw at the time of the year, tho the wind is still very cold.  I hope it will not cut off the apricot blossoms, which are just beginning to open.  Mrs Williams walkd up immediately after breakfast and spent the morning here.  Sir George and Lady Colebrook and Mrs Franklin calld.  Lady C was as chearful and good humourd as usual.  While I was walking in the garden (which I did an hour), Mr and Mrs Tyson and Mr Fletcher brought up Mrs Flinn to fetch Mr Williams in their smart Barouche and four.  They were gone before I came in.  I made my Aunt’s medicine.  Mr Wiltshire calld and appeard in better spirits.  My Aunt heard from Mr Bastard a better account of both invalids.

A Carriage and Four with an Outrider Passing the East Front of Burton Constable by Joseph Francis Walker (c) Burton Constable Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Carriage and Four with an Outrider Passing the East Front of Burton Constable by Joseph Francis Walker
(c) Burton Constable Hall; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 16 March, 1808

As fine a day as yesterday.  I went into the garden immediately after breakfast and staid an hour and quarter, setting sweet peas and other seeds.  My Aunt Powell came down to breakfast and after she had had her luncheon, walkd in the garden a short time.  This is the first day she has been out since her illness.  I went out again with her, so that I was in the air most part of the morning.  Mr Nelson from Dudding and Nelson’s furniture warehouse in London calld for a little Bill that was owing to them, the amount of which was too small for them to send down, so he waited till he came himself.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Another misfortune has occurd to them.  Charlott’s maid in London has got the measles, and as Charlotte has never had them, they are very apprehensive she will catch them.  My Aunts playd Cards after supper.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Barwell and sent her Mr Morse’s receipt for the money for the flowers.

Thursday, 17 March, 1808

A fine day, but very cold.  My Aunt Neate walkd to Bath to spend the day with my mother.  Mr Duggan calld and sat a long time.  He came up in consequence of having heard the unpleasant report of Cooper’s death.  He had not been gone long when Sir W Mane came.  I believe he had heard the same report, but seeing us very chearful and knowing we hear from Cooper almost every day, he said nothing about it.  Mr Wiltshire and Miss Elizabeth calld.  John is much better.  Harding went to meet my Aunt at the Turnpike. She did not return till near seven o’clock.  My Aunt P and I playd a game of Gosh after dinner and one after tea.  She read General Whitlock’s Trail to us after supper.  She heard from Cooper and Mr Bastard and answerd both their letters.

Friday, 18 March, 1808

A very cold, uncomfortable day, snowing a little, but not enough to lay.  Mrs Horne walkd from Bailbrook and staid all the morning.  She is looking remarkably well.  Mr Wiltshire calld, both in his way to Bath and back.  My Aunt Powell and I playd Cards after supper.  She hear from Mrs Poone.

Saturday, 19 March, 1808

Intensely cold and snowing fast, which continued till the middle of the day, when a rapid thaw came on and it raind all the evening and night, very hard. Mr Wiltshire calld.  He had heard from Cooper who gave him a very favourable account of Charlotte.  My Aunt heard from Mr Bastard.

Sunday, 20 March, 1808

A very dull looking morning but very mild out.  While we were at breakfast Mrs Stavens sent to beg some tincture of rhubarb.  We were sorry we had none but sent her some of the powder which I daresay did as well.  I brought in two pink hyacinths which were blooming in the hot house.  It was showery all day but I continued to get a little walk between the showers.  I finished the first vol. of Dr Beatties life, which Mrs Noyes lent me.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.   She wrote to him and enclosed a letter for him.  She also wrote a note to Mr Clarke and Mrs Franklin.

Monday, 21 March, 1808

A damp morning.  Kitty made some arrow root for Miss Stowers, who has got a complaint in her bowels.  It raind about the middle of the day and continued with little interruption.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  I began to work some pointed work to trim a gown.

Tuesday, 22 March, 1808

A damp uncomfortable day.  I walkd in the garden, but it was so extremely cold I could not stay long.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  The mare foald last night.  She has got a very fine colt foal.  My Aunt heard from Pen Saker.  Poor thing, she writes very much out of spirits and is extremely ill.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Miss R Hadlon.

Wednesday, 23 March, 1808

A fine looking day, very hard frost and extremely cold.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss W, Miss Maria, Louisa Savage and Mr Jones calld.  Miss Maria brought a beautiful nosegay of pinks and roses.  My Aunt put a piece of  simnel in the basket the flowers came in to go back.  I thought Miss Maria lookd better than when she was last here.  I walkd in the garden a short time.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Thursday, 24 March, 1808

A miserable day.  It snowd and rained the whole of it.  Mr Wiltshire calld and Mr and Mrs Williams dined and supt here.  We playd at Quadrille in the evening.  I won a shilling.  Ann talkd as much and as vulgarly as usual.  They went about eleven.

Friday, 25 March, 1808

A beautiful day, but frosty and cold out of the sun.  I walkd in the garden directly after breakfast, which was fortunate as it happend, for we had such a number of visitors in the course of the morning I should not have been able to have gone out at all.  First came Mr and Mrs Chapman and Mr Wiltshire.  The C’s were very gracious and good humoured.  They had not been gone long when Mrs Graeme came up.  She was hardly seated when Lady Mane, the two Miss Davys and a Mr Perning (of Devonshire) walkd in.  Mrs Graeme did not stay long, as she was going to Bath for the water, but before she went away Dr Davis came.  They all had some cake, ginger biscuits and wine and after sitting two hours they walkd back to Bath.  Soon afterwards Mrs Jones and Maria with little Betsey came up and Mr Wiltshire calld again.  I hardly ever saw him in such good spirits.  He was really quite gay.  Mr Jones and Miss Elizabeth were at the door but did not get off their horses.  Just before dinner Snoake (Mrs Bastard’s footman) calld in his way from Devonshire to town to know if my Aunt had anything to send to Cooper.  He went on the mail from here.  Soon after we had dined Miss Stowers came to ask for two grains of James’s powder for her mother, who is very not well and it was too late to send to Bath.  We all three read the whole evening.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper.  She heard from Miss R Ludlow who is in a great deal of distress, having lost a favorite little niece.  Mrs Jones read a letter to us she had from Mrs Vassall.

M0015903 'Dr. James's Powder for Fevers' Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org 'Dr. Jame's Powder for Fevers': Trade card advertising Dr Jame's powder for fevers sold by J. Newberry at the Bible and Sun, St Paul's Church Yard. 18th Century London Tradesmen's cards of the 18th century Ambrose Heal Published: 1925 Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Dr. James’s Powder for Fevers
Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org. Trade card advertising Dr James’s powder for fevers sold by J. Newberry at the Bible and Sun, St Paul’s Church Yard. 18th Century London Tradesmen’s cards of the 18th century, Ambrose Heal Published: 1925

Saturday, 26 March, 1808

A very fine day.  I walkd in the garden an hour and my Aunt was tempted by the sun to go out for a quarter of an hour.  I workd very hard all day at my points.  About four o’clock we were surprised by a visit from Major Coffin who staid some time and was as sociable as he used to be.  He eat some simnel and drank a glass of wine before he went away.  While we were at dinner Mr Wiltshire came.  He had had a letter from Cooper which he read to us.  I workd all the evening and my Aunts playd cards.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Blackburn with an account of my Uncle Appleton’s health.  He has had a slight attack of Panalatic and has not yet recovered it.

Sunday, 27 March, 1808

A dull day and cold.  Mr Wiltshire came while we were at breakfast and as he was too late for Church, he staid and read the Prayers to us.  While we were at breakfast he read three or four of his own letters, which were very good.  My mother sent me a note to say if Dugall would take down a pitcher, she would send us some Frummity, this being mid Lent Sunday.  Sir John and Lady Durbin sent to enquire after the family and to tell us the Major was very busy getting up a Play at Salisbury.  Mr Wiltshire calld again while we were at dinner.

Monday, 28 March, 1808

A very fine day.  I walkd to Bath directly after breakfast and spent the day with my mother.  Met Mrs Howes there.  Got a stamp at Crestwells for my Aunt P and a catalogue at Ballys for my Aunt N.  My mother and Emma walkd part of the way home with me in the evening and Harding met me at the turnpike.  The two Miss Paillets, Mrs Fraser and Mr Wiltshire calld.  My Aunt sent some barley water to Mr Dalamore by Dryall in the evening when he went home.  I was a good deal tired with my walk.  I broke sugar after tea and then playd cards with my Aunt Neate.

Tuesday, 29 March, 1808

A very fine day. I walkd in the garden directly after breakfast an hour.  Mrs Williams came up early to spend the day and sleep here.  Old Mr Fletcher walkd up with her, to whom she did the honors of the garden as compleatly as if it had been her own, without even the civility of asking me whether I would go with them or not.  Mr F appears to me a very second rate vulgar man.  Mr Wiltshire calld and Mr Williams came up to dinner.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  She wrote to him and Mr Ransom.

Wednesday, 30 March, 1808

A fine day but very cold.  The Williams went away about twelve o’clock.  Mrs Graeme calld and took my Aunt Powell and me to Bath.  We went first to Admiral Phillips, while she went in to see the Admiral, I had a long conversation with Captain Waterhouse about our dear William and he very kindly promised to get some intelligence concerning the ship he had a share in.  From thence we went to my mother’s, but she was not at home.  My Aunt calld at the Room to enquire what time we ought to be there tomorrow.  Saw Admiral Christie there.  Calld on Mrs Maling, who is looking a good deal better.  Mr and Mrs Graeme took us up there and brought us home.  Mr Wiltshire dined and slept here and was so kind to read Marmion on Flodden Field to us in the evening.  It is delightfully written, quite as beautiful, if not superior, to the Lay of the Last Minstrel.  It was very late before he had finished.  I finished the points for my gown.

Thursday, 31st March, 1808

Not a very fine day, but still a hard frost.  Captain Graves of the First Somerset calld before we woke up and left word he would come again in the afternoon, but as we were all going out, my Aunt sent to ask him to breakfast here tomorrow morning instead.  We saw part of his regiment go by in their way to Bristol while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt orderd the dinner at two o’clock, that we might be at the Rooms time enough to get good seats to hear at Catalani to advantage and we were just going to dress when Mrs Williams sent up a note to say it was announced in Bath that Madam Catalani was too unwell to come down and that all subscription money would be returnd.  It is a great disappointment to us, as we most probably shall never have another opportunity of hearing her. We had just dined and were drinking our wine when the Paillets came up in a great hurry to tell us this disappointment.  My Aunt prevailed on them to stay and have some mutton chops and eggs for their dinner and walk down afterwards, but when they were going away in the evening, my Aunt said if they had no engagement they had better stay and sleep and walk back after breakfast tomorrow.  My Aunt P read the Lay of the Last Minstrel to us after tea and we worked. Sir William More calld but was not admitted.  My Aunt P heard from Mr Ransom.

Fashion plate for April 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for April 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday, 1 April, 1808

A very cold disagreeable day, with snow and then rain and snow.  I walkd round the garden with the Miss Paillet after breakfast.  Miss P was so kind to pin up a very pretty blue cap for my Aunt Powell and I lent Mary Ann my lilac cap and the pattern of it.  While we were at luncheon Mr Wiltshire and Mr James came.  They were both in very good spirits and eat some luncheon.  The Paillets walkd to Bath at three o’clock.  Soon after they were gone Harding went out.  No one knew where.  When it was time to lay the cloth, Kitty came in quite alarmed, to know if my Aunt had sent him anywhere.  She said she was very much frightened about him, for she was sure there was something upon his mind, that for the last three days he had been very much altered, hardly ever spake, had quite lost his appetite and could not sleep at night.  The servants searched the house and grounds and my Aunt sent Dugall to the village and to his son at Bath, but he had not been to either.  We began to be very remarkably alarmed, till Gardener came in from his walk and said he had seen him running very fast up the Lane and when he askd where he was going he said “to Mr Jones’s”.  About eight o’clock his wife came in in great distress.  She said Harding had to come to her in very great agitation of mind, that he had lost two silver forks and he was fearful he should be suspected of dishonesty, that he had workd himself up to a state almost of madness.  My Aunt said she was fearful he was ill and that she should not chase him to come back till she was sure that was not the case.  His wife is to come up Sunday to let my Aunt know how he does.  My Aunts playd cards after tea and I read.  My Aunt heard from Mr Bastard.

Saturday, 2 April, 1808

A very fine day tho cold and frosty.  My Aunt Neate walkd to Bath to spend the day with my mother. Mr Williams calld.  I was in the garden most part of the morning. I planted the sweet peas my mother sent and also the geranium and Marvel of Peru seeds I saved last year.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was very much out of spirits.  Dugall went to meet my Aunt Neate after dinner and she returnd about seven o’clock.  She and I playd cards after tea and supper.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper.  A poor woman with a complaint in her eyes calld to ask if Cooper was here.

Sunday, 3 April, 1808

It was a wet morning and there had been a good deal of snow in the night, but it turnd out fine afterwards, tho very cold.  We read Prayers as soon as my Aunt Powell came down.  It was so cold I did not go out all day.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Had had a better account of Charlotte, but Maria is very bad.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper.  She wrote to him and a note to Mr Clarke.  Mrs Harding came up to say her husband appeard very well and wished to come back again and it was agreed he should come to speak to my Aunt on Tuesday.

Monday, 4 April, 1808

A very bad day, wet and windy.  Another large branch of the Elm tree in the front of the house was blown off today.  Mr Wiltshire calld, Maria much the same as yesterday.  My Aunt Powell wrote a note to Mr Clarke and had an answer.  She also wrote to Cooper.

Tuesday, 5 April, 1808

A dreadful day.  The rain pours down in torrents and the wind is quite frightful, notwithstanding which we all three went to Bath.  My Aunts were obliged to go to Mr Clarkes on business for Cooper.  We drove there first.  In our way we overtook Mr Wiltshire, who was going there on the same business.  Mr C was not at home and they did not expect him till four o’clock, at which time my Aunt said she would call again.  My Aunt Neate went to my mother’s and my Aunt P and I to Mrs Maling’s, to whom we took Mrs Robinson’s poems and the Matrical Miscellany. She looks better every time we see her.  Sir W and Lady Mane were both well.  From there we went to Admiral Phillip’s.  I sat in the carriage while my Aunt went in.  I waited about half an hour when the Admiral begd I would come in as he wishd to see me.  He looks very much better than I expected to see, but was extremely affected.  He cried violently and kissd my hand two or three times.  He was at dinner and would make me have some of his pudding and a glass of Madeira that I might not hob and nob with him.  From there my Aunt went to Mr Clarke’s and I to my mother’s, where I found my Aunt Neate and sent her to join my Aunt Powell.  In walking  over to my mother’s to Mr Clarke’s, somehow or other she turned her foot and and had a violent fall.  She bruised her face a good deal and made her nose bleed, which was fortunate.  She sufferd a good deal in the evening from pain and confusion in her head, but hopes she will be better after a night’s sleep.

My mother and Emma were both pretty well.  We did not get home till seven and sat to dinner.  Harding did not call today, so suppose he does not mean to come back.  My Aunt had two letters from Cooper and one from Ellen to say his mother was dead and to beg to stay home till after the funeral.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Pen Saker.  When we were going to bed and Kitty came to take off the Fire, she saw a large rat in the dining room.  We shut the door to keep him in and set the trap, in hopes to have caught him, but he was too cunning.

Wednesday, 6 April, 1808

It pourd with rain the whole morning.  My Aunt Neate was better today than I expected.  She put some Verjuice to her nose, which she thought did it good.  We did not catch the rat last night.  He was too much engaged knawing the batten of the door to get into the library to think of going into the trap.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  The first time he did not get off his horse, he was so wet.  My Aunt Powell and I and Aunt Neate playd cards. In the evening I broke sugar.  My Aunt P had a long letter from Cooper.  She wrote to him. I sent a note to my mother to say how my Aunt Neate did.  Mr Godden calld in the morning about the taxes they have chargd Cooper among for his horses and  surcharged him for his dogs.

Thursday, 7 April, 1808

A wet morning, but not so bad as yesterday.  The water is more out today than I ever saw it before.  All the fields near the river are compleatly coverd and the tops of the willows hardly visible above the water.

Mr Godden calld before breakfast and very obligingly said he would represent to Mr Drewitt that the horses were wrong chargd.  Mr Wiltshire calld and said he would bring our letters, as he should be back early.  Mr Wiltshire calld again in his way home.  He had a letter from Miss Hellen  who said Mr Bastard was very bad and that she had fallen under the grate and was near being burnt to death.  Dr. Boisragon was going to Shockerwick.  Maria was very bad.  My poor Aunt Powell was very unwell in the morning.  She had one of her old nervous attacks, with loss of sight, which lasted an hour or more and was very languid and restless all the evening.    She and my Aunt Neate playd cards the beginning of the evening and when my Aunt N was tired, I took her cards.  I wrote a note to my mother.

Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards
Shockerwick House © Stephen Richards

Friday, 8 April, 1808

A very fine day, but cold.  Harding came back and as he appeard well and was anxious to stay, my Aunt agreed to keep him. Ellen also came back.  Poor thing;  she looks ill and is very much depressd.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss Elizabeth and John calld, but I was washing my feet at the time, so did not see them. I walkd in the garden a short time and I  gatherd a great number of violets.  The flood is very much gone down and by tomorrow morning I daresay there will be scarcely any remaining.  A Mr Turner from Exeter calld on Cooper but as he was not here, he did not come in.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper.

Saturday, 9 April, 1808

A fine day.  I walkd in the garden a short time.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He had had a good account of Charlotte.  Harding askd leave to go to Bath after dinner.  He did not return till we had done supper.

Sunday, 10 April, 1808

A dry day but not very chearful looking.  We read prayers at home.  I lookd in the black trunk in one of the  garrats for the bill of my Aunt’s silver forks, as she wanted to know the price of them.  Rebecca Workman walkd from Bailbrook and sat all the morning here.  She was very good humoured and offerd to alter my Aunt’s blue leaves for the cap Miss Paillet made for her and said she would bring it tomorrow.  Mrs Graeme, Mr Jones and Maria calld.  Mr J lookd remarkably well and was in excellent spirits and I never saw Maria look so handsome.  They said they had calld on my mother but she was not at home.  I walkd in the garden a short time after they were gone and while I was out Mr Wiltshire calld, so I did not see him.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Monday, 11 April, 1808

A very fine day.  My Aunt and I went out directly after breakfast.  We walkd in the garden a very little while and then went to look at the evergreens that were lately planted.  While we were in the field Mr Graeme calld and came down to us.  We walkd with him a short time and then all came in together.  He staid about half an hour and then ? the ferry to Bath.  Mr and Miss Wiltshire calld.  She did not get off her horse as they could not stay.  My Aunt sent to the Joneses to borrow the Bath paper.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards.  In the evening my Aunt P wrote to Cooper.

Tuesday, 12 April, 1808

A beautiful day, tho the wind was cold.  I directed gardener where to cut the clymatos and had all the dead wood cut off the sweet briar in the front of the house and the rest nicely nailed up.  My Aunt P had some of her sycamores removed from the garden to the shrubbery up the sides of the lane and other trees planted.  Miss R Workman sat here all the morning and Mr and Mrs Williams and Betsey Blenman calld and staid two hours.  They all eat luncheon.  I strewd a good deal of hay seed (that Dryall got in the loft for me) on that part of the green walk that was new turf last year and which has very little grass on it.  My Aunt and I went up the garden with Rebecca and Betsey and let them out at the gate into the lane.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not stay long.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards in the evening.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper and Mr Williams took the letter to Bath.

Wednesday, 13 April, 1808

A very fine day.  Mrs Graeme came to breakfast and spent the day with us.  She brought a habit shirt which she was making for Betsey Blenman and which was to be a surprise to her, but tho we all workd very hard at it the whole day, we were not able to finish it, so she left it for us to do and my Aunt is to send it to her before eight o’clock tomorrow morning.  I walkd in the garden half an hour and then my Aunt, Mrs Graeme and I went to Alfoyds to enquire whether he has paid his rent, which he has not.  As we came back Miss E Wiltshire overtook us on horseback.  She stopd and had a little chat.  I came in and Mrs G and my Aunt went on to Kites.  Mr Wiltshire calld. We had the happiness of hearing of our beloved William today from Mr Porcher, thro Cooper, tho the careless manner in which he speaks of him and his concerns was very mortifying to my feelings and has distressd me more than anything that has occurd for a long time.  But so it is with the generality of mankind, where there is nothing to be got or expected.  It is not worthwhile to keep up even the appearance of regard or attention.  I hope my Aunt P will write to Mr Porcher to make more enquiries, for as yet we only know he was well when Mr P’s letters left India, but where he was or how situated we are entirely ignorant.

Just as we were going to tea, Mr Graeme came to fetch Mrs G and said it was so damp he could not allow her to stay later, so away they went without his sitting down.  I wrote a note to my mother by Dryall.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper.

Thursday, 14 April, 1808

A beautiful day.  I went into the garden directly after breakfast and sewd a great quantity of mignonette seed in different parts of the garden and was out more than an hour.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He had a very bad head ache and took some magnesium and Sir William Mane calld and sat some time.  My Aunt paid Harding his wages and told him he had better go home for a little while, which he seemd very much pleased to do.  Poor fellow, I am very sorry for him, for his head is certainly affected and he gets worse rather than better.  I walkd a short time with my Aunt in the garden.  My Aunts playd cards in the evening.  Harding’s wife came up before tea and had a great deal of conversation with my Aunt about him and it was some time before they could persuade her Harding was ill.  However, she promisd she would ask Dr Charles Parry to see and prescribe for him.  My Aunt heard from Cooper with a note from him to Mr Clarke which she sent to Bath. She wrote to Cooper and Mrs Blackburn.  My Aunt heard from Miss Johnson to say Mrs Fenwick and she were in London.

Friday, 15 April, 1808

A delightful day, quite summer it was.  It was Good Friday.  We read prayers directly after breakfast and my Aunt and I went into the garden and field to see Dryall water the road.  I gatherd a nice little nosegay.  Mr Wiltshire sent a note to say he was not well enough to come out today and enclosed Payne’s answer to to Mr Cowdry’s request which is “Mrs Payne does not chuse to comply”.  I do not mean to say they are the exact words, but that is the purport.  John Wiltshire calld.  He said Maria was much the same.  Stocker came up to see us.  She has got a very comfortable place with Lady Dunally, who lives in the Crescent.  Stocker lookd remarkably well and very smart.

Saturday, 16 April, 1808

A very fine day, but the wind as cold as it was at Christmas.  I went into the garden after breakfast for an hour.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He lookd very unwell and said he was worse than he thought he was when he came out.  He calld again while we were at luncheon and was kind enough to bring the letters.  He eat some pigs feet and drank a bottle of soda water and felt refreshd and better after it.  I walkd in the garden near an hour again before dinner.  Dryall’s wife came up in the afternoon to speak to my Aunt about herself.  My Aunt gave her some of my Aunt Neate’s pills.  My Aunt gave Dryall leave to go home with his wife to see their friends, who live at Shipton Mallet.  He is to say till Wednesday morning.  I made a little basket (to gather violets or seeds in) out of the same shavings as our hats are made of, broke sugar and afterward playd Cards with my Aunt Neate.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper.

Easter Sunday, 17 April, 1808

A fine morning, but the wind high and very cold.  We read Prayers directly after breakfast.  My Aunt Powell went to take her walk in the garden, but was driven in by a shower, tho a very slight one.  I hope it will continue fine today and Monday and Tuesday, for the sake of the poor holiday peaple, to whom it will be a great disappointment if it should rain.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd up to Mr Jones’s.  They were just going to dinner, so we did not stay long.  Saw Mr, Mrs and Miss Jones, Mrs Graeme and little Betsey.  Mary had a bad cold.  We walkd some time in the garden after we returnd from Bailbrook.  I went to see the two little pigs Gardener bought yesterday.  They are very nice, fat little things.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He look indifferent, but said he was better than yesterday.  The new cow from Sir John Hawkins’s, calved early this morning.

Monday, 18 April, 1808

A fine day, but cold and there was a little snow in the morning.  Mr and Mrs Graeme, Miss Jones, Betsey Blenman, the two Miss Paillets and Mrs Williams calld.  Betsey Blenman was so kind to shew me how to do the netting like Mrs Vassall’s bag.  The Miss P’s brought up some beautiful work that they had done to shew us and Mrs Graeme made my Aunts a present of a skirt, the same as the one she made the other day for Betsey Blenman.  Mr Jones Canning came to take Mrs G to Bath and Maria and Betsey walkd home soon after.  The Paillets had some luncheon with us, soon after which Mrs Williams walkd home by herself and they did not stay long after.  As soon as they were gone, my Aunt and I walkd in the garden.  I gatherd a good many violets.  One of the Miss Wiltshire’s calld and left a note from my mother to my Aunt Neate, but did not come in.

Violets

My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter to him which came by Friday’s Post and a list of the prices of working cotton that she begd Thomas would get for her.  Mrs Graeme took the letter to the Post.

Gardener and Daniel in removing the dung from the yard to the garden, found one of the small silver forks that poor Harding lost.  It must have been very carefully left in the wash and by that means thrown amongst the manure.

Tuesday, 19 April, 1808

It snowd very fast and when we got up it was quite a white world, but it melted about the middle of the day and there was a violent storm of hail and a good deal of rain, tho the sun shone between.  It was so cold and uncomfortable I did not go out all day, nor did one person call, except Mr Godden for my Aunt’s taxes, which she paid him.  My Aunt sent a note to Miss Jones to beg she would send for her letters with theirs, which she very kindly did.  My Aunt Neate and I playd Cards after supper.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper, Mr Blackburn and the Lottery Office keeper to say her Ticket was a Blank one, and my Aunt Neate from Mr Webb. Mr Milsom came to say Mr Campbell, the high Constable, insisted on having the door from the garden into the Land made to open inwards, as it is a public nuisance opening as it does now, tho it has done so for fifty years.

Wednesday, 20 April, 1808

A very cold dull day.  My Aunt had intended to walk to Bath, but it lookd so much as it if would rain, she put if off.  Mr Shaw Lefevre and Mr Wiltshire calld and sat an hour.  Mr W had some luncheon and soda water.  Mr Lefevre was extremely good humourd and pleasant, told us a great deal of news and scandal and very kindly offered to frank any letters for us.  He directed one for my Aunt Neate to Mr Touray for Friday.  Soon after they went away, it began to snow very fast and continued without intermission for the rest of the day and, I believe, the whole of the evening and night. My Aunt Neate and I played cards after supper.  She wrote a note to my mother.  Dayall come back about 12 o’clock.

Thursday, 21 April, 1808

The snow was quite thick on the ground early this morning, but it all thawd in the course of the morning.  A man of Bath Easton came to buy the calf and gave seven shillings for it.  He is to fetch it away tonight.  I attempted to walk in the garden, but was driven in by the rain.  There were some of the most violent storms of hail in the morning I ever saw and a terrible gust of wind.  My Aunt had the step of the garden door into the lane by the hot house filld up preparatory to the door being made to open inwards at the desire of that troublesome man Mr Campbell, who is high constable and who has nothing to do but annoy the public.  Kitty told me tonight she had heard General Whitelock was coming to live at Bath Easton.  She says he has taken Fisher’s house in the village for two years, with a good deal of land and is going to make great alterations in it.  My Aunt and I playd cards after dinner till dark and my two Aunts playd after supper.

Friday, 22 April, 1808

A very cold windy day with a great deal of rain.  Mr Wiltshire calld and read some very elegant verses addressed to Miss Wiltshire by Mr James, in consequence of her having sent him a pound of tea and saying he should pay her with a copy of verses.  Mr W read us his answer to Miss W which did not sound well after Mr James’s.   He has promised to give us a copy of both.  He corroborated the account I heard yesterday of Mr Whitelock’s having taken a house in the village.  Harding came up today.  He says he is taking medicines from Dr. C Parry, which have been of great service to him, but my Aunt wishd him to stay at home a little longer and persevere in what Dr C P had recommended, which he says he will.  Mr Wiltshire calld again.  He had not heard from town today.  My Aunt Neate wrote to Mr Touray and my Aunt Powell to Cooper and enclosed a letter to him.  She heard from Minah Warren.

My Aunt Powell paid Harding fifteen shillings, for the silver fork that was found the other day.

Saturday, 23 April, 1808

Incessant and violent hail storms the whole day.  I continued to walk a short time in the garden but it was a very short time, for the rain drove me in.  My Aunt Powell breakfasted in bed.  Her throat was very indifferent.  We persuaded her to gargle with alum and water and brandy and she found benefit from it.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He had had a tolerable account of Charlotte from Cooper.  My Aunt P and I playd cards in the dusk.  She heard from Cooper.

Sunday, 24 April, 1808

Very stormy and uncomfortable the whole day.  We read prayers at home directly after breakfast, soon after which Mr Wiltshire calld in his way to Bath.  I hardly ever saw him in such good spirits.  He read us a very amusing letter he had been writing to Miss Wall.  My Aunt told him Mrs Walters had sent Marmeon  here this morning.  He said we ought to have had it before, but Mrs W had had the impertinence to lend it to Mrs Jolliff against whom he enveighd most amazingly.  I never heard him so violent and severe against any one before.  He told us a great many anecdotes of her and many things she had said, but not one word of which he believed to be true, among others that her husband was in so lucrative a situation in America (to whom, by the bye, she is going out) that she had been under the necessity of hiring a Butler and Housekeeper at fifty guineas a year each, to take out with her, as he was obliged to keep a regular table and saw so much company and she was also to take out a service of plate.  My Aunt sent Marmeon up to the Joneses by permission both of Mr and Miss Wiltshire.  We went to enquire after my mother, who sent word she was very poorly and Emma had got a bad cold.  We heard the cuckoo this afternoon for the first time.  I think it is very early for it, particularly as the weather is so cold and bad.

My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Minah Warren.

Monday, 25 April, 1808

Constant and hard showers with very faint sunshine between the whole day.  I walkd in the garden and came in quite numbd with the cold. I wrote a note to my mother to say if she wishd to write to India, my Aunt would send her letters to Mr Porcher.  She desird Dryall would call tomorrow and she would have a letter ready for him.  I was almost all the morning continuing the sleeves of my gown. My Aunt Neate and I playd cards after supper.  My Aunt Powell wrote to my brother, Tom Porcher and Cooper.  She heard from Major Durbin who gave her a long account of the gaiters going forward at the regiment.

Tuesday, 26 April, 1808

We had a little snow while we were at breakfast, but it soon went off.  It is quite as cold as it was yesterday.  I walkd in the garden but it was so extremely cold I could not stay long.  Mr Porcher had the kindness to send my Aunt Powell an extract from Mr Burnaby’s letter about my brother (which Cooper might have done did his professions and actions agree).  It is very satisfactory, as it says our dear William was in perfect health, as Mr Burnaby heard from him from Cochin, three days before he wrote to Mr Porcher, whose letters are dated the 10 of October ’07.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He had been out with his troop, both yesterday and today.  He was very much out of spirits and lookd very ill.  My Aunt Powell and I playd cards after supper.  My Aunt heard from Mr and Mrs Porcher. She wrote to Miss Johnson.

Wednesday, 27 April, 1808

It rained a quiet still rain the whole day, notwithstanding which Mr Wiltshire and Mr James calld.  I hardly saw them as Rover had been washd and I was combing him.  They staid a very short time.  The Joneses sent back “Marmion” and borrowed the “Lay of the last Minstrel”. My aunts playd cards in the dusk after dinner.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  She wrote to him and enclosed a letter from my mother to my brother.

Thursday, 28 April, 1808

A gloomy looking morning and very cold. Dryall and two little boys were employd to pick the stones and rubbish in the field.  Mr Wiltshire calld in his way to Bath and read to us a beautiful little fable written by Mr Duncan, which he was going to send with a letter of his own to Rebecca Porcher.  Miss Wiltshire and Miss Maria calld and sat some time.  Miss M looks very much better than she did some time back before they went away.  Mrs and Miss Jones and little Betsey came.  They took my Aunt Powell with them to call on Mrs Noyes and Lady Durbin, neither of whom were at home, so they went on to Bath and my Aunt sat with Admiral Phillip while they did what they had to do.  She found him very much better than when she saw him last.  My Aunt received the account of poor Mrs Bastard’s death from Cooper.  She died in the most tranquil manner possible, so much so they did not at first see she was dead.  She breathd her last at 10 o’clock Tuesday night.

Just before tea, quite in the dusk, we were surprised by the appearance of Mr Wiltshire.  He said he had met a very old friend in Bath who had told him that a Dr Williams from Wales (of whom she had the highest opinion as she had know him perform most wonderful cures when others had faild) was passing thro Bath and she would advise him by all means to ask his opinion of Maria, which Mr W agreed to do, but the difficulty was where to find him.  Mr W said he went almost all over Bath and at last found him at the Play, where he was gone to see Master Betty perform.  Mr W is to send his carriage to take him to Shockerwick at seven o’clock tomorrow, as he leaves Bath in the course of the morning.  I wish most sincerely he may be able to think of any thing that will be of service to her. My Aunts playd cards after dinner.  I read all the evening.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Friday, 29 April, 1808

A gloomy cold day.  Gardener and Daniel cut some of the willow poles by the river to put into the ground to grow.  My Aunt went out to see where she would have them planted.  She had six put in the upper field and two by the river.  I walkd in the garden some time.  My Aunt was out almost all the morning seeing Daniel mend the gate in the  rick yard , moving the Bay tree out of the field and directing the two boys that are at work there.  I copyd  Lochinvar and Constance de Beverly song from Marmion.  My Aunts playd cards after dinner and my Aunt Neate and I after tea.  I broke sugar in the dusk.  Mrs Whiterose calld to ask for the pieces that were left of her child’s frock.  She is so much better.  She thinks she shall be able to go out to work again soon.  My Aunt P gave her some money and she had something to eat and a glass of wine.

Saturday, 30 April, 1808

The weather more mild than it has been for some time and I hope is going to be fine.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr James calld and before they went away Mr and Mrs Williams came.  They stayd all the morning.  Dr. Davies calld and sat two hours.  He was in very good spirits.  They had some luncheon.  When they were gone my Aunt and I walkd in the garden a short time.  Harding came up but my Aunt could not speak to him today.  She desired he would come again Monday.  Mrs Noyes calld but it was so late she was not let in.  Mr Wiltshire came again to say there were no letters.  I pinnd the sleeves into my gown in the evening.  My two Aunts playd cards after supper and I went to bed before them.  My Aunt Neate heard from Mary Tremlett a very bad account of poor old Mr Tuck.  Gardener brought two more little pigs.

Fashion plate for May 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for May 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Sunday, 1 May, 1808

A mild day, tho at times cloudy.   We read Prayers at home.  My Aunt and I walked in the garden some time.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was very much out of spirits from having had a bad account of Charlotte.  He is going to London tomorrow morning and means to return Saturday.  He was so kind to take Miss Johnson’s ring.  Harding’s wife came to speak to my Aunt.  She had promised to go herself to Dr C Parry tomorrow morning and let my Aunt know his opinion of Harding who, she says, is quite well, but my Aunt does not chuse he should come back till she has better authority for it.

My Aunt heard from Cooper.

Monday, 2 May, 1808

A fine day.  My Aunt and I went into the garden directly after breakfast and staid some time.  I tried on my gown and fitted it after luncheon.  I went to walk again and was out till near dinner time.  Went nearly all round the field.  As we were sitting after dinner, Miss Jones and the two Workmans came down and staid till it was nearly dark.  The W’s are come to stay a little time at Bailbrook.  Maria sent us her new calico pelisse to look at and take the pattern, if we liked it.  My Aunts playd cards in the evening and from nine o’clock till near eleven we were amused with a band of music that was playing either at Sir Andrew Ba…ter or on the canal.  It was so delightfully warm my Aunt P and I went out two or three times to listen to them.

She wrote to Mr Hare about the viranda and to Cooper.  My Aunt Neate wrote to Mr Hunter about the Weal Dart Mine.

Tuesday, 3 May, 1808

A lovely day.  While we were at breakfast Rebecca Workman came.  She staid till we all set out to walk to Bath.  We left her at Bailbrook.  My Aunt Neate went to Mathers while we went to a thousand places for things we wanted.  My Aunt bought some gingham at Lucas (where she paid Cooper’s bill) to make herself and me a pelisse.  She bought some canvas to begin another stool, but could not get the pink cotton she wanted.  We went to Hetling Court to see the new watering machine with which she was so much pleased that has has determined to keep the one Mr Richards is to send up tomorrow, if it answers here as well as it appeard to do there. From there went to my mother’s, where we found my Aunt Neate, but my mother and Emma had not been at home all the morning.  However, they came in about five minutes after us and we staid with them while they dined.  My mother was looking very well, but poor Emma was very hoarse with a cold.  They were both in very good spirits.  My Aunt Powell bought a very fine lamprey at Nashes as we came home and had the goodness to send it to my mother.  As we were coming home, saw Mrs Maling sitting at her window.  She would come down to speak to us, as did Sir W Mane.  Lady M was dressing to go to the Play.  Met Mrs Pickwick, who stopped to speak to us.  We walkd home and were all so much tired we could hardly move afterwards.  While we were out Mrs Noyes and Mr Allen calld.

My Aunt P heard from Mrs Porcher.  She wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter to be frankd for Maria Jones.  I wrote a note to mother.

My Aunt and I were  weighed at Hetting Court.  She weighed 151 pounds and I 116. My Aunt and I left our watches at Locks to be put to right.  He is to bring them up Friday and do something to the clock in the library.

Wednesday, 4 May, 1808

A beautiful day.  I walkd a very short time in the garden and afterwards went down the field and into the road with my Aunt to see the dams Daniel has made to water the road.  John Wiltshire calld twice.  He brought two beautiful cucumbers that his Aunts sent to my Aunt P.  While we were sitting after dinner with the wine and desert on the table and the room in all sort of confusion with pelisses and gowns laying about it, for I was cutting out one, we heard a great talking in the next room.  My Aunt P said “O, it is the Workmans and Maria Jones”.  I opend the door expecting to see them, when a perfect stranger met my view.  I shut the door again.  In a few minutes it opend and in came Mrs Carr.  She appeard very much surprised at seeing us here and my Aunt said “I have not the honor of knowing you Ma’am”.  “No Ma’am, we only came to see the place” and “pray who let you in Ma’am?”  “I don’t know Ma’am, the Porter I believe”.  My Aunt got up and rang the bell and she went out of the room and went away directly.  There were four of them in an open carriage.  They got out in the lane and asked Dryall if Colonel Cooper was at home .  When he said no, they still persisted in coming in and all rushd into the kitchen, where they saw Ellen and Mrs Carr said “I shall go in and see Mrs Powell”.  Kitty said she never saw such bold impudent women in her life, but I think they will not come here again.  Dryall brought up from Bath Mrs Williams’s new morning gown and Emma’s bonnet and pelisse and some of those nice biscuits, the same as those we tasted at my mother’s the other morning. My Aunt sent in the evening to borrow Maria Jones’s pelisse again and Mrs Jones sent one of hers also.  After tea I cut out part of mine.  My Aunt N and I playd cards after supper.

My Aunt P wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter for Miss Jones and one to Cooper that came by the post for him.  I wrote a note to Emma and had one from my mother.  My Aunt wrote to Mr Rothery.

Thursday, 5 May, 1808

A very fine day.  I went out in the garden directly after breakfast.  Soon after I came in Rebecca Workman came and sat all the morning.  My Aunt persuaded her to stay and dine and go with her to the Penny Club.  In the afternoon she went to Bailbrook to dress and brought little Margaret Hendy down with her.  It raind a little after dinner, but was very slight and did not prevent their going.  John Wiltshire and Miss Elizabeth calld.  Soon after my Aunt went out, the man brought the new watering machine.  My Aunt Neate and I went to the road to see him try it and afterwards in the garden we desired him to leave it till my Aunt came home, as we had not a doubt she would keep it.  She did not return till after nine o’clock.  Rebecca and Margaret went home directly.  We left off fires for the first time, but had it lit at night for fear my Aunt should be cold when she came in.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards in the evening.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper, Major Durbin and Mr Hare about the Viranda.  I wrote a note to Emma.  Harding’s wife sent up a note to say her husband was well enough to return.

Bailbrook House (via www.bath-business.net)
Bailbrook House (via http://www.bath-business.net)

Friday, 6 May, 1808

A fine day.  Walkd in the garden directly after breakfast and gathered a nice nosegay to send to my mother.  Rebecca Workman walkd down and staid almost all the morning.  Miss Wiltshire calld.  She was very much out of spirits.  Sir W and Lady Mane and Miss Malings calld.  They staid two hours.  Mrs M walkd in the garden with us.  Sir W carried a chair for her to sit down when she was tired.  It was the first time she has been out in a carriage.  She leaves Bath next week for Clifton, where she stays a short time and then goes to Weymouth.  They were delighted to hear the Regiment were gone to Weymouth and that they should have the pleasure of seeing Cooper there and tried very much to persuade my Aunt to say she would go there also – The handsomest and largest of the four little pigs died and when Gardener opened it he found it had over eat itself, that the blood has all rushd to its head and killd it.  He bled the others.  A man came to take the tin water engine to mend.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter which came yesterday from him.  She wrote a note to Mrs Williams, so did I one to my mother.

Saturday, 7 May, 1808

A gloomy cold day with very high wind.  Mrs Savage, her two daughters and Miss E Wiltshire stopped at the front gate.  My Aunt went and spoke to them,  Miss E W gave her two beautiful cucumbers.  Mrs Jones took her to Bath where she went to dine with Mrs Williams and walk back in the evening.  Miss Workman calld and sat an hour with us.  Before she went away the Miss Paillets came.  After we had had some luncheon Miss W returnd to Bailbrook and just as the Paillets were going away it began to rain.  It was quite a hard shower and lasted some time.  My Aunt Neate persuaded them to stay and dine and walk home afterwards, which they did.  They mean to leave Bath next Tuesday week and very kindly offered to take any thing for us to Lymington.

I taught Mary Ann to plait the shavings for bonnets.  The man brought home the Watering Machine that he took to mend yesterday.  My Aunt Powell did not come home till half past nine o’clock, which I thought a great deal too late, but she said it was very pleasant.  She heard from Mr Rothery and Cooper and my Aunt Neate from Mr Touray and Mr Hunter.

Sunday, 8 May, 1808

A fine day but the wind very cold.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd in the garden directly after breakfast, where my Aunt Neate for a great wonder joind us.  When we came in we read prayers.  Miss Jones, little Betsey and Mr Hendy calld.  I let them out at the top of the garden.  From the tenor of Cooper’s letter to my Aunt yesterday I think he has either made an offer to Mrs Fenwick and has been accepted, or means to do so.  If it is so, I sincerely hope he will be happy, tho I fear it will not contribute much to our happiness, as I daresay in a very short time he will no longer think of us, or care about any of us.  We drank tea and suppd at Bailbrook and spent a very chearful evening.  There were only their own family, the two Workmans and Mr Hendy.  We walkd home about half past ten.  It was a beautiful moonlight night.  I took a dose of Calomel when I went to bed.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Mrs Porcher.

Monday, 9 May, 1808

A very wet morning.  Harding came back before breakfast to stay.  He appears quite well and I hope is so,  My Aunt sent a note early in the morning to Miss Wiltshire to borrow the Fable of the Lambs, written by Mr Duncan, which she very kindly sent and my Aunt copyd it and sent it to little Betsey Jones with a note to Mrs J.  They are all going to Oldbury this morning to stay a fortnight.  My Aunt very kindly sent Emma a beautiful pot of mignonette, a myrtle and geranium with which both she and my mother were very much pleased.  The man came from Bristol to do the viranda.  I wrote the whole morning, copying poems into my little book and broke sugar in the evening.  I wrote a note to my mother and had an answer from her.  I sent Mrs Vassall that I wantd for her over to Oldbury by Mrs Jones.

Tuesday, 10 May, 1808

A very showery day.  I took my new medicine, the infusion of roses for the first time.  Mr and Mrs Williams walkd up to dine and sleep.  Dr and Mrs Gibson, Dr Davis and Mr James dined and supd here.  We spent a very cheerful day.  Harding waited remarkably well and little Jack from Mr Jones’s and Dr Gibson’s servant staid to assist.  We playd Whist and Casino in the evening.  I won five shillings.  Dr Davis did not stay to supper but the rest did not go away till twelve o’clock.  My Aunt heard from Colonel E Bastard.

Whist! by John Doyle, printed by Alfred Ducôte, published by Thomas McLean, lithograph, published 20 May 1839, National Portrait Gallery.
Whist! by John Doyle, printed by Alfred Ducôte, published by Thomas McLean, lithograph, published 20 May 1839, National Portrait Gallery.

Wednesday, 11 May, 1808

A fine day with showers occasionally, but a good deal of wind.  Mr and Mrs Williams walkd home but it raind hard almost all the time.  We had one violent shower with a slight clap of thunder.  While we were at luncheon we were agreeably surprised by Mr Wiltshire’s entering.  He looks ill and is very hoarse.  Charlotte is not to be moved for a month.  Mr Wiltshire’s significant smiles and looks when he spoke of Cooper confirmed in my opinion what I before suspected.  Lady Mane and Mrs Maling calld to take leave.  They go to Clifton Friday.

Thursday, 12 May, 1808

A miserable wet day.  Mr Wiltshire sent the cottons for my Aunt and the tooth powder for me which he brought from London.  I must return the tooth powder when I have the opportunity, as it is not the right.  My Aunt gave me a nice stock of cottons and I was employd all the morning winding them and making up my Aunt’s cotton papers.  My Aunt wrote a note to Mrs Williams.  I read to my Aunts from tea till bed time.

Friday, 13 May, 1808

A fine day.  Soon after breakfast Mrs Williams, her two children and Miss Hawes (their Governess) walkd up to spend the day.  Miss H appears a very pleasant, ladylike young woman and I think Mrs W has a great treasure in her.  The little children seem to be as happy as it was possible for human beings to be.  They ran about and did just as they pleased.  Mr W walkd up before dinner.  Mr Pymm calld (an uncle of Mrs Cooper’s) and staid two hours.  While we were at dinner Mr Wiltshire came, but did not stay a minute.  Miss Hawes and the children went home a little after eight o’clock.  Mr and Mrs W slept here.  We playd Quadrille in the evening.  Mrs W told us of the death of Mrs Tiffanys.  She died last Tuesday.

Saturday, 14 May, 1808

A very fine day. Mr Williams went home soon after breakfast.   My Aunt Powell and Mrs Williams walkd to Bath after luncheon, where my Aunt spent the day and did not return till half past nine o’clock.  The Williams and Major Durbin walkd to the gate with her but did not come in.  Lucas the Linen Draper came up to say there was some mistake in the Bill my Aunt paid him today, but as she was not at home it could not be rectified.  Dryall got me a quire of paper at Bath for which he paid one shilling.

Sunday, 15 May, 1808

A beautiful day.  We read prayers directly after breakfast.  I walkd in the garden an hour and then copied some of Mr Wiltshire’s poetry.  Major Durbin and Mr Wiltshire calld.  Major D told us the North Devon was very angry at being sent away from Weymouth to make room for the Somerset, so much so that Captain Albert said they ought all to throw up their ammunition and the common soldiers refused to carry arms to the officers of the Somerset when they pass’d them.  I walkd in the garden with my Aunt before dinner and by myself after dinner.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter to him.  She also wrote to Mr Clarke, from whom she had an answer and to George Shirley and sent it to the Miss Paillets (with the patterns they were so kind to lend us) to take with them to Lymington, where they are going Tuesday.

Monday, 16 May, 1808

I fine morning but it turnd off afterwards and was gloomy the rest of the day, but did not rain.  I cut out the Waist..? for my pelisse and very nearly finished making it.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was much out of spirits and not well.  The two Miss Davies walkd up after dinner and staid and drank tea.  They leave Bath for Cheltenham next Monday.  My Aunt N and I playd cards after supper.  My Aunt P wrote notes to Mr Clarke, Mrs Hupsman and Mrs Williams.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay.  Harding went to Bath after dinner.

Tuesday, 17 May, 1808

A fine day.  A horse trod on poor Rover’s foot on the road and took off all the hair on one side, just as if it was scalded.  It swelld very much and appeard to be very painful to him, poor fellow.  One of the pigs was killd and my Aunt sent a quarter of it as a present to Mrs Flinn.  Mr Williams calld.  He was very hot and tired and had some soda water.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to the village after dinner to speak to Mr Godden about the taxes.  From him we went to the Whiteroses.  She is very unwell again.  We saw her husband who shewd us his leg, which is very bad, poor creature.  My Aunt desired him to keep it constantly wet with verjuice, which he said he would do.  She gave them two shillings.  My Aunt Powell wrote a note to Mrs Williams and had an answer.  She heard from Mrs Porcher.

Wednesday, 18 May, 1808

A wet morning, but it ceased raining in the middle of the day and was dry afterwards, tho dull and gloomy.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He assistd my Aunt Neate in making Cooper’s entries and Dryall took them to the Assessor.  I did not go out the whole day.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards after supper.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper and Mary Taylor.

Thursday, 19 May, 1808

A fine day.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay after breakfast to send to my mother.  Dryall took it to her.  Mr and Mrs Williams and Mrs Hupsman walkd up and spent the day and slept here by invitation.  They play’d Quadrille in the evening.  I workd and Mr Williams slept.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mrs Maling.  I wrote a note to my mother.  Mr Wiltshire calld.

Friday, 20 May, 1808

A fine day but cold, and towards the evening it lookd very gloomy and as if it wanted to rain.  My Aunt P and Mrs Williams fumigated the plants in the hot house with tobacco and afterwards washed them with the new machine, which did it delightfully.  Mrs Noyes, her two sweet boys and her niece, a Miss Willatz (a very pretty and pleasant girl) calld and sat some time.  I walkd round the garden with Miss W and the children.  Mr and Mrs Williams and Mrs Hupsman went away as soon as they had had some luncheon.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr James calld and staid till a shower, that was falling when they came in, had ceased.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards after supper.

Saturday, 21 May, 1808

A cold uncomfortable morning.  We had a fire.  Dr Davies calld just as we were going to luncheon.  He was in remarkable good spirits and staid a long time.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  I cut out a pelisse for Emma and my Aunt Neate and I workd very hard to make it.  I did not finish it till after twelve o’clock.  It is a present to Emma from my Aunt Neate.  Thomas is to take it to her when he goes to Chapple tomorrow morning.  My mother wishd to have mine as a pattern, which I sent her by Dryall when he went home.  My Aunts playd cards after supper.  I had a note from my mother and wrote one to her.  My Aunt Neate heard from the Mine Committy.  My Aunt Neate had the Clematis very nicely tied around the pillars in the front of the house.

Sunday, 22 May, 1808

A fine day with very hard showers now and then.  We read prayers directly after breakfast and then my Aunt P and I walkd in the garden till a shower drove us in.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  He was more out of spirits and depressd than usual.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper.  She wrote to  Mrs Maling, Miss Stevens, Cooper and a note to Rebecca Workman.

Monday, 23 May, 1808

A very showery morning.  The man with the Lillys of the Valley came.  My Aunt bought two pots, which smell deliciously.  I gatherd a beautiful nosegay.

Chapman image - Lily of the Valley 1822
Lily of the Valley, 1822

There were some violent storms in the course of the morning.  While we were at breakfast Harding asked leave to go to Bath.  He said he would be back soon, as he only wanted to see a person about fixing one of his boys as an apprentice.  He returned before our luncheon time.  My Aunt Powell made a very pretty bonnet as a present for Emma to wear with the pelisse my Aunt Neate gave her. She and I assisted Hart in cutting out a gown like Mrs Williams’s.  Soon after dinner Harding came in to say he was very uncomfortable, that he was sure the servants suspected him of dishonesty and that they were going to have him taken up;  my Aunt said everything she could think of to tranquilise his mind, but he said he was so much agitated and distressd and his head was so confused he thought he had better go home and take some medicine, which my Aunt thought also and told him he might stay at home tomorrow if he pleased.  My Aunt sent Emma’s bonnet to her by Dryall and a beautiful pot of Lilys of the Valley and some orange blossoms to my mother.  I wrote a note to Emma to go with them but, like a simpleton, left it on the table, so it did not go.

Tuesday, 24 May, 1808

A showery morning.  I began to work the trimming for my Aunt P’s new morning gown like Mrs Williams’s.  Mr Broughton calld and sat some time.  He and Mrs B come to Bath for a month before they go to Dawlish.  Cooper wishd my Aunt to send him the inscription on Mrs Lister’s monument in the Abbey. She sent for the coach and as soon as we had had our luncheon we all went to Bath.  My Aunt N went to my mother’s, while we went to the Abbey, copyd the inscription and sent it to Cooper.  My Aunt and I went into almost every linen drapers shop in Bath to get a particular kind of trimming, but did not succeed.

Rudolph Ackermann The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Politics, 1809 - Fabric shop
Rudolph Ackermann: The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Politics, 1809 – the interior of Messrs. Harding Howell & Co., a drapers shop.

My Aunt spoke to Harding’s son about his father and told him she did not think he was well enough to return, therefore she should look out for another servant . My Aunt paid 3 shillings that she owed at ?.  We did not get to my mother’s till a little before six o’clock and as she was going to drink tea in the vineyard , my Aunt took her and Emma there in our way home.  We had a new driver, the handsomest face I think I ever saw.  It was exactly like a priest.

My Aunt P wrote to Cooper.  She heard from him and Mrs Vassall.  I had a note from my mother.  My Aunt Neate wrote to Colonel E Bastard about the Mines.  I bought a tooth brush.  Mr and Miss Wiltshire calld while we were out.

Wednesday, 25 May, 1808

A fine day.  Mr and Mrs Broughton and the Miss Workmans walkd up to dinner and Sir John Hardy and Major Durbin and Mr and Mrs Williams came in the evening.  There were two casino tables.  Sir J and Lady Durbin went away early.  The Broughtons and Williams’s slept here.  The Workmans had a bed at Bailbrook.  The Major walkd home with them after supper.  It raind very hard but we wrapd them up in plaids and they did not get wet.  Harding and his wife came up in the morning.  He persisted he was quite well and persuaded my Aunt to try him another week, which she consented to do, so he staid.

Mrs Crooke, her daughter and niece and Miss Drewitt calld.  The three girls walkd in the garden.  Mrs C was very pleasant and lookd very young and pretty.

Thursday, 26 May, 1808

A very rainy day.  The Workmans came from Bailbrook to breakfast.  Poor Miss W was very not well and continued so all day and was very unwell at night.  Little Bruce Broughton walkd up in the middle of the day and the weather was so bad my Aunt persuaded the whole party to stay till tomorrow.  We had the bed made up in the room over my Aunt’s for the Workmans and Bruce slept with his father and mother.  Harding waited very well at dinner and brought in the tea, but before it was over he went home without saying a word to anyone and my Aunt does not mean to take him back again.  I do not know what was the matter with Mrs Williams, but she was very disagreeable and ill natured the whole evening, quite uncomfortably so.  She, Mr W, Mr B and my Aunt N played Cassino.  Miss W went to bed directly after tea and Rebecca and I were backwards and forwards in her room till bed time, for she was really very ill.  Mr Wiltshire calld to say he was going to London and to ask if he could do anything for us.  I sent my tooth powder back by him to be changed.

Friday, 27 May, 1808

A wet morning.  Miss Workman was not much better, so my Aunt sent to Mr Crooke to beg he would call in his way to Bath.  He came while we were at breakfast, spoke to Miss W and took her with him to Bath.  Mr Broughton sent for a coach to take them home.  They all went together.  Soon after they were gone my Aunt P put a leech on her temple for a violent inflammation in her eye.  I walked a little while in the garden, but it was very cold and wet.  My Aunt Powell and I playd at cards after supper.  She heard from Cooper and wrote to him.

Saturday, 28 May, 1808

A dry day, but not very pleasant.  This day last year my Aunt P and I were busy getting ready to go to Cheltenham with Cooper and Mr Wiltshire.  Mr and Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall, Maria, little Betsey and Eliza Hendy walkd down after dinner and staid some time, but would not be prevaild on to drink tea here for fear of the damp in returning.  Mrs Vassall looks ill, is much out of spirits and is grown very thin.  She said she was commissioned to take us back to Oldbury with her.

My Aunts playd cards after supper.  My Aunt had another of the pigs killd.

Sunday, 29 May, 1808

A fine day.  This day last year was one of the happiest of my life.  I and my Aunt Powell went with Cooper and Mr Wiltshire to Cheltenham for a few days.

While we were at breakfast this morning we were agreeably surprised by seeing Governor King.  He came to Bath two days ago to see the Admiral and leaves again tomorrow.  He looks very much better than I expected to see him, but is very feeble from the gout.  He staid with us three hours.  Mr Tudor brought his wife to introduce.  She is a very pretty woman but was here too short a time to judge of her manners.  They walkd in the garden and I gatherd a beautiful nosegay for her.  John Wiltshire calld.  They had not heard from Mr W.

When poor Harding went away the other evening, he did not go home and his family have  not heard anything of him.

Captain Philip Gidley King (23rd Apr 1758 - 3rd Sept 1808, 3rd Governor of New South Wales) and his family, Robert Dighton, 1799. State Library of New South Wales: ML 1244
Captain Philip Gidley King (23rd Apr 1758 – 3rd Sept 1808, 3rd Governor of New South Wales) and his family, Robert Dighton, 1799. State Library of New South Wales: ML 1244

Monday, 30 May, 1808

A fine day.  While we were at breakfast Mrs Jones sent to say she was going to Bath, if we wanted to go.  She calld at the green gate and took my Aunt P and me, Mrs J and Maria in the carriage and Mr Jones on the box.  We calld at Mrs Flinn’s.  Did what we had to in the shopping way.  Sat half an hour with my mother (who we found not well and much out of spirits) and then went to the Miss Workmans’ where we were to meet the Jones’s.  Saw Mr and Mrs Boughton, Bruce and the Workmans.  Mr B had rode to Bath Easton while we were out.  Met Mr Sam Hartley in the street, looking remarkably well and also Lady George Sutton.

After dinner I divided the Botany Bay seeds Governor King gave my Aunt and she took them (with a pot of double Lilys of the Valley for Betsey) up to Bailbrook.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards in the evening.  Miss Jones sent my Aunt two letters (containing a necklace, earrings and bracelets) to ask Mr Bastard to frank them to Ireland.  The ass foald this morning before breakfast.

this next page seems to be out of place

Tuesday, 31 May, 1808

A very fine morning.  Miss Jones came down while we were at breakfast to speak about her letters.  She did not stay long.  I gathered a nice nosegay, soon after which a violent storm of rain with a good deal of thunder, but the thunder was at a great distance.  The rain lasted till the evening.  I broke some sugar in the morning.  After tea my Aunt P and I playd cards.  She heard from Cooper, George Shirley and Mrs Fenwick and I wrote to Mr Bastard and enclosed Miss Jones’s letters.

Fashion plate for June 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for June 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Wednesday, 1 June, 1808

A fine day.  I cut out a gown to be made like Mrs Williams’s.  Mrs Vassall came down soon after breakfast to spend the day and sleep here.  Stone came and mended the window that Bruce Broughton broke.  I gathered a beautiful nosegay for Dryall to take to my mother tonight when he goes home.  Miss Wiltshire calld and sat some time.  My mother sent a servant up to speak to my Aunt, but his wages were too high.  We workd in the evening.

Thursday, 2 June, 1808

A fine morning, but it turned off between two and three o’clock and was wet the rest of the day.  My Aunt P and I calld on Mrs Crooke and Mrs Walters.  Mrs W gave my Aunt a note she was just going to send, with an invitation to meet the Club, Whit Monday.

My Aunt mislaid the note before she opened it, so we do not know where they are to assemble.  Mrs Flinn, Mr and Mrs Williams, the two children and Miss Hawse dined here.  They playd Casino in the evening and all went away early.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Maling.  She wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter from Mr Clarke to him.  My Aunt had a note in the evening from Mrs Noyes about the Tythe.

Mrs Wiltshire calld to say that she had heard from her brother and that Charlotte was to leave town the beginning of next week.

Friday, 3 June, 1808

A  very cold, uncomfortable day which turned to rain.  I workd hard at my new gown.  We had a fire in the evening.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  I wrote a note to my mother and had an answer.  My Aunts playd cards in the evening.

Saturday, 4 June, 1808

A compleat rainy day.  We had the fire lit directly after breakfast.  What an amazing difference a few months make, not only in the happiness and prospects, but also in the opinions of people!!!  This day last year was one of the happiest of my life and such, as most probably, I shall never see again.

Cooper, Mr Wiltshire, my Aunt and I returnd from spending a few days very delightfully with the Porchers at Cheltenham, after which Cooper staid here with us a fortnight, the sweetest and shortest I ever passd.  It is in vain to regret time passd, as to wish that to come may glide on as smoothly as that which has gone by, I fear, forever.

Hart finished the body of my gown beautifully.  I workd hard all day.  The rain ceasd in the evening and I went in the garden for a short time.    My Aunt Neate and I playd cards in the evening after supper.

Sunday, 5 June, 1808

A tolerable fine day, but showers occasionally.  We read prayers after breakfast and then all went into the garden.  Gardener went to Mrs Harding to enquire if she had heard anything of her husband.  She said she had had a letter from Gloucestershire to say he was there, but in a very deranged state.  After dinner my Aunt P and I walkd up to Bailbrook.  We met Mr and Mrs Jones, Mrs Vassall, Miss J, Betsey and Eliza Hendy coming down to us.  They turnd back with us and we all went to their garden and hot house to see their plants, which are beautiful.  Mr J shewd us a new watering machine  he bought last night which he thinks better than the one we have, but my Aunt does not.  He also shewd us an alteration he has been making in his kitchen, blocking up a door on one side and opening it on the other, which is a great advantage.  We staid there till after their tea was brought in.  My Aunt had a cup of coffee and then we came home.  They have fixed Monday week for going to town.  My Aunt had a note of invitation from Mrs Gibson to tea and cards next Saturday.  She wrote to Cooper and enclosed a letter to him, franked by General Porter, containing a ring.  She heard from Mrs Fortune.

Monday, 6 June, 1808

Not a very fine day, which was unfortunate for the Holy day people, it being Whit Monday.  The Mens Club came to pay us a visit as usual with their Band.  My Aunt gave them a guinea for Cooper (he gave it himself last year).  I was out of spirits for, I believe, their appearance affected me so much I was obliged to leave the window and have a good cry. We went in the afternoon to Mrs Walters’s to see the Womans Club drink tea and dance, but the weather turnd out so bad they could not drink tea or dance in the garden, which was a great disappointment, both to themselves and the company assembled.  There was a large party, almost all strangers to us, except Mr, Mrs and Miss Crooke, Mrs Noyes, her two boys and sweet niece.  Mr and Mrs Trail, Captain Eckersall, his mother and two sisters.  Miss Willatz did not leave me a minute.  We walkd in the garden when the rain would let us and as soon as tea was over ( which Mrs Noyes, my Aunt and the two Miss Eckersalls made in the parlour below and sent upstairs) and we had seen a little of the dancing in the kitchen.  We came away, it did not rain until we were halfway home and then we had a violent shower.  I got a little wet, but changed my clothes as soon as I came in and found no inconvenience.  My Aunt Neate was at tea when we returnd.  Mr and Mrs Jones calld while we were at breakfast to borrow the key of our pew, as they were going to walk with the Club to church, but my Aunt had just sent it with a note to Mrs Walters.  My Aunt sent six guineas by Gardener to Mrs Noyes for his Tythe for two years.  Mr Williams calld.  He brought a note of invitation from Mrs Flinn for us all to dine there.  My Aunt fixed Wednesday.  My Aunt sent a note to Mrs Humphries to come and speak to her about the Dams in the road.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards after supper.

Tuesday, 7 June, 1808

A showery morning and so cold we were all black and blue.  We were obliged to go to Bath unexpectedly to make some enquiries about Mr Scrape for Cooper.  After a great deal of enquiry and some difficulty, my Aunt gained the intelligence she wanted.  Met Miss Wiltshire who told us Charlotte was to leave town tomorrow or next day and that Sir W Clayton has had the goodness to insist on driving her the whole way.  She comes in a Sociable and Four of his and he is so famous a whip she will have nothing to fear from jolts or roughness of road.  We calld at the Workmans, met a Miss Bowcher there, a very pleasant woman.  We walkd about a great deal, met the Williams’s on the road and Dr Gibson in Milsom Street.  Went to my mother’s at five o’clock, where my Aunt Neate was waiting for us.  Staid with her for some time and then made home.  Mrs Vassall and Eliza Hendy calld while we were out – and while we were at dinner (about seven o’clock) Mr and Mrs Crooke calld to speak to my Aunt, but did not come in.  We are partly expecting to see Mr Handly and Cooper in his way to Weymouth on Friday.  I was so tired when I came home I could not work or do anything but write this.  My Aunts playd cards.  Mrs Humphries calld and settld with my Aunt the difficulties about the Dams in the road.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and wrote to him.  She also wrote a note to Mrs Vassall and sent her some biscuits.  Dryall asked leave to spend the afternoon in Bath.

Sociable carriage c.1850, drawing by J. Gilfoy, Science Museum.
Sociable carriage c.1850, drawing by J. Gilfoy, Science Museum.

Wednesday, 8 June, 1808

A fine day, but cold.  Mrs Vassall breakfasted with us and we all went to Bath soon afterwards.  My Aunt Powell and I calld at Admiral Phillips, where we had the pleasure of seeing Mr and Mrs Calmady.  They were extremely glad to see us and very friendly.  Mrs C is grown thin and was a good deal affected. Miss C was in very good spirits and as good humoured and pleasant as usual.  The Admiral was in the drawing room and looking better.  We had some luncheon there and then calld on the Workmans.  Saw Mr Bowcher there again.  Went to Lucas’s, post office and two or three other places, and then to my mother’s, where my Aunt Neate was. Found my mother and Emma both very well.  Staid there some time and then we all calld on Mrs Gibson.  Saw her and the Doctor.  From there we went to Mrs Flinns where we were engaged to dine.  Met the Miss Workmans at dinner and the Broughtons in the evening.  Mr Broughton and I playd against Mrs Williams and Rebecca at Casino.   I lost two shillings.  I got two pairs of shoes.  My Aunt paid for them.  We supped at Mrs Flinns and as it was a very wet evening my Aunt sent the Workmans home in the coach first and we took Mr and Mrs Broughton and Bruce as far as Guinea Lane and they had a very short way to walk.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Hodge.

Thursday, 9 June, 1808

A very wet morning and so cold we had a fire directly after breakfast.  As soon as it held up, my Aunt P and I walkd in the garden.  I gatherd two nosegays and sent one of them to my mother by Dryall.  At night, the woman brought up some straw bonnets for us to see.  They were all pretty, but too small for us.  She is to bring some more tomorrow.  Gardener put out all the green house plants.  My Aunt P read to us in the evening and I workd.

bonnet1
Courtesy of Jane Austen.co.uk

Friday, 10 June, 1808

A fine day.  My Aunt P and I walkd up to Mr Jones’s, saw Mrs Vassall and Maria.  Mr J was a little better, but still very ill.  Mr Horne and Mr Ormsby were at Bailbrook.  My Aunt prevailed on Mrs Horne to return with us to dine.  Dr Davies calld while we were out.  Mr Crooke came in the evening to speak to my Aunt about the fence by Mr Jones’s.  I gathered a nosegay for Mrs Horne and let her out at the top of the garden.  The stupid woman brought up another bonnet, but still too small.  My Aunt Neate read to us in the evening and my two Aunts playd cards after supper.  I had a note from my mother.  My Aunt P heard from Cooper.  She wrote to Mrs Fortune  and Mr Porcher and enclosed a letter to him to forward to my brother from my mother.

Saturday, 11 June, 1808

A fine day.  Mrs Vassall came and breakfasted with us.  My Aunt could not prevail on her to stay and dine, but she said she would come again in the afternoon.  As soon as she went home, my Aunt P and I went out, with the intention of calling on Mrs Noyes, but met her, Mrs Littlehales and Miss Willitz in the Carriage going to Bathford, so we went on to Mrs Walters’s, where we saw her.  Her whole family, I believe, were there, Mrs Thorald and her two daughters, the two Miss Skinners, Mr and Mrs Walters and Sophia.  There was a most violent shower of rain while we were there.  Mrs W shewd us her house, which is one of the most comfortable I ever saw.  In our way home, Mr Tudor overtook us.  He had been to Shockerwick to see Maria. He said she was not so bad as he had seen her, but very low.

Mrs Vassall came down after dinner and brought some muslin to make a cloak, which I cut out for her.  She staid till near nine o’clock.  The woman sent up a very nice bonnet, but not large enough in the front, so I returnd it to have two rows more straw added to it.  They sent it up in the evening, very nicely done and looking beautiful.  My Aunt had another pig killd.

Sunday, 12 June, 1808

A fine day, but a great blight.  We read Prayers, soon after which Mrs Vassall came down.  She finishd a letter to Mr V and one to William here, to send to the Post by Dryall.  We walkd some time in the garden and when we had had our luncheon, Mrs Vassall left us.  In the afternoon my Aunt and I walkd through the village.  We stoppd at Whiteroses, found her better, her husband much the same.  As we were returning met Dryall, who came to tell us Mr and Mrs Williams were come to drink tea.  They staid till past nine.  It was a take leave visit, as they leave Bath Tuesday morning.  My Aunt had two letters from Cooper, one of which ought to have come yesterday.  She wrote to him.  My Aunt Neate heard from Mr Bastard.  We had no News Paper this morning.

Monday, 13 June, 1808

A fine day.  While we were at breakfast, a man came to offer himself as a servant.  He is to let my Aunt know Wednesday whether he will take her wages.  I walkd in the garden a short time.  Mrs and Mrs Calmay and a Miss Hawker walkd up from Bath.  The two girls and I went into the garden.  I gatherd a nosegay for them to take to Mrs Phillip.  They had some luncheon and then returnd.  I felt extremely unwell the whole day.  My throat swelld very much in a part that had never been affected before and was so tender I could hardly bear anything to touch it.  My Aunt Neate and I playd cards in the evening.

Tuesday, 14 June, 1808

A fine day.  While we were at breakfast Mrs Jones sent to say Mrs Vassall was going to Bath in the carriage by herself and could take us all if we liked to go.  I was too ill to bear the motion of the carriage, but my Aunts went.  While they were gone I laid on the sopha and sleept some part of the time.  Mrs Walters and all the family calld, but luckily I had said “not at home”.  Miss Willatz and one of the little Noyes’s too called.  I was very sorry I could not see her, but I was not equal to entertaining anyone.  My Aunts returned to dinner.  They had seen my mother and Emma, both pretty well.  Dear Emma was going to the music at the Abbey in the evening.  My mother was there yesterday morning.  Mrs Vassall, Miss Jones and little Betsey walkd down to see me after dinner but would not stay to tea.  I laid on the sopha all the evening and went to bed early.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mrs Porcher and Mr Bastard.  She wrote to Cooper.  There were also two letters came for Cooper by the post. No paper.

East view of Bath Abbey c.1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).
East view of Bath Abbey c.1805 (Victoria Art Gallery).

Wednesday, 15 June, 1808

A fineish day, but with violent showers.  We were agreeably surprised by the arrival of Mr Handly to breakfast.  I never saw him look so well.  He only staid two hours with us, but said he could not go through Bath without stopping to shake hands.  They began to mow the grass early this morning.  It appears to be a heavy crop.  Mrs Vassall came and sat the whole morning.  She could not stay to dinner as Mr Graeme was to dine at Bailbrook.  I walkd a very short time in the garden and then laid on the sopha till dinner time, tho my throat was better than yesterday.  Dr Davies calld while we were at tea.  He was in remarkably good spirits, but made quite a flying visit, as some gentleman was waiting for him in the road.  I went to bed before supper.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  I wrote a note to my mother.

Thursday, 16 June, 1808

Not a very fine day.  Cooper arrived to breakfast in the Mail to my great surprise, I must acknowledge, as I had not the least idea we should see him without his dear friends the Bastards, but they will soon be here I suppose.  He has ordered medicine for me and says the swelling in my neck is checked and will not come to anything serious.  Mr Allen calld soon after breakfast and I sat some time.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd in the garden and I went down the Lane to see the shrubs which are flowering.  Cooper read part of a pamphlet on the state of Ireland, (which is remarkably well written) to us in the evening.  I took Calomel when I went to bed. Cooper gave me some mourning rings which I am to sell to buy a chance in the Lottery.

Friday, 17 June, 1808

An uncomfortable cold day.  Mrs Vassall was to have breakfast here but, owing to a mistake, did not.  However, she came soon afterwards.  Mr Broughton, Mr Wiltshire and Sir William Clayton calld.  Charlotte got home last night and bore the journey very well.  I never saw Mr W look better.  Thomas came by one of the coaches this morning.  Cooper and my two Aunts went to Bath, after they had had some luncheon and Mrs Vassall walkd back to Bailbrook, but is to return to dinner.  It began to rain soon after they went and continued more than an hour.  Cooper, who walkd back, was wet through.  Mrs Vassall came to dinner, but left us soon after tea.  My Aunt N and Cooper playd at Chess.  My Aunt P heard from Pen Saker.  I made some of my new pills and began taking them.

Saturday, 18 June, 1808

A fine day.  We all four had a good deal of conversation about the house at Cowes and Cooper has determined to pull it down and rebuild it.  He talks of making a sweet place of it.  While we were at luncheon Miss Willitz and one of the little Noyses called to ask if I would go to Bath.  Cooper said I might go, if I would not walk about or expose myself to a draft of air.  She had a great many things to do, but we went every where in the carriage and I only got out once it was exceptionally hot.  Saw Mr Wiltshire and the Tudors on the road.  Mr Jones very kindly sent his carriage to take Cooper and my Aunt to Shockerwick.  They found Charlotte not the worse for her journey and looking lovely.  After dinner my Aunt and Cooper walkd to Bailbrook, but returned to tea.  My Aunt saw poor Eliza Hendy who is extremely ill indeed.  I very much fear she will not recover.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess in the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Henderson.

Sunday, 19 June, 1808

A very fine day.  We read prayers at home, soon after which Captain Chivers calld.  Cooper wrote a great many letters.  Mr Wiltshire calld twice.  I walkd in the garden some time and gathered a beautiful nosegay.  My Aunt had a note from Mrs Vassall to say poor Eliza was very bad.  She went up there after tea.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.  My Aunt P did not return till past ten.  I was so much depressd in spirits the whole evening it was with greatest difficulty I could suppress my tears and while Cooper and I were alone for a few minutes he was going to speak of how he had settled his affairs and began by saying “If anything happens to me, my dear girl, you will find you are comfortably provided for.”  I beggd he would desist, as I could not bear the conversation and he said no more on the subject.  My Aunt P wrote to Mrs Hodge and Elmsley about the newspaper.

Monday, 20 June, 1808

A very fine day.  While we were sitting at work after breakfast we were disagreeably surprised by Miss Langley’s walking in.  She is just as vulgar and disgusting as ever and came with the intention of spending the day here, but luckily, hearing we had some friends coming, she would not stay.  After she was gone Cooper walkd to Bath.  Mr and Mrs Broughton, the two Miss Workmans and Bruce dined and slept here.  They were very cheerful and good humoured.

Wednesday, 22 June, 1808

A gloomy morning which turned to rain.  It was very unfortunate, as the hay would all have been carried, but for the wet.  Mr Haines calld on Cooper.  While he was here Mr Wiltshire came in very low spirits to beg Cooper would go to Shockerwick to see Maria who was very bad.  Cooper walkd there and back and came home wet through.  He seemed to think Maria would not live much longer, but he said he had thought so, so often, that he did not know what to say. Soon after tea Mr Wiltshire came again to say Maria was very much worse.  Cooper advised him by all means to fetch Dr Parry and, if they would call for him in their way, he would accompany them to Shockerwick.  Dr Parry calld and took him with him at half past ten o’clock.  I never saw Mr W so depressd. He could not speak.  Cooper did not return till near one o’clock.  He left Maria a little better.  He had an egg and some soda water before he went to bed.  My Aunt Powell heard from Minah Warren.  She wrote to George Shirley.

Thursday, 23 June, 1808

A fine day.  We all went to Bath.  I saw my mother and Emma for a short time.  Took them a beautiful nosegay.  We calld at Admiral Phillips to take up my Aunt P.  We did not get out of the carriage, but Mrs Phillip came down to shake hands with us and the Admiral came to the window to kiss his hand to us.  Cooper had walkd on and we overtook him at Veseys, where he had stoppd to speak to Major Coffin who came out to us and was very friendly.  We all dined at Shockerwick.  It was only a family party.  We sat all the afternoon in Charlotte’s room, who was in bed looking most beautiful and very chearful.  We came home at half past ten to supper.  Miss E Wiltshire was so kind to lend us Marmion and my Aunt real a little of it.  After we came home poor Mr Wiltshire was very unwell and out of spirits.  My Aunt P heard from Mr Bussell and wrote to him.  I had a note from Miss Willits.

Friday, 24 June, 1808

A fine day.  The Miss Workmans walkd up to breakfast and spent the day.  Sir George and Lady Colebrook, Mr Walters, Mr Wiltshire, Miss Willits and Mrs Thonald calld.  Cooper and my Aunt P walkd to Hampton to call on the Allens.  My Aunt persuaded the Workmans to sleep here.  I have not seen Cooper in such spirits for a long time.  He was quite boisterous after tea.  In the evening my Aunt Powell read Marmion but it quite provoked me to see how much it was thrown away on Rebecca W and Cooper, who did not appear to enjoy or be at all interested by it.  The former was too much taken up with Cooper, and his thoughts being fixed on Mrs Fenwick’s “Broad Lands”, they could neither of them attend to anything else.  My Aunt Powell had a note from Mrs Vassall and answered it.

Saturday, 25 June, 1808

A very fine day.  The Workmans left us soon after breakfast.  Cooper and my Aunt were in the garden and field three hours.  Cooper went down to the Mill and got some Gudgeons. Mr and Mrs Tudor, Dr and Mrs Gibson, Mr Allen and his two sisters dined here.  A tolerable pleasant day.  Miss Janetta was extremely agreeable and good humoured.  They and the Tudors went away early.  Cooper, my Aunt N and the Gibsons played Whist.   My Aunt P and I gosh.  They went away directly after supper.  Mr Wiltshire calld and my Aunt tried to prevail on him to dine, but he said he was too wretched to come to dinner, but would join the party in the evening.  However, he did not come.  Mr Johnson calld, but only Cooper saw him,  I was in the garden gathering flowers.

Sunday, 26 June, 1808

A gloomy morning.  Mr Allen came to breakfast, but went away soon after for fear of the rain, which did come shortly after he took his leave.  It did not last more than an hour.  Cooper read the prayers to us.  Mrs Vassall sent a note to say she would dine here, which she did.  Mr Wiltshire was one of the party also.  We were very busy all day putting our clothes together to be packd, as my Aunt P determined on going to town about her teeth before we go to Weymouth and she and I are to set out in the Mail tomorrow, stay as long as is necessary and then join my Aunt Neate and Cooper at Weymouth, instead of returning here.  Mr Massingbend and Mr John Savage calld, but only Cooper saw them.  Mrs Vassall went away before tea on Eliza Hendy’s account, who is still very bad, and Mr Wiltshire about half past nine. I bathed my feet when I went to bed at night.  Cooper was in very good spirits and we sat up late.

by Thomas Anthony Dean, after Charles Jagger, stipple engraving, early 19th century
Sir John Hutton Cooper, Bt by Thomas Anthony Dean, after Charles Jagger, stipple engraving, early 19th century courtesy of National Portrait Gallery

Monday, 27 June, 1808

A very fine day.  Cooper, my Aunt and I went to Bath soon after breakfast.  I went purposely to take leave of my mother and when I got there both she and Emma were out.  We waited near an hour in hopes of seeing them and then were coming away in despair when they came in, but it was so late we could not go upstairs with them.  I promised to write to my mother as soon as I got to town.  Cooper was just the same today in his manner as he was this time last year.  He went to Bath this morning to sign his Will in which he says he has taken care of me.  He made me a present of two guineas to buy me a gown and told me the picture he promised me so long ago by Jagger  of himself was nearly, if not quite, done and that I might call for it if I liked, but I fear I shall not be able.  Mrs and the Miss Allens calld while we were out.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Fenwick, Mrs Fortune, Mrs Phillips and Mr Pugh enclosing a draft for his Bill.

Tuesday, 28 June, 1808

A gloomy day, but dry.  At a quarter past four yesterday my Aunt Powell and I got into the Mail at Bath Easton, in which was a very handsome and gentlemanly young man, an Officer just come from Malta, to whom Cooper recommended us and said he should feel particularly obliged if he would take care of us on the road, which he did with the greatest good humour and politeness.  The other passenger was, from his appearance, a lawyer and tho not so pleasant as our younger favourite, yet there was nothing disagreeable about him.  We got out at Marlbro’ and went upstairs while the gentlemen had some supper, but not being inclined to eat, we did not join them. We reached the Gloucester coffee house at twenty minutes past six o’clock.  The Guard calld a Hackney coach.  Our young companion jumped out and assisted us to step from the Mail into it and away we went to Mr Henderson’s, who we found up and expecting us.  We breakfasted with him, his wife and children six, then went up stairs with him, where he took the model for my Aunt and lookd at the tooth for which I came to town.  He will not consent to do any thing to it but fill  it with some composite to prevent the air getting to it, as he says it is not yet sufficiently decayd to allow of its being filed, for the pain it would give me would be so intolerable it might throw me into convulsions and if he took it out, the gum would not be enough hardend under six weeks to admit of its being replaced.  He removed a great deal of tartar from the inside of my front tooth, which was rather a painful operation.  When he had done with us we went to a most comfortable lodging that he recommended, next door but one to his house, promising he would work night and day to enable us to leave town Thursday evening.  We dined at half past two and went to Mr Henderson’s at half past four, where we staid till past six.  He operated again on us both.  When we returnd we drank tea, intending to sup very early to have a long night’s rest.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper, my Aunt Neate and Mrs Williams and I a very long letter to my mother.

Messrs Andrew Collyer's Mail Coach by John Cordrey (c.1765-1825) (c) Jersey Heritage; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Messrs Andrew Collyer’s Mail Coach by John Cordrey (c.1765-1825)
(c) Jersey Heritage; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 29 June, 1808

A very fine day, but extremely hot.  We found ourselves very much refreshed by a night’s rest and as soon as we had breakfast we went to Mr Henderson’s.  He told us it would not be convenient to him to attend us till after dinner, so we walkd to do what we had to do.  Went first to McMillan’s shoe shop in Jermyn Street, where my Aunt gave me three pairs of beautiful dress shoes and one pr of thick soles for walking.  She bought a good many for herself.  We then went to Crooks in Pall Mall and got some cotton.  From thence we went to Mr Lister’s at White Hall  about the Mines for my Aunt Neate.  He was very polite and obliging and gave us the information we wanted.  As we were so near Westminster Abbey we went on to see the alterations made there since  we were in town last.  There is so large a space laid open and so many houses taken down it was sometime before I could find out where I was or recollect what it was like formerly.  When we had satisfied our curiosity, we crossed the park where we saw the beautiful cannon which, I believe, was taken from Bonaparte in Egypt) to Mr Webb’s in Little King Street.  He was in Devonshire, but we saw his Clerk, who appeard as extraordinary as his master and from whom we could get no satisfactory information.  From there we went to Brown’s the jewellers in Piccadilly to have a Christal put in my ring with my father’s hair and I bought a very pretty locket set with pearls to put Cooper’s hair in with the money he gave me, adding thirteen shillings.  From there we went to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross about our places in the Mail for tomorrow.  They told us the Dorchester Mail went from Lad Lane, so my Aunt took a coach and we went there.

There were three places vacant, but the Book keeper made some difficulty in taking us up at the end of Sloan Street, till my Aunt gave him five shillings and said she would give the coachman half a crown when he promised we should be taken up there.  We then came home and dined and afterwards went into Mr H’s, who did not keep us long.  When he had done with us we walkd to Mrs Lara’s shop in Oxford Street, where my Aunt bought some ribbon, lace and two very beautiful fans to give to Mr Henderson’s little girls.  From there we walkd to Reveine’s in Bond Street to ask where Jagger lived.  He told us at number 9 Duke Street, Manchester Square.  We went on there to enquire for Cooper’s picture.   We found them very busy packing to go to Cheltenham and extremely surprised at our coming there for a picture of the Colonel, as he had not sat to him for one since he was at Brighton and indeed he had seen him only once there eight months.  I was very much disappointed and mortified.  We were witness to a shocking accident in Oxford Street.  A man driving a Mourning coach ran against a post with such violence that he was thrown from the box and both wheels went over his legs.  We enquired as we returnd if he was materially hurt.  They told us one of his legs was broken.

We came home extremely tired.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper, my Aunt Neate and Elmsley to desire he would not send any more papers to Bath Easton.  Mr Henderson’s eldest son was so kind to go to Sawyers to get the prize for the ticket Cooper gave my Aunt P.  It proved to be four prints in commemoration of the naval victories of Howe, Duncan, St. Vincent and Nelson.  Very beautiful.

Chapman image - Manchester Square
Manchester Square 1813

Thursday, 30 June 1808

A fine day.  We got up early and went to Mr Henderson’s before breakfast.  He did not keep us long, but desired we would return as soon as we could.  We went back at half past nine and staid till half past one.  We then came home and had some luncheon and put up our things and then returnd to him again.  We waited more than an hour before we could see him, there were so many people waiting.  He then told us we had better go and have our dinner and return to him as soon as we could and he would devote the whole afternoon to us.  We walkd as far as Berners Street to get some Lavender Water and some Esprit de Rose and bought some buns in our way to take with us. After we had dined and paid everything we went into Mr H.  When he finished with my Aunt and me and she asked what she was in debt to him besides thanks, he said same as before, which was ten pounds or guineas.  He took a most friendly leave of us.  At seven o’clock we got into a Hackney coach and proceeded to the end of Sloane Street, where we waited till a quarter before nine before the Mail arrived.  We were very fortunate in our companions.  One was a Midshipman going to join his ship at Plymouth, the other a young Irishman, just come from the West Indies for promotion and going to visit his Colonel at Lime – extremely handsome and very good natured.

Fashion plate for July 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for July 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Friday, July 1 1808

We came very comfortably as far as Blandford, where we got out and breakfasted, changed our cloaths and went on in a Chaise to Dorchester, where we arrived about half past three.  Found Cooper at Mr Williams’s.  My Aunt was mortified at his reception of us and fancied it more polite than affectionate.  Mrs Williams pretended to be delighted to see us but I, being in the secret know, knew it was only pretence.  Her manner to Cooper grows more absurd and impudent every day I think and I am much mistaken if they do not understand each other perfectly.  The children are all at home for the holidays.  Both James and Ann are wonderfully improved.  Mr Geatman dined there.  He is looking remarkably well.  My Aunt Neate joind us there about seven o’clock and we all reachd Weymouth at ten.  Cooper, My Aunt P and I in the Hack Chaise, my Aunt N, Hart and the two men in my Aunt’s carriage.  We found Mr Bussell waiting to receive us in Charlotte Row, where we have a very comfortable house.  Mr Bussell supd with us and did not go away till twelve o’clock.

Saturday, 2 July, 1808

There was a good deal of rain in the morning early, but it was fine afterwards.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us and the house was compleatly full the whole morning.  Major Knott, Captain Chivers, Captain Road, Captain Nash, Captain and Mrs Roch, Captain Mark, Captain and Mrs Simmons, Captain and Mrs Gillet, Mrs Chalie and Mr Skreene, who by the bye looks most dreadfully.  We have not seen him since his accident and my Aunt thought his intellects were  injured.  I never saw Captain Bastard look so well in my life.  He has grown quite fat and has got a good colour and appears a healthy man.  Some of the officers left cards for Cooper.  We dined alone.  After dinner Cooper and my Aunt went to ask the Bastards to drink tea here, but Mr B declined on account of the evening air, to the great mortification of Mrs B who, I daresay,  gave him a good scolding.  They did not stay out long.  Mr Terry drank tea here.  He appears a very gentlemanly young man.  Cooper wrote a beautiful Charade on Mrs Fenwick, which he sent her.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Kitty and I to my mother.

Sunday, 3 July, 1808

A very fine day.  Major Durbin and Mrs Bussell breakfasted here, after which Cooper read prayers.  We had a great many morning visitors, Captain and Mrs Nash, Mr and Mrs Gyon, Mr and Mrs Davis, Captain Roach, Captain Chivers, Captain Sherston and seven or eight others who only left cards.  My Aunt Powell, Cooper, Mr Bussell and I walkd on the Esplanade, where Mr and Mrs Bastard joind us.  Mr B read us a long letter he had just received from Lady Peller, with an account of the narrow escape her son and John Bastard had had in a tremendous storm in the East Indies.  Mr Bastard was very much affected and Mrs B tried to hatch an hysteric, but as no one took the least notice of it, she thought she might put it off until another opportunity.  We walkd more than an hour and the German band play’d most of the time.  Major Durbin and Mr Bussell dine with us.  They and Cooper went to the Parade after dinner.  As soon as that was over the Band came and play’d before the house for more than an hour.  Cooper and Mr Bussell returnd immediately.  The Major, luckily, made himself scarce till we had mainly done tea and I wish with all my heart he had staid away entirely, as he could not be contented without taking C and Mr B out.  I was very glad he did not return with them.  Mr B eat his egg with us and went away a little after eleven.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mary Taylor.  She wrote to Mrs Vassall and Cooper wrote to Mr Jones about the Boarding House here, as he talks of coming for a little warm bathing.

Monday, 4 July, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell and Mr Skreene breakfasted with us.  Mr and Mrs Williams, Mr Geatman and little James came soon after and staid all the morning.

My Aunt and Cooper went out to call on Mrs Chalie and Mrs Simmons.  Captain Simmons, Captain Jeffries, Captain Chivers and the Bastards calld, the latter Mr Geatman and Mr Bussell dined here and Captain Chivers drank tea with us while the Band was playing.  Mrs Williams took the impertinent liberty of bringing a Miss Pippin, accompanied by Major Durbin in, to hear it, instead of walking on the Esplanade, which was the proper place for her.  Nothing could be more happy and comfortable than we were, when she came and interrupted our sociable party with her nosey vulgarity.  She staid as long as she could.  It was past ten when she went away.  When my Aunt was out in the morning, she met Mr and Mrs Cox, who were just arrived and Mr Cox calld here afterwards.  Cooper was in excellent spirits and we spent a delightful afternoon (till Mrs W interrupted us), for the Band was enchanting.  The Bastards went home before supper, as did Mr Geatman. Mr Bussell stoppd till eleven.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Willis at Bath about her stool to Mr Wiltshire.

Thursday, 5 July, 1808

A beautiful day.  Mr Busell breakfasted with us, soon after which Cooper and my Aunt went out to look for lodgings for the Hendersons, who are coming today.  Mrs Williams and James came down and sat some time. At twelve o’clock the Miss Gladstones came to go with us to a concert and breakfast at Major Durbin’s rooms at the Barracks.  We crossed the water and Major Knott and Mr Bussell met us at the water side and shewed us the way to the Barracks.  The concert was in the Mess room and very well performd by Major Durbin, Captain Gillet, Mr Andrews and Mr Atkins with a few of the Band.  After it was over we all went up to the Major’s room, where there was an elegant breakfast laid out, of which we partook.  There were, besides ourselves, the Miss Gladstones (whom my Aunt took with her), Mr and Mrs Williams, Mrs W Williams and a Miss Pippin.  We saw a good many of the Officers who were strangers to us, two or three of whom were introduced to my Aunt.  Mrs W was very much disconcerted at Cooper’s not paying her more attention and my Aunt was cooler to her than usual in consequence of her having the impertinence to ask Cooper to dine with her without including my Aunt in the invitation.  We returnd across the water at half past three.  The Miss Gladstones, Mr Terry, Captain Sanders and myself in one boat, Cooper, my Aunt and Captain Gyllett in another.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd on the Esplanade a short time, where Mr Cox joind us.  We were introduced to Miss Phryn and her sister (of Cheltenham) by Mr Falkes.  Captain Sanders and Mr Bussell dined here and in the evening we all went to the Ball, except my Aunt Neate.  It was a very pleasant chearful evening.  The Miss Gladstones, Mr Skreene, Captain Sanders, Mr Bussell and James Williams went with us.  Mrs Chalie was so kind to send her carriage to take and bring us back from the Ball.  We met the Cox’s and almost all the Somerset Officers.  Major Durbin, Captain Sanders, Captain Roach, Captain Staples and Mr Atkins askd me to dance.  The Ball did not break up till twelve o’clock.  In compliment to the Officers of the Somerset, Mr Rodbend allowd the music to stay an hour later.  Cooper danced and danced with Mrs Cox, to the evident mortification of Mrs Williams, who lookd extremely ugly and vulgar.  We found my Aunt Neate up and waiting supper for us. While we were dressing after dinner, the Henderson’s came, both looking remarkably  well. We left them with my Aunt Neate.

Weymouth and Portland, near the Turnpike, Dorset by R. K. Robens, 1814 (c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Weymouth and Portland, near the Turnpike, Dorset by R. K. Robens, 1814
(c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 6 July, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Cooper calld in little Cooper and John Henderson, as they were going by, to see us.  John is very much grown and improved.  Mr and Mrs Henderson calld soon afterwards and took Cooper and my Aunt to see the house they have engaged.  While they were out the two Mrs Williams’s calld, but did not come up, as the Colonel was not at home.  It was not worth Mrs Williams’s (of Harringstone) while to come up and see the rest of the family.  Mrs Clarke and the Miss Gladstones, Mr and Mrs Cox, Mr and Mrs Williams, Mr Andrews, Major Knott, Baron and Captain Linsingen, Miss Lintern and little Fanny Simmons and Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  My Aunt and Cooper went to pay visits.  Mr and Mrs Williams returnd to Dorchester, the latter not in very good humour I believe, for she must have perceived how cold and distant our manners were to her, to what they used to be.  Mr and Mrs Henderson dined with us and Colonel and Mrs Bastard , Mr and Mrs Cox, Count Kelmensegge and Mr Bussell joind us at tea to hear the Band.  They all went away before supper, except the Hendersons and Mr Bussell.  My Aunt Powell heard from my Uncle Appleton to announce the death of poor George Blackburn on his voyage home.  What is to become of her I do not know, for I should suppose there is no provision for her, as they must have expended all they had in fitting out their last voyage

Thursday, 7 July, 1808

A tremendous hot day.  Mr Bussell and Count Kelmensegge breakfasted with us.  At twelve o’clock we all went, accompanied by the Miss Gladstones and Mr Skreene to a breakfast given by Major Knott at the Barracks.  There was a large party assembled, all strangers to us , but to whom we were introduced.  Mr and Miss Greenley, Miss Leigh, Mr and Mrs Gorton, Mr and Mrs Whittaker and many of the Officers.  The men were drawn out in the Barrack Guard and went thro’ the manual.  We then went into the Mess room and had the Band.   Afterwards we all visited the Camera Obscura and were very much delighted with the moving objects on the Esplanade.  When we returnd to the Barracks we had a very elegant luncheon, after having partaken of which, Major Durbin and Mr Atkins amused us with duets on the flute.  It was a very pleasant chearful party.  We all crossd the water in one boat going over, but coming back the Officers took my two Aunts and the Miss Gladstones in their boat and Cooper, Mr Bussell, Mr Skreene and myself came over in another, most delightfully.  Mr Cox intruded himself very impertinently into the party at the Barracks, without being askd.  After we returnd, Mrs Prinn, a young lady with her, Mr Falkes and Captain Sanders calld.  Cooper and my Aunt calld on Mrs Williams and the Cox’s.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us.  The Band was accompanied in the evening by the drums and fifes and playd delightfully.  The Drum Major beat one of the drums himself.  My Aunt had all the little boys in the Band up (seven of them) sixpence apiece, with which they were very much delighted.  Major Durbin came in for a very short time but both he and Mr Bussell went away before supper.  My Aunt Neate and Cooper playd Chess.  We had a basket from home with vegetables.  Mrs Chalie was so kind to send Mr Skreene to ask me to be of their party next week to Lulworth, but I declined it.  I wrote to my mother.

Friday, 8 July, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Count Kelmensegge calld immediately afterwards.  Mrs Cox came in while he was here but did not stay long.  Mr Prinn, Mr and Mrs Whitaker and their two children, Mr Henderson, Captain Jeffries, Captain Gyllett, Captain Simmons, Colonel Bastard, Mr Skreene, Mr and Mrs Greenly and Miss Leigh calld.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bussell dined here.  The Bastards, Mr and Mrs Henderson, John and little Cooper drank tea with us.  About half past eight Mr Jones arrived in the Bath coach and my Aunt sent to beg he would come here, which he did and we made him some tea.  He is looking very well and in good spirits.  He brought my Aunt a letter from Kitty.

Captain Jeffries calld.

The following line has been crossed out.

My Aunt Powell bathed for the first time in the warm bath

Saturday, 9 July, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell and Captain Roach breakfasted with us.  Mr Jones came in before we were done.  My Aunt and I went to order a warm bath and then went thro the town where we met Captain Sanders who walkd home with us.  When Cooper came, in he and my Aunt went to call on the Whitakers and Mrs and Miss Coffin.  Mrs Cox very kindly came to ask my Aunt Neate and me to dine there, fancying my Aunt Powell was going to Dorchester with the Colonel, she sat here two hours.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mrs Bastard came in and eat some luncheon with us, after which I went to the warm bath with my Aunt.  Captain Chivers calld about two o’clock to take Cooper to dine at Mrs Williams.  We dined quite alone and the Hendersons, with John and two of their little girls, Colonel and Mrs Bastard, Mr Jenkins, Mrs Simmons and little Mary drank tea here.  Mr Jones and Captain Simmons came in afterwards to hear the Band.  It was a lovely evening and the Bay lookd beautifully.  The Alomene frigate came to anchor in a capital style, just without the Bay and all the Officers came ashore while the Band was playing.  Captain Tremlotte commands her, but it was so dusk when they were walking, that we could not distinguish him from the other Officers.  Mrs Cox came in for a few minutes.  She was to have spent the evening with us, but Mr Cox came home so late from his excursion in the water, that she was obliged to send an excuse.  All the party went away before supper.

Sunday, 10 July, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell and Major Durbin breakfasted with us.  They came home from Dorchester last night and brought word that Cooper would return about one o’clock today.  When they left us we read prayers.  Captain Chivers and Cooper came before their time, the latter out of spirits and uncomfortable.  Mrs Williams wrote a very fine letter of apology by Captain Chivers to my Aunt Powell, full of lies and contradictions, professing a great deal of affection, not an atom of which she feels to my certain knowledge.  Captain and Mrs Nash, Mr and Mrs Cox, Colonel and Mrs Bastard and Captain Simmons and Mr and Mrs Coffin calld.  The soldiers paraded at half past four on the sands in front of the house.  It had a very pretty effect.  Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mr Jones, Mr Rhodber, Mr Bussell and Mr Forward dined here and Mrs Chalie, the Miss Gladstones, Mr Skreene, Mr Terry and Major Durbin came in the evening.  They all went away when the Band had done playing, except the Hendersons and they left us before supper.  It was a beautiful evening.

Monday, 11 July, 1808

A very thick fog, so thick that at times we could hardly see the Esplanade.  Cooper wrote a great many letters before breakfast.  Mr Henderson came while we were at breakfast to bring a letter to be forwarded to Mrs Cooper, which Cooper enclosed in his letter to the Dr.  Mr Jones calld, but did not stay long.  Mr and Mrs Henderson came to speak to Cooper, who was gone to Mr Bastard’s and they went there to him, but returnd soon and spent almost all the morning here.  Major Durbin calld Cooper and Mr Bussell to a long walk.  The former dined at Mr Prinn’s.  We went in the evening.  Mr Bussell dined with us.  At the Prinns we met Major Durbin, Captain and Mrs Simmons, Captain and Mrs Gyllett, Captain Sherston, Miss Lintern and Miss Basset, who is staying with Mrs Prinn.  The Band went there to play, but Mrs W Williams (who has the next house to them) was so unwell she could not hear the sound, so they were dismiss’d after playing a few tunes.  The party play’d cards, Cooper and I, Miss Basset Chess and we did not leave them till after eleven.  Mr Geatman rode over from Dorchester and sat an hour with us.  My Aunt mentioned Mrs Williams’s conduct to him which, he said, he had not heard a word of before and appear’d very much surprised at.  I did not spare her but vented great part of my spite and I wish with all my heart he may repeat to her every word I said.  The party at Mrs Prinn’s were much pleasanter than I expected, as instead of being all strangers, it consisted of the Officers and their wives.  My Aunt Powell bathd at four o’clock.

Chapman image - gaming table
Gaming Table, June 1811 Ackermann’s Repository

Tuesday, 12 July, 1808

A fine day with a great deal of wind and a very fresh sea.  Mr Bussell and Mr Skreene breakfasted with us and Mr Jones came in soon afterwards, but did not stay many minutes.  Cooper was out of spirits and, what is more extraordinary out, of humour.  He chuses to take Mrs William’s part against my Aunt P and as he cannot persuade her that Mrs W has acted right, he is angry and resents what he ought to applaud, for I do not know any one who resents an insult shewn to themselves sooner than he does.  I suppose in the end he will prevail on my Aunt, either by slight or coaxing, to treat her with the same attention she did before, but he will not easily persuade or frighten me into doing it, for I have long had a very bad opinion of Mrs Williams and I am not at all sorry to have an opportunity of shewing how much I despise and dislike her.  Mrs Cox brought her work and sat a long time. Cooper and Mrs Bussell walkd to upway and back.  They both came in very hot.  Mr and Mrs Prinn, Miss Basset, Mr Jones, Major Durbin, Mr Bussell, Captain Roach and Captain Sher? dined with us.  They all went to the Ball afterwards.  Miss Basset appears a very good humoured, agreeable girl.  While my Aunt was at the Ball, Mrs Williams sent a man from Dorchester with a letter to my Aunt, full of apologies again, such a farago of nonsense and lies I hardly ever saw except, from Mrs Williams’s pen.  We sent it up to my Aunt, who answered it at the Ball.  Mr Basset came home with Cooper and my Aunt to supper.  The Colonel was in rather better temper, but not much.  He talked at my Aunt and me and alluded to Mrs Williams without mentioning her and condemn’d in us the very conduct he has himself adopted.  Since last Friday he has been hardly even civil to me, has not spoken one word or paid me the least attention, except for his own convenience and comfort, when he wanted anything at the table.  He is very much mistaken if he imagines that treating me with unkindness, not to say rudeness will induce me to receive Mrs Williams with the same cordiality I did formerly.  My spirit rebels at any intentional slight and Cooper has taken the  wrong method to appease it.  Mrs Cox gave my Aunt the greatest curiosity of a pair of scissors I ever saw.  They are not much bigger than a minikin pin.  My Aunt wrote to Mrs Williams and I a very long letter to my mother.  The elder Colonel Bastard arrived at Mr E B’s at half past eleven o’clock.

Wednesday, 13 July, 1808

One of the hottest days I ever felt.  Mr Jones came in before breakfast but did not stay. Mr Bussell and Count Kielmansegg breakfasted with us, as Cooper went to Mr Bastard’s. Directly after we were very much surprised at Mrs Williams arriving at eleven o’clock, after my Aunt had written to her last night to say we were engaged out to dinner and could not receive her, but she does not mind any thing and has impudence enough to do any thing she chuses to do.  I received her with great coldness, which she must have perceived, at least I intended she should.  She cry’d and mona’d and told a thousand falsehoods and at last prevailed on my Aunt (which I thought she would) to treat her with the same kindness she did before.  She did not stay long, but returnd again before she went to Dorchester in hopes, I suppose, of seeing the Colonel, but she was disappointed, for he did not come in.  My Aunt P and I went to the warm bath.  I bathd for the first time and found it very comfortable.  When we returnd, Mrs Whitaker, Mrs Prinn and Miss Bassett joind and came in with us.  Mrs Prinn taught us  to weave purses.  We all dined at Mr Greenlys, about two miles from Weymouth.  We three went in my Aunt’s carriage.  Cooper, Captain Naish and Mr Atkins in  the elder Colonel Bastard’s and we met Captain Simmons there.  We spent a very pleasant day, great hospitality and attention.  We did not return till a little before eleven.  It was a beautiful night.  Mr Bussell was waiting for us and supp’d here.  He was in very good spirits and had had a little more wine I believe than usual.

Thursday, 14 July, 1808

A very hot morning.  Mr Jones came in before breakfast.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us and the Hendersons sat with us all the time.  We dressd early to go to the entertainment given by the Officers of the Mess, which was one of the best conducted and pleasantest parties I ever was at.  They pitchd a great many tents on the lookout and every Officer asked those friends who had shewn him civilities.  The party was very large, upwards of an hundred.  The German General  Baron Hensingen and all his staff, Mr Jones, the Hendersons, Mrs and two Miss Geatmans and their brother went with us.  We sat down to a most elegant dinner at half past three o’clock with the greatest profusion of fruit I ever saw.  When we left the table we walkd about and chatted till the gentlemen joind us, when we drank tea and they then began dancing.

Weymouth from the Lookout, Dorset, May 1812 by R. K. Robens (c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Weymouth from the Lookout, Dorset, May 1812 by R. K. Robens
(c) Weymouth Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

It was one of the prettiest sights I ever saw.  The Belles, most of them very handsome and elegantly dressd, the Beaux all dancing without their hats and many hundred people collected to witness the entertainment.  It had exactly the appearance of the picture of the Dutch Fairs.  The day was intensely hot, but the evening delightful, except that it lighten’d very much.  We came away a little after nine.  The Hendersons, Geatmans, Mr Jones, Mr Bussell and Mrs Williams suppd here.  The Geatmans and the latter returnd to Dorchester afterwards.  Cooper was very tipsy (as indeed were most of the gentlemen) but very good humoured and kind.  I do not think Mrs Williams enjoyd the day much, for no one paid her much attention and Cooper hardly spoke to her the whole day.  At times she appeard very grumpy and dissatisfied and altogether, I believe, would have been as happy any where else.  I heard from my mother.

Friday, 15 July, 1808

A very fine day but hotter, if possible, than yesterday.  Major Durbin, Mr Bussell and Captain Roach breakfasted with us and afterwards they accompanied my two Aunts and Cooper, by invitation from the elder Colonel Bastard, to sail and fish.  He had provided a very elegant cold dinner and the fish they caught were dressd on board.  I was afraid to venture, so staid quietly on shore and went to the warm bath and dined at Mr Henderson’s.  Miss Greenly, Miss Lee and Mrs Davies calld, but I did not see them.  At seven o’clock my Aunt sent to me for the key of the tea and I prevaild on Mr and Mrs H to come home with me.  We found the elder Colonel Bastard, Mrs B, Mrs Cornwell, Captain Roach, Mrs Bussell, Cooper and my Aunts all at tea.  They had a delightful day, were none of them ill.  The Bastards and Mrs Cornwell went home directly after tea and the rest of the party left us before supper.  There was a good deal of humour in the afternoon and the finest lightening in the evening I ever witnessed.  The whole sky was illuminated.  We went out on the Esplanade when the Hendersons went home to look at it, but as it began to thunder, we did not stay many minutes.  When the party came on shore, Cooper wanted some powder put in his hair and calld Thomas to do it, who answerd him impertinently, which Cooper told him he would not put up with.  In reply he said “very well Sir, you must provide yourself with another servant, for I shall leave you tomorrow morning.”  Of course Cooper was much surprised and not a little angry, as it was so unexpected an occurrence.  I saw something had discomforted Cooper, but concluded it must have been something on board the vessel, not having the least idea Thomas (having lived with Cooper ten years) could behave so unpardonably.  This very unpleasant affair compleatly did away all the amusement of the day.  Mr Bussell suppd with us.

Saturday, 16 July, 1808

A very fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here. Captain Simmons, Mr and Mrs Henderson and two of their little girls came while we were at breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mr Skreene, Mr Yeoman, Mr Geatman, Captain Roach and some of the German officers calld.  Cooper, my Aunt and I went to call on Mr and Mrs Sanders, Mrs Cornwell and Mrs Chalie.  We met Mrs England in our way, coming to call on us.  My Aunt told her we were obliged to go as far as Glocester Row, but would be back as soon as possible, when we hoped to find her at home.  While we were at Mrs Chalie’s, she was announced.  It seems she had asked if Mrs Powell was there and the maid told her yes, so she came up, fancying it was our lodging and, seeing a great many red coats, did not find out her mistake till my Aunt told her and she came in with us.  She had some luncheon before she went away.  We all dined at Mr Henderson’s, met Mr Jones and Mr Bussell. After tea we walkd on the Esplanade, but it was so damp we did not continue out long.  There was a concert at the rooms, composed of Somerset and German officers and part of each band, but as the Hendersons did not propose it, we did not go.  I am sure it is cheap enough; half a guinea the gentlemen and five shillings ladies admits them the whole season to the concerts and promenades.  Mr Bussell came in and suppd with us and Captain Jeffries calld while we were at supper to ask Cooper to sign a pass for his servant to accompany him tomorrow to the Court Martial at Winchester on Mr Ball.  Cooper settled everything with Thomas before we went out and he says he means to go to London tomorrow by the Mail. Mr Bastard left Weymouth early this morning.  We calld on Mrs Cox.

Sunday, 17 July, 1808

A very fine day.  Captain Simmons breakfasted with us.  Mr Bussell and Major Durbin went off early to Winchester.

Winchester City Council; (c) Winchester City Council Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Winchester from the South by Tobias Young 1803 Winchester City Council; (c) Winchester City Council Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Captain Sherston and Mr Andrews calld to ask leave from the Evening Parade, as they are going to Lulworth.   Mr and Mrs W Williams, Mr Brown, Mr Bastard, Mr and Mrs Henderson and Captain Simmons calld.  The Parade was at half past four, before our windows, on the sands and had a very pretty effect.  Cooper gave the word.  We dined alone and when we came up stairs afterwards my Aunt saw Mr and Mrs W Williams in the crowd listening to the Band.  She sent to beg they would come here to drink tea, which they did, and two of their children.  Colonel and Mrs Bastard, Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mr Jones also joind us at tea, but all went home before supper.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Porcher.

Monday, 18 July, 1808

A very hot day.  I compleated my thirty third year.  Captain Simmons and Mr Jones came while we were at breakfast, but did not come up stairs.  Cooper went to the Parade and sent to little William Cornwell to go there, which he did.  While Cooper was out my Aunt had a note from Mrs Whitaker to ask her interest with Cooper to allow her to consult him about her health.  Some people have the impudence of old Nick, for Mrs Whitaker is a stranger to us.  We never even heard of her before we came here.  My Aunt sent back word she had not a doubt the Colonel would be happy to be of service to her, but that he was gone to the Parade and she would let him know her request as soon as he returnd.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mr Jones came to take a sail with Cooper and my Aunts.  The waited near two hours before he was ready.  I went to the warm bath and dined alone.  The Band came down at seven, but were undecided whether they should play or not.  They sent up to me to know if they were to stay, as the Colonel was not returnd.  I told them I believed he expected to find them here  when he came home which, I imagined would be soon, as I expected him to tea.  Mrs and Miss Pine-Coffin, Dr Percival and Count Kielmansegg calld, but were not admitted.  My Aunt Powell wrote a second note to Mrs Whitaker after Cooper returnd, to say he would call on her tomorrow morning.

The party did not return from their excursion on the water until twelve o’clock and would not have arrived as soon as that had not Allen gone out in a row boat to fetch them, as it was  dead calm.  They came four miles and a half in the small boat.  Luckily it was a beautiful night.  They dined on board, then rowed into Lulworth and drank tea there.

Mr Jones came in and eat a biscuit and drank some wine and water.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Williams and wrote to the newspaper man to change from the Star to the Sun.

Tuesday, 19 July, 1808

A fine day and much cooler than it has been for some days past.  Captain Simmons and Mr Jones came in while we were at breakfast and eat some fruit.  The Hendersons, Miss Gladstones, Mr Shrine, Mr and Mrs Cox, Mr Bastard and Miss Rodner calld.  The latter staid two hours I believe.  The Miss Gladstones came to offer Mrs Chalie’s carriage to take us to the Ball, if we were going and Mrs Cox tried to persuade my Aunt to be of her party.  When she found my Aunt was not very well inclined, she attackd Cooper and  told him he must go.  He said he was under orders.  However, he was not anxious about the matter, so they agreed to stay at home quietly. Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess before tea.  Mr Jones and Captain Simmons came to tea and playd at Whist.  They went away before supper.  My Aunt P bathd.  I went to the bath with her.

Wednesday, 20 July, 1808

A raining morning, but it became fine afterwards. Captain Simmons and Mr James came while we were at breakfast, as did Mr Andrews. Captain Bastard, Mr Jones, Mr Henderson, Captain Simmons.  Mrs Whittaker and Mr Cox calld in the course of the morning.  Mr Cox and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.  I bathed.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mr Jones dined with us.  Captain Simmons came in the evening.  They playd a rubber of Whist, but all went away before supper.

Thursday, 21 July, 1808

A fine day.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  Soon after breakfast my two Aunts and I calld on Mrs Bastard, who is not very well.  When we left her, my Aunt Neate returned home and we went on to Mrs W Williams.  We staid with her a very short time, as she was going on the water.  As we came back we met Captain Roach and Captain Staples who came in with us.  Found Mr Bussell here, just returned from Winchester.  When we had sat some time with him, my Aunt and I sallied out to call on Miss Rodber.  Met her and Captain Simmons on the Esplanade.  She pressd us so much to go home with her, we could not refuse.  We sat half an hour there.  In our way home Mr Terry overtook and came in with us.  He staid until it was time for my Aunt to go to the bath.  I went with her.  My Aunt Neate went sailing with the Hendersons.  She had a delightful day, for it landed at Portland, walkd about there and returnd to dinner.  Mr Bussell and Major Durbin dined here.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Count Kielmansegg came to tea.  We all, except my Aunt Neate, went to the concert, which was very delightfully performed.  Major Durbin, Mr Atkins, Mr Andrews and Colonel Alton of the German Legion playd with a great number of the German band.  We met Mrs Whittaker, who attached herself to us and it was one of the pleasantest evenings I have spent since we came here.  Mrs Cox was very much out of humour.  I do not know what had offended her, except she came here in the morning and expected to be asked to dine, but my Aunt did not take her hints.  The General and some of his Officers joind our party for a short time.  My Aunt N was gone to bed when we returnd and no one came in with us.

Friday, 22 July, 1808

A very wet morning.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Cooper went out soon after to call on Count Kielmansegg and Mr Bastard, but did not stay long.  The sands were beautiful and we put on our pelisses to take a little walk with Cooper and Mr Bussell. Captain Simmons came in and prevented our going for a short time, but when it held up we walkd beyond the hotel on the sands, when it began to rain and before we got to the machines it raind hard.  My Aunt proposed getting into one of them until the shower was over.  With the assistance of Cooper and Mr Bussell we mounted into it and were kept there more than half an hour by the violence of the storm.  Had we been outside it, we must have been wet through long before we could have reachd home.  Cooper was in very good humour and as merry as a grig.  His manner to me today has been just as affectionate and kind as it was last year.  When we returnd he went to Mrs Cox’s, from whom he had a note, to beg to see him.  I went to the warm bath.  When I returnd I found Major Durbin here.  He came to accompany Cooper to dine at Mr W Williams, where we were to have gone in the evening, but it was so wet and uncomfortable my Aunt sent an excuse.  Mr Bussell dined with us.  The evening was so wet we did not have the Band to play there, but Major Durbin chose (wet or no wet)  that they should play at Mrs Williams.  Cooper has had a great many letters from Thomas to apologise for his bad conduct and to beg he will take him again and he has been twice to Mr Bussell to ask his interference.  He has written four times today and at last Cooper has consented to take him again if he will go to the servant whose character he has written for and induce him to give up the place, which Thomas very readily agreed to and is to go tomorrow morning.  Mr Bussell staid with us till Cooper came home, which he did at eleven.  It was a very wet night and he was not in such good spirits as he was in the morning.  I wrote to my mother, but the letter will not go till tomorrow.

A replica of George III's bathing machine on Weymouth seafront (www.regencyhistory.net)
A replica of King George III’s bathing machine on Weymouth seafront (www.regencyhistory.net)

Saturday, 23 July, 1808

A fine morning, but very wet underfoot.  Mr Bussell came so late to breakfast that Cooper had done and was gone up stairs.  Mr Bastard came in soon afterwards, as I did.  Mr and Mrs Whittaker, Mr Williams and little James rode over from Dorchester, but did not stay long.  Cooper went out almost as soon as they came.  I went to the bath with my Aunt and after we had some luncheon.  She and I walkd on the sands for some time.  It was delightfully pleasant.  Captain Simmons, Mr Davies and Mr Burnell, who was in the First Somerset, calld.  I think it was something of a liberty on his part, considering his wife has come here as an actress to perform at the theatre.  We all dined at the Hendersons.  Met Mr Bussell and Captain Simmons, spent a very pleasant day.  Cooper very kind and in good spirits.  Mr Bussell came home with us to supper.  Thomas returnd to Cooper’s service this morning, having settl’d with the other man, whose character Cooper got today, but I do not think it was one that would have induced me to take him.  Thomas appears very grateful and extremely happy to return.

Sunday, 24 July, 1808

A very fine day.  I got up early and bathed at eight o’clock.  Major Knott and Mr Bussell breakfasted here. Cooper pressd the old Major to dine with us, but he begd to be excused, I believe it was  because it was Sunday.  My two Aunts, Cooper and the Major went to church.  I lay on the sopha very quietly while they were away.  Mrs Chalie and Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  Cooper went to the Barracks, it being Muster day.  My Aunt Powell and I went to pay visits.  We calld at Mrs Bastard’s, Mrs Cox’s, Mrs Whittaker’s and Mrs Chalie’s.  Met Mrs Davis and had a little conversation with her.  Mrs Cox and Mr Bussell dined with us.  Mr and Mrs Whittaker, their two children, Miss Pippin, Colonel and Mrs Bastard and Count Kielmansegg came to hear the Band and drink tea here.  Major Durbin came in afterwards.  Margan Geatman calld, but would not come into the drawing room because of his boots.  My Aunt Powell and I went into Cooper’s room with him while he had some tea.  Every body but Mr Bussell went away before supper.  We spent a very cheerful delightful evening.  My Aunt heard from Pen Saker, who sent her a pattern for a ruff.

Monday, 25 July, 1808

A fine morning, but there was a thunderstorm afterwards.  Cooper went out with the men early.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Sanders, Mr Cox, Mr and Mrs Whittaker, Mrs Cornwell and her daughter and a Mr Benson (a young man who arrived today to join the Regiment) calld.  Mr Cox was here all the morning playing Chess with Cooper.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Bastard, who was not very well.  Colonel Bastard came in before breakfast, but did not stay.  Cooper was all kindness the whole day.  He dined at Baron Linsingens.  Mr Bussell, Mr Benson and Mrs Henderson dined here.  Mr Benson appears a gentleman.  Young Maw Cooper came home before nine in very good humour and very kind.  He playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.   Mr Skreene came just before supper to bring a letter to be frankd.  He staid till we had supper.  Cooper walkd home with Mrs Henderson.  He was a little tipsy, but not unpleasantly so.

Tuesday, 26 July, 1808

A very fine day.  Major Knott, Mr Bussell and Captain Simmons breakfasted here.  Mr Cox came in, but did not stay.  While we were at breakfast Mr and Mrs and the two Miss Chapmans from Bathford came to the window to ask us how we did.  They arrived last night and mean to continue for some time.  They all looked very quizzical and ugly.  Cooper and Major Knott went to Herringston on horseback.  While they were gone we heard that part of the Expedition going to Spain under Sir John Moore had anchored in Portland Roads and that the 9th Regiment, in which one Captain Broughton, Mr Thornhill and Mr Davies formed part of it.  We every moment expected to see them arriving on shore, when we were told not one would be allowed to leave the transports and this was confirmed by letter from Captain Broughton to Cooper, brought by Captain Paten, one of the German officers who had been sailing amongst them.  My Aunt immediately determined on going out to shake hands with him, but how to accomplish it was the difficulty, as we were engaged to dine at Mrs Chalie’s and go to the Ball with the Miss Gladstones afterwards.  However, Mr Whittaker and Captain Paten so strongly persuaded her to go that she sent Mr Bussell in to Mrs Chalie’s to beg she would put off her dinner for an hour, which she very politely said she would do so.  Away we went, Mr and Mrs Whittaker, their two children, Mr Bussell, my two Aunts and myself.  We had a delightful sail there and tho we met a great many boats, the Officers in which told us Captain Broughton was gone on shore, having had his letter to say it was impossible, we still persisted on going on.  We saild round almost every transport before we found the one in which he should have been, for he was really gone on shore, but it was one of the most gratifying sights I ever beheld and I would not have missed it for a great deal.  The delight and joy that was pictured in the men’s countenances (volunteers from the Somerset to the 9th) on seeing Mr Bussell “How do you do Mr Bussell”  “I am very glad to see you Mr Bussell” was vociferated from fifty men at least at a time and they were all pressing upon one another to speak to him.  A very handsome young man, an Officer of the 9th, came and pressd us very much to go on board, but we had not time.  My Aunt was very anxious he should come on shore with us and return when Captain B did, but he said he did not dare as he had had strict orders to the contrary.  We took all the mens letters that were written to put in the post for them from Bath Transports that had Somerset then on board and when we came away they gave us three cheers and playd Rule Britannia on the drum and fife.  I never enjoyd anything more in my life.  We did not land till seven o’clock and I was so unwell in returning that I could not go to dine at Mrs Chalies.  My Aunts went in just as they were , not having time to dress themselves, as Mrs C had sat down to dinner.  I laid on the sopha and took a little nap, which did me good, but I could not eat any dinner.  Between eight and nine my Aunts came in to dress and brought Captain Broughton, Mr Thornhill and Mr Bussell with them.  The two former looking remarkably well and in excellent spirits.  They staid with us till the last moment and promised to come and spend a long day tomorrow, if the wind did not change in the night.  My Aunt P dressd to go to the Ball and my Aunt N went back to drink tea with Mrs Chalie, but returnd in a very short time with Cooper, who was so unwell he could not go.  He had a great deal of fever and sort throat, partly occasiond by cold and partly by having drunk a great deal too much wine at the General’s yesterday.  His fever increased so much after he came home that he sent to beg Captain Roach to come to him, which he very kindly did and Cooper took some Calomel.  My Aunt staid a very short time at the Ball.  She and Thomas sat up with him till five o’clock.  I staid till near three, when I went to bed.  I heard guns fire, which I suppose were for the transports to get under way.   My Aunt Powell and I bathed.

Wednesday, 27 July, 1808

A very wet day.  Captain Roach and Mr Bussell came early to see Cooper, who was very much unwell.  They and Major Durbin breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt Powell had hers in bed.  We were engaged to dine with Mrs Whittaker, but were obliged to send her an excuse.  While the note was going to her she came here to say if our friends were coming on shore again today not to mind our engagement to her but go there some other time.  A great number of people calld to enquire after Cooper, but no one came up but Colonel Bastard to see him and Mr Cox to play Chess with my Aunt Neate.  The transports all saild early with a fair wind and were soon out of sight.  Captain Roach came again after dinner to see Cooper, who did not get up till tea time and then his throat was so much worse that Captain R persuaded him to send for Mr Warne, who came immediately.  He prescribed some more Calomel and James’s Powder and I thought that Cooper, after having talkd to him, appeard not so low and depressd.  Captain R and Mrs Bussell, the latter of whom dined here, spent the evening with us.  My Aunt Neate and Captain Roach playd Chess.  I did not go to bed till three o’clock.  I had a note from Mrs Henderson and answerd it.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mrs Porcher, Minah Warren and Mrs Williams.  She wrote to Mrs Fenwick and Mrs Williams.

Thursday, 28 July, 1808

A fine day.  Poor Cooper still very unwell.  A little better than he was yesterday.  He complains of his throat being very sore and Captain Roach says there is an ulcer on one side.  Mr Warne came when we were at breakfast to see Cooper.  He thought him better.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here and Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mr and Mrs Henderson, Captain Simmons, Major Durbin and Mr Cox calld while we were at breakfast to enquire after Cooper.  A great number of peaple sent and came, but no one except Mr Bastard and Captain Simmons were allowd to come up stairs.  Captain Roach and Mr Bussell dined here and Mr Bastard, the Hendersons and Captain Simmons drank tea with us.  I am sure it was too much for Cooper and he had a very bad night in consequence.  Mr Warne calld before dinner and again in the evening.  Captain Roach, Mr Bussell and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.  They did not go away till after supper.  I bathed in the warm bath.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mrs Newell and Mrs Williams.  She wrote to Mrs Fenwick and Dr Cooper.

Friday, 29 July, 1808

A wet morning.  Cooper had a very bad night.  He sent to speak to Mr Warne before breakfast, who came directly.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  No one was admitted to see Cooper but Mr Bussell, Mr Bastard and Captain Roach.  We dined alone for Mr B was engaged at Mr Cox’s.  Captain Roach, and Mr Bastard drank tea here and Mr Warne calld to see Cooper.  They playd a rubber of Whist in the evening to amuse the Colonel and when he was tired I took his cards.  Mr Bussell came for half an hour.  He was quite gay and had evidently had wine enough.  He returnd to the party at Mr C’s to sup.  Captain Roach  suppd here.  My Aunt Powell and I sat up till two o’clock that the men might go to bed.  I had a note from Mrs Henderson and answerd it.

Saturday, 30 July, 1808

A fine day and very hot.  Cooper had a better night than he has had since he was taken ill, but his throat was very sore.  This morning he came into the drawing  to breakfast, but was extremely languid and uncomfortable.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here and Mr Cox came up and shook hands with Cooper, but did not sit down.  Lord Craven calld and sat half an hour.  He appears very good humourd and agreeable.  Colonel and Mrs Bastard and Captain Roach calld.  Margan Geatman rode from Dorchester to see Cooper.  My Aunt prevaild on him to stay and dine.  He and Captain R playd Chess with my Aunt Neate all the morning.  My Aunt and I bathed. As I was going to the bath I saw Captain Sanders and had a little chat with him.  Mrs Henderson overtook and walkd to the Quay with me.  Major Knott, Captain Roach, Mr Geatman and Mr Bussell dined here.  My Aunt and I calld on the Chapmans from Bathford and passd half an hour pleasantly enough.  My Aunt Neate and Captain Roach played Chess in the evening and My Aunt P, Major Knott, Cooper and Mr Bussell playd Whist.  They all went away before supper.

Sunday, 31 July, 1808

A wet day.  Cooper a little better.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  My Aunt Powell had hers in bed.  She read prayers to us, as Cooper was not equal to do it.  Colonel and Mrs Bastard, Mr Henderson, Major Durbin and Captain Chivers calld.  Lord Hinton arrived and came here immediately.  He is grown very thin, but is not at all altered in manner.  His Lordship, Captain Chivers and Mr Bussell dine with us.  Captain Roach came in before we left the table.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess, my Aunt Powell wrote and my Lord frankd the soldier’s letters.  They did not go away till after our supper, tho they did not eat any themselves.  My Aunt P heard from Dr Cooper.  She wrote to Mrs Porcher and Mr Wiltshire.

Fashion plate for August 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates
Fashion plate for August 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates

Monday, 1 August, 1808

A showery day, but very warm.  Cooper better.  Lord Hinton, Mr Atkins and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Major Knott, Mr Henderson and Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast, the former to take leave, as he and Mr Atkins are going on leave.  They all met here by appointment to swear to the accounts before Lord Hinton signed them.  Mrs Whittaker, her two children, Miss Lintern and Mrs Cox calld.  My Aunt and I received them in the parlor, at which Mrs Cox was not best pleased.  She did not stay a minute. When she went away she calld Thomas to desire he would take a purse to his Master she had netted for him.  Miss Lintern brought some beautiful flowers painted on white velvet of her own doing for us to look at.  He is going away tomorrow. Mrs Chalie calld to say she was going to Bath tomorrow, to return Thursday, if she could do anything for  us.  My Aunt sent a note to Kitty by her.  Lord Hinton, Captain Simmons, Captain Roach, Major Durbin and Mr Bussell dined here.  The Hendersons came to tea.  My Aunt Neate and Captain R playd Chess, the rest of the party Whist.  Mr Warne calld to see Cooper.  Mr Cox had the impertinence to intrude himself and staid till the party broke up.  They all went away before supper.

Tuesday, 2 August, 1808

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Colonel and Mrs Bastard and Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt and I went to the Bath.  When we returnd we found Mrs Hodge and Mrs Williams here, the former looking remarkably well.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Pownall (who is just come for his Holydays), Captain Eckersall, Mr and Mrs and two Miss Chapmans and Mrs Whittaker calld.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell dined with us.  Cooper dined below for the first time.  We had the Band again for the first time since Cooper’s illness.  Mr and Mrs Whittaker, the three Master Cornwells and Master Gardiner drank tea here.  Cooper, my Aunt Powell, Lord Hinton and Mr Whittaker playd Chess.  They all went away before supper.  I am sorry to say the Whittakers leave Weymouth tomorrow morning.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess after they went away.  I left them at it when I went to bed.  I heard from my mother.  Both she and dear Emma have been very ill with the same sort of sore throat and fever that Cooper has had, but I trust are now recovering.

Wednesday, 3 August. 1808

An excessively hot day.  Lord Hinton, Captain Simmons and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Lord Cavan came over from Southampton in his hatch and calld on Cooper.  Mr Bastard, Count Kielmansegg, Mrs Henderson, two of her children, Mr Warne, Major D, Captain Roach and Mr Davis calld.  Cooper and my Aunt P went to Upway in Captain Chiver’s carriage.  Mr and Mrs Cox and Mr Andrews stopd at the window to speak to us.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell dined here.  Captain Simmons drank tea and played Whist.  Mr Bussell went to the Play for half an hour to see Mrs Burnell, who came out the first time here under the name of Beverly.  The Gentlemen went away while we were at supper.  I wrote to my mother.

Thursday, 4 August, 1808

A very fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast.  My Aunt and I went to the warm Bath.  When we returnd we found Baron Linsingen and Captain Paten here and my Aunt Neate playing Chess with Captain Roach.  Mr England calld on Cooper.  My Aunt and I went to see Mrs Bastard, who is not well and Mrs Cox who was going on the water, so we did not go up stairs.  Cooper, my Aunt Powell, Mr Bussell and myself crossd the water and took a delightful walk round the Lookout.  It is the only pleasant walk I have had since I came.  Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  Mrs Cox came in and drank tea with us before she went to the Concert.  Just after we had left the table, we were surprised by a visit from a Mrs Wood, rather an extraordinary time to call I think, but I suppose she does not know any better.  Captain Simmons and Captain Roach drank tea here, the former with Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell went to the Concert, but returnd very soon to play Whist, as did Mrs Bussell and my Lord before supper.  We suppd while they were at cards and they all went away soon afterwards.  My Aunt and Cooper sent tickets for the concert to Mr and Mrs Graham, Mrs Davis and Mrs Geatman.  Mr Cox sent Cooper a present of a pair of very handsome silver goblets.  We calld on Mr and Miss Pine-Coffin.

Friday, 5 August, 1808

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  A great number of people calld, after which my Aunt and I went into the town.  When we returnd we found Captain Roach, Mr Terry and Mr Bussell here.  When they were gone we, Cooper, my Aunt, Mr Bussell and I went to Mrs Bastards.  We did not stay long there, crossd the water and walkd nearly the same way as yesterday.  Lord Hinton, Count Kielmansegg and Mr Bussell dined here.  Mrs and Miss Pine-Coffin drank tea with us.  Cooper ,my two Aunts and Mrs C playd Casino and we chatted and looked on.  They all went away before supper.  Mr Cox came in after they were gone to shake hands with Cooper.  Lord Hinton laid a wage of five shillings with Cooper that the goblets Mr Cox gave C would hold a bottle of wine each.  Cooper won, tho by only a wine glass full.  The Cox’s go away tomorrow.

Saturday, 6 August, 1808

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bastard came in while we were at breakfast.  A great many people calld in the course of the morning.  I went to the warm Bath.  While I was gone, Mrs Hodge and Mrs Williams came from Dorchester, but were gone to pay visits before I came back.  After we had had our luncheon my Aunt and I calld on Mrs Chalie (who was not at home) and Mrs Bastard. She was better.  As we came away Mrs Hodge went in.  Mrs Chalie and Miss Gledstone calld.  Cooper, my Aunt, Mr Bussell and I crossd the water and walkd backward and forwards on the Lookout.  Lord Hinton, Mr and Mrs Greenley, Miss Lee, Mrs Hodge, Mr Bussell, Mrs William and James dined here.  Captain and Mrs Simmons, Captain Roach, Captain Chivers and Mr and Mrs Henderson joind the party in the evening.  They playd Whist, Casino and Chess.  The Simmons, Hendersons, Captain Chivers, Mrs Hodge, Mrs Williams and Mr Bussell staid to supper Mrs Williams went back to Dorchester.  Mrs Hodge remains here till tomorrow evening, with her brother and sister, who are just come.  I do not think Mrs Williams pasd a very pleasant day, as no one took much notice of her, but Mrs Hodge.  I heard from my mother a better account of dear Emma.

Sunday, 7 August, 1808

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mrs Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bastard were here at the time.  The latter staid while C read Prayers.  He was quite exhausted by it and laid down on the sopha.  After Church Miss and Mr Greenley and Miss Lee calld to ask us to fix a day to dine with them.  Cooper fixd Saturday.  Mrs Hodge calld and went with us to Mr Bastard’s, where we left her while we took our walk.  Cooper left a Card in his way at Dr Ryan’s and Mrs Cornell’s.  We walkd up and down the Rope Walk by the Turnpike.  It was very ? and pleasant.  Stopd at the Turnpike as we came back, and bought a new laid egg, the only one they had.  My Aunt and I calld on Mr S Davis.  Only Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell dined with us.  While we were at tea, Mr and Mrs Adams, Mrs Hodge and Mr and Mrs Williams came in.  The three latter staid till near ten o’clock, when they went back to Dorchester.  Not much attention paid to Mrs Williams by any of the party.  Mrs Hodge goes to London tomorrow.  I wrote to my mother and Cooper had the kindness to send a prescription for Emma’s throat and one for medicine to strengthen her.

Monday, 8 August, 1808

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bastard came in while we were at breakfast.  Lord Hinton left us for Blandford Races, where he means to stay till Friday.  I playd a game at Chess with Cooper.  Captain Roach, Captain Staples, Mrs Henderson and John and Mr Smith and Mr Warne calld.  Cooper took a short ride on horseback for the first time.  He was very much fatigued and exhausted by it.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Bastard and intended to do the same on Mrs W Williams, but met her in our way to her house.  We went to enquire for a house for Mr Dupre, but did not succeed in getting one.  Captain Chivers, Captain Roach, Captain Staples, Captain Ekesall, the younger Mr David, Mr Benson and Mr Bussell dined with us.  Mr and Mrs Henderson joind us after dinner and we all went to the Play together, to see The Honey Moon and the Weather Cock bespoke by Baron Linsingen and the Officers of the German Legion.  The House was very full and we were tolerably amused, tho I do not think Mrs Burnett is at all improved in her acting.  Cooper went home at the end of the Play.  We staid till it was all over.  Captain Sanders offerd me his arm when we came out, which I was obliged to take, much against my inclination.  Cooper was gone to bed when we came home.  We suppd alone.  Mr G Davis appears to be a good tempered, pleasant young man.  My Aunt P heard from Miss R Workman and Mr Wiltshire.

King's German Legion line infantry, 2nd btn light infantry, 3rd hussars. Published in Costumes of the Army of the British Empire, according to the last regulations 1812, engraved by J.C. Stadler, published by Colnaghi and Co. 1812-15. Painting by Charles Hamilton Smith (1776-1859).
King’s German Legion line infantry, 2nd btn light infantry, 3rd hussars. Published in Costumes of the Army of the British Empire, according to the last regulations 1812, engraved by J.C. Stadler, published by Colnaghi and Co. 1812-15. Painting by Charles Hamilton Smith (1776-1859).

Tuesday, 9 August, 1808

A very showery morning and in the middle of the day we had a violent thunder storm, which cleard the air and it was fine afterwards.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mr Bastard Pownall, Captain Simmons and Mr Warne calld.  My Aunt P and I went to the warm Bath, but I did not bathe.  Only Mrs Bussell dined with us.  After dinner my Aunt saw the little child we think so beautiful on the Esplanade with its nurse and calld them in and gave the little boy an apricot.  Mrs Chalie calld for a few minutes to take leave.  She goes tomorrow.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess till after tea and then they all playd at Whist.

Wednesday, 10 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here. Captain Simmons came at the same time. Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  Mrs H  left her here.  She went out with my Aunt and me.  My Aunt engaged a house in the Crescent for Mr Dupre.  Count Kielmansegg calld and took Cooper in his Gig on the sands.  Mr and Mrs Adams and two of their children calld.  Mr A gave me some Totnes apples.  Count Kielmansegg and Mr Bussell dined here.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Major Durbin came in the evening.  They all went away before supper.  Cooper was a little better this evening.  My Aunt Neate heard from Pen Saker.

Thursday, 11 August, 1808

A fine day.  Cooper went to see John Henderson (who is not very well) before breakfast, but did not stay ten minutes.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came as usual.  Mr Bastard, Captain Roach and Mrs Coffin calld.  Count Kielmansegg took Cooper as far as Upway.  My Aunt and I walkd on the sands.  We were joind by Mr Bussell, Captain Roach, Captain Staples and Mrs Henderson and her children.  My Aunt bathed.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  Mr Bussell went to the Concert for half an hour.  When he came back they playd Whist.  Mr Warne calld.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Fenwick and Mr Morland.

Friday,12 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came at his usual time.  Mr and Mrs Bastard calld.  Count Kielmansegg came to ask Cooper to ride with him, but he thought he has caught cold yesterday, so declined going with him today, but went with Captain Chivers in his carriage.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Captain Roach calld, as did Mrs England, but we were not at home to the latter.  My Aunt and I calld on the Chapmans, but did not stay with them many minutes, as they were going to walk.  Captain Eckersall calld to ask for the Band this evening, as he has a party on the Look-out.  He askd my Aunt if she would go and when she declined it he said “Well, Miss Chapman, will you honour the party with your presence, Bussell will Chaperon you.”  Whether it was ignorance or intended for  impertinence I don’t know.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us.  Count Kielmansegg came and drank tea and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Cooper and my Aunt Powell playd at Whist against Mr Bussell and me.  A delightful evening.  Cooper wrote a Charade on my name.  Mr Warne calld while we were at cards.  Mr Bussell walkd with my Aunt and me more than an hour in the morning.  We calld on Mrs Williams, but she was gone to the Bath.  Saw Mrs England in our way.  Mr Bussell staid and eat some supper with us.

Saturday, 13 August, 1808

A very wet day with a great deal of wind.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons did not come till some time afterwards.  Mr Bastard calld.  Lord Hinton returnd from Blandford.  I workd hard all the morning making my gown.  My Aunt Powell, Mr Bussell and I dined at Miss Greenley’s.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate sent excuses, as Cooper was afraid to venture out so bad a day.  We were very near being obliged to do the same, as they disappointed us of the horses, but just as my Aunt had written a note and was going to send it, they brought the carriage to the door.  We met only Lord Hinton and Captain Naish.  Spent a tolerable pleasant day, but left them at half past eight to save the light, as the road is, I think, very dangerous in the dark.  On our return found Cooper and Captain Simmons playing Whist against my Aunt Neate and Captain Roach.  They finishd their rubber and then my Aunt P took Cooper’s place, who was tired.  He was very irritable and inclind to be cross, tho not to me and went to bed very early before they had finishd their rubber.  Captain Simmons eat some cherry pye.  Captain Roach and Mr Bussell drank some wine and water and then went away.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mr Wiltshire and Mrs Williams.

Sunday, 14 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell, Lord Hinton and Major Durbin breakfasted here.  Mr Bastard and Captain Simmons came in soon afterwards.  As soon as they were all gone, Cooper read Prayers.  He is out of spirits and uncomfortable to day.  He wrote a very long letter to Mrs Fenwick this morning and I have taken it into my head it was to desire a decided answer whether she meant to marry him or not, as he did not shew it to my Aunt Powell before it went, which he generally does and, indeed, to me also.  I came away to write and have heard a thousand and one knocks at the door, so there must have been a great many peaple here, tho I do not know who they were.  When I went down I found Mr and Mrs Bastard in the Drawing Room.

? and Count Kielmansegg dined here.  The Count staid till near supper, Mr Bussell till we had suppd.  Mr Warne calld in the evening.  I wrote to Emma.

Monday, 15 August, 1808

A fine day, with the exception of one slight shower.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came.  Soon after Mr and Mrs Bastard calld.  Mr Warne met them here and drew two teeth for Mrs Bastard.  My Aunt Powell and I were with her at the time.  She behaved remarkably well on the occasion, but better than I expected.  My Aunt and I went out to Market.  While we were gone Mr and Miss Bodber calld and Mrs Henderson.  We afterwards walkd with Cooper to the top of the Esplanade.  Major Durbin joind us. Cooper calld at Dr Gardiner’s and Mrs Adams’s, but was not let in at either.  Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson dined here.  After dinner my Aunt P, Mrs H and I calld on Mrs Bastard and Mrs Williams.  On our return we were joind by Captain Staples, who walkd home with us but would not come in.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  We workd.  Mr Bussell was of our working party, as he hem’d part of the bottom of a frock for Mrs Henderson.  They both went away before supper.  My Aunt P wrote to Mrs Fenwick and Governor King and my Aunt Neate to Pen Saker.

My Aunt and I bathed.

Tuesday, 16 August 1808

A fine morning. Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bastard came soon after, as did Mrs Henderson.  My Aunt and the latter went out together.  Lord Hinton came in for a few minutes.  Mr Henderson made an ornament for the middle of the table.  I assisted and Mr Bastard cut Cooper’s crest in gold paper to put on it.  Mr and Miss Chapman and Captain Roach calld.  Lord Hinton, Captain Roach, Captain Jeffries, Mr Marrant, Mr Cockburn, Mr Legge, Mr Galway, Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson dined here and Mr and Mrs Davis and Captain and Mrs Simmons drank tea and suppd with us.  They playd cards.  Lord Hinton and Mr Legge went to the Bath.  His Lordship did not return, but Mr Legge came back just as the whole party had left us.  However, he sat down and had some fruit and wine and water.  The day went off  very well.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mr Porcher and my Aunt Neate from my mother.

Wednesday, 17 August. 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Mr Bastard and Captain Simmons came soon after.  Mrs Henderson and Count Kielmansegg calld.  I left them here while I went to Bathe.  Cooper took a ride with the Count to Upway.  He brought my Aunt a nice Geranium back with him as a present.  Mrs Henderson and Mr Bussell walkd with my Aunt as far as the Crescent to call on Mrs Rodber.  They did not go in, but joind us when we had paid our visit.  My Aunt afterwards calld on Mrs W Williams, but did not stay a minute. Miss Pine-Coffin and Lord Hinton calld.  Major Durbin, Mr Atkins, Mr Andrews, Mr Jenkins, Mr B?, Mr Terry, Mr Bussell and Mrs Henderson dined here.  We all (except my Aunt Neate) went to the Play bespoke by the Officers of the Somerset.  It was Town and Country and the Tale of Mystery and really very amusing.  the House was crowded in every part.  Cooper came home as soon as the Play was over, we staid till the end.  Mrs Henderson and Mr Bussell suppd with us.  We found Cooper and my Aunt N playing Chess. I wrote to my mother.

Thursday, 18 August, 1808

A fine day.  Cooper was not so well today, as yesterday.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, Captain Simmons and Mrs Henderson came soon afterwards.  Mr Warne calld.  Cooper took a ride with Count Kielmansegg.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Cornwall, Mrs March, Mrs Gyllett, Mrs Sanders and Mrs Henderson, found only the two latter at home.  Mrs Henderson and Count Kielmansegg dined here.  Captain Simmons, Miss and Mr Greenley and Miss Lee drank tea and suppd here.  I playd Cassino all the evening and won three shillings.  The party went away at eleven.

Friday, 19 August, 1808

A fine day, but very close.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons, Mr and Mrs Bastard and Mr and Mrs Henderson came soon afterwards.  Mr Warne and Captain Roach calld.  My Aunt and I walkd out.  I bathd.  Cooper rode with Count Kielmansegg.  Lord Hinton sat half an hour with us. We were agreeably surprised by seeing Mr Bryant, who came from Gurnsey this morning, in his way  home.  He looks remarkably well.  Gotta? knew and was delighted to see him.  Cooper dined at Dr Byams.  Mr Bussell and Mr Bryant dined with us.  Mr and Mrs Bastard Pownall and five of Mrs Cornwell’s children drank tea and suppd here.  We all playd Blind Mans Buff and Puss in the Corner to amuse them.  Little William said he should tell his Mama he had spent a delightful evening. Cooper came home while we were at supper.  The Bastards and Cornwells went away about eleven.  Mr Bryant and Mr Bussell staid some time longer.

Saturday, 20 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons, Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mr Warne calld.  Immediately afterwards Cooper walkd to Mrs Cornwell’s with Mr and Mrs Bastard.  Major Durbin, Mrs Simmons and little Mary calld.  My Aunt Powell took a walk with Cooper only.  Mr Bussell dined here.  Count Kielmensegge spent the evening with he and my Aunt Neate.  Playd Chess. My Aunt P and Mr Bussell playd Whist against Cooper and me.

Sunday, 21 August, 1808

A beautiful day, but very hot.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came while we were at breakfast.  Cooper read prayers.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, Lord Hinton, Count Kielmansegg, Mr Atkins, Mr Andrews and Captain Paten calld.  At two o’clock my Aunt and I walkd with Mr Atkins to the German Barracks.  Cooper rode there with the Count, but walkd back with us and gave me his arm all the way home.  The German parade was beautifully conducted.  We were introduced to some of the Officers, another Captain Paten, Captain Muller and Captain Todd.  Lord Cavan calld on Cooper and sat some time.   Mrs Nash and her sister also calld while we were out.  Only Mr Bussell dined here.  Lord Hinton brought his friend  Mr Sturt here after dinner to introduce to Cooper.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Mr Atkins drank tea here. The latter brought his flute and playd some beautiful things.  Spent a delightful evening.  The H’s went away before supper.

Monday, 22 August, 1808

A beautiful day.  My Aunt and I went out before eight o’clock to get what we could for dinner.  Cooper walkd on the Esplanade before breakfast.  Mrs Bastard and Mrs Henderson calld while we were at breakfast.  Captain Simmons came soon after, as did Mr Bastard and Mr Henderson, tho they did not stay long, as every body was in confusion, setting tables and getting the things arranged for dinner.  All our friends were very kind in lending their assistance and procuring what they could for us, as the notice was so short we had difficulty in getting what we wanted.  Cooper and my Aunt calld on Miss Pine-Coffin while I went to order a Bath for myself.  At four o’clock Rolle and Major Foster calld and at dinner we had a very large party.  Lord Craven, Lord Cavan, Lord Kilcoursie, Baron Linsingen, General Johnson, Lord Hinton, Major Linsingen, Major Durbin, Captain Pater, Captain Simmons and Mr Bussell.  The dinner was very good and every thing went off extremely well.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Mrs Cornwell came in the evening.  They all went away a little after ten, except General Johnson, Lord Kilcoursie, Captain Simmons and Mr Bussell.  Lord K gave me a long history of his dogs, which lasted full on an hour.  The General, Captain and I and my two Aunts playd Whist.  Cooper was in excellent spirits and very kind and affectionate all day.  I wrote to my mother.

Tuesday, 23 August, 1808

A fine day.  We got up very early, that Cooper might have his breakfast comfortably, before he went to to the ground.  Lord Hinton came to breakfast and just as we were preparing to set off, Cooper rode back to say Lord Cavan had that instant received a letter from the Prince, to say he could not be at Dorchester till one o’clock, so we staid quietly till eleven before we set out.  My Aunt put her pair of horses with Mrs Cornwell’s pair to Mrs C’s Landau, in which were Mrs Bastard, Mrs Cornwell, Miss Cornwell and us three with Pownall and little William on the Box.  It was a beautiful Review and we got so near the Prince and Duke of Cambridge we saw every thing to the greatest advantage.  We did not get home till near six o’clock, dined alone, for Cooper was engaged with Lord Cavan and the Prince’s party and Mr Bussell did not return time enough for dinner.  The Henderson’s and Mr Bussell drank tea with us and went to the Ball, which was a very good one.  The Prince and Duke of Cambridge were very gracious to Cooper, but particularly the Prince, who talkd to him more than half an hour.  Nothing could be more attentive and obliging than Mr Rodber was to us.  If we had been of the Prince’s party, he could not have paid us more attention.  We did not get home till near one o’clock.  There were fire works on the Esplanade in the evening.  We calld on Lady Craven, but did not see her.

The Prince of Wales (1762–1830) (later George IV) by William Beechey c.1798 (c) Royal Academy of Arts; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
The Prince of Wales (1762–1830) (later George IV) by William Beechey c.1798
(c) Royal Academy of Arts; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wednesday, 24 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell and Lord Hinton breakfasted here and about eleven o’clock we set out in the same order as yesterday (except that My Aunt Neate and Miss Cornwell did not go with us) for the Barracks, where we got out and saw the Prince and his suit inspect the Germans.

When that was over we made to the top of Ridgeway Hill to see a sham fight between the two German Regiments.  Mr Bussell and Captain Simmons went with us.  Cooper staid to breakfast with the Prince’s party by invitation at Colonel Altons at the Barracks, but joind us when he came on the Grand.  The engagement was extremely well managed and the cheers of the conquering party had a very good effect.  After the battle was over, one of the Regiment maneuvered before the Prince and when he took leave they cheerd him.  When it was all over and they were returning the whole of the two Regiments struck up a German Hymn.  The number of voices had a wonderfully fine effect and appeard to delight and surprise the Prince very much, as he stopd his horse and allowd them to pass him.

My Aunt and I went to the warm Bath after we returnd.  Mr Bussell dined with us.  Cooper dined with the Prince at General Linsingen’s, but met us at the concert in the evening.  Mr and Mrs Henderson drank tea and went with us to the concert.  The room was so full we could not get a seat till Captain and Mrs Gyllett and Captain Staples made room for us.  The concert was delightfully performed and the Prince and Duke appeard to enjoy it very much.  The Prince called out “Charming” in the middle of Mr Atkins’s playing on the flute and when he went out of the room he shook Cooper by the hand and said “Well, God bless you Cooper till we meet again.”  The German Bands serenaded him after he went home and cheerd him when they went away.  The Hendersons, Mr Bussell and Mr Galway walkd home with us but no one came in to supper.

Mrs Du Pre, Mrs Murray and two Miss Maxwells calld while we were out.

Thursday, 25 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  The Prince and his party went away early this morning and Weymouth appears quite quiet.  Captain Simmons calld while we were at breakfast and Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mr Henderson and Count Kielmansegg soon afterwards.  Cooper , My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Du Pre, Mrs Cornwell and Mrs Williams.  Found only the latter at home.  Cooper took a ride and my Aunt and I sat some time with Mrs Henderson.  Captain and Mrs Gyllett and Captain Roach calld.  Mr Marker, Captain Roach, Count Kielmansegg, Mr Quin, Mr Smith, Mrs Symes and Mr Bussell dined here. Mr and Mrs Adams and their little boy drank tea with us.  They playd Whist and Chess.  Cooper left the party at half past nine and went to bed without saying a word to any one.  The Adams waited till eleven, expecting him to return and then went away.  Only Captain Roach and Mr Bussell suppd with us.  We heard of our dear William thro Mr Porcher and that there was a prospect of his being well settld in India.  God grant it may turn out well.  The Gentlemen were so obliging to drink his health and success to him after dinner.  General Johnson calld and staid some time, as did Major Linsingen, both in the morning.

Friday, 26 August, 1808

A fine day.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  His Lordship left Weymouth this morning for a few days.  Captain Simmons came in as usual.  I went up stairs to write.  A great many people calld, but I did not see any of them.  Cooper took a ride to see how he liked the new Pointer dog he has bought off Lord Hinton.  My Aunt and I calld on Mrs Cox and Mrs Henderson.  Found only the latter at home.  She came out to walk with us.  I went to the Bath.  On my return I met my Aunt and Mrs H.  They were coming to tell me my Aunt had just got a letter from our beloved William, written in very good spirits, dated January 28th, 1808.  We had a large party to dine.  Mr and Mrs Cox, Captain and Mrs Gyllett, Mr Atkins, Mr Thomson, Mr Rodber and Mr Bussell.  The Cox’s kept us waiting till after six o’clock and did not come at last till we were seated at table.  Sir John and Lady Smith, Miss Smith, Mr, Mrs and two Miss Chapmans, Mr and Mrs Morland, Mr Andrews and Major Durbin joind our party in the evening. We had one Whist table and passd a tolerably pleasant evening.

Saturday, 27 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came directly afterwards.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, Mrs Henderson, Sir John Smith, Mr Warne, Mrs and the two Miss Chapmans, Captain Todd, Mrs Cornwell, Lady and Miss Buller calld.  Cooper rode out.  My Aunt and I walkd a short time before dinner.  Cooper dined at Mr Greenley’s and took Mr Atkins and Dr Byam in the Carriage with him.  Only Mrs Bussell dined with us.  Mrs Henderson drank tea with us.  Cooper did not return till eleven o’clock.  He left Mrs Byam his Carriage to come home in, because they had no lights.  Mr W Williams’ two children came to hear the music and Miss Pippin sat half an [hour] when she came to fetch them home.

Sunday, 28 August, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell and Major Durbin breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came in while we were at breakfast and Mr Bastard soon afterwards. They all went away except Mr Bastard, who staid while Cooper read Prayers.  Dr and Mrs Byam and Mrs Deoy? calld, but my Aunt had desired to be “not at home” to them.  Lord Hinton, Mr and Mrs Henderson, Lady Delawar and Lady Catherine West calld, the two latter in consequence of having met Cooper at the Greenley’s yesterday and asking all the party to meet at her house tomorrow evening.  she very politely came to ask us to join them.  Cooper, my Aunt and I took a walk on the Wareham Road.  Little Adams came to see the Parade and was on the sands at half past four.  Lord Hinton and Mr Bussell dine here.  Lady and Miss Buller, Mr and Mrs Bastard and Pownall and Mr and Mrs Henderson drank tea with us, the two latter and Mr Bussell staid to supper.  I had a note from Mr Porcher enclosing two letters from dear William to my mother and Emma.  Cooper calld on Dr Cockman, Mr Collins, Mr Surtees and General Johnson.  We all calld on Mrs Williams.

Monday, 29 August, 1808

A fine day, but a very rough wind.  Mr Bussell and Mr William Williams breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came while we were at breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Mrs Henderson came soon afterwards.  I went to the Bath.  Cooper and Mr Bussell rode on horse back to Dorchester.  We went in the carriage, but they sent us such bad horses we were obliged to stop at the Lodge while the man went back to get another pair.  While we were waiting there Count Kielmansegg came up and offerd to take one of us in his carriage to Herringston.  My Aunt Neate acceptd his kind offer and went with him.  Mr Bastard came and staid with us till the man returnd with the horses.  They were not much better than the first, for they ran back with us on Ridgeway Hill and we were obliged to walk up.  We got out of the carriage at Herringston and walkd to the house, where we found my Aunt N, Morgan Geatman and Mr and Mrs Williams.  I never saw such a miserable patch work business as the house at Herringston, which Mrs Williams had represented as such a perfect place.  We took her in the carriage with us to her house at Dorchester, where we dined and slept.  Met Mrs Geatman, Charlotte and Morgan, Mr and Mrs Churchill and Miss Hawkins, a very nice girl who is staying at Mr W’s.  Miss Geatman and Jane came in the evening.  The party playd Casino and Speculation.  I lookd on.  Spent a very uncomfortable disagreeable day, as I always do in the society of Mrs Williams, whom I despise and hate most cordially.

Tuesday, 30 August, 1808

A very wet day.  Breakfasted at Mr Williams.  Cooper came in soon afterwards and sat some time.  He took no more notice of me than if I had been a post, nor I of him.  We all dined at Morgan Geatman’s, where we me Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mr Haines, Mr England and Major Durbin and sat down eighteen to dinner.  It was a most superb and elegant entertainment.  I never saw a better dinner or better conducted, with a most elegant desert and a profusion of all kinds of wine; old Hock, Champaign, Maderia, Cypress and, in short, every thing that was good, and given with the greatest liberality.  They playd Whist and Speculation again in the evening, but I was not or of their party.  Mrs Williams was very mortified and mad at Cooper’s attention to Mrs Henderson, who sat next to him, both at dinner and supper.  However, she did continue to get close to him at Cards.   I do not know what was the matter with Cooper, but he took not the least notice of me the whole day, except that at dinner and supper he did condescend to ask me to eat some Cheese and when we went away at night he offerd to shake hands with he, but I only gave him one finger, as I have no idea of putting up with impertinence from any one, but more particularly from one whom it has always been my study to oblige and please.  We slept again at Mr Williams’, very uncomfortably, without a convenience or comfort.

Wednesday, 31 August, 1808

A wet morning, but it cleard up at one o’clock and was fine the rest of the day, tho the wind was extremely high.  Mrs Williams left home immediately after breakfast to go into  Purbeck for some days and very politely left us alone in her own house.  It is certainly a new way of acting, to invite company and then leave them to entertain themselves, but I suppose it is the Herrington fashion.  We spent the morning very pleasantly at Mrs Geatman’s, quite a large party, the Henderson’s, Cooper, Mr Haines, Captain Churchill and ourselves.  Mr Henderson playd and sung a great deal.  We went to see the Dr’s house, which is next door to Margans and then Mr Henderson,  Cooper, my Aunt and I calld on Miss Manfield to ask her how she did.  We had a very nice luncheon at the Geatmans and then left Dorchester for Weymouth.  My two Aunts and Mrs Henderson in the carriage and Mr Henderson and myself on the box.  We should have had a very pleasant ride but that the wind was unpleasantly high and in the evening it blew a gale.  The Colonel went from Dorchester to Sidling to dine at Sir John Smith’s.  He was a little more inclined to be civil, but my spirit was too high to give any encouragement to his very obliging advances, so we parted without taking any notice of each other, tho he had the politeness to offer to assist me to get on the box, but there were others equally polite whose attentions were more acceptable.

Fashion plate for September 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for September 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Thursday, 1 September, 1808

A fine morning.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Mrs Henderson and Mr and Mrs Bastard calld.  My Aunt and I went to the warm Bath and then sat more than an hour at Mrs Bastard’s.  In our way there we met Captain Roach, Captain Chivers, Captain Eckersall, his mother and sisters, Captain Naish, General Johnson and Mr and Mrs Davis.  Cooper came home from Herringston before we returnd from Mr Bastard’s, who came home with us to see him.  He was  very civil, but I was too distant for him to be more.  He brought home a brace of partridges and a pheasant and sent one of each to Mrs Geatman, so did pretty well to kill five the first day only.  Mr Bussell dined with us.  Captain Simmons came in the evening.  He and my Aunt Powell playd Whist  against Cooper and my Aunt Neate, Mr Bussell and I lookd on.

Friday, 2 September, 1808

A showery day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us.  Captain Simmons and Mr and Mrs Bastard calld.  Cooper and Mr Bussell rode out shooting.   My Aunt and I calld on Mrs W Williams and got compleatly wet thro coming home, for we were caught in a very heavy shower where there was no shelter.  Cooper and Mr Bussell were also wet thro.  We found Mrs Henderson here when we returnd.  Captain Chivers calld.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us, but had a large party to tea and Supper.  Captain and Mrs Naish and Miss Greenhill, Mr and Mrs Gyhan, Captain Roach and Captain Chivers, Mr Atkins, Mr Andrews, Mr Gorton and Mr and Mrs Henderson.  I playd Cassino the whole evening and lost seven shillings.  The party broke up about twelve o’clock.  I heard from my mother.

Saturday, 3 September, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons, Mr and Mrs Bastard and Mr Warne calld while we were at breakfast.  Cooper went to call on Mrs Collins.  While he was gone Mrs W Williams came to speak to him before she went to Bridehead.  She gave us all a very PRESSING invitation to go there before we left Weymouth.  Mrs Henderson and Captain Roach came in just as we were going to have our luncheon.  Cooper went shooting.  My Aunt, Mrs Henderson and I calld on Mrs Eckersall, who was out.  I left them to walk, while I went to order a Bath for myself at 4 o’clock and then returnd home, where I found Captain Roach playing Chess with my Aunt Neate.  Captain Thornton, Mr Benson and Mr Chapman calld.  My Aunt and I both went to the Bath.  When we came back, we found Mr Terry here, whom Cooper had met while he was shooting and brought him home to dine.  Cooper shot one bird.  Mr Bussell and Mr Terry dined here.  The latter did not come up to tea luckily, for i think he is one of the most unpleasant young men I ever saw.  Mr Chapman came in for a SHORT time in the evening.  Cooper and my Aunt P playd Whist against Mr Bussell and my Aunt Neate.  C was in remarkable good spirits and very KIND and GOOD HUMOURD.  Mrs Williams sent my Aunt a brace of birds and some very BAD grapes.

Sunday, 4 September, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons and Mr and Mrs Bastard came in while we were at breakfast, the two latter staid to prayers, which Cooper read to us.  Mr and Mrs Eckersall, Mr, Mrs and Miss Chapman, Count Kielmansegg, General Johnson, Mr and Mrs David, Captain and Mrs Gyllett, Mrs Henderson, Mr and Mrs Farrell, Mrs Marshall, Mr and Miss Pine-Coffin calld.  Cooper took a ride with the Count.  My Aunt and I calld on Miss Barker, met Mrs Henderson in our way, who walkd there with us.  Saw Lady Buller at Mr Bastard’s window listening to the German Band.  Stopd to speak to her but did not go in.  Mrs Geatman, Miss G, Charlotte and Frank came from Dorchester to spend the day with us.  They, with Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mr Hale and Mr Bussell dined with us and in the evening the party was increasd by Lady and Lord Delawar, Lady C West,  Mr G Davies, Captain Roach, Count Kielmansegg and Mr Atkins.  It was one of the most beautiful moonlight nights I ever saw.  The Band playd till late in compliment to Lady D.  Mr Atkins playd some beautiful tunes to us after supper.  The party left us about twelve o’clock.   

Monday, 5 September, 1808

We got up at six o’clock this morning with the intention of going to the Isle of Wight, but it was such a miserable rainy morning it was impossible to think of it.  It appears to me there is a spite against our going.  The time has so often been fixd and something has always occurd to prevent it.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here, Captain Simmons came soon afterwards.   It was so wet all this morning few people calld.  Only Mr Bussell dined here.  Captain Roach came and playd cards in the evening and suppd here.  Cooper and I playd two games at Chess.  Mr Jones sent a basket of very fine fruit, two pines, a melon and a great number of peaches and nectarines.  I wrote to my dear William, so did my Aunt Powell.

Tuesday, 6 September, 1808

A fine morning.  We got up early again to be ready to embark.  Mr Bussell and Captain Roach breakfasted with us.  We then call’d on the Hendersons, who were not quite ready, but follow’d us to the Pier where we stepd on board the vessell and saild for the Isle of Wight at eight o’clock.  Our party consisted of Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mr Bussell, Captain Roach, Cooper and our three selves.  Captain and Mrs Naish and Captain Simmons walkd down to the pier to see us sail.  The weather was fine (except that it blew very hard with a tremendous swell) till we reachd the Needles, when it began to rain very hard and continued the rest of the day.

(c) National Trust, Waddesdon Manor; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
A Frigate with a View of the Needles by Dominic Serres (c) National Trust, Waddesdon Manor; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Every one of the party, except Cooper and the Hendersons, were sick, but particularly myself.  I was so bad I was obliged to lay on the deck and tho they coverd me with sails and great coats, was compleatly wet through.  The weather was so bad Cooper thought it better to land at Yarmouth, then go on to Cowes and we were fortunate enough to find the beds at the Inn unoccupied.  My Aunt P and I immediately undressd and got between warm blankets for an hour and by that means escaped colds and at dinner continued to laugh away our ills, for tho it was very dirty and badly dressd and the accommodations very indifferent, yet the inconveniences we had sufferd on board made it appear to so much advantage that we fancied every thing was very comfortable.  My Aunt Neate and Captain Roach playd chess in the evening and indeed we left them at it when we went to bed.

Wednesday, 7 September, 1808

A finish day.  After breakfasting we embarkd again for Cowes, which we reachd in an hour and an half without any of us being ill.  We landed at the cottage which, tho let, was unoccupied and after examining every part of it went to East Cowes.  At the ferry we met my Uncle and Matilda coming over to us.  They turnd back and we all went to their house, where we found Mrs Chapman looking remarkably well.  From there we went to the hotel, where we chose our beds.  Cooper wrote a note to hand Henry Seymour to ask him to dine with us.  We then (that is my Aunt P, Cooper, Mr Bussell, Mrs Henderson, Matilda and myself) walkd to Mr Nash’s.  The family are all in Ireland, but one of the maids very obligingly shewd us the whole house, which Mr Nash is encreasing very largely and in, my opinion, very oddly.  There were a great number of people at work.  We met Lord Henry, Mr Old and Mr Bowen in the street.  They were all very much pleased to see us.  Mr Ruldgo? calld upon us and sent us some very nice fruit.  Lord Henry and the Chapmans dined with us and Mrs Bowen joind the party in the evening.  He, my Aunt P, Lord Henry and Mr Chapman playd Whist, all the rest Loo, except me who taught Mrs Henderson.  After supper Captain Roach sung us two songs and he and Lord Henry playd three or four games at Chess.  We walkd in the morning round Norris Castle land.  ??  which is finishd since we came here last.

East Cowes Castle c.1824, home of the architect John Nash.
East Cowes Castle c.1824, home of the architect John Nash.

Thursday, 8 September, 1808

A fine day.  As soon as we had breakfasted Cooper and Mr Bowen went out shooting.  My Aunt Powell, Mrs Henderson, Mr Bussell, Matilda and I crossed the water to West Cowes.  We left Mrs H on the quay and we went to call on Mr Old and see his new house, which is very pretty and snug.  After staying some time with him we went down to the cottage.  Mr Bussell measured the ground.  We saw the Princess Sophia of Gloucester, who is living at Mrs Walter’s.  After we returnd to East Cowes my Aunt, Captain Roach, Mr Bussell and myself went again to Mr Maher’s to shew it to Captain Roach.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and my Aunt Neate took a sail to Spithead.  Mr Bowen and Cooper brought home two brace of partridges, a Curlew and hand rail.  The Chapmans, Mr Bowen and Mr Ward dined with us and we all spent the evening at my Uncle’s.  My Aunt P, Cooper, Mr Bowen and Mr Chapman playd Whist, the rest Loo, except me.  The gentlemen were all very gay and talkd a great deal.  Matilda got us some very nice shavings for hats, much better than we can get at Bath.  We did not leave them till past twelve.  Mr and Mrs Mackenzie calld on us and were very anxious for us to breakfast with them tomorrow morning, which my Aunt declind, but said we would call before we left the island.

Portrait of Sophia of the United Kingdom (1777-1848) by William Beechey, c.1797.
Portrait of Sophia of the United Kingdom (1777-1848) by William Beechey, c.1797.

Friday, 9 September, 1808

A very showery day.  Mr Bowen and my Uncle came in while we were at breakfast.  As soon as we had finishd we all crossd the water and went to Mr Mackenzie’s, where we were receivd with the greatest kindness and attention.  Mrs M shewd us the house, which they are encreasing very much since we were here before and is as compleat as it is possible for a house to be.  She appears a very pleasant, sensible woman and her politeness to us was unbounded.  We staid with them more than an hour and then set sail for Yarmouth again, for the sea was too high for us to venture thro the Needles.  A sloop, which passd us and attempted to run thro, was obliged to put back with the loss of her mast and some of her sails.  We landed at Yarmouth in a hard storm of rain, but did not get wet thro.  I was not the least sick on board.  Part of the rooms we had when we were here before were engaged, so that Cooper was obliged to sleep out, not that that was any disadvantage, as he was much more comfortable out of the house than in it, as the accomodations here appeard very much worse than before, after the comforts we enjoyd at the hotel at East Cowes.  We walkd all over Yarmouth, went into the church to see a very fine monument carved by Boubiliac to the memory of one of the Holmes family and then returnd to the Inn, to dinner, which was shocking bad.  Mr and Mrs Gossitt (who are staying at Yarmouth and an acquaintance of the Hendersons, as well as us) calld after dinner, but would not stay to tea.  They told us that George Shirley had come across from Lymington after we had landed and had some luncheon at their house and then returnd home without knowing we were in the island, which was very mortifying to us, as we should have been so glad to have seen him.  My Aunt P, Cooper and Mrs Henderson and I playd Casino in the evening.  Captain Roach and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.

Saturday, 10 September, 1808

A dry morning but very wet afterwards.  After a very nasty uncomfortable breakfast, we set sail for Swannage, where we arrived about six o’clock very cold and wet, for it raind all the way after we had passd the Needles.  I was so sick I was obliged to lay on deck almost all the way.  We went to the little snug Inn, where every thing was so comfortable, clean and nicely dressd that it repaid one for all the inconvenience sufferd on the voyage.  Kitty Hayson, who is grown as beautiful as it is possible for a girl to be, lives at the Inn as a servant and was delighted to see us.  Cooper wrote a very nice Charade on Miss Johnson’s name after tea and sent it to Mrs Fenwick.  We all went to bed early.  Captain Roach and Mr Bussell were obliged to sleep out of the house, but Mrs Francis got very comfortable beds for them.

Sunday, 11 September, 1808

A fine day.  As soon as we had breakfasted we all went out different ways.  Captain Roach and Mr Henderson walkd to Tilly Whim.  Mr Bussell, Mrs Henderson, Cooper and us three went up the town.  We calld on Mr W Taylor, the Dampiers, the Warrens, Betty Hatchard and both the Haysoms.  The joy with which every one receivd us was very gratifying to our feelings.  I never saw Mr Taylor look better and his two little boys are nice children, but I do not like his house.  It is badly situated and very uncomfortable.  Poor Betty Hatchard was very much affected at seeing us.  George is grown a fine boy.  Poor old Tubb is still alive and came to see my Aunt, as did Mrs Brewer.  In short, most of the peaple we knew came down to see us and they all appear to me to be grown younger instead of older since we saw them.  We left Swanage with regret, for every one of the party were delighted with it.  We got on board about one o’clock.  The wind was very high and directly against us, so that we were obliged to tack continually, which was very disagreeable.  Also the sea ran tremendously high.  We did not reach Weymouth till half past eight o’clock.  I was very ill all the way, but not able to relieve my stomach, which makes me suffer more than if I was sick.  As soon as we landed my Aunt sent into Lady Delawar’s to excuse ourselves from going there, which we were engaged to do.  She sent word back she was very glad to hear we were arrived safe.  The Hendersons, Captain Roach and Mr Bussell dined, or rather supp’d with us, for we had nothing after, and left us about eleven o’clock.  Upon the whole, our expedition turnd our very pleasant and agreeable and all the party appeard amused and gratified

Monday, 12 September, 1808

A very wet morning.  We thought ourselves fortunate to have got home so well last night.  Mr Bussell breakfasted here.  Captain Simmons came while we were at breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, General Johnson, Captain Chivers, Mr David and Mr Henderson calld.  Cooper was very much out of spirits in consequence of letters he found here from Mrs Fenwick.  I have not yet heard the particulars, but he said last night when he went to bed, he thought he should not go into the North.  Captain Roach, Captain and Mrs Naish, Miss Greenhill, Mr George Davies, Mr Cockburn, Mr Benson, Mr  Atkins and Mr Hale calld.  My Aunt P and I calld on Lady Delawar, but were not let in. She calld almost immediately after on us, but we were dressing to go to Mr Henderson’s, where we dined and I met Count Kielmansegg.  Captain Roach, Mr Atkins and Mr Bussell spent a very stupid, disagreeable day.  Mrs H playd to us after dinner.  The Count and Mr Atkins went away directly after tea.  My two Aunts, Cooper and Captain Roach sat down to Whist as soon as they could get a table, but I never saw anything so awkward as Mrs H is in entertaining her guests.  My Aunt was obliged to do the honor of the house, the same as if it had been hers.  In short, Mrs H was so much engaged in attending to, and getting close to Cooper that she had no time to spare for the rest of the company.  It was really quite ridiculous.  There was a tremendous storm of thunder and lightening, with torrents of rain in the evening.  We were obliged to come home in Chairs.  My Aunt P and I came in one to save them.

Tuesday, 13 September, 1808

It raind very hard early in the morning, but cleard while we were at breakfast and was a very fine day.  Mr Atkins and Mr Bussell breakfastd with us.  Captain Simmons and Mr Bastard came in before we had done.  Mr and Mrs Henderson spent most part of the morning here.  We were very busy.  I went to the warm bath for the last time and afterwards accompanied my Aunt to call on Mrs Gyllett.  Mrs Davis, Mrs Eckersall, Mrs Adams, Mr Simmons, Mrs Naish, Mrs Cornwall, Miss Marker and Mrs Rodber, the four former were not at home. At the five latter we were let in.  We left cards also at Lady Delawars, Mrs Du Pre and Mrs Byan’s.  Mrs Cornwall and little William walkd home with us, but did not stay long.  In our way we met Captain Jeffries, Captain Eckersall and Captain Sherston, who also joind us.  Captain S begd I would give a little box he had turnd to Cooper, as a snuff box.  We sat some time at Mrs Bastard’s and saw Miss Buller’s beautiful butterflies, which are more exquisite than any thing I ever saw of the kind before.  Lady and Lord Delawar, Lady Buller and some of the officers calld while we were out. Lady D sent a note to beg we would spend the evening there.  My Aunt P went in to make our excuses.  Only Mr Bussell dined with us.  Cooper was engaged at Mr P Collins’s.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Miss Marker drank tea with us, and Mrs Bastard, little William Cornwall, Captain Roach and Captain Chivers came to shake hands with us, but staid a very short time.  The Henderson’s waited till Cooper came home and I though never intended to go away.  Mrs H just as imprudent and ridiculus as yesterday and Cooper encouraging her in her folly.  My Aunt did not order the supper till they were gone.  I wrote to my mother.

Wednesday,14 September, 1808

A fine morning but showery in the course of the day.  Mr Bussell breakfasted with us and Mr and Mrs Bastard came to wish us good bye.  Cooper and Mr Bussell set out on horseback half an hour before us and we met Mr B on his return, just by Upway and shook hands with him.  We staid an hour at Mrs Geatman’s.  They expected us to breakfast and had every thing set out for us very nicely, so we had a second breakfast with them.  My Aunt Powell and I calld at Mrs Williams, but did not sit down.  They leave Dorchester for Bath Friday.  They gave us some fruit to eat in the carriage.  When we got to Sherborne we found Cooper very much vex’d and uncomfortable.  His new grey mare had been taken ill on the road and could hardly carry him so far.  Dryall rode her a foot’s pace on and Cooper got on the box, but it began to rain soon after and he came into the carriage with my Aunt P and me.  We reachd Old Down about six o’clock, where we suppd and slept.  I never was in so comfortable an Inn in my life, so much civility, every thing so clean and well dressd.  It was like being at home.  We were a good deal tired and I went to bed early.

Old Down Inn by Ironside, 1769. Shows a covered wagon pulled by horses, outside an inn. A sign on the wagon reads; 'John Deane Wincanton Shaftesbury Sherborne & Brutton Common Stage Waggon to the 3 Kings Tho.s Street Bristol'. The inn sign reads; 'Old Down Inn'. A roadsign is inscribed; XV Miles from Bristol'. (c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Old Down Inn by Ironside, 1769.
Shows a covered wagon pulled by horses, outside an inn. A sign on the wagon reads; ‘John Deane Wincanton Shaftesbury Sherborne & Brutton Common Stage Waggon to the 3 Kings Tho.s Street Bristol’. The inn sign reads; ‘Old Down Inn’. A roadsign is inscribed; XV Miles from Bristol’. (c) Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thursday, 15 September, 1808

A very wet morning, but it cleard about one o’clock and was fine the rest of the day.  Cooper was in very good spirits this morning and very much inclind to stay the day at Old Down, if my Aunt P would have agreed to it, but as she did not we left it about one o’clock.  On the road we met Colonel Lee and Mr Barton on horseback, both looking remarkably well.  The Colonel wanted us to go and dine there, but that was impossible.  When we got home we found Gardener so drunk he did not know what he was about.  He had not got any straw or corn for the horse and the sick mare was obliged to be led about more than an hour before the straw was ready for her to go in, besides which he was so exceedingly impertinent to Cooper, that he told him he should go away tomorrow morning, which then soberd him and he began to cry.  Mr Sewel came up to see the mare and prescribed for her.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess in the evening.  We went to bed early.

Friday, 16 September, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Sewel came up to see the mare soon after breakfast.  A Mr Cookson, a friend of Cooper’s from Hamford, calld and staid some time as did Miss R Workman, Mr Wiltshire and Dr Davis.  Cooper went with Mr Ford and Mr W to Shockerwick to see Charlotte, who is not so well as she was.  Dr Davis, Mr Ford and Mr Wiltshire dined here, the latter sleep here also.  He read a part of Marmion to us in the evening.  Dr Davis went away before supper.  Louis askd leave to go to Bath.  He came back very tipsy and gave my Aunt warning as he meant to go away tomorrow morning.

Saturday, 17 September, 1808

A fine day.  Mr Wiltshire went away before we were up.  Cooper was to have gone away for the North early, but was so loath to leave home he put if off as long as he could.  Mr Wiltshire, Mr Jones and Mr F Savage calld, so did Mrs Vassall, Miss Baker, her brother Henry and the Allens, but only the three former were admitted.  Cooper was very much depressd and out of spirits.  He did not like the idea of going so far by himself and is uncertain how he shall be receivd when he gets there, for he says he does not think Mrs Fenwick intends to marry him.  If he finds that is the case, he shall stay only two days with her, spend a week with Mrs Pearson and Mrs E Cooper, a day or two at Mr Ewbanks and then to to Cheltenham.  My Aunt P and I went as far as Lambridge in the carriage with Cooper, where we took leave of him and walked on to see my mother.  Met Miss H Wiltshire, Mr and Mrs James, Miss Baker and her brother.  Found my mother very indifferent and dear Emma, I think, looking very ill, tho she is much better than she was.  We sat there till half past four and then walked home, neither of us so much tired as we expected.  Met Major Coffin, who was very civil and walk’d as far as the top of Milsom Street with us.  I wrote all the evening.  My Aunt paid Louis his wages and he went away directly after breakfast.

Milsom Street Bath c1806, courtesy of the British Library. Charles Jagger (1770-1827) was resident there around 1811 and Fanny was living at the time of her death in 1871
Milsom Street Bath c.1806, courtesy of the British Library.

Sunday, 18 September, 1808

A gloomy looking day, at least it appeard so to me, probably from having lost Cooper’s cheerful society, tho he, for some months past, has not enjoyd his usual flow of spirits.  My Aunt read prayers after breakfast.  She and I walkd up to Bailbrook before dinner.  Saw old Mr Jones (who was delighted to see us), Mrs J, Maria, little Betsey, Mrs Vassall, Eliza Hendy and the two Miss Workmans, all looking remarkably  well, except Maria who has a bad pain in her face.  Eliza, I think, appears better than before her illness.  We staid with them till their dinner time.  They leave Bailbrook for London next Wednesday, when I hope Mrs Vassall will come to us for a little time.  My Aunt Powell sent a parcel, directed to Mr Bussell, containing two petticoats of Mrs Henderson’s, a pair of silver sugar tongs belonging to Mrs White, which were brought away by mistake and the black necklace she bespoke at Spreats for Lord Hinton.  She wrote to Mr Bussell, Mr Grant, Mr Walker and Cooper.  She heard from Cooper from Gloucester, where had had arrived safe last night.

Monday, 19 September, 1808

A fine day.  I workd hard all day and did not walk at all.  Miss Helen Wiltshire and Charlotte Savage calld and sat two hours.  They were both very chatty and pleasant.  They had some luncheon before they went away.  Mr Wiltshire brought the letters from Bath for us.  Miss W calld, but did not get off her horse.  We all workd in the evening. A very odd sort of man came to offer himself as servant.  My Aunt told him she would enquire about him in Bath.

Tuesday, 20 September, 1808

A fine day.  We all three walkd to Bath, stopd for a few minutes in our way at Bailbrook, saw the old gentleman, Mrs J, Maria, Mrs Vassall and Eliza.  They go tomorrow.  Saw Mrs Fraser at Lambridge, where she was busily engaged in the stable yard disposing of some and arranging the rest of her furniture.  My Aunt askd her to dine with us tomorrow, which she said she would.  Mr Wiltshire overtook us on the road and we met the Miss Workmans in Bath.  We calld at Molly’s, Heath the grocers and Mr Garthwaite’s to enquire about the man who came up yesterday.  They all spoke well of him.  My Aunt bought a very handsome Topaz ring to send to Mrs Chapman in the Isle of Wight as a keepsake.  We went to my mother’s, where we found my Aunt Neate.  Both my mother and Emma but poorly.  We sat with them more than an hour and then walkd home.  We were all very much tired and did not get home till seven o’clock.  Mrs Noyes calld while we were out and Mr Williams, just as we were going to Bath.  He did not stay many minutes and I did not go down to see him, as I have no inclination to shew any civility to Mrs Williams and do not care about him enough to put myself out of my way to shew him any attention.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper from Litchfield, Mrs Porcher and Mrs Bastard.  My Aunt forwarded three letters to Cooper from Mrs Balteel, Mrs Fenwick and Mr Porcher.

Wednesday, 21 September, 1808

A very thick fog in the morning, but it cleard up after breakfast and was fine the rest of the day.  Mrs Vassall and Mrs Beckford calld and sat some time.  Mrs Vassall was to have come to day to stay with us, but has put if off till tomorrow on Mrs Beckford’s account.  Mrs Fraser dined with us.  Mr Wiltshire calld just as we sat down to dinner but would not be prevaild on to stay.  Mrs F went away soon after tea.  My Aunt askd her for the money for the plants and tables she has owed her so long and she is to send it up tomorrow morning when my Aunt sends down Mrs Chapman’s ring, which she is so good to take to Southampton with her.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper and Mrs Bussell a melancholy account of the death of poor Mr Legge.  He was found dead in the lane under his window, from which they supposd he had fallen late in the evening, attempting to get out.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper.

Thursday, 22 September, 1808

A fine day.  Sir John and Lady Durbin calld and sat some time.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Mrs Vassall came before dinner to stay with us.  She was very much tired with walking from Bath, where she had been with Mrs Beckford.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and Mr Bussell.

Friday, 23 September, 1808

A very wet day.  It was so cold and damp we had a fire lit before dinner.  Mr and Miss Wiltshire calld, only the former came in.  Mrs Chalie also calld, but we said “not at home”.  My Aunt read to us in the evening.  I workd hard all day at Emma’s gown.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mr Bastard.

Saturday, 24 September, 1808

A fine day.  Mrs Vassall walkd up to Bailbrook, but did not stay long.  Mr Wiltshire calld and read part of the letter he had written to Cooper.  When Mrs Vassall returnd, my Aunt and I walkd with her in the garden.  I gathered a nosegay.  Mr Wiltshire calld again but I did not see him.  We workd in the evening.  My Aunt P read, sometimes aloud, part of Marmion, but not much.  She heard from Cooper, from Rippon. She wrote to Mr Bussell and I wrote a note for my mother.

This day Cooper left us to go into the North in search of a wife, apparently much against his inclination, but she has a great deal of money and I do not think any man can withstand that temptation, at least I am sure Cooper cannot, for I am equally sure he cares no more for Mrs Fenwick, (independent of her large property) than he does for me, and even vanity and self love does not blind me so compleately as to induce me to suppose he would marry me, except, indeed, I had five thousand a year in my own disposal.

Sunday, 25 September, 1808

A gloomy, cold day.  My Aunt read Prayers soon after breakfast.  The weather was so uncomfortable and dismal she had the fire lit in the Library before she began to read.  She and Mrs Vassall walkd to Bailbrook.  I did not go with them, but walkd in the garden.  We all of us read in the evening.

Monday, 26 September, 1808

A very fine day.  I walkd down to see my mother, intending to spend the day with her, but as it was Kingsdown Fair, I came back to dinner, for fear of the drunk people in the evening.  Found my mother and Emma tolerable.  Tryd on Emma’s gown, which we have been making for her.  It fitted delightfully and she was very much pleasd with it.  Cut out part of a gown for my mother.  Soon after they had dined, they walkd as far as Walcot Parade with me, in my way home.  Dryall was waiting for me at Mr Clarke’s and I got home to dinner without any inconvenience.  I calld on Molly to beg she would enquire for a tenant for us.  While I was at Bath, my Aunt P and Mrs Vassall calld on a Mrs and two Miss Mans (who are just come to Miss Neave’s cottage), who they found very pleasant, agreeable women.  They also calld on Mrs Noyes, but she was not at home.  My Aunt P and I workd in the evening.  Mrs Vassall and my Aunt N playd Chess.  My Aunt heard from Cooper and Mrs Henderson.

Tuesday, 27 September, 1808

A beautiful day, but very cold.  Mr and Mrs Chapman from Bathford called, but were not admitted.  Dr Davis sat with us some time.  My Aunt P and I called at Mrs Walter’s, but the family were all too ill to admit any body.  Met Mrs Noyes and little Ben coming to us.  She walkd with us to Lady Colebrook’s.  They were out from thence.  Went to Mrs Bourdais.  We saw her and her sister, Miss Banney, both very quizzical and not in my opinion very lady like.  We met Mr Noyes in the road looking very ill.  Mrs N came to the gate with us, but could not come in.  When we came in, found Mrs Vassal was gone up to Bailbrook, so we walkd up there to ask the Workmans, who are staying there a few days while their house is cleand, to dine here tomorrow, which they agreed to do.  Mrs V came back with us.  We workd all the evening.  My Aunt wrote to Cooper and heard from John Morgan Geatman.  I wrote a note to my mother.

Wednesday, 28 September, 1808

A fine morning, but it turnd to rain in the middle of the day and was wet all the evening.  Miss Wiltshire and Miss Helen walkd here and sat two hours.  Mrs Vassall went to Bailbrook directly after breakfast to have some things sent to the Jones’s.  The Workmans dined and suppd here and were very cheerful and pleasant.  We workd and chatted in the evening.  My Aunt hear from Cooper and a Mr Burg.  I had a note from Emma.  She also heard from Mr Bussell.  The letter came in the Basket, which brought the prawns and lobster to my mother last night.

Thursday, 29 September, 1808

A very fine morning.  Mr Sewell came to tell my Aunt that Dr Coopers horse and the Bay colt were ready to go to Dorchester whenever Mr Geatman’s servant came for them.  The Workmans came early and spent the day here.  Rebecca made a bonnet for my Aunt. Miss Baudois and Miss Burney calld.  They are very amiable, good sort of people, I dare say, but I do not think them very agreeable.  The Workmans did not go home till after supper.

My Aunt P heard from Mrs Williams.  In my opinion a very  impertinent letter demanding  an explanation of her alterd conduct, which she is not conscious of having deserved. Mr Geatman’s servant came from Dorchester to fetch the horses, which he is to take tomorrow.

Friday, 30 September, 1808

A very cold day, but dry, except one slight shower.  My Aunt P, Mrs Vassall and I crossed the water to call at the Allens.  Found the old lady and Miss Jannetta at home, who receivd us very kindly.  Jannetta was very chearful and pleasant.  She shewd us the new Dairy Mr Allen has built and the cottage he is building.  The dairy is excessively pretty.  We walkd over the garden, which is beautiful.  I never was in it before.  The Miss Mans calld and sat some time.  They are pleasant girls.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  I have not seen him in such good spirits for a long time.  We workd in the evening and Mrs Vassall read to us.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper.  Mr Geatman’s man took the horses away this morning after breakfast.

Fashion plate for October 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plate)
Fashion plate for October 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plate)

Saturday, 1 October, 1808

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bathford to call on Mrs Chalie and Mrs Chapman.  We found only the former at home.  She was very civil and obliging we should stay longer.  There was a very genteel old lady with her, a Mrs Vaux.  As the Chapmans were not at home my Aunt said she would call on Mrs Pickwick, who we found walking in her garden.  She received us with the greatest politeness and attention, gave us some excellent plum cake, shew us her house and walked all over the garden with us.  It is one of the prettiest places (if not the prettiest) in this neighbourhood.  Mr Pickwick came home from Bath, just as we were coming away and they walkd across their orchard to their farm house, which is neatness itself.  I never saw a place in such order as theirs and nothing could exceed their attention. Mr Wiltshire calld just as we were going to dinner, but did not stay many minutes.  My Aunt Powell read and she workd in the evening.  We calld at the Walter’s, to enquire how they did, but did not go in.

Sunday, 2 October, 1808

A very wet morning, which prevented our going to church, as we had intended.  My Aunt Powell read prayers to us directly after breakfast.  I walkd in the garden a short time and gatherd a beautiful nosegay.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  The Miss Workmans dined and spent the evening here  My Aunt wrote to Minah Warren

Monday, 3 October, 1808

A very fine day.  My Aunt Powell and I walkd to Bath, calld at Bailbrook in our way, but did not stay many minutes.  Left our cards at Lady Durbin’s who is out of town.  We walkd half over Bath and did all our commissions, met Maria Baker in Bond Street, who was very gracious.  Saw the Chapmans of Bathford three or four times. My Aunt went to call on Mrs Flinn and the Williams, while I went to my mother’s  Found her and dear Emma but poorly.  My Aunt joind me there and sat some time to rest.   She did not see the Williams’s, they were gone to Bristol.  I bought some needles.  Gave Emma thirteen shillings.  We walkd home to a late dinner,  were a good deal tired, but not so much as we expected.  Mr Wiltshire and Miss Elizabeth calld while we were out.  Mrs Vassall calld to see us.  In the evening  we workd.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Henderson.

Miss Workman sent down for some rhubarb, which my Aunt sent to her.

Tuesday, 4 October, 1808

A very showery, uncomfortable day.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr James calld, but did not stay long.  Rebecca Workman came down from Bailbrook to bring the cap she has made for my Aunt, which is a beauty, but did not stay.  I workd hard all day.  Mrs Vassall read to us. In the evening we workd.  My Aunt hired a lad as servant.  He is to come Friday morning.  She heard from Cooper and Mr Grant of Portsmouth.

Wednesday, 5 October , 1808

One of the most beautiful days I ever saw at this time of the year.  Mrs Horne walkd from Bath soon after breakfast, meaning to return to dinner, but my Aunt prevaild on her to take half Mrs Vassall’s bed.  Miss Willets calld and staid an hour or two.  She is just as amiable and pleasant as ever.  The Miss Workmans and Mr and Mrs Williams dined and spent the evening here.  Mrs W very cold, reserved and glumpy the whole day.  My two Aunts, Miss Workman and Mrs Williams playd Quadrille.  Mr W slept.  Mrs Vassall, Rebecca and I workd and Mrs Horne lookd on.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Cooper.  She heard from Pen Saker.

Thursday, 6 October, 1808

A very pleasant day.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr Allen calld.  Mrs Vassall, Mrs Horne, my Aunt and I walkd to the village to see a house for Mrs Horne,but it did not suit her.  My Aunt and I calld at Mrs Walter’s.  She was out but we saw Mr W.  Met Mr James at Mr W’s door.  He walkd on with us to Mrs Crooke’s.  They were at home, but at dinner, so we did not go in.  Mr James came home with us, but did not stay long.  Mrs Horne staid and slept here again.  Mrs Vassall read to us in the evening and we workd.  My Aunt P had a very melancholy letter from poor Minah Warren.  Mrs Taylor has had an apoplexy and is not expected to recover.  My Aunt Neate walkd to Bath to spend the day with my mother.

Friday, 7 October, 1808

A cold dull looking day.  The Workmans came down to take leave.  We walkd with them, Mrs Horne and Mrs Vassall as far as Bailbrook.  They went on and Mrs V, my Aunt and I walkd about the garden and hot house.  My Aunt Neate gave the Workmans and me some beautiful pink mode for bonnets.  Rebecca very kindly offerd to make mine for me.  Mr Wiltshire calld and staid some time.  He waited for the rain, which began about four o’clock and lasted all the evening, accompanied at night with a great deal of wind.  Mrs Vassall read aloud to us in the evening and we workd.  My Aunt Powell heard from Mrs Cornwall.  George, the new man servant, came this morning.

Saturday, 8 October, 1808

A showery morning with quite a storm of wind.  Mrs Noyes wrote me a note to beg to see the gowns and cap Miss Willits had seen here, which I sent her.  My poor Aunt Powell very unwell with a violent pain in her side, which darts through to her shoulder.  She breakfasted in bed.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but I did not see him.  I sent the things for my bonnet to Miss Workman by Dryall, who is gone home to see his wife, to stay till Monday.  I workd hard all the evening.  My Aunt P took some medicine at night, which I hope will be of service to her.  The Madeira came Portsmouth and was put safely in the cellar.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Porcher and had a note from Cooper.  I wrote notes to Mrs Noyes and Miss R Workman.  Mrs Noyes sent back the patterns and a note to me with them.

Sunday, 9 October, 1808

A very fine day, but cold.  My Aunt P a little better, but not much.  She read prayers to us after breakfast.  Molly Giles came up to see us.  My Aunt desird she would stay and dine.  I walkd in the garden some time and gatherd a nosegay.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not stay long.  My Aunt Powell and Mrs Vassall wrote letters almost all the evening.  Poor Hunt heard of the death of her brother, which affected her very much and she was ill in consequence of it.  My Aunt Powell heard from Cooper.  She wrote to him, and my Aunt Neate to Mary Tremlett.

Monday, 10 October, 1808

A very fine day.  My Aunt sent for the coach to take us all to Bath.  By the mistake of Jack at Bailbrook they sent a Chaise and that so late that we did not get to Bath till after two o’clock.  Mr Wiltshire calld and took our letters to the Post.  We did all we had to do and then went to my mother’s.  Found her and Emma better.  We sat there some time and Mrs Vassall came there to  us.  We had the Coach to return, which took us up at my mother’s.  We calld at Mrs Flinn’s, but luckily neither she or Mrs Williams was at home.  Met the Miss Workmans, Mrs Gibson and Mr Haines in the street, Mrs G looking remarkably well.  We had a long chat with Mr Haines.  He was very agreeable and pleasant.

I brought home my mother’s gown to make for her and workd very hard all the evening.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs Porcher, Mrs Hodge, Mrs Henderson and Mr Bussell.  She had a note in the evening from Mr Jagger to say he was come to Bath and to beg her recommendation.

High Street, Bath, 1807 (Victoria Art Gallery)
High Street, Bath, 1807 (Victoria Art Gallery)

Tuesday, 11 October, 1808

A beautiful morning, but it turnd off about three o’clock and raind all the evening.  Mr Lye came to speak about the Madeira wine that came from Portsmouth and which my Aunts think has been playd tricks with on the road.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  I workd on my mother’s gown and cut one out for Mrs Vassall.  We all workd hard all the evening.

Wednesday, 12 October, 1808

A very fine day.  We were busy packing the whole of it.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss W and Sir John Louis (with their?) calld.  I did not see any of them. Rebecca Workman sent home the bonnet she has had the goodness to make (the materials for which my Aunt Neate gave me).  It is a little beauty.  I cut the ends off my white fur tippet and workd the rest and it has made a very nice short one.  My Aunt Powell sent a packet of New South Wales seeds to Mrs Pickwick, with a note, who sent her back the receipt for making the cake we eat at her house.  The rest of the seeds my Aunt gave to Mr Jones’s gardener, who came down in the evening.  I sewd the tassalls on the stools my Aunt has workd for Mrs Porcher and did a great many little odd thing, among others, sent my mother a parcel with some old silk stockings for mending others, and Marmion, which my Aunt has lent her to read.  My Aunt P wrote to the Newspaper man to desire him to send the paper on to Cheltenham.  She heard from Mrs Barwell.  I wrote notes to my mother and Rebecca Workman, from both of whom I heard.

Monday, 13 October, 1808

A very fine day.  Dear Mrs Vassall left us at half past seven to go to Oldbury.  I only saw her thro the window for a moment.  We left Bath Easton at half past ten.  The gray mare was not well enough to travel, so Dryall staid at home to take care of her, till she is equal to the journey.  George went on the bay horse and took Juno and Basto with him.  We got out of the Carriage for a few minutes at Hunter Hall and walkd down Froster Hill.  We reach’d Gloster safe and comfortably at half past six o’clock, had a very nice dinner and went to bed early.

Gloucester from Westgate by unknown artist Copyright expired; (c) The Stroud District (Cowle) Museum Trust Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Gloucester from Westgate by unknown artist
Copyright expired; (c) The Stroud District (Cowle) Museum Trust Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Friday, 14 October, 1808

A fine morning, but many showers in the course of the day.  We left Gloster about nine o’clock and did not get to Cheltenham till past eleven, the road was so infamously bad.  We could not go more than a walking pace most of the way.  We drove to the George, where we breakfasted and then my Aunt Powell and I went out in search of the lodgings.  Met Mr King, who told a family were going from Cambray Street, but when we went there, the house was relet.  After walking about from eleven o’clock till past four, my Aunt fix’d on a small house, quite new, next to Mr Newell’s, till we can get a better. Met Mr Newell, Mr Falkes, Mrs Bennett, Miss Smith and Mr Morland in the street.  Calld on Mrs Newell, who insisted on our dining with her.  She desired we would come just as we were, as she was quite alone, which we did.  Mr N did not dine at home, but came in just as we had sup’d.  We playd a pool at Quadrille in the evening.  I neither lost or won.  We expected Cooper all the evening, as he promised faithfully he would meet us here then, but he did not come.  I had a very bad head ache when I went to bed.

Saturday, 15 October, 1808

A showery day and very cold.  We all went to the Well, but not very early.  I drank a glass of water.  Mr Newell call’d, but did not sit down.   Mrs Newell came in for half an hour.  My Aunt P and I went out to get what was wanted for the house, met Sir John and Lady Smith coming to us, saw Mr Robert Scot, who spoke to my Aunt.  We unpack’d our things and put them away. Alone all the evening.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs E Cooper, George Shirley and Mr Bussell.  She wrote to George Shirley, Kitty. I wrote to my mother.

Sunday, 16 October, 1808

A fine morning, but showery afterwards.  My Aunt and I went to the Well and after Church we calld on Lady Smith. Saw her, Sir John, Mr and Mrs Mainland and Miss Smith.  They shewd us their house, which they have next Monday.  It is a very good one, but old and dismal.  In our way home, we sat half an hour with Mrs Bennet and Mrs Pawney.  Our dear Cooper arrived to dinner, much out of spirits and I think looking ill.  Mr Newell came in to shake hands with him after dinner.  He did not stay.  My Aunt wrote to Minah Warren and Mrs Barwell.

Monday, 17 October, 1808

A cold morning.  Cooper and my Aunts went to the Well.  I was not ready, besides which I had a little pain in my stomach.  We walkd out after breakfast, calld on Mrs Newell and went in search of better lodgings, but could not find a house unoccupied.  Mrs Kidman promised my Aunt the refusal of both her houses and came to tell her the Bank house would be vacant next Monday and my Aunt has taken it for three weeks certain at six guineas a week and, as long as she pleases after,  at five.  Cooper was in better spirits to day and kind as usual.  We dined alone and drank tea and suppd at Mr Newell’s, only ourselves. Cooper and Mr N playd Chess, we Quadrille.  I won 1/6.

Old Well Walk, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1780 (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Old Well Walk, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1780
(c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Tuesday, 18 October, 1808

A beautiful day.  We went to the Well early with Mrs Harland and Miss Smith, who joind and walkd round Mr Thomson’s field with us and did not leave us till we came  home.  Mr Newell calld but did not sit down.  Mr, Mrs and Miss J Witts, Sir John, Lady and Miss Smith, Mr and Mrs Morland.  Mrs Bennett and Mrs Powney calld.  Cooper, my Aunt P and I walkd all the morning.  Went to see the Pump Room at Mr Thomson’s.  Dined alone.  Cooper wrote after tea and then playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  I workd.  My Aunt Powell wrote to Mrs E Cooper.

Wednesday, 19 October, 1808

A fine morning.  Cooper was ready to go to the Well before my Aunt and I were out of bed, but waited till she was ready.  I did not go.  Sir John Smith, Mr F Witts, Dr C Parry, Mr Newell, Mr, Mrs and Miss Pernin calld.  My Aunt and I walkd in the street and were caught in a shower.  Cooper wrote in the morning and did not walk till just before dinner. Miss Hughes calld.  We calld on Mrs Newell, who was not at home.  We met her afterwards in the street.  She dined with us.  Mr Newell did not come till after tea.  Cooper, my Aunts and Mrs N playd Whist till Mr N came, when he and C went to Chess and I playd a pool of Quadrille with my Aunts and Mrs Newell.  Lost 3/-  My Aunt P bought a cheap cap.  I bought some puce purse twist.

Thursday, 20 October, 1808

A beautiful morning.  We were ready before Cooper today, but I did not go to the Well.  Miss Silverthorn brought a gown for my Aunt to try on.  Cooper had the kindness  to hear her complaints and prescribe for her.  Mr Newell calld soon after breakfast, but did not sit down.  My Aunt, Cooper and I, calld on Mrs Perring, found them very pleasant, agreeable people.  Dr Boisragon sat near an hour with me.  Dined (except my Aunt Neate) at Sir John Smith’s and went to the Play with them to see Mrs Edwin.  It turned out a dreadful night and Sir John had the kindness to send us home in his Carriage, but owing to Mrs Boisragon being of the party, poor Cooper was obliged to walk home and got wet in his feet.  We met a very sensible, pleasant man, a Mr Graham, at Sir John Smith’s.  As we were going up there, saw the Hendersons, who are just arrived, both looking very well.

Friday, 21 October, 1808

A fine morning.  I did not go to the Well with my Aunt and Cooper, but we all three walkd the whole morning, till just dinner time and the Hendersons and Mr and Mrs Newell calld.  We calld on Miss Hughes, who was not at home and sat some time with Mrs Bennet and Mrs Powney.  Mr and Mrs Henderson dined with us.  Mr Newell came into tea and Mrs M, just as we had done supper, to which the Henderson’s did not stay.  Cooper, my Aunt Neate and Mr Newell playd Chess.  I began a purse and the rest of the party chatted.

Saturday, 22 October, 1808

A very fine morning, after a shocking night.  My Aunt and were ready before Cooper.  I went with them to the Well and drank one glass of water, saw the Smiths, Morlands, Pickwicks, Hendersons, Pennings, Mr Folkes, Mr Forbes and Major Coffin. Mr Penning, his son and Mrs Forbes calld here. We walkd, calld on Mrs Newell and Mrs Witts.  Cooper rode with Sir John Smith and Mr Morland.  Mrs Boisragan calld and sat a long time.  Mrs Newell dined here and went to the Play with Cooper, my Aunt and me.  We sat with Lady Smith, who had the kindness to send their Carriage to take us to the Play and bring us back again.  Mr and Mrs Newell suppd with us.  Mrs N and my Aunt Neate playd Chess after we came home.  A delightful day.

Sunday, 23 October, 1808

A fine morning, but it began to rain after breakfast and continued the rest of the day.  We met Sir J and Lady Smith, Miss Smith, the Hendersons, Mr Morland and Major Coffin at the Well.  I drank a glass of water.  Mr Newell came here while we were at breakfast.  As soon as he was gone, Cooper read Prayers to us.  Mrs Newell came to ask if we would like to go to Church, but we declined it.  Mr Morland and Mr Henderson calld.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess in the evening.  My Aunt Powell wrote letter and I read.  Cooper was in remarkably good spirits.

Monday, 24 October, 1808

A fine morning, but rain in the course of the day.  I did not go to the Well.  Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  We calld on Mrs Boisragon and Mrs Coffin, neither of whom were at home.  Dined and suppd at Mr Newell’s, met Sir Ralph Woodford and Mr De la Bere at dinner and Mr and Mrs Willts, Mr and Mrs Frank Witts, Mr Kingston and Mrs R Kingston in the evening.  They playd Quadrille and Chess.  I lookd on.

Tuesday, 25 October, 1808

A fine morning, but it began rain about one o’clock and continued all day.  At night it blew a perfect hurricane, with torrents of rain.  Saw the Smiths, Pickwicks and Hendersons at the Well.  I drank a glass of water.  My Aunt and I calld at Mrs Newell’s and walkd about the town for things wanted for the housekeeping.  We moved into our new lodgings after dinner, which are very comfortable but not like the Jones’s.  Mr and Mrs Marland, Mr Prinn, Mr de La Bere and Mr Falkes calld.   The latter dined here and went to the Play with us to see Master Dawson act the part of ? in the Beaux Stratagem.  He playd delightfully, but the play is most disgusting I ever saw.  The lightening was tremendous, but we walkd to the Play, as it really would have been dangerous to have gone in a Chair. Mr Falkes gave his arm to my Aunt P and Cooper took care of me, a very delightful.

Saw all the Smiths, Marlands, Prinns, Boisragans and Mrs Newell.  The Hendersons were to have gone with us, but the night was so bad they sent an excuse.  We walkd home and had some nice hash’d pheasant and mashd potatoes for supper.  My Aunt and Cooper treated all the servants to the Play.

Wednesday, 26 October, 1808

A very showery morning, nevertheless we continued to go to the Well and back without getting wet, tho it raind while we were there.  I drank a glass of water. Saw the Hendersons and Mr and Mrs Pickwick.  Mr and Mrs Morland, Mr Henderson, Mr Newell and Major Coffin calld.  We all dined at Mr Perrings, only ourselves and them.  A tolerable pleasant day.  It was so muddy we were obliged to have the carriage to go and return.  We came home at half past nine.  My Aunt Powell heard from Minah Warren, I from my mother.

Thursday, 27 October, 1808

A beautiful day.  I drank one glass of water.  Saw Sir John and Lady Smith, Mr and Mrs Marland, the Hendersons and Pickwicks at the Well.  Met Sir C Pegg in our way home, who stoppd Cooper to enquire about the Dr and Mrs C.  My Aunt and I walkd a good deal in the morning.  Major and Mrs Coffin, Mr and Mrs Witts, Mr Newell, Mrs Prinn and Miss Smith calld.  The Smiths, Prinns, Marlands and Hendersons dined here.  Mr and Mrs Newell came in the evening.  I playd two rubbers at Casino, won a shilling.  The Newells and Hendersons staid to supper, Mrs H acting with Cooper in the same improper manner that Mrs Williams does.  Very far from a delightful or pleasant day.

Friday, 28 October, 1808

A fine morning, tho very muddy and wet under foot.  I did not go to the Well.  My Aunt and I walkd about the street.  We calld on Mrs Newell.  She was not at home.  Met Major Coffin.  I was measured for a pair of boots.  As we returnd we went into the Plough to ask if the Bastards were arrived, met Edmund at the door, who walkd home with him, where we found his father and mother.  Mr and Mrs Pickwick, Mr, Miss and Mr John Perring calld.  The Bastards dined and spent the evening here.

Cheltenham High Street, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1740 (c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Cheltenham High Street, Gloucestershire by unknown artist, c.1740
(c) Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Saturday, 29 October, 1808

A beautiful morning.  I drank one glass of Water.  Met the Pickwicks, Smiths, Coffins and Hendersons at the Well.  The latter walkd home with us, for there is no getting rid of them, once they have hold of one.  The Bastards breakfasted and spent the morning here.  Lady George Sutton, the Miss Peants, Mr and Mrs Newell, Mr Falkes and the Hendersons calld here.  Cooper walkd a long time with Mr Bastard and Edmund. My Aunt and I and Mrs B attempted to walk, but were driven back by a shower.  We dined at Mr Prinns, met the Smiths, Newells, Mr Falkes and Mr Hughes.  They gave us a most magnificent entertainment, enough for forty peaple.  I playd three Rubbers at Cassino and lost ten shillings.  We suppd there and did not come away till after twelve o’clock.  Their house is a beautiful one, most superbly and elegantly fitted up.  Miss Smith very good naturedly shew me her trinkets and some of the most beautiful gowns I ever saw.  She also playd and sang to us some excessive pretty songs.  Upon the whole, it was a very stupid sort of a day, but the ride home delightful.  My Aunt Neate returned with Mrs Newell and Mr Falkes, for Mr N was obliged to go home early and Cooper, my Aunt P and I came together. I wrote a very long letter to my mother, which Colonel Bastard was so kind to frank.

Sunday, 30 October, 1808

Rather a damp morning and very muddy.  I did not go to the Well.  Cooper and my Aunts did.  We walkd round Thomson’s field with the Bastards.  My Aunt and I drank a glass of water at his Pump.  We then went with the Bastards to see the Bathes, where we met Mr Thomson, who had a great deal of conversation with Cooper.  Mr Newell calld, the Bastards dined here.  Mr Newell lookd in in the evening.  My Aunt wrote to Kitty.

Monday, 31 October, 1808

A very thick fog, which fell like rain.  My poor Aunt P was attackd with the gout, but walkd to the Well, which increased it so much that she was in great pain all the rest of the day.  Saw the Smiths, Bastards and Hendersons at the Well.  I drank one glass of water.  Mr and Mrs Newell, the Bastards and Hendersons calld.  The Bastards dined here.  Cooper and Edmund went to the Ball.  Mrs Newell very kindly wanted me to go with her, but I declined it.  Mr N spent the evening here.  Cooper came home at half past eleven.  He was engaged to dance two dances with Miss Smith, but she danced so very bad, he was glad to make the excuse of coming home to see how my Aunt did and said he would return and finish his engagement, but without the least intention of doing so, to the great mortification and disappointment of Miss Smith, I hear.

Fashion plate for November 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for November 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Tuesday, 1 November, 1808

A very fine, delightful day.  Only my Aunt Neate went to the Well.  My Aunt Powell’s gout a little better, but she was not able to walk without assistance.   Mrs Prinn, Lady and Miss Smith calld at the door to enquire after my Aunt, but did not get out of the Carriage.  Sir John Smith, Mr Prinn, Mr and Mrs Newell, the Bastards, Mr Hughes, Major McMurdo and the Hendersons calld.  The Bastards dined with us.  Mr and Mrs Newell came in the evening.  Cooper, Mrs Newell, my Aunt P and Mr Bastard playd Whist, my Aunt Neate and Mr Newell, Chess.  Mrs Bastard fell asleep and Edmund and I lookd at the card and chess players.  My Aunt P heard from Mrs Cooper.

Wednesday, 2 November, 1808

A lovely and delightful day.  My Aunt Powell’s gout a great deal better, but Cooper would not allow her to go to the Well.  He did not go either.  I walkd there by myself, went the street way, drank one glass of water and then returnd.  I was only twenty five minutes going and coming back.  Met Mr and Mrs Newell, Mr Falkes, Mr, Mrs and Mr S Penning.  The Bastards, Mr Newell, Mr Falkes and Major Coffin calld after they were gone.  We said “not at home”, as Cooper wanted to write letters.  Lady and Miss Smith, Mrs Prinn, Mrs Henderson and Dr. C Parry calld after we had desired to be denied.  Cooper, my aunt P and I calld on Lady George Sutton, who was not at home.  We lookd at Captain Fothering’s house, which is very comfortable and most superbly furnishd.  My Aunt and I came home and Cooper pursued his walk, intending to call on Major McMahon. We dined alone.  Mr Newell came in the evening and playd Chess with Cooper and my Aunt Neate.  Cooper wrote a long letter to Miss Johnson, from whom he heard to day.  Mrs Fenwick has given up all idea of coming to Cheltenham and all intention and idea of accepting C.   I think she has behaved very extraordinary not to say unjustifiably, but it does not appear to affect his spirits much.  My Aunt P and I workd all the evening.

Thursday, 3 November, 1808

A very fine morning.  Only Cooper went to the Well.  My Aunt and I walkd a good deal in the street shopping.  The Hendersons joind and went every where with us, for there is no getting rid of her when once she gets hold of you.  We calld on Mrs Bastard, who was not at home. Mr and Mrs Newell and the Bastards calld here.  We went to return Lady George Sutton’s visit.  She was not at home.  We dined and spent the evening at Mr Henderson’s, only ourselves.  Spent a pleasanter day than I expected.  Mrs H playing. Mrs Williams with Cooper at supper.  Came home about twelve o’clock.

Friday, 4 November, 1808

A beautiful and delightful day, but very cold.  My Aunt Powell went to the Well this morning for the first time since she was attackd by the Gout.  Met the Smiths, Pickwicks and Hendersons.  My Aunt P and I went out after breakfast and calld on Mrs McMurdo and Mrs Bastard.  Spent a very pleasant half hour at the formers.  We came home and had some luncheon and then Cooper accompanied us to call on the Pickwicks, who were not at home.  We walkd round Mr Thomson’s, where we left him, and calld on Mrs Kingston, who was not at home and on Mrs Newell, where we staid only a few minutes.  We then joind Cooper again, walkd a short time with him and then came home, leaving him to finish his walk.  Mr and Mrs J and Miss P?, Mr and Mrs Newell, Dr Parry, Mr Falkes, Mr Hughes and Mr de La Bere dined here.  The Bastards and Mrs Bennett came in the evening.  The Newells, Mrs Bennett, Mr Falkes and Dr Parry staid to supper.  They playd Whist, Quadrille and Chess in the evening.  We had a very nice dinner, beautifully dressd and altogether delightful.  It was the pleasantest day I have spent since I have been in Cheltenham.  The party did not break up till near one o’clock.

Saturday, 5 November, 1808

A most delightful day.  I drank a glass of water, saw the Bastards, the Hendersons, Mc Murdos and Major Coffin at the Well, also the Smiths and Mrs Prinn.  Sir John came and breakfasted with us.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Lady and Miss Smith, the Bastards, Hendersons and Miss Hughes calld.  I thought we should never get rid of them to take our walk.  We calld on Mrs Travell, who was not at home.  We walkd round the back of the town, down the street to the turnpike, across the fields to get to the Well, then round Mr Thomson’s and back by Mrs Farley’s, up the street home.  A good long walk.  We were out an hour and a half.  Dined alone.  Cooper was in remarkably good spirits all the evening.  He and my Aunt Neate playd Chess, I and my Aunt Neate read.  Mr Newell came in just at supper time and playd a few games with them.

Sunday,  6 November, 1808

A fine and delightful day.  I did not go to the Well with Cooper and my Aunt.  Mr Bastard came soon after breakfast and staid till we had read prayers.  Cooper went with him to see Mrs Bastard, who was not very well.  Mr Newell and Mr Henderson calld.  Cooper walkd some time with Mr Bastard and then wrote the rest of the morning.  My Aunt and I sat some time with Mrs Bastard and then walkd up and down camb? by way of exercise, where Cooper joind us.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess in the evening.  Mr Newell came in just before supper and playd a game or two with them, but did not stay late.  I wrote a long letter to my mother, to go by tomorrow morning’s Post.

Monday, 7 November, 1808

A gloomy looking morning.  Mr Bastard calld before Cooper was ready to go out.  He was so kind to frank my letter to my mother.  I did not go to the Well.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Mr Prinn and Mrs Bennett calld.  Cooper wrote almost all the morning in the parlour below.  Cooper, my Aunt and I went out together.  We met Mr Bastard and Edmund Cooper joind them and we went on to pay bills.  Saw Mrs Henderson, who joind us, according to custom, but luckily she was on the same errand that we were, so did not continue long with us.  We calld on Mrs Coffin, who was not at home, saw Miss Newell and Mr and Mrs Prinn in a shop.  My Aunt and I sat a short time with Mrs Bastard, who was better to day.  Cooper dined at Major McMurdo’s, we quite alone.  Mr Newell came and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate in the evening.  Cooper did not come home till we had supp’d.  He playd two or three games of Chess with Mr Newell.

Tuesday, 8 November, 1808

Quite a November looking day, damp and dark.  I did not go to the Well, but was down stairs before my Aunt and Cooper were ready to go.  Cooper found a Ladies Pocket on the walk at the Well, which he carried in his hand the whole time he was there, but no one owned it.  Edmund Bastard came home with him to be a witness to the contents, which were a purse containing three guineas, a half crown, shilling and sixpence, a pocket book which they did not open and some receipts,which proved to belong to Lady Anstruther.  Cooper seald it up and sent it to her by Edmund, who is acquainted with them.  Mr Newell, Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund, Mr and Mrs Henderson and Sir Eyre Coate calld. The latter only  sent up his card.  We dined and suppd at the Bastards, where we met the Hendersons.  A cheerfulish sort of a day.  Mr Bastard, my two Aunts and Cooper playd Whist, Mrs H acting as usual with Cooper.  It had raind in the evening and was very muddy when we came home.  My Aunt heard from Mrs Chapman of Cowes.

Wednesday, 9 November, 1808

A dull looking day.  My Aunt Powell was gone to the Well by herself before I came down stairs.  Cooper had a bad night and did not get up till late.  We had begun breakfast when he came down.  The Bastards, Mr Newell and Mrs Henderson calld.  After they were gone, we said “not at home”.  Lady George Sutton, Mrs Peart, Miss Peart, Mr Prinn, Mr Falkes calld. We did not any of us go out all day.  Cooper employd himself in composing verses in answer to some very elegant lines Mr Prinns sent him and, when finishd, they were not at all inferior to Mr P’s.  We dined alone, drank tea and spent the evening at Mr Perrings.  Met Mrs Bastard and Edmund, neither of whom staid to supper.  My Aunt P, Cooper, Mr Perring and Edmund playd Whist, Mrs Bastard, my Aunt Neate, Mrs Perring and myself Casino.  I lost two shillings. We spent a cheerful pleasant evening.

Thursday, 10 November, 1808

A very dark wet looking morning.  Cooper and my Aunt were gone to the Well before I came down.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund, Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs Henderson (the latter did not come up) and Mrs Bennett calld.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd.  We calld at Mr Henderson’s and Major Coffin’s and then went round Mr Thomson’s, where we met Edmund Bastard who joind us.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess all the evening.  My Aunt Powell and I read.  She heard from Mr Clarke and answerd his letter.  I wrote to my brother Henry.

Friday, 11 November, 1808

A tolerable morning, tho it rained a little, but very slightly.  My Aunt and Cooper were gone to the Well before I came down, he in good spirits and delightful as usual.  When they came back, which they did sooner than they generally do, Mr Newell, Mr and Mrs Bastard, Edmund, Mrs Henderson, Mr and Mrs McMurdo and Mr de La Bere calld.  The three latter eat luncheon with us and were very cheerful.  They staid more than an hour here.  My Aunt and I walkd some time in the street, where we met Mrs Bennett.  Cooper walkd with Edmund Bastard.  He had a bad account today from Mrs Porcher of poor Rebecca and she has begd him to go to town to see her, which he has determined to do tomorrow in the Mail.  We dined at Mr Henderson’s, met Mrs Bastard and Edmund at dinner and Major Coffin in the evening.  Very stupid indeed till after supper, before which Mrs B went away.  We had no cards and nothing to do at all the afternoon.  Hardly a creature except Major Coffin and Mr Henderson spoke.  Cooper was either out of spirits or not well, for he hardly opend his mouth till after supper, when he rallied and was delightful.  We came home a little before twelve o’clock.

Saturday, 12 November, 1808

A very fine morning. We did not any of us go to the Well, tho I was ready at half past eight.  Cooper wishd to have his breakfast early, so my Aunt would not go.  She would not have missd drinking the water to oblige anyone but Cooper I am sure.  Soon after breakfast Gale came in and said one of the new houses in the Crescent were on fire and the inside quite destroyd.  Cooper said he would go and see it, would we go with him.  I went up stairs to put on  my bonnet, but my Aunt and Cooper were gone before I could come down stairs.  They had not the kindness even to call me, or stay one moment.  I should not have done so with them had I been in their situations, but dependents must put up with unkindness and slight.  My Aunt was so  very obliging to send Edmund Bastard to fetch me.  I suppose she wanted to get rid of him, for it could not be to gratify or amuse me.  It is very evident had that been the case she would have waited one moment and allowed me the honor going with her.  They returnd in about an hour.  The fire had been got under, without communicating to the adjoining houses tho it compleatly destroyd the one it broke out in.  Many people calld in the course of the morning.  My Aunt and Cooper walkd a long time.  Edmund Bastard dined with us and we all drank tea and suppd at Mr Newell’s.  Met Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mrs Bastard, Mr Falkes, Mr de la Bere, Miss Hughes and Miss Lucas.  They playd Whist and Quadrille.  A cheerful pleasant evening.  We came home a little before twelve.

The Crescent, Cheltenham, 1813 (British Library).
The Crescent, Cheltenham, 1813 (British Library).

Sunday, 13 November, 1808

A fine day.  I was not downstairs when my Aunt and Cooper went to the Well.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund came to prayers.  Mr Mc Murdo, Mr Newell, Mr Falkes and Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  Cooper got a letter by the Post from Mr Porcher, to beg him to come to see Rebecca, who still continues very ill and he determind on going by the Mail this evening (if there is a place) as far as Oxford, sleeping there and going on in on of the Coaches tomorrow.  We dined at three o’clock and a little before five Gale came and said the Mail was come, there was a place and everything was ready.  Cooper gave us a kiss and hurried off.  We saw the Mail go past and fancied he was gone, but in a few minutes he returnd, as they could not take him the whole way to Oxford inside, as they were engaged to take a gentleman up on the road to go to London.  We had a very snug, comfortable evening by ourselves, excepting Mr Newall, Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess till he came, when he playd with her and Cooper made Charades.  He was in remarkably good spirits, cheerful and good humoured.

Monday, 14 November, 1808

A fine morning, most delightful. I did not go to the Well.  Indeed I was not down time enough to go with Cooper and my Aunt.  Mr Bastard, Edmund, Mrs McMurdo, Mr Newell and Mrs Henderson came to take leave of Cooper before he went.  He got into his own carriage with Gale about twelve o’clock, intending to sleep at Oxford and go on tomorrow morning in one of the Coaches.  He had not been gone above a quarter of an hour when I saw the Carriage come back.  I was very much surprised, but Gale stopd to say one of the back braces had given way and they were obliged to come back to have it repaird.  Cooper had walkd on.  The Bastards, Mr Newell, Major and Mrs Coffin and Mrs Henderson  called, the three latter staid till after five o’clock, indeed I thought Mrs Henderson intended to sleep here, for the dinner waited some time for her going away.  Mr Newell came in the evening and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate.  I made some of the scarlet cloth Cooper gave me last year into a cloak.  Mrs Prinn calld while we were out, but saw my Aunt Neate.  We calld on Lady George Sutton, who was not at home and on the Perrings who were.

Tuesday, 15 November, 1808

A fine morning.  I went to the Well with my Aunts and drank a glass of water.  Saw the Bastards, McMurdo, Coffin and Hendersons.  Mrs H walkd home with us.  My Aunt and I went out soon after breakfast, met the Bastards and Mrs Bennet.  We went with the latter to enquire about a servant she thought might suit my Aunt in Hart’s place and then went home with her to get the pattern of her pretty lace tippet.  Found Mr Newell with my Aunt Neate when we came back and that the Bastards and calld while we were out.  We went to a straw shop to look at some bonnets.  My Aunt fixd on a pattern to have her alterd to and they are to do it by Thursday.  She calld at lady Saxton’s door to enquire how she did.  She does not return from Gloucester till after Sir Charles is buried.  My Aunt heard from Cooper.  He arrived safe and well at Oxford at half past six o’clock.

It began to rain about two o’clock and continued to do so the rest of the day and all night, with a great deal of wind.  Mrs Bennett and Mrs Newell drank tea with us and playd Whist.  Mr N also playd Chess with my Aunt Neate after supper and my Aunt P and I playd Gosch.  I wrote a very long letter to my mother and sent her Edmund’s Charade on Miss Coate.

Wednesday, 16 November, 1808

A dry morning, but so uncomfortable and windy my Aunt would not let me go to the Well with her.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund calld and sat some time.  When they were gone my Aunt and I went out and calld on Mrs Bennett, where my Aunt had appointed to meet a young woman that she thought might suit her as a servant, but she does not appear to be equal to the place.  We calld on Mrs Wills and Mrs Henderson, the latter had been at our house and sat some time with my Aunt Neate.  Mrs McMurdo calld to take leave, but was not admitted.  The wind was so tremendously high it was with difficulty we could stand, tho at the same time it was very mild and warm.  It began to rain while we were at dinner and was wet all the evening.  Mr Newell came in, but did not stay.

Thursday, 17 November, 1808

A beautiful morning.  I drank one glass of water, saw the Bastards and Coffins, Hendersons, Lady George Sutton and Mrs Peart at the Well.  Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund and Mr Newell calld.  It was so fine and mild my Aunt and I were out almost all the morning.  We walkd more than an hour in Mr Thomson’s field.  Dined alone.  Mr and Mrs Newell, Mrs Bastard, Edmund, Major and Mrs Coffin, Mrs Bennett and the Hendersons drank tea and suppd with us.  We had only one card table, as very few of the party were card players.  It turnd out a dreadful evening.  Raind and blew tremendously.  Our friends did not leave us till near twelve o’clock.  I heard from my brother Henry, who sent me a letter to forward to William.

Friday, 18 November, 1808

A very fine morning after a very bad night.  We did not go to the Well till  half past nine.  I drank one glass of water, met the Bastards, Hendersons, Coffins, and Sir Eyre Coate who joind us.  Mr Newell, the Bastards, Hendersons and Dr Parry calld, the latter was very pleasant and agreeable.  It raind frequently in the course of the day and was so muddy that we did not go out after breakfast.  My Aunt Powell and I drank tea and suppd at Mr Pennings (my Aunt Neate would not go).  Spent a very cheerful pleasant evening. Only ourselves, Mr and Mrs Penning. My Aunt and I playd Casino and did not come home till near twelve o’clock.

Well Walk, Cheltenham, 1813 (Ancestry Images)
Well Walk, Cheltenham, 1813 (Ancestry Images)

Saturday, 19 November, 1808

A beautiful morning, but rather cold.  We were late at the Well.  I drank a glass of water.  Met the Hendersons, Coffins, Bastards, Lady George Sutton and Miss Peart.  The woman sent home my Aunt P’s bonnet which she has cleand and alterd very nicely.  Mr and Mrs Newell, the Bastards, Hendersons and Mrs Bennett calld.  My Aunt and I walkd more than an hour.  Went to speak about my straw bonnet, to have it cleand and alterd to the same pattern as my Aunt’s.  They have promised to let me have it on Tuesday next.  Dined by ourselves and were alone the whole evening.

Sunday, 20 November, 1808

A thick November mist that felt like rain, notwithstanding which my Aunt Powell and I went to the Well, tho very late.  Saw only the Hendersons, Major Coffin and Edmund Bastard.  I drank a glass of water.  It was so wet and uncomfortable we walkd up and down the room at Mrs Forty’s for exercise.  My Aunt read prayers.  Mr Newell, Major Coffin, Mr and Mrs Witts, Edmund B and the Hendersons calld.  The weather was so bad we did not go out at all after breakfast.  Mr Newell and Mr Falkes came in after tea, the latter did not stay long.  He came to say “good bye” as he is going into Wales tomorrow.  Mr N staid and playd Chess with my Aunt Neate, but went away before supper.

Monday, 21 November, 1808

A very fine morning, but so wet underfoot we were obliged to walk in Mrs Forty’s walks instead of Mr Thomson’s.  I drank a glass of water.  Saw Major and Mrs Coffin, the Bastards, Mr Henderson and Mr Penning at the Well.  Mr Newell, the Bastards, Hendersons Mrs and Miss Penning calld.  My Aunt and I walkd some time, met Miss Penning, who joind us and went with us to see the end house in the Crescent, which is a very good one.  In our way home we calld on the Bastards and Hendersons.  Mr and Mrs Newell and Mrs Bennett dined and spent the evening with us.  Mr N and my Aunt Neate playd Chess, we four Quadrille.  I lost a shilling.  Mr Newell was obliged to go away before supper, but the ladies did not leave us till twelve o’clock.

Tuesday, 22 November, 1808

A beautiful morning. I drank a glass of water, saw the Coffins, Bastards, Hendersons and Mr and Miss Penning at the Well.  My Aunt and I were the last on the walks.  The Walters, Mr Newell, Mr and Mrs Bastard and Edmund calld.  My Aunt and I walkd a long time on the road leading to Charlton, met Mr and Mrs Bastard and Mr Henderson walking there also.  Our beloved Cooper, accompanied by Mr Porcher, arrived about four o’clock.  They left Rebecca a little better.  I was gone up to dress when they came, but Cooper received me (when I came down) with his usual kindness and affection.  Mr Porcher was in very good spirits.  No one dined with us but him and we spent a most delightful, cheerful evening, Cooper as gay as a lark and as kind as possible.  Mrs Porcher very kindly sent me a box of Spillikins to play with, by Mr P, which he delivered very safe, with a pocket book by Cooper, which he lost in the way.  Cooper and I playd a game of Spillikins after supper.

Wednesday, 23 November, 1808

A very fine morning.  I got up intending to go to the Well, but Cooper was ready so much earlier than I expected that (except I had made them wait for me) I could not go.  Mr Porcher breakfasted with us.  He was very unwell with a violent palpitation of his heart.  Mr and Mrs Newell and the Bastards calld.  My Aunt and I walkd to Mr Thomson’s to buy three pounds of salt for Mr Sullivan.  They were packd up and sent to London by the Mail.  Mrs Newell walkd with us.  Mr and Mrs Bastard, Edmund, Mr Porcher and Mr and Mrs Henderson dined and suppd here.  Mr and Mrs Newell came in the evening.  They playd Chess and Whist.  It was a delightful, pleasant dinner, ever body cheerful and chatty, except Mrs Henderson, who was more conspicuously indecent and ridiculous with Cooper in the evening, than I ever saw her before.  She made a grand dash to sit next to him at supper, but I completely nicked her, at which she did not appear best pleased.  Mr and Mrs Bastard left us before supper, the rest of the party at twelve.

Mr Penning calld, but did not sit down, as Cooper was writing.  I wrote a few lines to my mother in my Aunt Neate’s letter.

Thursday, 24 November, 1808

A foggy, damp morning, but delightfully warm.  I and Cooper were ready a few minutes before my Aunt.  I drank a glass of water, saw the Bastards, Coffins, Hendersons, young Penning and Mr Porcher at the Well. The latter very kindly gave me his arm.  Mr Newell, the Bastards and Mr Porcher calld.  It began to rain soon after breakfast and continued the whole day and night without any intermission.  Only Mr Porcher dined with us.  A very cheerful, pleasant dinner.   Edmund Bastard came and spent the evening.  He, Mr Porcher, Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Whist.  My Aunt Powell and I workd.  I had a nice, long letter from Emma.

Old Wells and Pump Room, Cheltenham, 1813 (British Library).
Old Wells and Pump Room, Cheltenham, 1813 (British Library).

Friday, 25 November, 1808

A beautiful morning.  I would not go to the Well because I thought it would be very wet.  The Bastards, Mr Newell, Mr Porcher, Colonel Plumb and Mr and Mrs Henderson calld.  Mrs H would not go away with her husband, but acted very ridiculously, as she generally does.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd in Mr Thomson’s field some time.  We calld at Mrs Porcher’s, Mr Bastard’s and Mr Penning’s, but did not go up stairs at either.  It was the most beautiful day I ever remember at this time of the year.  We all dined and suppd at Mr Bastard’s, met the Hendersons at dinner and Mr and Mrs Newell in the evening.  Mr Porcher calld here and as no one was ready but me, he proposed our going first, which we did.  It was a very stupid sort of a day.  Cooper was not well and very much out of spirits.  We came home before twelve.  Mr Porcher heard from Mrs P today saying she should be here tomorrow, as Dr Clarke thought it absolutely necessary for her to have the Waters immediately.  Cooper found the pocket book Mrs Porcher was so kind to send me.

Saturday, 26 November, 1808

A very fine warm morning.  My Aunt and I were ready some time before Cooper came down.  He lookd unwell and was more out of spirits than yesterday.  I drank a glass of water, saw the Coffins, Bastards, Mr Porcher and the Hendersons.  We came away as soon as Cooper and my Aunt had had their second glass of water, as Cooper wishd to enquire at the Post Office about a letter he had put in, so that we did not walk much.  My Aunt and I went out soon after breakfast and were out a long time.  Met Mr and Mrs Newell and Dr Boisragon.  Mr Porcher calld before we went out and the Bastards, Mr Newell, Mr Penning and the Hendersons before we came home again.  Cooper went out to walk.  Mrs Henderson came again and I thought never intended to go away.  I suppose she waited in hopes of seeing Cooper again, but she was disappointed.  Dear Mrs Porcher arrived about half past three.  My Aunt P and I went over to see her as soon as she got out of the carriage.  I never saw any person so alterd as she is since we saw her last.  She is grown thin and looks most miserably, but her spirits are good and she is just the same affectionate, good, creature she always was.  We all dined and spent the evening at Mr Henderson’s.  Met Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mrs Bastard and Edmund at dinner and Mr and Mrs Newell in the afternoon.  Mrs Porcher and the Bastards went home before supper.  Cooper, Mr Porcher, Mr and Mrs Newell and my Aunt Neate playd Whist, the rest of the party chatted and amused themselves as well as they could.  Upon the whole it was a pleasanter day than I expected.  We came home about half past eleven.  Mr De la Bere calld to take leave.

Sunday, 27 November, 1808

A very fine morning, but so muddy I would not go to the Well.  Mrs Porcher and the Bastards came after breakfast to read prayers.  The Bastards went away soon afterwards.  Mr Porcher and Mr Newell calld.  There were some hard showers in the course of they day and we did not go out at all.  Mr and Mrs Porcher spent the day and evening with us.  Cooper, my Aunt Neate and Mr P playd Chess.  Mrs P and I Spillikins and my Aunt Powell wrote a letter.  They left us a little past ten.  I wrote a long letter to Emma, which Mr Porcher had the kindness to frank for me.  My Aunt Neate heard from my mother.

Monday, 28 November, 1808

A beautiful frosty morning.  We were late at the Well.  I drank a glass of water, met the Pennings, Bastards, Coffins and Mr Porcher.  We had hardly done breakfast before Mr Newell, Mr Prinn, Mr and Mrs Porcher, the Hendersons, Bastards and Mrs Newell calld.  Mrs Porcher appeard a little better today.  Major and Mrs Coffin calld and brought their beautiful boy with them.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd an hour in Mr Thomson’s field, met Mr and Mrs Bastard and Lady George Sutton and Mrs Peart, who joind and walkd home with us, but did not come in.  We all dined and suppd at Mr Prinn’s, met Mrs Hughes, Mr Nettleship, a Captain Johnson and Miss Packington, as disagreeable a woman as I ever saw.  They playd Whist and Casino.  We came away a little after eleven.  A very stupid sort of a day.

Thursday, 29 November, 1808

As it raind a little, I would not go to the Well, tho I was down stairs before Cooper.  My Aunt and he went.  It began to rain hard while we were at breakfast and never ceasd the whole day, notwithstanding which Mrs Henderson chose to come thro it to see Cooper. She staid two hours under pretense of copying some poetry and when my Aunt askd her to go down to luncheon she said she never eat any, tho she always does if Cooper goes down.  She fancied we should go and leave her alone with Cooper, but I completely disappointed her and would not move till my Aunt came back, for which she wishd me an old scratch I daresay.  We dined at Mr Porcher’s, only ourselves and Edmund Bastard at dinner and the Hendersons.  In the evening Cooper, Mr P, my Aunt N and Edmund playd Whist. Mrs Porcher gave us some music and Mrs Henderson fancied she playd also, but it was so very bad after watching Mrs Porcher, that it was shocking.  We came away a little after eleven and fortunately it did not rain when we came home, tho it did soon afterwards and continued all night.

Wednesday, 30 November, 1808

A very fine morning.  I drank a glass of water, met Mr and Mrs Porcher, the Bastards, Pennings, Coffins and Hendersons at the Well.  I walkd part of the way home with Mr and Mrs Porcher, and Major and Mrs Coffin walkd back with me, till I joind my Aunt again.  My Aunt and I went out soon after breakfast and were out two hours and a half.  My Aunt bought a gown and shift for the woman at the Well, which is to be paid for by a subscription from us all.  Cooper walkd with Mr and Mrs Henderson in Thomson’s field till five o’clock, when Mrs H prevaild on him to tell Mr Henderson that he should go to Bath before he returns to London.  We dined alone.  Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mr and Mrs Newell and Edmund Bastard spent the evening with us.  They playd at Whist and Chess.  I netted.

Fashion plate for December 1808 from Ladies' Museum (LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)
Fashion plate for December 1808 from Ladies’ Museum
(LA Public Library; Casey Fashion Plates)

Thursday, 1 December 1808

One of the finest days I ever saw at this time of the year.  It was cold before breakfast but as mild as May the middle of the day.  Saw the Porchers, Bastards, Pennings, Coffins and Hendersons at the Well.  I drank a glass of water.  Mr Newell, Mr and Mrs Porcher, the Bastards and Hendersons called.  The Porchers and Hendersons walkd with us to Charlton.  Mr and Mrs Porcher went to Mr Prinns with us.  They were not at home, but we went in and sat down to rest.  As we came back we encountered the Hendersons at the top of the Lane and they walkd back with us.  Mrs H made an appointment to meet Cooper at the Pastry Cook’s.  He askd us to go down with him, which we did, to her great mortification and disappointment.  We afterwards walkd down to Mr Newell’s, where Cooper wrote a prescription for Mrs Porcher and then we came home.

The Porchers, Newells, Mrs Bastard and Edmund and the Hendersons dined with us.  The Pennings and Mrs Bennett came in the evening.  They playd Whist, Chess and Commerce.  I lost 1/6.  Mr Prinn came in just before supper from the Ball (which he said was a very bad one).  He staid and suppd with us.  The party broke up about twelve o’clock.  It raind exceptional hard when they went away and continued all night.

Friday, 2 December, 1808

A very fine morning, as dry as if there had not been a drop of rain in the night.  Saw the Porchers, Bastards, Major Coffin, Mr Penning and Mr and Mrs Henderson at the Well.  I drank a glass of water.  We walkd longer than usual this morning.  Met my Aunt Neate, who came home with us, as did the Hendersons to the door, for when she gets hold of one, there is no shaking her off.  The Bastards, Porchers, Mr and Mrs Newell calld.  Cooper dined at Mrs Hughes’s, we at Mrs Pennings, where we met the Porchers at dinner and the Hendersons to tea and supper.  Cooper and Mrs Newell came up in the evening, the latter did not stay long.  Mrs Porcher and Miss Penning playd a short time to us and then we went to Commerce.  I lost 3/6.  Mr Porcher, Edmund Bastard and Mr Penning and my Aunt P playd Whist.  Mrs P went away before supper at which Mrs Henderson continued to sit so very close to Cooper she was almost in his lap.  We came away at twelve.

Saturday, 3 December. 1808

A beautiful morning.  Met the Coffins, Bastards, Porchers, Pennings and Hendersons at the Well.  I did not drink the water.  My Aunt and I were out the whole morning running about paying bills.  Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mrs Henderson, Mrs Newell , Dr Boisragan, Major Coffin and the Bastards calld.  Cooper and Mrs Porcher walkd with us in Mr Thomson’s field and we went to see his house, which is a very pretty one, but very inconvenient.  We all dined at Mr Porcher’s, where we met Mrs Bastard, Edmund and the Hendersons at dinner and the Newells and Pennings in the evening.  I made the tea for Mrs P.  We playd Whist and Commerce.  I lost one shilling.  Mr Newell brought a Charade of his own writing, which is most excellent.  My Aunt Neate found it out, tho it is very difficult.  Spent a very cheerful pleasant day.  Miss Penning gave me the pattern of the work at the bottom of her gown.  We came home at half past eleven.

Sunday, 4 December, 1808

A fine morning.  I did not go to the Well, tho I was ready before Cooper.  Hart left my Aunt this morning.  She was to have gone yesterday, but allowd the Coach to go without her on purpose.  Mrs Newell came, but went away soon.  Mrs Porcher, Mr Bastard and Edmund came to Prayers.  As soon as they were over, we went to packing, which took us all the morning.  Cooper went out for a short time and when he returnd wrote letters. The day most delightful.  A great many people calld, but we had said “not at home”.  When we had finishd every thing, Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd out to take leave.  We calld on Miss Hughes, Lady George Sutton, Mrs Witts, Mrs Boisragon, Mrs Kingston, shook hands with the Newells, Perrings and Mrs Bennet.  We all dined at Mr Porcher’s, only ourselves, quite snug.  Mr Newell came in the evening, a very cheerful, pleasant day.  I never saw Mr Porcher in such good humour and spirits.  He appeard to enjoy Cooper’s wit and Charades (he made three or four after tea) very much.  We left them a little after eleven o’clock.  The new servant of the name of Ambrey came in Hart’s place.

Monday, 5 December, 1808

A very disagreeable morning, with a nasty mist, which fell like rain.  Mr and Mrs Henderson calld to wish us good bye before breakfast.  Mr and Mrs Porcher, Mr Bastard and Edmund also came.  Cooper walkd down with the latter and we calld there and took him up.  We got out and shook hands with Mrs Bastard, who look’d extremely ill.  We left Cheltenham at ten o’clock.  Cooper was unwell, he said, but I believe he was also very much out of humour, tho I can’t tell at what.  He did not speak ten times the whole journey.  The road was dreadful to Gloster, but very good the rest of the way.  My Aunt and I walkd up Fenaster? Hill, Cooper rode.  The fog was so thick we could not see twenty yard any way round.  When we got to Cross Hands, it began to be very dark and Cooper proposed our getting out and staying till the moon rose, which we agreed to.  They got us some excellent mutton chops and the best bread and cheese I ever tasted.  The Cheese was so good, Cooper wishd to buy it and they very obligingly spared it to him.  The waiter was the civillest creature I ever saw.  We staid there two hour and then had the lamps lit and came home in less than two hours, found everything comfortable, had some tea instead of supper.  Cooper was very uncomfortable and low.  The idea of letting the house, which he has determined to do, and Gales going away, affects his spirits I believe.  Mr Bastard has sent Cooper four of the finest pine apples I ever saw.  Mr Bardew a collar of ? and Kitmaster a basket of game, all for his birth day.

Tuesday, 6 December, 1808

A dismal wintery day.  Cooper a little better to day, but his spirits still depressd.  We were busy unpacking and putting away our things most part of the morning.  Major Durbin calld, but did not stay long.  He took a note to Shockerwick for my Aunt and is to bring back an answer.  We dined alone.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess in the evening.  He was more like himself and in better spirits.  I wrote a note to my mother.  Mr Shepphard sent Cooper a basket of game containing six partridges, two pheasants, a hare and a goose and Mr Henderson sent a barrel of oysters.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  My Aunt Neate made me a present of a very nice black lace to trim my scarlet cloak.

Wednesday, 7 December, 1808

Beloved Cooper’s birth day.  He is better and in  spirits.  I pray with fervor and sincerity he may see a great many of them.  The wind last night blew down the top of one of the trees near the house.  I went out with Cooper to see it and he went with me into the Green House.  Most  delightful.  The Workmans walkd up soon after breakfast.  They, the Hendersons, Dr Davis, Major Durbin, Edmund Bastard and Mr Wiltshire dined and suppd here.  We playd Whist and Speculation.  I neither lost or won.  The Workmans and Major Durbin slept here.  The party did not break up till one o’clock, tolerably pleasant and cheerful.  Mr Henderson brought Cooper a present of a pocket book and my Aunt a beautiful ivory fan.

Thursday, 8 December, 1808

A beautiful and delightful morning.  Major Durbin and the Workmans breakfasted here.  The Major went away soon after.  Mr Wiltshire, Colonel and Mrs Flight, Count Kielmansegg and Mr and Mrs Williams calld.  The latter was very grumpy and out of humour with everyone, but particularly Cooper.  They sat here a long time, but would not have any luncheon or do any thing that any body else did.  Cooper went to Bath with the Count and walkd back late.  Mr and Mrs Henderson and Edmund Bastard dined here, they also walkd up at the same time with Cooper and walkd back after supper.  Mr H brought my Aunt Neate and me a present of a beautiful sandal wood fan.  I had rather he had not, but it was not possible to refuse it.  We all playd Speculation in the evening.  Mr H and I were partners.  We lost six shillings.  They went away a little after eleven.  We had a very delightful half hour’s chat after they went away.  Gale went away from Cooper.  I am very sorry he is gone.

Friday, 9 December, 1808

An uncomfortable rainy day.  Rebecca and Cooper were down stairs before me.  Cooper in very good spirits.  Mr Wiltshire and Major Durbin calld.  The Workmans were to have gone home to day but, it being wet, my Aunt persuaded them to stay till tomorrow.  I finishd Miss W’s purse and gave it to her.  My poor Aunt Powell was very unwell all day.  She did not go to dinner with us.  We were quite snug, only ourselves and the Workmans.  My Aunt was better after tea.  Cooper was in remarkably good spirits and very kind.  He made a great many Charades, some very good.  We playd Commerce.  I neither lost or won.  Spent a very cheerful pleasant evening.  Cooper read some of Carlyle’s poems to us before we went to cards.  I had a note from my mother and answerd it.  Mr Tudor calld.

Saturday, 10 December, 1808

A dry morning, but not very fine.  Cooper went to breakfast at Mr Wiltshire’s before any of us came down stairs.  My Aunt Powell was better to day.  When Cooper came back from Shockerwick, the Miss Workmans, my Aunt Neate and myself went with him to Bath.  He did not think it would be prudent for my Aunt P to go out today.  We set the Workmans down at their own house, then drove to the Post Office.  From there to Nashes, when I got out and bought some fish.  We then took Cooper to Mrs Flinn’s and my Aunt Neate and I drove to Mrs Keens to see my mother.  We found her and dear Emma looking very well.  Mrs Keen and Ann were both very obliging.  Emma and I went as far as the Pump Room to make an enquiry for Cooper and got two stamps for my Aunt Neate.  We staid at Mrs Keen’s till four o’clock when the coach came for us.  We stopd in our way home at the Carriers and brought up the boxes and baskets which came from Cheltenham, left Mrs Giles box in our way.  Cooper had walkd down before us.  We dined alone.  He was not in good spirits, but in tolerable humour till after tea, when he became cross and gloomy. My Aunt Neate proposed cards or chess, but he was not in a humour to agree pleasantly to either or us or rather to decide which he liked best, so may Aunt chose chess for him, which he playd with her, but evidently more to avoid conversation, than to amuse himself or her.  My Aunt P workd and I wrote and wound my cotton.

After supper Cooper wrote to the elder Mr Bastard to say he should leave home for Kitley the 26th of this month, instead of staying here till the 1st January, which was the time fixd when we returnd.  Mr Ensor and Sir John and Lady Smith calld while we were at Bath.  My Aunt saw them.

Sunday, 11 December, 1808

An excessive thick fog in the morning, so much so that when I got up I could not see the road from the house, but it cleard about ten o’clock and was as beautiful a day as I ever saw at this time of the year.  Cooper and I were down stairs some time before my Aunt.  He was in a  most delightful good humour, which continued the whole day.  Mr Wiltshire came again after breakfast and staid to prayers.  I walkd some time in the garden without either hat or gloves.  It was as mild as Spring.  I gatherd an Heartsease, a Violet, a Primrose and two or three other flowers.  While I was out Dr and Mrs Gibson calld.  I did not see them.  She was not well enough to get out of the carriage, so my Aunts got in and chatted to her while the Dr consulted Cooper.  We dined alone, Cooper in delightful spirits and humour.  My Aunt Powell not so well in the evening as she was in the morning.  Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.  My Aunt P wrote letters and I read.

Wednesday, 12 December, 1808

A very thick fog again with white frost.  Cooper in delightful good humour.  He, my Aunt Powell and I went to Bath.  We put him down at the top of Milsom street.  We calld at my mother’s and sat some time with them.  Emma went with us as far as Nashes and went across with me to Arnolds to get change for a draft.  We calld at the Henderson’s, only Mrs H at home.  We sat some time with her and then went to Mrs Bastard’s.  Found her better and the Colonel looking remarkably well.  Had some bread and butter there and a glass of wine.  Count Kielmansegg came there to take us up.  Cooper walkd home.  We overtook him on the road.  We calld at Sir John Durbins on our way to tell the Major Mr Henderson would drive him up to dinner, but he had made some mistake about the engagement, so put off coming till tomorrow.  Mr Allen, Edmund Bastard, Mr and Mrs Henderson, Mr and Mrs Williams and Count Kielmansegg dined and supt here.  The Count sleept here.  Mr Allen was in remarkably good spirits and yet it was a very stupid disagreeable day till after supper when it was most delightful.  The Count and my Aunt playd Chess in the evening, the rest of the party (except Mr W and myself) Speculation, Mrs Williams making fierce love to Cooper at cards, but before that she was very distant and out of humour.  The whole party went away a little after twelve.

Milsom Street, Bath in 1828. Victoria Art Gallery, Bath
Milsom Street, Bath in 1828.
Victoria Art Gallery, Bath

Tuesday, 13 December, 1808

A cold dull looking morning, but not wet.  The Count breakfasted here.  He and Cooper went to Bath in the carriage about one o’clock.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  My Aunt P and I were busy all the morning looking over Cooper’s linen.  Cooper brought back the Count and Major Durbin, who with Mr Hartley and Whincomb dined with us.  Poor Mr H is nearly superannuated, but appeard to enjoy himself very much.  They took Major Durbin (who was as stupid as an owl) home with them before supper.  The Count slept here.  He and my Aunt Neate playd Chess and when he was tired Cooper playd.  My Aunt P and I watched.

Wednesday, 14 December, 1808

A very dull looking morning.  Cooper in delightful good humour.  The Count breakfasted with us.  Soon after breakfast Mr Blackburn and Miss Harvey came in their way to Bristol.  Susan looks remarkably well.  She was a good deal affected when she first came in, but soon recoverd and I thought her spirits tolerably good.  They staid near two hours.  My Aunt Powell, the Count and I went to Bath in the carriage.  Cooper intended going with us but Edmund Bastard came up, persuaded him to walk in with him.  When we got to Paragon we met Whincomb Hartley, whom we stopd, got out and walkd up the  hill with him to his uncle’s.  My Aunt settled the business she had to do with Dr Hartley.  They gave us a glass of wine and some bread and after chatting there some time we went to Sir B Baker’s.  Maria was not at home.  We then calld on Mrs Phillips, found her very well and the Admiral better.  We did not stay long there and from there went to Miss Lovelock’s, where we saw some very pretty gowns.  It began to rain while we were there, but we walkd thro it to Nashes and the market.  When we had done what we wanted there we calld on the Hendersons, where we found Cooper and Edmund Bastard.  They went with us to Mrs B’s, where the carriage took us up. Cooper came back with us.  We met Miss Pine-Coffin in the street, who was very friendly and obliging.  Cooper was low and gloomy after dinner.  He attributed it to the rain which affected his spirits.  Mrs Williams engaged him the day she dined here to breakfast with her tomorrow, unknown to us, but he wrote her a note this evening to say he could not go, at which I was very glad.  We heard to day in Bath that she had cut her thumb very badly yesterday at dinner, cutting some cheese.  Cooper and my Aunt N playd Chess.   My Aunt P and I lookd on and workd.  Miss Silverthorn sent Cooper a present of a hare.

Thursday,15 December, 1808

A very delightful morning, frosty, but not a white frost. It continued beautiful the whole day.  Mr Wiltshire, John, Miss W, Miss L Savage and Dr Davis calld, also Mrs and Miss Noyes and Miss Willats, but we said “not at home” to the three latter.  Dr D and J W had some luncheon.  My Aunt P and Cooper went to Bath.  I should have gone with them, but that my Aunt Neate was very angry that she could not go too, so I left my place for her, but she would not go if I staid at home, so we both staid.  Cooper dined at Lady Louise Lennox’s.  My Aunt was to have brought Mrs Henderson back with her to dinner and to stay here the time Mr H is in London, but she pretended she had so much to do she could not come up then, but would come up at night with Cooper, but my Aunt compleatly  nickd her, for she sent us word she could not return to dinner and staid to come up with Cooper and Mrs Henderson at night, which I daresay was a disappointment to both.  I am sure it was to the lady.  My Aunt Neate dined alone.  They came a little after ten o’clock to supper, all very cheerful and good humourd.  I gatherd a nice little nosegay and sent it to dear Emma to wear at the Ball tomorrow and wrote a note to my mother.

Friday, 16 December, 1808

A dull looking morning with a slight frost.  Cooper and I were down stairs first.  He delightful and good humourd.  Edmund Bastard walkd up to breakfast.  Mrs Henderson came down very late at which Cooper made such a fuss and laughed so much she is determind to get up before seven tomorrow.  Mr Wiltshire, Mrs and two Miss Chapmans and Mr James calld.  Cooper and Edmund walkd to Bath .  Mrs Henderson walkd till very late in the garden waiting, I suppose, for Cooper’s return, but he did not come back till after five.  Edmund returnd with him and slept here.  Something had disconcerted Cooper very much.  He was extremely out of temper all dinner and tea time, found fault with the tea and was very uncomfortable, but after he had been at cards a little while and ogled Mrs Henderson, which she returnd  with interest, he became himself and  was more cheerful.  Mrs H and I workd and they playd Whist.

Saturday, 17 December. 1808

A very fine morning, but it turnd to rain in the middle of the day.  Mrs Henderson got up early but she did not come down till she thought Cooper was down also.  She went out to walk in the garden at half past nine, but did not stay above a quarter of an hour, for tho Edmund joind her, Cooper did not and it was not worthwhile to walk for health and exercise alone.  Mr Wiltshire sent the carriage to take Cooper to Shockerwick and as it came empty he said my Aunt might as well go with him to see Charlotte.  I should like to have gone very much, but as Mrs Henderson chose to be one of the party, there was not room for me.  Edmund walkd to Bath but is to return to dinner.  It snowd and raind extremely fast from two o’clock and blew tremendously, notwithstanding which Edmund returnd to us.  Nobody dined here but him and Mrs Henderson.  Cooper was delightful and in excellent spirits the whole evening.  Mrs H wrote, Cooper, my Aunts and Edmund playd Whist and I lookd on.  It blew a dreadful gale all the evening and most part of the night.

Sunday, 18 December, 1808

A beautiful and most delightful morning.  Bright sunshine and so hard a frost that the water fall in the garden was a sheet of ice.  Mrs Henderson was down long before us writing in the dining room, waiting I suppose for Cooper, but he only staid a minute with her and came to me in the library, which I believe was a little disappointment to her.  Edmund walkd in the garden before breakfast. Cooper read prayers after breakfast, soon after which I had the misery of seeing in the newspaper the capture of our beloved William by the French in his way from Bombay to Columbo.

HMS St. Fiorenzo vs. French frigate Piémontaise (www.sailsofglory.org)
HMS St. Fiorenzo vs. French frigate Piémontaise (www.sailsofglory.org)

He was taken by the Piedmontese Frigate and we are ignorant where he is or what his fate may be.  The shock is doubly severe as we were flattering ourselves with the idea of hearing from him, now the fleet is come in every day.  Cooper and Edmund Bastard walkd to Bath.  Mr Wiltshire and Mr Skreene calld, did not see them.  My Aunt and Mrs Henderson went to call on Mrs Noyes.  She was not at home. I walkd some time in the garden.  My Aunt Joind us when she returnd.  We dined alone, Cooper very kind.  In the evening he and my Aunt Powell made some very good Charades, Mrs Henderson wrote. After we had supped, Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess.

Monday, 19 December, 1808

A very hard frost.  It snowed a little in the morning but was fine afterwards.  Mr Wiltshire, Miss Sandford and Colonel and Mrs Flight calld after we had had our luncheon.  Cooper, my Aunt, Mrs H and I walkd to Bath.  It was extremely pleasant.  My Aunt and I met the Count, who walkd about a good deal with us.  My Aunt went to Mr Cruitwell’s on business, but he was not at home.  Saw Mr Allen and Miss Hambley in the street.  We calld on Mrs Bastard , where we met Mr Skreene and Mr Wiltshire.  Cooper and Mrs Henderson joined us at Mr Bastard’s and we walkd home.  Mr Wiltshire overtook us on the road with a letter for Cooper from Miss Johnson.  Edmund Bastard has very kindly written to day to John to enquire if he knows any thing of our poor dear William.  He may probably be able to tell us where he is put to.  I got a pair of gloves at Miss Lovelock’s.  Tho I did not sit down in Bath more than a quarter of an hour, yet I was not the least tired when I came back.  We dined alone in the evening.  We all playd a pool of Commerce.  I won 4 shillings.  After we had finishd the cards Cooper and my Aunt Neate playd Chess and we sewed Cooper’s handkerchiefs.  Mr Massingbend and the Miss Langtons calld while we were at Bath.

Tuesday, 20 December, 1808

A very hard frost.  Delightful Edmund Bastard walkd up to breakfast.  Mr Skreene came also to breakfast.  Poor fellow.  He appears to me to be worse than he was at Weymouth.  Mr Wiltshire calld.  Cooper, my Aunt, Mrs H and I walkd to Bath again.  My Aunt and I sat some time with Mrs Gibson, who is better.  We met the Dr C and Kielmansegg and Dr Davis in the street.  Calld for a few minutes at Mrs Bastard’s.  We walkd back and were not at all tired.  Mrs Bastard, Edmund, Major Durbin, Dr Davis and the Workmans dined here, a delightful dinner.  My Aunt Powell, Miss W Edmund and Miss Workman playd Whist, while the rest of the party played Speculation. I lost a shilling.  Mrs Bastard, Edmund, Major Durbin and Dr Davis went home before supper.  We did not go to bed till after one o’clock.  The Workman’s slept here.

Wednesday, 21 December, 1808

A very hard frost with thick fog, which froze as it fell.  While we were at breakfast, Mr Allen and Captain Allen came in, which made our breakfast party large.  The Captain, I think, does not look well, but was as pleasant as ever and Mr Allen in excellent spirits and as droll as possible.  Soon after they were gone, Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not stay many minutes.  Cooper, my Aunt and I walkd to Bath.  It was excessively cold and when we got to Bath began to snow very fast.  Cooper and my Aunt went to Mrs Flinn’s.  In the mean time I went to my mother’s.  She was not at home, but Emma was.  I sat as long as I could with her and she went with me to Mr Clarke’s, where I was to meet C and my Aunt.  They were not there, but she met them in the street after Cooper had settled his business at Mr Clarke’s.  We walkd up to Mrs Bastard’s, where the Carriage took us up and brought us home, where we found Captain Graves of the 1st Somerset.  Nobody dined with us but him.  In the evening, he and my Aunt P playd Whilst against Cooper and my Aunt Neate.  Mrs Henderson and I workd, Mrs H made us three a present of a little bottle of Otto of Roses, with a small gold chain to hang around our necks.  I wish with all my heart she had not.

Thursday, 22 December, 1808

A beautiful morning, but it began to snow very fast about twelve o’clock.  Little James Williams walkd up to breakfast.  Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not stay long.  He walkd here and was going into Bath.  Cooper sent to Bath for horse to take him in, but the snow increased so much he would not go.  My Aunt sent Dryall in the coach with little James.  The weather was so bad they could not go out, so Cooper, Captain Graves and my two Aunts sat down to Whist.  Mrs Anderson wrote and I workd.  Captain and Mr Allen and Mr Wiltshire dined with us.  Mr A was in very good spirits but still the dinner was very heavy.  In the evening Captain Graves, Mr Allen and my two Aunts playd Whist.  Mrs Henderson made fierce love to Cooper, who was ill naturedly drunk and the rest of the party lookd on.  The Allens and Mr Wiltshire went away before supper.  It was the stupidest and most disagreeable day I have passd since we came home.  Mr Henderson sent Cooper a very nice Stilton cheese.

Friday, 23 December, 1808

A snowy morning.  Captain Graves left us after breakfast, for which I was very sorry, but he was obliged to be at Bristol.  Mrs and the two Miss Chapmans came to consult Cooper.  Mr Henderson and John came in soon after breakfast.  They arrived at Bath last night to an empty house and every thing uncomfortable, which did not at all distress his amiable wife who, provided she can be with Cooper, does not at all care what becomes of her husband and children.  Edmund Bastard walk up from Bath and walkd back again with Cooper and Mr Henderson.  He returnd and dined with us.  They made Charades in the evening.  I workd.  Edmund Bastard went home in a Chaise after supper.  I was particularly depressd and low the whole day.  Mr Wiltshire calld.

Saturday, 24 December, 1808

A very miserable morning, both snowing and raining.  Mr Wiltshire calld and sat some time.  My Aunt and I went to Bath.  We took the Hendersons home, at which I sincerely rejoicd.  Calld at Mr Bastard’s, found them tolerable, saw Major Durbin and Mr Skreene there.  Calld at Mrs Flinn’s, saw Mr and Mrs Williams and James.  Mrs F better.  Mrs Williams gave my Aunt three woodcocks, which I would not have accepted.  My Aunt got Cooper’s neckcloths.  We went to Mr Hartley’s, the last place and my Aunt settled her business with him.  We walkd down Guinea Lane to the carriage and came home.  Dined alone.  In the evening Cooper and my Aunts were busy reading parchments appertaining to the Villa.  I sewd a neckcloth for Cooper.  We had the happiness of hearing our beloved William is well and safe. Today’s Post bought my Aunt a letter from Tom Porcher in which he say our dear William was at Columbo and expected at Madras every day.

Sunday, 25 December, 1808

A very cold uncomfortable day.  My Aunt Powell very unwell with a violent cold in her head.  She did not get up to breakfast, which was a very uncomfortable one, for Cooper was writing to Mr Clarke the whole time and before we had done, Mr Wiltshire sent the carriage to take him to Shockerwick and when he returnd from thence he walkd to Bath.  My Aunt Powell very ill the whole day.  We dined in the library on her account.  Cooper brought Edmund Bastard back with him, who sleept here.  He had heard from his brother John that our dear William was bound for Piedmontese when he was taken and went to Columbo in her.  I do not know that I ever passd a more uncomfortable xmas day in my life.  How different to the xmas’s we used to pass at my Uncle Appleton’s and Lambridge.  Happy days! gone never to return.  I wrote a note to my mother.  Mrs Porcher in a letter to Cooper tells him it is reported in London that Mrs Fenwick is going to be married to Mr Hodson, the infamous seducer of many of the girls at the Asylum some years ago !!!  Such things are!!!  Cooper has had a lucky escape and I believe he thinks so too.

The Jones’s sent to enquire after us.  They came home last night.

Monday, 26 December, 1808

I beautiful morning, but it turnd off about twelve o’clock and in the evening it snowd again. Cooper left us at eleven o’clock to go to Mr Bastard’s at Kitley.  He went in the Mail, which did not leave Bath till two o’clock so that he need not have been in such a hurry to go from here, but that I suppose his time passd more pleasantly with Mrs Henderson than with us.  He says he shall be back in a fortnight, but I do not believe it.

Mr Wiltshire calld, but did not stay, as he wishd to see Cooper before he left Bath. We were quite alone all day and I workd hard.  My Aunt Powell not much better.  If she had been a Lady with a large fortune, or indeed any one out of his own family, I am sure Cooper would not have left her, so ill as she is.

Tuesday, 27 December, 1808

Extremely cold and uncomfortable, raining and thawing.  Mr Wiltshire, Mrs Bastard, Mr and Mrs Henderson and John calld.  They staid two hours and had luncheon.  Mrs Henderson has persuaded Cooper to tell Mr H it is necessary he should stay at Bath another month, that she may have the pleasure of seeing him when he comes back.  We dined alone and I workd hard all the evening.  My Aunt wrote a note to enquire after the Joneses and had an answer written in very low spirits.

Wednesday, 28 December, 1808

Very damp and thawing fast.  Mr Williams and James walkd from Bath.  Mr Wiltshire calld but did not come in as were just stepping into the carriage to go to Bath on business.  My Aunt took Mr W and James down.  They got out of the coach at Fountain Buildings.  We went on to Miss Lovelocks where we saw a very nice servant who, I think, would have suited my Aunt exactly, but she would not take my Aunt’s wages.  We calld at the Bastards, saw them all. We saw Mr Allen and Sir John and Lady Hawkins and had a good deal of conversation with them.  The coach took up my Aunt N at my mother’s and then came and fetchd us.  We got home a little after eleven.

Fountain Building, Bath
Fountain Buildings, Bath

Saturday, 31 December, 1808

A rainy, foggy day.  Mr Wiltshire calld before he went to Bath.  Mrs Vassall, Mrs Jones, Eliza and Betsey spent two hours here.  Mrs J more out of spirits than I ever saw her.  When she heard this house was not large enough for Mrs Coddington, she begd my Aunt would continue to let her know she might have Bailbrook, as they wishd to let it.  Major Durbin calld to ask if he could do any thing for us at Weymouth.  He goes there next Tuesday.  We all workd hard in the evening.

Copyright

The articles published on The Diaries of Miss Fanny Chapman are copyright by their respective authors. An article may not be reproduced in any medium without the authors permission and full acknowledgement. You are welcome to cite or quote from an article provided you give full acknowledgement to the original author. 

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